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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • ARM in the Datacenter

    ARM processors have seen unprecedented growth in the last three years and are now being used in everything from smart watches to Apple's new M1 desktop and laptop systems, but there is one sector where they have yet to take hold: the enterprise market. For years, many of the largest cloud providers have designed computers around ARM chips, and in December 2020, Microsoft said it was joining the fray by designing its own ARM-based chips for Azure and Surface PCs. Now we are seeing technology based on ARM chips float down from the cloud providers and rise up from the consumer market and start to take hold in the datacenter. In this article, I will highlight some different ARM devices and discuss ways that they have made their way into the datacenter.

  • Hacked Codecov uploading script leaked creds for two months

    Scores of projects potentially affected by supply chain attack.
    A malicious alteration to a shell script lay undetected since January this year at software testing coverage report provider Codecov, sparking fears of another significant supply chain attack.

    Forensic analysis shows that an unknown threat actor exploited an error in Codecov's Docker container image creation process, and gained access to the credential that allowed the modification to the company's Bash Uploader script.

    Codecov said a Google Cloud Storage key was accessed starting January 31 this year, and not secured until April 1 US time.

    The script is normally used to upload coverage reports to Codecov, but it was altered to transmit the UNIX shell environment, which can be used to store variables.

    [...]

    The company said it has rotated all credentials, including the key that was captured by the attackers, and set up monitoring and auditing to ensure that the Bash Uploader cannot be compromised like this again.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (xorg-server), Fedora (CImg, gmic, leptonica, mingw-binutils, mingw-glib2, mingw-leptonica, mingw-python3, nodejs, and seamonkey), openSUSE (irssi, kernel, nextcloud-desktop, python-django-registration, and thunderbird), Red Hat (389-ds:1.4, kernel, kernel-rt, perl, and pki-core:10.6), SUSE (kernel, sudo, and xen), and Ubuntu (clamav and openslp-dfsg).

  • Google plans to tidy up search on Chromebooks

    While the exact categories are still up in the air, we could see the company going for something similar to the Linux distro Ubuntu, which organizes system search results into different categories for applications, files, folders, websites, and more.

  • Linux Desktops in the Cloud with Shells.com [Ed: A lot of YouTube has become paid-for spam and pseudo 'reviews']
  • These guys made me a CUSTOM gaming laptop, running LINUX!

    I received this laptop, which has been custom-made for me by a company called Eurorra. It's a bit of a weird story, and this won't be a traditional laptop review, because... well, you'll see.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 679
  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 679

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 679 for the week of April 11 – 17, 2021.

  • The Call for Talk and presentation proposals for EuroBSDCon 2021 is now open.

    EuroBSDcon is the European technical conference for users and developers of BSD-based systems. The conference is scheduled to take place September 16-19 2021 in Vienna, Austria or as an all-online event if COVID-19 developments dictate. The tutorials will be held on Thursday and Friday to registered participants and the talks are presented to conference attendees on Saturday and Sunday.

    The Call for Talk and Presentation proposals period will close on May 26th, 2021. Prospective speakers will be notified of acceptance or otherwise by June 1st, 2021.

  • Daniel Stenberg: Mars 2020 Helicopter Contributor [Ed: Daniel Stenberg helps Microsoft liars steal credit for other people’s work. PR stunt.]

    Friends of mine know that I’ve tried for a long time to get confirmation that curl is used in space. We’ve believed it to be likely but I’ve wanted to get a clear confirmation that this is indeed the fact.

  • curl those funny IPv4 addresses

    All of these versions shown above work with most tools that accept IPv4 addresses and sometimes you can bypass filters and protection systems by switching to another format so that you don’t match the filters. It has previously caused problems in node and perl packages and I’m guessing numerous others. It’s a feature that is often forgotten, ignored or just not known.

    It begs the question why this very liberal support was once added and allowed but I’ve not been able to figure that out – maybe because of how it matches class A/B/C networks. The support for this syntax seems to have been introduced with the inet_aton() function in the 4.2BSD release in 1983.

Proprietary Software and Linux Foundation

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Misc
  • New ransomware targeting Asian nations using malvertising: Kaspersky

    Cybersecurity researchers have discovered a very sophisticated Exploit Kit that is targeting countries in the Asia-Pacific region to deliver ransomware via malvertising, which is the spread of malware through online advertisements.

    Exploit kits are automated threats that utilise compromised websites to divert web traffic, scan for vulnerable browser-based applications, and run malware.

