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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • curl 7.84.0 inside every box

    Welcome to take the next step with us in this never-ending stroll.

  • Mars Probe Running OS Developed in Windows 98 Receives Software Update in Space [Ed: With a budget like this, there's no excuse for running vandalOS from Microsoft]
  • ESP32 board with 150Mbps 4G LTE modem also supports RS485, CAN Bus, and relay expansion - CNX Software

    LILYGO has designed another ESP32 board with a 4G LTE modem with the LILYGO T-A7608E-H & T-A7608SA-H variants equipped with respectively SIMCom A7608SA-H for South America, New Zealand, and Australia, and SIMCom A7608E-H for the EMEA, South Korean, and Thai markets, both delivering up to 150 Mbps download and 50 Mbps upload speeds.

    The board also supports GPS, includes a 18650 battery holder, and features I/O expansion headers that support an add-on board with RS485 and CAN bus interfaces, in a way similar to the company’s earlier TTGO T-CAN485 board with ESP32, but no cellular connectivity.

  • ICE-V Wireless FPGA board combines Lattice Semi iCE40 UltraPlus with WiFi & BLE module - CNX Software

    Lattice Semi ICE40 boards are pretty popular notably thanks to the availability of open-source tools. ICE-V Wireless is another ICE40 UltraPlus FPGA board that also adds wireless support through an ESP32-C3-MINI-1 module with WiFi 4 and Bluetooth LE connectivity.

    Designed by QWERTY Embedded Design, the board also comes with 8MB PSRAM, offers three PMOD expansion connectors, plus a header for GPIOs, and supports power from USB or a LiPo battery (charging circuit included).

  • Felipe Borges: See you in GUADEC!

    After two virtual conferences, GUADEC is finally getting back to its physical form. And there couldn’t be a better place for us to meet again than Mexico! If you haven’t registered yet, hurry up!

FSFE Information stand at Veganmania MQ

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From 3rd to 6th June 2022 happened the Veganmania street festival at the Museumsquartier in Vienna. Despite not happening for two years due to the Corona pandemic this over the years has developed into the biggest vegan street event in Europe with tens of thousands visitors everey day. Of course there have been plenty of food stands with all kinds of climate and animal friendly delicious meals but the festival had also many stands for buying other stuff. In addition many NGO tents were there too to inform about important issues and their work.

Like already tradition for many years also the local volunteers group manned an FSFE information stand from Friday noon until Monday night. It was exhausting because only two volunteers manned the stand. But we both stayed there the whole time and the interest of so many people had confirmed once more how well we optimized our information material assortment without losing the ability to bring everything at once using just a bicycle.

The front of our stall was covered with a big FSFE banner while the sides are used for posters explaining the four freedoms and GnuPG email encryption. (We very soon need to replace our old posters with more durable water resistant paper since the old one has gotten rather worn down and doesn’t look very sleek any more with all the tape pieces it is hold together.) In addition we use a small poster stand we built ourselves with just two wooden plates and a hinge. This was of left over material from a DIY center. Unfortunately this time we didn’t have any wall behind us where we would have been allowed to put any posters or banners on.

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today's leftovers

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Misc

  • Beginnings of more flexible encoder and I/O support

    However, the moteus hardware has always been capable of more, both because the processor is a very capable one, and the exposed IO pins are relatively flexible. While looking at some future designs that incorporate even more IO options, I decided it was time to update the firmware to finally start taking advantage of that flexibility.

    My goals can be broken down into two parts. First, what types of IO (input/output) to support, and second, how those inputs and outputs can be used.

  • F37 change proposal: Make Fedora CoreOS a Fedora Edition (System-Wide change

    This document represents a proposed Change. As part of the Changes process, proposals are publicly announced in order to receive community feedback. This proposal will only be implemented if approved by the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee.

  • Hacker Diary: Embedded World 2022

    Yesterday I went up to the Embedded World trade fair in Nuremburg, Germany. As a lone hacker, you often feel more than a little out of place when you buy chips in single unit quantities and the people you’re talking to are used to minimum order quantities of a million. But what’s heartening is how, once you ask an interesting question, even some of the suit-wearing types flip into full-on kids who like to explain the fun tech. I struck up conversations with more than a couple VPs of global chip behemoths, and they were cool.

