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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • WordPress 5.4 Beta 2

    WordPress 5.4 Beta 2 is now available!

    This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend running it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

  • Open Build Service: More Responsive Than Ever Before!

    We want to change this. And with the new UI technology we introduced last year, we have the chance to do so! :clap: So in the last couple of weeks, we have focused on improving the user experience following a mobile-first approach (start the design of the page on a small screen, which has more restrictions, then expand the page features to create a tablet or desktop version).

  • Charity Navigator awards the FSF coveted four-star rating for the seventh time in a row

    Recently, we got some terrific news: Charity Navigator, an independent evaluator of US-based nonprofit charities, awarded the Free Software Foundation (FSF) a four-star rating, the highest available. According to the confirmation letter from Charity Navigator president Michael Thatcher, this rating demonstrates the FSF's "strong financial health and commitment to accountability and transparency." A four-star charity, according to their ratings, "exceeds industry standards and outperforms most charities in its cause."

    This is our seventh time in a row receiving the coveted four-star rating! Only 7% of the charities that Charity Navigator evaluates have gotten this many in a row, and they assess over 9,000 charities a year. As Thatcher's letter says, "This exceptional designation from Charity Navigator sets the Free Software Foundation apart from its peers and demonstrates to the public its trustworthiness." Even better: our overall score went from 96.66 out of 100% last year, up to 98.55 this cycle.

  • Arm's ASTC Encoder Replaces Its Restrictive EULA With Apache 2.0 License

    Arm has been developing the ASTC encoder as the texture compressor for Adaptive Scalable Texture Compression (ASTC) as open-source but until last week was carrying a restrictive license. 

    The Arm ASTC encoder had been carrying an end-user license agreement that is rather restrictive to not only the code but also the documentation and Mali ASTC specification. The EULA has been quite restrictive and far from conventional open-source licenses. 

  • Anwesha Das: The scary digital world

    Some years ago, my husband and I were looking for houses to rent. We both were in different cities and were having a telephone conversation. We had three or four phone calls to discuss this. After that, I opened my laptop and turned on my then browser, Google. Advertisements started popping up. Showing the adds of houses for rent at the very same location, the same budget I was looking for. A chill went down my bone. How did this particular website knows that we are looking for a house?

    [...]

    Why would someone want to track me? I have nothing to hide.

    This is the general response we get when we initiate the discussion of and about privacy. To which Glen Greenworld has a great reply, ‘if you do not have to hide anything, please write down all your email ids, not just the work ones, the respectable ones but all, along with the passwords to me.’ Though people have nothing to hide no one has ever got back to him Smile

    Everyone needs privacy. We flourish our being and can be true to ourselves when we do not have the fear and knowledge of being watched by someone. Everyone cares about privacy. If they did not have, there would be no password on their accounts, no locker, no keys.

  • Stephen Michael Kellat: Trying A Minimum Working Example

    When you make assertions in a channel like the Ubuntu Podcast's Telegram chatter channel they sometimes have to be backed up. Recently I made reference to how you could utilize Markdown within a LaTeX document. I should take a moment to discuss a way to use LuaLaTeX to make your Markdown documents look nice. We're going to build a "Minimum Working Example" to illustrate things.

    First, I will refer to a package on the Comprehensive TeX Archive Network simply named markdown. That handles processing Markdown input. In its documentation you find that you can actually input a separate Markdown-formatted file into the macros provided which will convert them into appropriate LaTeX code and add that programmatically into your document. LaTeX is a Turing-complete programming language after all.

  • Stuart Langridge: On the Birmingham tech scene

    You see, it doesn’t appear that the Tech Week team did much in the way of actually trying to find out whether there was a tech scene before declaring that there probably wasn’t one. If they had then they’d have probably discovered the Birmingham.io calendar which contains all the stuff that’s going on, and can be subscribed to via Google. They’d probably have spoken to the existing language-specific meetups in the city before possibly doing their own instead of rather than in conjunction with. They’d have probably discovered the Brum tech Slack which has 800-odd people in it, or2 CovHack or HackTheMidlands or FusionMeetup or devopsdays or CodeYourFuture_ or yougotthisconf or Tech Wednesday or Django Girls or OWASP or Open Code or any one of a ton of other things that are going on every week.

    Birmingham, as anyone who’s decided to be here knows, is a bit special. A person involved in tech in Birmingham is pretty likely to be able to get a similar job in London, and yet they haven’t done so. Why is that? Because Brum’s different. Things are less frantic, here, is why. We’re all in this together. London may have kings and queens: we’re the city of a thousand different trades, all on the same level, all working hand in hand. All collaborating. It’s a grass roots thing, you see. Nobody’s in charge. The calendar mentioned above is open source exactly so that there’s not one person in charge of it and anyone else can pick it up and run with it if we disappear, so the work that’s already gone into it isn’t wasted.

    [...]

    And so there’s a certain amount of resistance, on my side of the fence, to kingmakers. To people who look at the scene, all working together happily, and then say: you people need organising for your own good, because there needs to be someone in charge here. There needs to be hierarchy, otherwise how will journalists know who to ask for opinions? It’s difficult to understand an organisation which doesn’t have any organisation. W. L. Gore and Patagonia and Valve are companies that work a similar way, without direct hierarchy, in a way that the management theorist Frédéric Laloux calls a “teal organisation” and others call “open allocation”, and they baffle people the world over too; half the managers and consultants in the world look at them and say, but that can’t work, if you don’t have bosses, nobody will do anything. But it works for them. And it seems to me to be a peculiarly Brum approach to things. If we were in this for the fame and the glory we’d have gone down to London where everyone’s terribly serious and in a rush all the time. Everyone works with everyone else; BrumPHP talks about BrumJS, Fusion talks about School of Code; one meetup directs people to others that they’ll find interesting; if the devopsdays team want a speaker about JavaScript they’ll ping BrumJS to ask about who’d be good. That’s collaboration. Everyone does their bit, and tries to elevate everyone else at the same time.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OnMSFT.com – What we use [Ed: "On Microsoft" is actually... not on Microsoft. It's on GNU/Linux.]