    Called 'Magnitude EK', the constantly evolving Exploit Kit uses its own ransomware as its final payload.

  • Millions of web surfers are being targeted by a single malvertising group

    [Crackers] have compromised more than 120 ad servers over the past year in an ongoing campaign that displays malicious advertisements on tens of millions, if not hundreds of millions, of devices as they visit sites that, by all outward appearances, are benign.

    Malvertising is the practice of delivering ads to people as they visit trusted websites. The ads embed JavaScript that surreptitiously exploits software flaws or tries to trick visitors into installing an unsafe app, paying fraudulent computer support fees, or taking other harmful actions. Typically, the scammers behind this Internet scourge pose as buyers and pay ad-delivery networks to display the malicious ads on individual sites.

  • 10 Best Rufus Alternatives For Windows, Linux, And MacOS
  • Telegram Launched Telegram WebZ & Telegram WebK

    Telegram is a popular instant messaging app known for protecting users’ privacy while providing the same features as WhatsApp. Telegram apps are available for all major platforms. The company also has a web version of the app that one can open in any web browser.

    The Telegram web version is available on web.telegram.org. But Telegram recently launched two more versions of the web app called Telegram WebZ and Telegram WebK.

    [...]

    Besides this, you can notice very minor differences in the color palettes of the two apps. The search box’s background in WebZ is grey whereas in WebK it’s white.

    When a user does not set a profile picture, Telegram creates a profile picture out of the user’s full name. It takes the first letter of first name & last name and creates the profile picture by combining the two letters. I noticed the WebZ version creates more accurate profile pictures than WebK. In some cases, WebK just added a random letter instead of the first letter of the last name.

  • ELISA Project Welcomes Codethink, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, NVIDIA and Red Hat to its Global Ecosystem
  • ELISA Project Welcomes Codethink, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, NVIDIA and Red Hat to its Global Ecosystem
  • ELISA Project Welcomes Codethink, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, NVIDIA and Red Hat to its Global Ecosystem

    Today, the ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) Project, an open source initiative that aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems, announced that Codethink, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, NVIDIA and Red Hat has joined its global ecosystem.

    Linux is used in safety-critical applications with all major industries because it can enable faster time to market for new features and take advantage of the quality of the code development processes which decreases the issues that could result in loss of human life, significant property damage, or environmental damage. Launched in February 2019 by the Linux Foundation, ELISA will work with certification authorities and standardization bodies across industries to document how Linux can be used in safety-critical systems.

  • Linux Foundation, AAIS Launch openIDL Project

    The Linux Foundation and the American Association of Insurance Services (AAIS) have announced openIDL, the Open Insurance Data Link platform and project. The platform will help reduce the cost of regulatory reporting for insurance carriers, provide a standardized data repository for analytics and a connection point for third parties to deliver new applications to members.

today's leftovers

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  • Resurrecting my Iomega Zip 100 parallel-port drive – Linux comes to the rescue

    Back in 1998 I purchased what was then a state-of-the-art storage medium: an external Iomega Zip 100 drive, which used removable 100 MB ‘SuperFloppy’ disks. Until 2002 I backed up my important files on removable Zip 100 MB disks. Over several years in the 1990s Iomega released various models of the Zip 100 GB drive: internal SCSI; internal IDE; internal ATAPI; external DB-25 IEEE 1284 parallel port; external USB 1.1. I bought the external DB-25 IEEE 1284 parallel port, model Z100P2. When affordable CD drives and external hard disk drives started to appear I began using those for backups instead, and the Zip drive and a box full of Zip 100 MB disks had been gathering dust on a shelf at home since I stopped using them in 2002.

  • PiMod Zero for Raspberry Pi Zero SBC broadcasts video to your older NTSC TV (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Playing retro games or watching older movies on your Raspberry Pi Zero board over a modern digital video interface like HDMI clearly ruins the experience! While it should be possible to use to 2-pin reserved for video composite on the Raspberry Pi Zero to connect to an old TV, PiMod Zero HAT allows you to get back that retro feeling even with TVs lacking RCA composite and audio inputs by broadcasting video over VHF to older NTSC compatible televisions.