Proprietary Leftovers

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Misc
  • Microsoft Receives Backlash Over Minecraft Moderation Changes

    Ever since Minecraft's release, fans have set up servers to allow for multiplayer in the game. However, a recent update is causing concern among server moderators and players alike, as Microsoft is moving to implement its own moderation on top of the already-existing tools provided to server owners.

    For several years now, Minecraft has been split into two versions. The Java Edition allows for more freedom with modding and server hosting, while the Bedrock edition allows cross-platform multiplayer, implements microtransactions, and gives its server owners less freedom.

  • A Deep Dive into Minecraft 1.19.1's Report System

    To accomodate the chat reporting system, chat messages are now signed using the user's keypair. There is a setting under Options → Chat Settings... → Only Show Secure Chat that toggles whether messages with invalid signatures are hidden. This setting is off by default at the time of writing (1.19.1-pre1).

  • ‘3.5 million cyber security jobs will open up by 2025’ [Ed/iophk: their approach to "security" is job security (for them alone) and not actual computer security]

    Pointing out how the world is facing a major workforce shortage in the cybersecurity sector, Kate Behncken, vice- president and global head of Microsoft Philanthropies, on Friday, said that there would be 3.5 million open roles in cyber security around the world by 2025.

    Speaking at the launch of CyberShikshaa initiative, launched by Microsoft India in collaboration with ICT Academy as part of its ongoing commitment to create a robust cybersecurity ecosystem in the country, Behncken said, “The number of cyber security incidents in India have increased from 2.9 lakh in 2018 to almost 1.5 million in 2021.

  • Cisco announces plan to exit Russia and Belarus

    The networking company first made a statement on March 3, declaring that it would be halting all business operations in Russia and Belarus "for the foreseeable future." On Thursday the company released another statement, noting that it had continued to "closely monitor" the war in Ukraine and as a result, a decision had been made to "begin an orderly wind-down of our business in Russia and Belarus."

  • After years of delay, Plex replaces its desktop media player client

    Mediaphiles have had years to cope with the imminent demise of the Plex Media Player. Plans were first announced in August of 2019, right when the Plex had also released its intended replacement, the Home Theater PC app. Outrage from the crowd stopped everything in its tracks for three years, but at last, Plex is now calling time of death for PMP. Long live HTPC.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • 3600 Games Now On The Steam Deck with Teardown, a Great Demolition Game as Verified

    Valve has provided more verification in the past few days vs usual for the Steam Deck. We are now more than 3600 games validated (3626 games to be precise at the time of publication) on the Steam Deck – in two categories...

  • The Steam Deck’s Super Power: Super Sleep

    The Steam Deck undeniably has some great features, but if it were a superhero its superpower might not be what you expect. No, it’s not the powerful processor or advanced options and software, but seemingly the complete opposite of that: the Steam Deck’s real power is its super sleep.

    First, a superpower needs to be reliable and without any big caveats. The Deck’s sleep ability is just that: every time it works quickly and flawlessly. It is a quick power button press away or in the Steam button’s power menu. In the middle of a game without a pause button (hi, Elden Ring)? No problem. Running low on battery or just need a moment to move the Deck without accidentally hitting the buttons? Or want to resume in that spare minute to get in a quick gaming fix? The Deck delivers every time. You can also set the Deck to go to sleep after some idle time, confident you won’t lose your game progress or battery life.

  • [Slackware] Chromium 103 (regular and ungoogled) available as Slackware package

    Apologies for the delay, I was out of town, but i have finally uploaded my new chromium 103 packages for Slackware 14.2 and newer. Their un-googled siblings are also available. Thanks as always to Eloston and his friends for updating the patch-set for ungoogled-chromium.
    Last week saw a Google Chromium update which addresses a series of vulnerabilities, which is nothing new of course, but in particular one security hole that has now been patched would allow remote attackers to take control of your computer and execute arbitrary code. See CVE-2022-2156. An update of your installed browser package seems in order.