    OnMSFT runs Ubuntu 18.04 and Nginx...

  • Linux 5.7 Staging Will Be ~28.7k Lines Of Code Lighter Thanks To Nuking WUSB + UWB

    With the Linux 5.7 kernel cycle in two months there is some "spring cleaning" within the staging area that is leading to almost twenty-nine thousand lines of code being removed thanks to removing a deprecated feature.

    Last year we reported on Linux deprecating Wireless USB and Ultra Wideband subsystems. That WUSB and UWB code was demoted after being orphaned without a code maintainer for years with Wireless USB really not being popular in an era of Bluetooth and WiFi advancements. With no one having expressed concern or stepping up to maintain the code since deprecating WUSB and UWB, the code is now set to be removed with Linux 5.7.

  • Everything you need to know about the ArcoLinux Tweak Tool

    Screenshot of the last version

  • Mozilla Reps in 2020 Berlin All Hands

    14 Reps were invited to participate in this year’s All Hands in Berlin.

    At the All-Hands Reps learned some easy German words (Innovationsprozess-swischenstands-schreihungsskizze), did some art (see here X artistic endeavor during a group activity), and learned about cultural differences in communication.

  • Waterfox: Firefox Fork With Legacy Add-ons Options

    In this week’s open source software highlight, we take a look at a Firefox-based browser that supports legacy extensions that Firefox no longer supports while potentially providing fast user experience.

    When it comes to web browsers, Google Chrome leads the market share. Mozilla Firefox is there still providing hopes for a mainstream web browser that respects your privacy.

    Firefox has improved a lot lately and one of the side-effects of the improvements is removal of add-ons. If your favorite add-on disappeared in last few months/years, you have a good new in the form of Witerfox.

  • Vulkan 1.2.133 Released With VK_KHR_shader_non_semantic_info

    It's been nearly one month since the release of Vulkan 1.2.132 and that came shortly after the big Vulkan 1.2 milestone, but out today is now Vulkan 1.2.133.

    Vulkan 1.2.133 has various clarifications to the documentation, adds a vendor ID for Codeplay, VK_EXT_shader_subgroup_vote / VK_EXT_shader_subgroup_ballot are deprecated, and other clarifications/corrections to the text.

  • Work on IoT Device Communication Standardization Begins

    Most people working with industrial automation equipment are familiar with OPC UA for machine and device communications. More recently, industry has been getting up to speed with MQTT and its complimentary role for industrial device communications.

    While OPC UA has long been an industry standard, work is now beginning on a broad standardization of MQTT communications via Sparkplug, the open source software specification that enables applications, sensors, devices or gateways to integrate data within an MQTT communications infrastructure. Sparkplug defines MQTT topics namespace, payload, and session state management.

    [...]

    This work will address the issue of MQTT ‘s undefined topics structure and data types—a key differentiator from OPC UA which “provides a framework for standard and custom datatypes, a defined (hierarchical) namespace and a definition for request/response style communication patterns,” as noted by Jen Reiman in ctron’s blog post about OPC UA implementation with the Eclipse Foundation’s Milo (an open source communication stack for developing OPC UA clients and servers).

    Founding members of the Sparkplug Working Group include Chevron, Canary Labs, Cirrus Link Solutions, HiveMQ, Inductive Automation, and ORing.

  • Google pulls 500 malicious Chrome extensions after researcher tip-off

    Google has abruptly pulled over 500 Chrome extensions from its Web Store that researchers discovered were stealing browsing data and executing click fraud and malvertising after installing themselves on the computers of millions of users.

    Depending on which way you look at it, that’s either a good result because they’re no longer free to infect users, or an example of how easy it is for malicious extensions to sneak on the Web Store and stay there for years without Google noticing.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (evince, postgresql-9.4, and thunderbird), Fedora (ksh and libxml2), openSUSE (hostapd and nextcloud), Red Hat (chromium-browser, firefox, flash-plugin, and ksh), and SUSE (firefox and thunderbird). 

  • Microsoft's Edge roadmap reveals history sync coming this summer, Linux support coming

    Recently, Microsoft updated its public roadmap for its still-new Edge browser, which is based on Chromium. There's quite a bit on there, from minor fixes to major things like support for Linux.

    Two specific things are new. The ability to navigate a PDF via a table of contents is now under review, and the tab preview feature from Edge Legacy is now in discussion. As 'in review' and 'in discussion' suggest, neither is a commitment to actually building out the features.

  •                

  • Nintendo Is Likely to Suffer Global Switch Shortages From Virus

                     

                       

    Limited component supply coming out of China is affecting output at a Nintendo assembly partner’s factory in Vietnam, which the gaming giant primarily uses to build consoles for the U.S., said the people, asking not to be named because the details are private. A shortage of components this month would affect Switch units scheduled for arrival in April, after existing inventory and current shipments of the console have sold through.

  •                

  • Roboflow: Popular autonomous vehicle data set contains critical flaws

    A machine learning model’s performance is only as good as the quality of the data set on which it’s trained, and in the domain of self-driving vehicles, it’s critical this performance isn’t adversely impacted by errors. A troubling report from computer vision startup Roboflow alleges that exactly this scenario occurred — according to founder Brad Dwyer, crucial bits of data were omitted from a corpus used to train self-driving car models.