  • The missing ps2pdf mystery

    Posting here as a placemarker, putting down the thoughts so far. Will append to this post if/when solved.
    Feodor reported that /usr/lib/cups/backend/pdf-writer wants /usr/bin/ps2pdf, which is missing.
    'pdf-writer' is a script, and I had to hunt where that came from. It is in PET package 'cups_pdf'. This is an ancient PET, for printing a Postscript or PDF to file. But the GTK print dialog offers "Print to file" as well, so 'cups_pdf' is redundant, so have removed that PET.
    I looked at packages.debian.org and found that 'ps2pdf' is part of the 'ghostscript' package. Interesting, my ghostscript, compiled in OE, doesn't have it.

  • Kubernetes: Introducing Indexed Jobs

    Once you have containerized a non-parallel Job, it is quite easy to get it up and running on Kubernetes without modifications to the binary. In most cases, when running parallel distributed Jobs, you had to set a separate system to partition the work among the workers. For example, you could set up a task queue to assign one work item to each Pod or multiple items to each Pod until the queue is emptied.

today's leftovers

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Misc

Leftovers: Corporate Distros, Eee PC, EasyOS and LHS

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Misc

  • Does the choice of enterprise Linux really matter anymore?

    We speak to Canonical, Red Hat and SUSE about the place of Linux in a cloud-based future - and what the CentOS EOL foretells

  • You ever think about how Asus put out like 40 models of a laptop called the “Eee PC”

    There were two products that arrived in 2007 that fundamentally changed computing: one, of course, was the iPhone. The second, obviously more important product was the $399 Eee PC 701. It originally ran a custom Linux operating system that reviewers loved (Laptop Mag’s Mark Spoonauer said it was “ten times simpler to use than any Windows notebook”) and was generally heralded as a new kind of computer with tremendous mass appeal. Spoonauer: “Pound for pound, the best value-priced notebook on the planet.”

    Again, this was a weirdo little two-pound plastic laptop that ran a custom Linux distro that was basically a front for various websites. (We hadn’t invented the phrase “cloud services” yet.)

    Windows getting shown up by Linux was not allowed, so Microsoft did some Microsoft maneuvering, and by January 2008 the Eee PC was running Windows XP instead. It was also part of a larger category called “netbooks,” and we were all made to know what netbooks were.

  •  

  • Bugfix for gFTP in EasyOS

    gFTP is a gtk+2-based FTP client. The first time that a ssh2 connection is made, there is a popup asking to confirm key authorization, with yes/no buttons. However, in EasyOS Dunfell-series, the popup dialog window does not appear, so unable to confirm the connection.
    This problem does not occur in EasyOS Buster-series.

  • LHS Episode #407: The Weekender LXX

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

today's leftovers

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Misc

     

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/15

    After I left you and Tumbleweed in the capable hands of Richard for two weeks, it is good to be back. The week has seen a slightly lower count of published snapshots, but only because openQA was nice enough to find bugs that we did not you having to fight with. So, we only released two snapshots (0408 and 0414). As usual, the large gap means a few snapshots were tested in between, and things accumulated.

  • Pop!_OS 21.04 Preview: Test-driving the Cosmic Desktop!

    System76 recently unveiled their plans to debut a new desktop, dubbed "Cosmic", along with Pop!_OS 21.04 this coming June. I can't wait that long, so I decided to check it out right now. In this video, I show-off the current in-development version of the Cosmic Desktop as of April 16th, 2021.

  • Ubuntu Blog: KubeCon co-located events: Operator Day is back!

    Another KubeCon is just around the corner and, due to popular demand, we’re hosting Operator Day again! Designed for KubeCon, but free and open to all.

    Last year, thousands of you joined us to get hands-on training from Ubuntu’s experts, so this time around we’re making the workshop even more elaborate and interactive!

    Operators simplify everyday application management on Kubernetes. Learn how to use them, how to create them in Python, and how to evolve from configuration management to application management. We’re working to create a community-driven collection of operators for everything that’s integrated and tested everywhere.

  • Tetrate Service Bridge for Istio On Hybrid Clouds Ready for Production | Data Center Knowledge

    The startup recently raised $40 million in venture funding and now has a product ready to make Istio palatable for enterprises.

  • What we learned from our survey about returning to in-person events

    Recently, the Linux Foundation Events team sent out a survey to past attendees of all events from 2018 through 2021 to get their feedback on how they feel about virtual events and gauge their thoughts on returning to in-person events. We sent the survey to 69,000 people and received 972 responses.