  • I bought THIS LAPTOP: Tuxedo Stellaris 15 Gen 4 Review - Invidious [Ed: Nick from The Linux Experiment already got his channel banned before... for shilling laptops. Maybe he's not afraid of it happening again.]

today's leftovers

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  • Free RPG Day: Create maps for your Dungeons & Dragons game with Mipui | Opensource.com

    It's Free RPG Day again, and there's no better to play a free roleplaying game than with free and open source software. In this digital era of pen-and-paper gaming, it's still relatively unusual for adventures to include digital maps. In fact, it's also unusual for paper adventures to include maps that are sized correctly for miniatures, and many that do have colourful and richly textured maps that look great in a glossy book but look murky when photocopied and enlarged for the tabletop. Long story short: a tabletop gamer is often in need of a quick and convenient way to produce maps. Mipui is an open source web app that enables you to create grid-based maps for role-playing games, and it works great for virtual and physical tabletops alike.

  • Holybros unveils Pixhawk 6X and Pixhawk 6C flight controllers

    Holybro has revealed two new models of the popular Pixhawk flight controller for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The Pixhawk 6X and the Pixhawk 6C use a Cortex-M7 as Flight Management Unit (FMU) and a Cortex-M3 as an I/O processor.

    The Pixhawk 6X is based on the Pixhawk FMUv6x Open Standard and the Pixhawk Autopilot Bus Standard. Both versions 6X/6C feature H7 microcontroller which consists of a Arm Cortex-M7 core (up to 480 MHz) and a single core Arm Cortex-M3 (up to 72MHz).

  • Hackaday Podcast 174: Breaking Into The Nest, The Cheapest 3D Printer, A Spy In Your HDMI, And AI All Over The Place

    Fresh from vacation, Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams makes his triumphant return to the Hackaday Podcast! He’s joined this week by Managing Editor Tom Nardi, who’s just happy he didn’t have to do the whole thing by himself again. In this episode we’ll talk about tackling BGA components in your custom PCBs, a particularly well executed hack against Google’s Nest Hub, and why you probably don’t really want the world’s cheapest 3D printer. We’ll also take a look at an incredible project to turn the Nokia 1680 into a Linux-powered handheld computer, a first of its kind HDMI firewall, and a robot that’s pretty good at making tacos. Listeners who are into artificial intelligence will be in for quite a treat as well, as is anyone who dreams of elevating the lowly automotive alternator to a more prominent position in the hacker world.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Learn C++ Programming Step by Step – A 20 Day Curriculum!

    Although there are numerous programming languages available in the market to work upon, but C++ has never lost its charm since its inception and still has a strong impact in the development world. As per the reports, C++ comes under a few top programming languages across the world. Alike the C programming language, C++ also makes it easier for you to understand the underlying architecture of programming, although it also supports other additional features such as object-oriented programming, exception handling, etc. Moreover, various IT giants Google, Amazon, Microsoft, etc. offer numerous career opportunities to C++ professionals, hence you’re strongly recommended to give it a try and start to learn C++ Programming.

  • Security by Diversity: Designing Secure, Reliable and Robust Systems

    This is the first in a series of blog posts on Security by Diversity. Here we'll focus on the scaling properties of reliability through diversity. Later blog posts will introduce the business and economic aspects of security through diversity and discuss not only technical security but also how to secure coordination and similar organisational aspects.

  • Firmware updates, part 2: Transporting the update

    This is the second post in a series about doing device firmware updates (DFU) over the air (OTA) and continuous deployment of firmware for embedded devices. We'll explore the different parts of a complete end-to-end system with this capability.

    This post will be about the different networks and how you can manage firmware updates using them.

  • A mystery with Fedora 36, fontconfig, and xterm (and urxvt)

    As of Fedora 36, Fedora changed their default fonts from DejaVu to Noto. This changes what the standard names 'serif', 'sans', and especially 'monospace'. When I upgraded my desktops to Fedora 36, I had a very bad reaction to the 'monospace' change, because the result looks really bad. It turns out that part of the reason that the result looks bad (although not all of it) is specific to xterm, and that is where the mystery comes in.

  • App Rules Are Twisted to Absurdity

    Apple and Google have twisted their decade-old rules for their app stores like a pretzel to the point where they may no longer make sense. This has made buying digital stuff in apps convoluted as heck.