    Dwyer writes that Udacity Dataset 2, which contains 15,000 images captured while driving in Mountain View and neighboring cities during daylight, has omissions. Thousands of unlabeled vehicles, hundreds of unlabeled pedestrians, and dozens of unlabeled cyclists are present in roughly 5,000 of the samples, or 33% (217 lack any annotations at all but actually contain cars, trucks, street lights, or pedestrians). Worse are the instances of phantom annotations and duplicated bounding boxes (where “bounding box” refers to objects of interest), in addition to “drastically” oversized bounding boxes.

  • The Open Wearables Initiative expands founding team; begins soliciting algorithms and datasets for wearable and connected health technologies

    Shimmer Research, a global leader in wearable technology for research applications, today announced that the Open Wearables Initiative (OWEAR) is now actively soliciting open source software and datasets from wearable sensors and other connected health technologies at http://www.owear.org. OWEAR is a collaboration designed to promote the effective use of high-quality, sensor-generated measures of health in clinical research through the open sharing and benchmarking of algorithms and datasets. OWEAR has also expanded its Working Group to include executives from four major global pharmaceutical companies, a major clinical research organization (CRO), Sage Bionetworks and the Digital Medicine Society (DiMe).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This Week in Linux 93: MATE 1.24, KDE Plasma 5.18, Blender, OpenShot, Evernote, MX Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we have monster of a show with new releases from desktop environments like MATE and KDE Plasma to distro news from MX Linux, Ubuntu, Project Trident and Tiny Core. In App News this week, we see new releases from Blender, OpenShot and some interesting news from Evernote. We’ll also talk about some updates from TLP the laptop performance project and Wayland display server protocol. Later in the show, we’ll check out a cool gaming overlay project called MangoHud and we’ll discuss some Legal News related to Mycroft AI and their fight against a “Patent Troll”. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • How Ceph powers exciting research with Open Source

    As researchers seek scalable, high performance methods for storing data, Ceph is a powerful technology that needs to be at the top of their list. Ceph is an open-source software-defined storage platform. While it’s not often in the spotlight, it’s working hard behind the scenes, playing a crucial role in enabling ambitious, world-renowned projects such as CERN’s particle physics research, Immunity Bio’s cancer research, The Human Brain Project, MeerKat radio telescope, and more. These ventures are propelling the collective understanding of our planet and the human race beyond imaginable realms, and the outcomes will forever change how we perceive our existence and potential. It’s high-time Ceph receives the praise it deserves for powering some of the most exciting research projects on Earth.

  • Kubernetes' Inevitable Takeover of the Data Center
  • How To Drive Infrastructure Like Uber Does
  • DragonFlyBSD 5.8-RC1 Is Ready With Many Changes From DSynth To Performance Optimizations

    Not only did NetBSD 9.0 make its debut today but DragonFlyBSD 5.8 was branched and its first release candidate made while DragonFlyBSD 5.9 is the version now open on Git master.

  • Executive interview: Melissa Di Donato, CEO, SUSE

    New CEO of the world’s largest independent open source company wants to make SUSE more innovative and help businesses to modernise traditional IT

  • Every time Windows 10 Updates, it deletes all saved desktop icons, clears my taskbar, deletes all my saved favorites, passwords, and more!

    Every time my PC updates my desktop wallpaper goes back to default, and all saved icons, favorites, passwords, etc are gone. Every. Single. Time. This is getting tiring and I'm losing so much time at work saving my icons again, paswords, etc. What is going on? Also keeps changing my default printer even when the box is left un-checked, when the computer updates and restarts the box will be checked. Its almost as if the computer is set back to default after every update. Please help. I've tried quite a few things to fix and no luck.

  • February Win10 1903 and 1909 cumulative update, KB 4532693, causing desktops to disappear

    Microsoft should be paying you to beta test their buggy patches.

  • Windows 10: Update KB4532693 kills user data/profile

    There are reports that cumulative update KB4532693 for Windows 10 versions 1903 and 1909 dated February 11, 2020, is causing significant issues for some users. Desktop gone, files gone, icons gone and more.

  • Second Windows 10 update is now causing problems by hiding user profiles

    Windows 10 users are reporting that a second Windows update included in this month's Patch Tuesday is causing problems.

    According to reports, a bug in the KB4532693 update is hiding user profiles and their respective data on some Windows 10 systems.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tux Linux 18.04 overview | lightweight, complete & looks great!

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Tux Linux 18.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Looking for an open-source VPN? We've got the answer

    After undergoing a successful independent security audit earlier this year, IVPN has announced that it will open source all of its VPN clients.

    The VPN provider's Android, macOS, iOS and Windows apps are now open source under the GPLv3 license.

    However, this is just the first step in IVPN's multi-year plan to open source many other parts of its service. The company's next step is to release key parts of its infrastructure to the public with end goal of enabling anyone to set up and verify its VPN server configuration.

  • Is Google cooling on open-source foundations?

    Google has been one of big tech's biggest supporters of open-source software. But customers, partners and members of the open-source community say the company is shifting its priorities.

    Consider the case of the open-source project Istio, whose future was thrown into question late last year.

    Istio is a "service mesh," a tool that helps technology organizations manage application strategies built around microservices. Microservices allow developers to work on various parts of an application without having to worry about screwing up the whole thing — and help ensure that if one service goes down, the impact is relatively minor. For example, adopting microservices helped Twitter end the days of the fail whale.

    Google, IBM and Lyft introduced Istio in May 2017, and discussion about donating the project to a nonprofit foundation — which is common practice for open-source projects — took place almost immediately, according to several people familiar with the talks. Google controls six seats on the 10-seat steering committee that governs Istio, and the parties agreed to table further decision-making until the project found its footing, with consensus that Istio would eventually wind up in a foundation when the timing was right.