  • Linux Foundation Newsletter April 2021: 30 Percent off Training Sale, New Research Division, LF Fights Rare Genetic Diseases [Ed: Jason Perlow from Microsoft signed/published on this newsletter from the failing “Linux” Foundation, whose newsletter is still served on Microsoft Windows]

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The State Of OpenCL To Vulkan Compute Layers On Linux In April 2021

    It is, in theory, possible to run OpenCL applications on Linux using any graphics driver capable of doing Vulkan Compute. We have examined the alternatives for doing so and found them to be technically interesting and practically useless. It may become possible to run Blender with OpenCL compute using Vulkan at some point in the far distant future. Don't expect to be able to do that today or next month.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Between Loads

    I’m typing this up between loads and runs of various games I’m testing, since bug reports for games are somehow already a thing, and there’s a lot of them.

    The worst part about testing games is the unbelievably long load times (and startup videos) most of them have, not to mention those long, panning camera shots at the start of the game before gameplay begins and I can start crashing.

    But this isn’t a post about games.

    No, no, there’s plenty of time for such things.

    This is a combo post: part roundup because blogging has been sporadic the past couple weeks, and part feature.

  • Sid Meier: More than Just Civilization

    Let’s face it. The video games world is not getting any younger, and the most famous creators of yesterday are now well past 60. Sid Meier is no exception. I picked up his memoir and it was a good read. I am now pretty confident that we will see more publications in the same vein, as the age of pioneers reaches an end.

    For Linux gamers, Sid Meier’s current company, Firaxis, is a well known benefactor – one of the few friendly to our cause: Civilization 5, 6, and Beyond Earth have all been ported to Linux by Aspyr with the blessing of Firaxis. Even back in the Loki days, Civilization: Call To Power was one of the first games ported to Linux… while this was not a game by Sid Meier – just one from Activision who had secured the rights to the franchise. This is one of the things you will learn as you go through this memoir.

  • My Dog's Garage Runs OpenBSD

    I was inspired by the April 2017 article in undeadly.org about getting OpenBSD running on a Raspberry Pi 3B+. My goal was to use a Raspberry Pi running OpenBSD to monitor the temperature in my garage from my home. My dog has his own little "apartment" inside the garage, so I want to keep an eye on the temperature. (I don't rely on this device. He sleeps inside the house whenever he wants.)

    If anything seems wrongheaded, please chalk it up to a frothy mixture of enthusiasm, ignorance, stubbornness, and "just-because-I-wanted-to-do-it-this-way-ness."

  • News: Finland implements API framework proposed by the European Commission

                         

                           

    The Ministry of Finance set up the project on opening up and using public data in Finland on 30 April 2020. It will put into effect the aims given in the Government Programme by promoting wider and more effective public data use through society. The project will last until the end of 2022 and aims to promote the coherent use of data and functions, primarily through APIs. At the moment, there are no common principles for API development in the public sector in Finland.

Proprietary Software and Linux Foundation Fluff

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  • Aviation Sector Calls for Unified Cybersecurity Practices to Mitigate Growing Risks

    The latest report, Pathways to a Cyber Resilient Aviation Industry, developed in collaboration with Deloitte, outlines how the industry – from airlines to airports to manufacturing and the supply chain – can work with a common language and baseline of practices. The report focuses on mitigating the impact of future digital threats on multiple levels: [...]

  • Dell finally spins off VMware stake in $9.7B deal

    Dell Technologies said on Wednesday it would spin off its 81% stake in cloud computing software maker VMware to create two standalone public companies in a move that will help the PC maker reduce its pile of debt.

    VMware is currently Dell’s best-performing unit, as it has benefited from companies looking to cut costs and move to the cloud, a shift that has been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Ransomware Attack Creates Cheese Shortages in Netherlands [iophk: Windows TCO]

    In a local media report spotted by Bitdefender, Verhoeven said he suspected the attackers gained a foothold through a Microsoft Exchange server vulnerability. That would make Bakker Logistek just the latest victim in an onslaught of attacks against Microsoft Exchange servers following the disclosure of the ProxyLogon group of security bugs.

  • Facebook will not notify the 533 million users exposed in online database

    Last weekend, it was reported that a database of records from more than 533 million Facebook accounts — including phone numbers, email addresses, birthdays and other personal details — had been shared online. While the leak did not include sensitive information such as credit card or social security numbers, the data could still be exploited by bad actors.

    Facebook (FB) noted earlier this week that the data was scraped from public profiles on its platform in 2019 using its "contact importer" feature. The company says it quickly made adjustments to the feature to prevent such activity from happening again.