    One example: In theory, although not yet in reality, you can use your Amazon account to buy an e-book from Kindle’s iPhone app. You cannot buy an e-book in the Android version of the app. Until recently, Kindle purchases were effectively a no-go under Apple’s rules but fine under Google’s. Now it’s the opposite.

    Confusing? Yep. Apple and Google have written long, complicated guidelines for apps and have frequently revised those rules to protect their own interests. (I’ve noted before that Apple’s app rules are much longer than the United States Constitution.)

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Foundries.io looks to $1bn IPO - eeNews Europe

    The Cambridge-based company provides an embedded Linux distribution with a security and update framework for devices that connect to the Internet of Things. For example its Foundries Factory software is used in an electric scooter in Germany to run both the IVI in-vehicle infotainment system and the motor controller.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Microconferences at Linux Plumbers Conference: Open Printing

    Linux Plumbers Conference 2022 is pleased to host the Open Printing Microconference

    OpenPrinting has been improving the way we print in Linux. Over the years we have changed many conventional ways of printing and scanning. Over the last few years we have been emphasizing on the fact that driverless print and scan has made life easier however this does not make us stop improving. Every day we are trying to design new ways of printing to make your printing and scanning experience better than that of today.

  • XPath for libvirt external snapshop path | Adam Young’s Web Log

    The following xmllint XPath query will pull out the name of the backing file for a VM named fedora-server-36 and an external snapshot named fedora-36-post-install,

  • Expanding U.S. healthcare travel benefits for access several healthcare services

    Red Hatters should be able to access quality healthcare no matter where they live. We're working with our U.S. benefits provider to reimburse associates and their dependents covered by a Red Hat medical plan for travel to access several healthcare services that may not be available everywhere.

    Effective July 1, 2022, our U.S. benefits provider will cover up to $10,000 maximum (lifetime) in travel expenses for an associate and a companion if they must travel greater than 60 miles from their home to access in-network care.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Friday's Fedora Facts: 2022-25 – Fedora Community Blog

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)!

  • Red Hat Learning Community celebrates 100,000 members

    The Red Hat Learning Community (RHLC) celebrates a monumental milestone this week as it exceeds 100,000 members! At its launch in September of 2018, the main goal was simple: provide a collaborative space for open source learners to connect as they optimize their skills in working with Red Hat products. As the core of that mission has remained true since its launch, Red Hat has strived to provide our users what they need in order to collaborate, learn, build skills and meet their individual learning and career goals.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2022/25

    During this week, we sweat some blood. Not only was it really hot here, but we also had a gap in the snapshots delivered. Turned out that the update to SELinux 3.4 worked in most cases – but not so well with containers. We stopped rolling for a few days to figure out the fixes for that one issue before merging other, large changes. Nevertheless, we still delivered 6 snapshots this week (0616,0617, 0618, 0619, 0622, and 0623).

  • Transform Your Scripts With Bash Simple Curses - Invidious

    Bash Simple Curses is a simple curses library made in bash to draw terminal interfaces.

  • Startup crowdfunding high-refresh-rate e-paper monitors • The Register

    E-paper display startup Modos wants to make laptops, but is starting out with a standalone high-refresh-rate monitor first.

    The initial plan is for the "Modos Paper Monitor," which the company describes as: "An open-hardware standalone portable monitor made for reading and writing, especially for people who need to stare at the display for a long time."

    The listed specifications sound good: a 13.3", 1600×1200 e-ink panel, with a DisplayPort 1.2 input, powered off MicroUSB because it only takes 1.5-2W.

    The company also has some rather impressive demonstration videos, showing that the display is fast enough to play video, albeit in monochrome. There's also a technical explanation of how this is accomplished.

  • Annotated Perl::Critic Policy Index | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    In the wake of my postings on the file access tests (-r and friends) I wondered if there was a Perl::Critic policy to find them. So I constructed an annotated index of Perl Critic policies. Because of its size I stuck it on GitHub rather than in-line to this blog post.