    By 2019, that momentum had arrived, as usage of Istio grew inside big companies and major organizations, like the U.S. Air Force. Throughout the year, Google continued to make vague promises to its partners about donating Istio to a foundation, which would mean ceding control of the project's trademarks and overall direction. The most natural time to make that announcement seemed to be November's Kubecon, a software convention dedicated to Kubernetes, the open-source project Google gave to a foundation in 2015.

  • Resolve data breaches with Firefox Monitor

    Corporate data breaches are an all too common reality of modern life. At best, you get an email from a company alerting you that they have been hacked, and then you’re left to figure out how to protect yourself from there. It’s lonely, daunting and leaves you seeking closure.

    With Firefox’s newest update to Monitor, you can track the breaches you’ve been involved in, follow steps to protect yourself, and mark a breach as “resolved” when you’re ready for some satisfying closure.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 69
  • MariaDB 10.5.1 Release Notes

    MariaDB 10.5 is the current development series of MariaDB. It is an evolution of MariaDB 10.4 with several entirely new features not found anywhere else and with backported and reimplemented features from MySQL.

  • Kiwi TCMS: We're not participating in 'QA of the year' award

    Hello testers, this is the story of how our team is not taking part of the "QA of the year" contest organized by the QA: Challenge Accepted conference despite being nominated by Alex.

  • People of WordPress: Kori Ashton

    You’ve probably heard that WordPress is open-source software, and may know that it’s created and run by volunteers. WordPress enthusiasts share many examples of how WordPress changed people’s lives for the better. This monthly series shares some of those lesser-known, amazing stories.

    [...]

    Like many other web development agencies, WebTegrity started out with the “one-time fee and you’re done” business model. This business model is known for unpredictable revenue streams. Hearing about recurring revenue business models at WordCamp Austin was a lightbulb moment for Kori. She started drafting a more sustainable business model on the way back home.

    Support packages were key to their new business plan. Clients needed ongoing support. They decided to include at least 12 months of post-launch support into their web development projects. This doubled their revenue in one year and allowed them to even out their revenue streams.

  • 2020-02-14 | Linux Headlines

    OpenSSH plans for the future of cryptography, NetBSD launches its first fundraising drive in a decade, Blender releases version 2.82, and Corona Labs announces its shutdown.

  • Last week of SoK 2020

    To this one I have made an checkable action in the menu “edit”, you can select it if you want to auto save a json or xml file automatically in the current working directory. This functionality can be pretty handy when annotating a big amount of items.

  • Akademy 2019 – Late Report

    There has been some time since my last blog post. It has happened because of a good cause, since I was focusing on my undergraduate thesis. Now I have finished it and finally have completed my graduation, yay! Soon I will include my thesis on my blog and share it with the world… I have just decided to fix some details in the project before that. Anyway, this post is to comment about my participation in Akademy 2019. I will give a brief report, share my experiences and tell you about how this experience was for me.

  • How to use an LED with Raspberry Pi

    Learn how to use an LED with Raspberry Pi in our latest How to use video on YouTube.

  • Accelerating IoT device time to market

    Launching IoT devices and managing them at scale can be a time intensive and complex process. With 85% of IoT initiatives not launched after a year of development, it is inevitable that change is needed.

    To overcome these challenges, Canonical has introduced Smart Start, a package that reduces business and technical decision making into a 2-week, fixed-cost decision. Smart Start provides a guided journey through the infrastructure needed to develop, customise, and distribute software to fleets of devices. With consulting services to de-risk the journey at critical points, an enterprise’s IoT strategy is fast tracked to market.

    This webinar details the learnings from over 30 project summaries and case studies of Canonical customers. Nilay Patel, Product Manager for IoT and Devices, will speak about the lessons to take away, and why businesses such as Rigado, Cyberdyne and Fingbox chose Canonical to launch their IoT devices.

  • Register today for LibrePlanet -- or organize your own satellite instance

    LibrePlanet started out as a gathering of Free Software Foundation (FSF) associate members, and has remained a community event ever since. We are proud to bring so many different people together to discuss the latest developments and the future of free software. We envision that some day there will be satellite instances all over the globe livestreaming our annual conference on technology and social justice -- and you can create your own today! All you need is a venue, a screen, and a schedule of LibrePlanet events, which we'll be releasing soon. This year, a free software supporter in Ontario, Canada, has confirmed an event, and we encourage you to host one, too.

    Of course, ideally you'll be able to join us in person for LibrePlanet 2020: "Free the Future." If you can come, please register now to let us know -- FSF associate members attend gratis. We are looking forward to receiving the community at the newly confirmed Back Bay Events Center this year. We've put together some information on where to eat, sleep, and park in the vicinity of the new venue.

    However, we know that not every free software enthusiast can make it to Boston, which is why we livestream the entire event. You can view it solo, with friends, or even with a large group of like-minded free software enthusiasts! It is a great opportunity to bring other people in your community together to view some of the foremost speakers in free software, including Internet Archive founder and Internet Hall of Famer Brewster Kahle.

  • Why I am not using Grindr

    Grindr is proprietary software that only runs on Android and iOS. It also depends on a centralized server infrastructure that stores data in unencrypted form. The company that hosts Grindr, Amazon is known for violating users privacy. Grindr also sends data to Third-Party Websites and is known for sharing users HIV status without their consent. The terms of use and privacy policy are much too long (about 50 pages), therefore most users don’t read them. If a user has read only parts of those terms, they should become suspect that Grindr violates their privacy and not use the service. I think that sensitive information should be visible only to the intended recipients and not the administrators of any servers or routers, therefore I never use Grindr.