  • Open Minds and Open Source: Linux Foundation LF Energy Introduces Two Initiatives Designed to Reduce Carbon and Shift to Sustainable Energy [Ed: Greenwashing]

    Building on its groundbreaking initiative, the Linux Foundation’s LF Energy announced it has introduced a Service-based Open-source Grid automation platform for Network Operation of the Future (SOGNO) and Power System Network Operations (PSNO) designed to advance energy automation and hardware virtualization.

  • Charting the Path to a Successful IT Career [Ed: Linux.com turned to trash and marketing]

    So, you’ve chosen to pursue a career in computer science and information technology – congratulations! Technology careers not only continue to be some of the fastest growing today, but also some of the most lucrative. Unlike many traditional careers, there are multiple paths to becoming a successful IT professional.

today's leftovers

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Misc

  • Apache Software Foundation retires slew of Hadoop-related projects

    It's been no secret lately that Apache Hadoop, once the poster child of big data, is past its prime. But since April 1st, the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) has announced the retirement to its "Attic" of at least 19 open source projects, 13 of which are big data-related and ten of which are part of the Hadoop ecosystem.

  • SODA Foundation Announces 2021 Data & Storage Trends Survey

    Data and storage technologies are evolving. The SODA Foundation is conducting a survey to identify the current challenges, gaps, and trends for data and storage in the era of cloud-native, edge, AI, and 5G. Through new insights generated from the data and storage community at large, end-users will be better equipped to make decisions, vendors can improve their products, and the SODA Foundation can establish new technical directions — and beyond!

    The SODA Foundation is an open source project under Linux Foundation that aims to foster an ecosystem of open source data management and storage software for data autonomy. SODA Foundation offers a neutral forum for cross-project collaboration and integration and provides end-users quality end-to-end solutions. We intend to use this survey data to help guide the SODA Foundation and its surrounding ecosystem on important issues.

  • Kube World at SUSECON – The Rancher Journey Continues

    SUSECON is only a few weeks away, and the excitement is starting to build. While working on my keynote, I took some time to look back on how much has happened since SUSE completed its acquisition of Rancher Labs in December of last year. It’s just unreal how fast things are moving. It hasn’t even been six months, and more things have happened than many companies can accomplish in a year or more.

  • Improving the remote experience: treadmill

    Last year I decided to add an improvement to my home office, a treadmill. I thought about during the total lock-down we suffered in Spain in spring 2020. The reason for not trying it earlier was that I was skeptical about keeping my productivity level while walking on the treadmill. Finally I made the decision to try out and asked for one to The Three Wise Men. They were kind enough to bring it.

    After a few weeks using it, I would like to report about it since several of my colleagues at MBition/Daimler asked me about it. I hope that reading about my experience is useful to you.

    [...]

    I detected a productivity decrease in those activities which require high levels of concentration or creativity like complex meetings with many people that I facilitate, those times when I need to come up with new ideas, analysis of complex data, etc. The good news is that I did detect this productivity reduction early. The longer I have been using the treadmill though, the more type tasks I can do without noticing a productivity reduction. So I plan to try again during the coming weeks some of those activities that I dropped early on.

    Walking is helping me a lot to go through those days with back to back meetings. I pay better attention and get less bored compared to standing up. As I get more used to walking, my energy levels during the afternoons are increasing, as mentioned, which helps me to get through the last couple of hours during long working days. It was not like that at first though, so plan accordingly.

  • Studies for episode 35

    Here under studies for episode 35, a montage of roughly 30 Sketches, featuring Pepper at various ages, Arra dragon, Carrot and Torreya (a new character), Arra's pilot.

  • Hangover 0.6.5 Released For Running Windows Software On ARM64, POWER

    Hangover is the project that crafts Wine with a modified QEMU and other bits for allowing x86 32-bit and 64-bit Windows programs to run on alternative architectures under Linux. But before getting too excited, at this stage it still supports a limited number of real-world software packages and the architecture support is primarily focused on AArch64 and PPC64LE. While Linux is seemingly the primary focus, there is also some macOS support with Hangover too.