    This index assumes that any CPAN module whose name begins with Perl::Critic::Policy:: is a Perl Critic Policy. The index entry for each module contains the name of the module itself (linked to Meta::CPAN), the name of the distribution which contains it, and the abstract for the module if it contains anything other than a repeat of the module name. I suppose the module description could have been added, but I hoped the abstract would be sufficient.

today's leftovers

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  • Signing email with DKIM is becoming increasing mandatory in practice

    There are people who don't like email forwarding, but I can assure them that it definitely happens, possibly still a lot. Unless you want your email not to be accepted by GMail when forwarded, this means you need to DKIM sign it, because forwarded email won't pass SPF (and no, the world won't implement SRS).

  • Weave Cybersecurity into your product design

    How important security is for your application and digital services? “Very important”, this is the answer we get the most often from Product Managers and Executives. Nobody wants the malware to take advantage of the vulnerabilities of their applications. However, any access point to the internet can be an entry point for hackers. Considering the ubiquitous awareness of the importance and risks associated with security, you may expect that security has been well embedded in all the aspects of digital product development, especially in the early stages of product design when costs are comparatively manageable.

    Unfortunately, according to a recent study by MIT, “cybersecurity is rarely considered among the criteria in the early design phase”. This study finds three reasons why this ignorance of cyber security happens in the early stages:

  • Comparing YottaDB Web Framework Performance

    It is interesting to compare the performance of different web stacks and frameworks under simulated stress. To compare apples-to-apples, the database, the JSON string response to a REST query, and front-end load generator were the same.

    Of course, this end-to-end test only involves a single operation. Any real application consists of many operations at different layers in the framework, only a fraction of which are database accesses.

  • The software operator design pattern: advantages – part 4 | Ubuntu

    The software operator is a design pattern. Its design is based on successful applications where this approach was found useful. In other words, it’s a proven approach that can be recommended to others. But like all approaches, it’s important to understand their advantages disadvantages. Software developers need to understand when the application of this pattern leads to a good solution and – perhaps more importantly – when it does not.

    [...]

    Installing a single application locally is straightforward in most cases. There are app stores and package managers for that. However, installing applications on remote servers is a more tedious task, which becomes more complicated as the number of applications increases. First of all, the login to these machines must be prepared and maintained. But manually maintaining logins does not scale very well. In fact, what is desired is an entity that controls the required provisioning of the machine and performs the required steps. The software operator design pattern, as a dedicated entity, can cover the execution of operational tasks and the remote login, at the same time.

  • systemd-oomd issues on desktop
    I have opened an upstream PR to implement this [1], and it seems
    upstream is OK with the idea in principle, but some more thinking
    needs to be done before it can be merged.
    
    Assuming we can push that change through upstream, service units will
    immediately benefit because .service files can configure the
    ManagedOOMPreference property. However, applications which are
    launched by gnome-shell or snapd run as transient scope units, which
    means the ManagedOOMPreference property needs to be set when e.g.
    systemd-run is invoked, as demonstrated in the example above. This
    means that a bit of integration work will be needed from snapd,
    gnome-shell, etc. to set ManagedOOMPreference=avoid on _some_
    applications. This immediately raises new questions:
    
    1. Which services and applications should be given a setting of
    ManagedOOMPreference=avoid by default?
    2. What is the interface to designate such applications? It seems to
    me that we would want to have a "single source of truth" from which
    gnome-shell, snapd, etc. can determine when ManagedOOMPreference=avoid
    should be set.
    
  • The fight for Init Freedom: Devuan [PDF]

    [...] To start with, systemd is much more than an init system. Rather, as contributor dasein described on the Debian User Forums, “calling systemd an init system is like calling an automobile a cup holder”.

  • AMD publishes the source code for FidelityFX Super Resolution 2 (FSR 2)

    As they promised they would, AMD has now officially published the source code for FidelityFX Super Resolution 2 (FSR 2) under an open source license. With it under the MIT license, developers can pretty much go nuts with it.

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today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.

Red Hat Hires a Blind Software Engineer to Improve Accessibility on Linux Desktop

Accessibility on a Linux desktop is not one of the strongest points to highlight. However, GNOME, one of the best desktop environments, has managed to do better comparatively (I think). In a blog post by Christian Fredrik Schaller (Director for Desktop/Graphics, Red Hat), he mentions that they are making serious efforts to improve accessibility. Starting with Red Hat hiring Lukas Tyrychtr, who is a blind software engineer to lead the effort in improving Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and Fedora Workstation in terms of accessibility. Read more

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