  •                    

  • Microsoft temporarily blocked from beginning Pentagon project

                         

                           

    Amazon had asked the judge to force a temporary stay of work on the Joint Enterprise Defence Infrastructure, or JEDI, project until the court can rule on Amazon’s protest over Pentagon awarding it to Microsoft.

                           

    AWS had earlier alleged that the contract was awarded to Microsoft last October after US President Donald Trump exercised his influence over the country’s Defence Department.

  • Russell Coker: Self Assessment

    A significant problem in large parts of the computer industry is that it’s not easy to compare various skills. In the sport of bowling (which Erik uses as an example) it’s easy to compare your score against people anywhere in the world, if you score 250 and people in another city score 280 then they are more skilled than you. If I design an IT project that’s 2 months late on delivery and someone else designs a project that’s only 1 month late are they more skilled than me? That isn’t enough information to know. I’m using the number of months late as an arbitrary metric of assessing projects, IT projects tend to run late and while delivery time might not be the best metric it’s something that can be measured (note that I am slightly joking about measuring IT projects by how late they are).

    If the last project I personally controlled was 2 months late and I’m about to finish a project 1 month late does that mean I’ve increased my skills? I probably can’t assess this accurately as there are so many variables. The Impostor Syndrome factor might lead me to think that the second project was easier, or I might get egotistical and think I’m really great, or maybe both at the same time.

    This is one of many resources recommending timely feedback for education [4], it says “Feedback needs to be timely” and “It needs to be given while there is still time for the learners to act on it and to monitor and adjust their own learning”. For basic programming tasks such as debugging a crashing program the feedback is reasonably quick. For longer term tasks like assessing whether the choice of technologies for a project was good the feedback cycle is almost impossibly long. If I used product A for a year long project does it seem easier than product B because it is easier or because I’ve just got used to it’s quirks? Did I make a mistake at the start of a year long project and if so do I remember why I made that choice I now regret?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • F2FS Root File-System Support For Clear Linux Appears To Be Coming

    Clear Linux looks poised to join the ranks of the few Linux distributions allowing it to run off an F2FS root file-system.

    There recently has been some mailing list discussions and patches proposed for adding F2FS root file-system support to Clear Linux and also exposing it as a file-system option in the Clear installer. Not many Linux distributions yet offer F2FS as an easy-to-enable option for the root file-system.

  • TURNIP Open-Source Adreno Vulkan Driver Adds A618 Support, Sysmem Rendering

    While the open-source Intel "ANV" and Radeon "RADV" Vulkan drivers get talked about a lot, one of the lesser known Vulkan drivers within Mesa is Turnip but it's been gaining steam recently.

    Turnip is the open-source Vulkan driver for Qualcomm Adreno graphics hardware and basically falls into the Freedreno umbrella. With Freedreno Gallium3D for OpenGL being in very good shape, we are finally seeing more activity on Turnip both by Google engineers and community developers.

  • How to Install Odoo 13 on Ubuntu 18.04 with Nginx – AWS
  • Digging up IP addresses with the Linux dig command
  • Proton 5.0-2 Released To Fix Crashes For Steam Play Linux Gamers

    Proton 5.0-2 is out with fixes over last week's big Proton 5.0-1 release that brought many features to this Wine 5.0 downstream focused on powering Valve's Steam Play for running Windows games nicely on Linux.

    Proton 5.0-1 was their first release in moving from Wine 4.11 to the stable Wine 5.0 along with enabling DXVK's Direct3D 9 by default, updates to DXVK and FAudio, and many other changes. With all the changes at play, to little surprise there is this point release out now focused on addressing the early fall-out.

  • Meetup Debian Toulouse

    My company Viveris is opening its office for hosting a Debian Meetup in Toulouse this summer (June 5th or June 12th).

    Everyone is welcome to this event, we're currently looking for volunteers for presenting demo, lightning talks or conferences (following the talks any kind of hacking session is possible like bugs triaging, coding sprints etc).

  • Code a Kung-Fu Master style beat-’em-up | Wireframe #32

    Punch and kick your way through a rabble of bad dudes in a simple scrolling beat-’em-up. Mark Vanstone shows you how

  • Class action lawsuit filed against two Puerto Rican hospitals for alleged ransomware attacks [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The alleged ransomware attacks, which took place in February last year at the Pavía Hospital Santurce and Pavía Hospital Hato Rey hospitals, affected 305,737 people, according to Department of Health and Human Services records. The plaintiffs, both former patients of the hospitals, allege patients’ personal identifying information, including full names, addresses, dates of birth, gender, financial information, and social security numbers, were exposed as a result of the attacks. These records also constitute protected health information as designated by HIPAA.

  • An Open-Source Bootloader For Windows Lets You Run Off Btrfs, Other Possibilities

    Quibble is a new open-source bootloader that supports booting Windows XP through Windows 10 and opens up new possibilities like booting a Windows installation off Btrfs.

  • UMG Confirm Elton John, Nirvana, Beck Recordings Were Lost or Damaged in Vault Fire

    The revelation appeared in a new filing in the ongoing class action lawsuit against UMG on behalf of artists seeking damages related to the fire. It marks the first public confirmation of specific artists who lost recordings in the fire following a New York Times Magazine report last year that detailed the potential extent of the damages. The list also includes …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead, Bryan Adams, David Baerwald, Jimmy Eat World, Les Paul, Peter Frampton, Michael McDonald, Slayer, Sonic Youth, Suzanne Vega, Surfaris, White Zombie and Y&T.