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More in Tux Machines

Dev kit and module run Linux on Zynq Ultrascale+

Topic Embedded has launched a “Florida Plus” dev kit that runs Linux on its Zynq Ultrascale+ based Miami MPSoC Plus module. Meanwhile, Aries announced it has begun distributing Topic’s Zynq-based Miami modules. Netherlands-based Topic Embedded Systems has been around for 20 years doing FPGA work, with the last decade focused primarily on manufacturing Linux-driven Xilinx Zynq based modules. Last week, Topic announced an open-spec Florida Plus Development Kit that showcases its top-of-the-line Miami MPSoC Plus compute module, which features the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. system-on-chip. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Install Mosh Shell as SSH Alternative on Linux Desktop

    Using an SSH client tool is always helpful and handy for the system administrator and the remote users. In the conventional SSH clients, you may find some network and auto session logout issues. As a system admin, you already realize the importance of the CLI-based remote SSH client. To solve frequent logout, lagging, and packet loss issues, you can install the Mosh SSH as an SSH alternative on Linux. The Mosh stands for the Mobile shell, which is a command-line-based secure shell client for Linux. It doesn’t require a stale and static IP address to establish the connection; moreover, the Mosh SSH shell client is also compatible with mobile devices.

  • New Linux Publication Released: How Linux Works, 3rd Edition: What Every Superuser Should Know by Brian Ward

    I am very excited about this publication not only because it is a great book covering such a large set of Linux-related topics but also because I helped with the technical review.

  • How to install the NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu 21.04

    The objective is to install the NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo Linux and switch from a opensource Nouveau driver to the proprietary Nvidia driver. To install Nvidia driver on other Linux distributions, follow our Nvidia Linux Driver guide.

  • How to install Blender 2.92 on Deepin 20.2

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Blender 2.92 on Deepin 20.2.

  • How to install Funkin' High Effort Ugh mod on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Funkin' High Effort Ugh mod on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below. If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

GNU Project: GCC 11.1 Release Candidate and Cryptographic Algorithms GnuTLS

  • GCC 11.1 Release Candidate available from gcc.gnu.org
    The first release candidate for GCC 11.1 is available from
    
     https://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/11.1.0-RC-20210420/
     ftp://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/11.1.0-RC-20210420
    
    and shortly its mirrors.  It has been generated from git revision
    r11-8265-g246abba01f302eb453475b650ba839ec905be76d.
    
    I have so far bootstrapped and tested the release candidate on
    x86_64-linux and i686-linux.  Please test it and report any issues to
    bugzilla.
    
    If all goes well, I'd like to release 11.1 on Tuesday, April 27th.
    
  • GCC 11.1 RC Released, GCC 12 In Development On Trunk

    The release candidate to GCC 11.1 as the first stable release of GCC 11 is now available for testing. If all goes well GCC 11.1.0 will officially debut next week while GCC 12 is now in development with their latest Git code. Red Hat's Jakub Jelinek announced the GCC 11.1 release candidate today, which has been bootstrapped and tested so far for i686 and x86_64 Linux. He is hoping to release GCC 11.1 officially next week if all goes well.

  • Daiki Ueno: AF_ALG support in GnuTLS

    The Linux kernel implements a set of cryptographic algorithms to be used by other parts of the kernel. These algorithms can be accessed through the internal API; notable consumers of this API are encrypted network protocols such as IPSec and WireGuard, as well as data encryption as in fscrypt. The kernel also provides an interface for user-space programs to access the kernel crypto API. GnuTLS has recently gained a new crypto backend that uses the kernel interface in addition to the user-space implementation. There are a few benefits of having it. The most obvious one is performance improvement: while the existing user-space assembly implementation has comparable performance to the in-kernel software emulation, the kernel crypto implementation also enables workload offloading to hardware accelerators, such as Intel QAT cards. Secondly, it brings support for a wider variety of CPU architectures: not only IA32 and AArch64, but also PowerPC and s390. The last but not least is that it could be used as a potential safety net for the crypto algorithms implementation: deferring the crypto operations to the kernel means that we could have an option to workaround any bugs or compliance (such as FIPS140) issues in the library.

More JingPad A1 Linux tablet detailed revealed ahead of crowdfunding

The JingPad A1 is a tablet with an 11 inch AMOLED touchscreen display, support for digital pen input, and a detachable keyboard that lets you use the tablet like a laptop. It also has an operating system that’s designed for both tablet and laptop mode. That’s because the JingPad A1 will be the first tablet to ship with JingOS, an operating system developed by Chinese company Jingling that’s a custom Linux distribution designed for tablets but capable of running desktop applications (as well as some Android applications). First unveiled in March, the tablet will go up for pre-order soon through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. Jingling hasn’t announced a price yet, but an Indiegogo preview page is now live, and folks who sign up with an email address may be able to save 40-percent when orders open up in May. Read more