    The filing itself pertains to disputes over discovery in the class action suit, with lawyers for the artists seeking to obtain a complete list of damaged recordings. Lawyers for the artists cited a document that UMG filed back when it was quietly pursuing litigation and insurance claims after the fire that included “17,000 unique artist names on the list of purportedly lost original music recordings.” UMG, in turn, said that list merely “identified myriad potentially lost assets,” including materials that aren’t original master recordings. The label did, however, name 19 artists whose material was either damaged or destroyed in the fire.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LibreOffice QA/Dev Report: January 2020

    LibreOffice 6.4 was released on January 29 containing many performance and interoperability improvements

  • Microsoft will no longer force Bing by default for Office 365 ProPlus customers

    Microsoft will no longer forcibly make Bing the default search engine in Chrome for Office 365 ProPlus customers. A techcommunity post from Microsoft announced the change. Microsoft states that people will have the choice to opt-in to have the Microsoft Search in Bing browser extension installed.

    Microsoft was going to install the Microsoft Search Bing extension onto any system with Office 365 ProPlus that didn't already have Bing set as the default search engine. This would have effectively forced Bing onto Office 365 ProPlus customers. The move set off waves of backlash around the web, which caused Microsoft to change its plans.

  • Stephen Michael Kellat: Making A Service Launch

    While I know the folks behind the Ubuntu Podcast are planning to return to air shortly I will instead be taking a different path. The current hotness appears to be launching your own newsletter such as this technology one. Since podcasting is not feasible at the moment the reformatting of content to a strictly textual form seem like the simplest way forward for now.

    I could operate an announce-only mailman list on a minimal Ubuntu 19.10 droplet on Digital Ocean. However, my current economic circumstances have instead pushed me over to trying to utilize tinyletter.com instead. To quote the 13th & 21st US Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld, in an apt manner: “As you know, you go to war with the army you have, not the army you might want or wish to have at a later time.”

  • MontaVista Launches a Linux® Migration Program for Windows® Embedded and Windows® CE Users
  • GetWired Aims to Make RS-485 Wired Home Automation Affordable and User-friendly (Crowdfunding)
  • Attend our Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium

    Are you an academic, researcher, student, or educator who is interested in computing education research? Then come and join us in Cambridge, UK on 1 April 2020 for discussion and networking at our first-ever research symposium.

Openwashing Galore: Waste, Linux Foundation and 'Open' Surveillance

Filed under
Misc
  • This Open-Source ‘Precious Plastic’ Project Is Changing What Waste Means And How Recycling Is Done

    People involved in more than 400 projects around the world are using a recycling system that they downloaded for free from the internet. It’s from an open-source project called Precious Plastic, based in the Netherlands. The basic idea: Plastic can be a resource if you have the tools to turn it into beautiful new things.

    “Plastic is a precious and valuable material. It’s just been kind of designed, used and marketed in the wrong way, in our view,” says Joseph Klatt, business guy with Precious Plastic.

    That’s Klatt’s official title: business guy. He’s based in the Netherlands, but is originally from Ohio.

  • Cloud Foundry Foundation Turns 5

    The Cloud Foundry Foundation, home to open source projects helping build the future of cloud applications, is celebrating its 5th anniversary.

    Officially launched in January 2015 with more than 40 members as an independent not-for-profit Linux Foundation Collaborative Project, the Foundation projects include Cloud Foundry Application Runtime, Cloud Foundry Container Runtime, BOSH, Open Service Broker API, Eirini, Project Quarks, Abacus, CF-Local, CredHub, ServiceFabrik, Stratos, and more.

    The Cloud Foundry project comprises of Cloud Foundry Elastic Runtime (now Cloud Foundry Application Runtime) and BOSH.

  • Facebook Releases Open-Source Library For 3D Deep Learning: PyTorch3D

    In a significant boost to 3D deep learning research, Facebook AI has released PyTorch3D, a highly modular and optimised library with unique capabilities to make 3D deep learning easier with PyTorch.

    PyTorch3d provides efficient, reusable components for 3D Computer Vision research with PyTorch.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The State of Robotics – January 2020

    Last month the TechRepublic came out with an article dubbing ROS the “hottest thing in robotics […] you’ve never heard of.” This feels like an excellent step in the right direction, moving beyond academics and into the mainstream. Of course, if you’re reading this it’s likely you have heard of ROS before, and given the size of the community, we hardly agree with the “you’ve never heard of” part. But more exposure, more adoption, more contributions to ROS, is only going to be a good thing.

    The article also links to another entitled “The 8 Coolest Robots Spotted at CES 2020.” CES, the consumer electronics show, is an annual show for consumer technologies in Las Vegas. It’s a chance for innovators and new technologies to take the stage and prove themselves in the industry. Typically it’s very saturated with lots of new technologies and it’s hard to make a mark, but it’s good to see publicity around consumer robotics coming out. One in particular that caught my attention was MarsCat. A bionic cat, home robot. As of publishing this blog the folks behind MarsCat still have time on their Kickstarter too, in case you’re the backing type.

  • Introducing a cheat sheet for open source software alternatives

    It can be frustrating when a mainstream software tool is proprietary. This is a common problem at work. Many companies default to Slack for chat, Adobe Photoshop for creative editing, and Salesforce for customer relationship management. We are faced with this issue at home, too. Our friends and family are likely to use the most popular social media platforms which tend to be closed source. With tax season coming up here in the United States, we are reminded that the go-to home finance software is proprietary.
    Luckily, we do not need to be bound by the constraints of proprietary software. There are tons of open source software alternatives to meet arguably every demand. If there isn't one already out there, someone (maybe you!) is bound to create one. One of the many benefits of choosing open source technology is that it is supported by the community. There's bound to be someone else out there eager to lend a new user a helping hand.

  • The Top 10 Free and Open Source HR Technology Solutions

    Searching for HR technology solutions can be a daunting (and expensive) process, one that requires long hours of research and deep pockets. The most popular HR tech tools often provide more than what’s necessary for non-enterprise organizations, with advanced functionality relevant to only the most technically savvy users. Thankfully, there are a number of free and open source HR technology solutions out there. Some of these solutions are offered by vendors looking to eventually sell you on their enterprise product, and others are maintained and operated by a community of developers looking to democratize HR tech.

    Let’s examine free and open source HR technology solutions, first by providing a brief overview of what to expect and also with short blurbs of the options currently available in the space.

  • Daniel Stenberg: Rockbox services transition

    Remember Rockbox? It is a free software firmware replacement for mp3 players. I co-founded the project back in 2001 together with Björn and Linus. I officially left the project back in 2014.

    The project is still alive today, even of course many of us can’t hardly remember the concept of a separate portable music player and can’t figure out why that’s a good idea when we carry around a powerful phone all days anyway that can do the job – better.

    Already when the project took off, we at Haxx hosted the web site and related services. Heck, if you don’t run your own server to add fun toy projects to, then what kind of lame hacker are you?

    None of us in Haxx no longer participates in the project and we haven’t done so for several years. We host the web site, we run the mailing lists, we take care of the DNS, etc.

    Most of the time it’s no biggie. The server hosts a bunch of other things anyway for other project so what is a few extra services after all?

  • 6 open educational resources for learning Spanish

    My goal for 2020 is to improve my Spanish, and I intend to use the open educational resources described below to help me along my long path towards fluency. These suggestions are by no means an exhaustive list of resources for learning Spanish. The items included are all open resources, which means they are either shared under an open license or are in the public domain.

    You should also consider using resources that are not open but are free, such as books in Spanish from your local library, videos on YouTube and similar sites about topics that interest you or that are designed for people learning Spanish, and anything else you can access that will increase your exposure to the Spanish language.

  • Gunnar Wolf: Migrated to Jekyll

    My blog remained with JAWS for four years, but by February 2008, I decided to switch over to Drupal 5; I needed to properly evaluate it in order to use it at work, so I migrated my blog to use Drupal instead. And behold! You can still look at my half-decent and quite long (and specific to my site) JAWS to Drupal 5 migration script!

    The upgrade to Drupal 6 was quite uneventful. I don’t remember (and cannot find) when it happened, but it didn’t scare or scar me forever. But, even when I most embraced Drupal 7 (I adopted the Debian packages in 2013, and have kept it at least up to date with the each time less frequent updates), I never got around to do the 6→7 migration on my personal website. Yes, because I don’t want to migrate a sh!tload of posts by hand… And could not be bothered to produce a script to decently replicate the whole thing.

  • Best Open Source eCommerce Platforms to Build Online Shopping Websites

    In an earlier article, I listed some of the best open-source CMS options available out there. These CMS software, as the name suggests, are more suitable for content focused websites.

    But what if you want to build your own online shopping websites? Thankfully, we have some good open source eCommerce solutions that you can deploy on your own Linux server.

    These eCommerce software are tailored for the sole purpose of giving you a shopping website. So they have essential features like inventory management, product listings, cart, checkout, wishlisting and option to integrate a payment solution.

  • Key Factors to Consider Before Starting an eCommerce Store

Upcoming Events: foss-north in Sweden and Oracle OpenWorld Europe in London

Filed under
Misc
  • [foss-north 2020] CfP

    Just a friendly reminder that the Call for Papers for foss-north 2020 is closing tonight. Make sure to get your talk submission in!

    Also – if your project wants to join the community day – let us know at info -at- foss-north.se. We set up a venue and promote – you bring the contents!

  • Join the Oracle Linux and Virtualization Team in London at Oracle OpenWorld Europe

    The Oracle OpenWorld Global Series continues with our next stop at ExCeL London, February 12–13, 2020. With just 5 days left to register, you’ll want to sign up now for your complementary pass and reserve your place.

OSS and Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Misc
  • The Y2038 problem in the Linux kernel, 25 years of Java, and other industry news

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

  • How fast are your disks? Find out the open source way, with fio

    Storage benchmarking—much like Wi-Fi benchmarking—is a widely misunderstood black art. Admins and enthusiasts have for decades been tempted to just “get the big number” by reading or writing a large amount of data to a disk, getting a figure in MB/sec, and calling it a day. Unfortunately, the actual workload of a typical disk doesn’t look like that—and that “simple speed test” doesn’t reproduce a lot of the bottlenecks that slow down disk access in real-world systems.

    The most realistic way to test and benchmark disks is, of course, to just use them and see what happens. Unfortunately, that’s neither very repeatable, nor is it simple to analyze. So we do want an artificial benchmarking tool—but we want one that we can use intelligently to test storage systems across realistic scenarios that model our day-to-day usage well. Fortunately, we don’t have to invent such a tool—there’s already a free and open source software tool called fio, and it’s even cross-platform!

  • How the Iowa caucus app went wrong and how open source could have helped

    Opinion: It was incompetence, not politics, that led to the Iowa caucus app misfiring. Above all, it was poor programming. Open-source software techniques could have prevented this blunder.

    When the Iowa Democratic Caucus results were delayed by an application foul-up Bernie Sanders supporters were outraged at a stolen victory. Now, as the results trickle in, and Sanders' results turned out OK, they've quieted down. But the fact remains that the application not only fouled up caucus results reporting, but it also made people even less trusting of the election process.

    Most of the Iowa caucus post-mortem has focused on Shadow, the company behind the app, and its parent organization, Acronym. The root problem wasn't with the groups behind the misfiring application, IowaReporterApp; it was with a fundamentally flawed software development process.

  • GNU Screen v.4.8.0

    I'm announcing availability of GNU Screen v.4.8.0

    Screen is a full-screen window manager that multiplexes a physical terminal between several processes, typically interactive shells.

  • Switzerland plans to anchor public services' contribution to open source in law

    Swiss federal government organisations and agencies will soon be free to share the source code of their software solutions as open source. In addition, software developers working for the federal government should be able to be part of open source communities. The government wants to anchor this in federal law, according to new Guidelines on Open Source in the Federal Government, made public last Friday.

  • Mass resignations at Wiley journal over academic independence

    The resignation of all members of a journal's editorial and advisory boards in a row over academic independence raises fundamental questions about "who owns" academic publications, scholars have claimed.

    The mass resignations at the European Law Journal -- in which a total of 20 academics linked to the Wiley publication quit -- follow more than a year of negotiations with the US publisher in the wake of its alleged effort to appoint new editors-in-chief in 2018 without consulting either its board of editors or its advisory board.

  • Bada Bing, bada bork: Windows 10 is not happy, and Microsoft's search engine has something to do with it

    Microsoft doesn't do things by halves. Not content with Teams taking the day off and Outlook labeling everything as spam, now Windows 10 Search has joined the cock-up club.

    The problem manifests itself by flinging up a large black box where search results should be on the Windows 10 desktop. Multiple flavours of Windows 10 are affected, and PCs at Vulture Central have also suddenly caught the search sickness.

    We're guessing queries are piped to Bing, which isn't responding for some reason, causing all results to not show up on desktops. In which case, we have to wonder, why is it necessary for Windows 10 to send local queries to Microsoft's backend, and why is it programmed in such a way that network failures blow away all results, including local ones?

  • Cats and lasers and (Raspberry) Pi, OH MY!

    Keeping a modern cat entertained requires something more high-tech than a ball of yarn. The MagPi's Phil King wonders if this is a purr-fect project?

  • Citrix ADC in OpenShift Service Mesh

    Citrix is proud and thankful to achieve Red Hat OpenShift Operator Certification. Operators enable users to deploy and manage resources in an OpenShift environment in an easier and more simplified manner. This blog post talks about various benefits of Citrix Cloud Native Stack and deployment of Citrix ADC to act as OpenShift Ingress.

    I believe that readers are familiar with Kubernetes, Istio, and Istio resources such as Gateway, VirtualService etc. It is recommended to glance through this blog post to gain perspective about aforementioned resources.

    In this blog, I shall talk about deploying Citrix ADC as Gateway in OpenShift Service Mesh using the Citrix ADC Istio Ingress Gateway Operator.

  • This Month in Mutter & GNOME Shell | December 2019 & January 2020

    One area of focus during this cycle was unifying the layout, content structure, and feel of dialogs in GNOME Shell. Many dialogs were redesigned, polished, and updated as a result of this effort...

  • How to use 7zip to encrypt files
  • 7-Zip 20.00 Alpha
  • Learn More About Systemd-Homed For How Linux Home Directories Are Being Reinvented

    Coming with the imminent systemd 245 is systemd-homed that is making fundamental changes to Linux home directories. Systemd lead developer Lennart Poettering presented at FOSDEM 2020 last weekend on systemd-homed and that video recording is now up.

    Systemd-homed is focused on offering easier migration of home directories from system-to-system, better home directory encryption handling, better self containment, new user record formats, and more.

  • Docker Inc. Creates Index to Track Docker Hub Usage

    Docker Inc. this week launched a Docker Hub Index that provides access to analytics based on anonymized data from 5 million Docker Hub and 2 million Docker Desktop users.

    John Kreisa, senior vice president of marketing for Docker Inc., says the company decided to create the index to illustrate how vibrant the Docker developer community remains in the wake of its restructuring to focus on workflow tools that accelerate the development of containerized applications.

    The Docker Index shows there have been 8 billion pulls from the Docker Hub in the last month alone, and a total of 30 billion overall. Docker Inc. reports there are now 6 million repositories on Docker Hub that are being accessed by 5 million users.

  • Rancher Labs Achieves 169% Revenue Growth, Doubles Customer Base in 2019 as Kubernetes Management Market Matures
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Android Leftovers

Canonical Outs New Major Kernel Update for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Available for the Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the new Linux kernel security update is here to fix a vulnerability (CVE-2019-14615) affecting systems with Intel Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. It also addresses a race condition (CVE-2019-18683) discovered in the Virtual Video Test Driver (VIVID), which could allow an attacker with write access to /dev/video0 to gain administrative privileges, as well as a flaw (CVE-2019-19241) in Linux kernel’s IO uring implementation that could also allow a local attacker to gain administrative privileges. Another race condition (CVE-2019-19602) was fixed on x86 platforms, which could let a local attacker to cause a denial of service (memory corruption) or gain administrative privileges. Moreover, issues (CVE-2019-18786 and CVE-2019-19947) discovered in the Renesas Digital Radio Interface (DRIF) and Kvaser CAN/USB drivers could allow local attackers to expose sensitive information (kernel memory). Read more

10 Best Linux Terminal Emulators [2020 Edition]

Do you prefer terminal emulators over GUI? But there are times when the terminal’s decent styling seems boring. In such cases, you look for more options to customize the terminal just like we do while choosing Linux distros. If that’s the case, your wait is over as we bring the list of best terminal emulators for Linux that you can use to refresh your monotonous daily work. Along with the styling, you can also turn the single terminal into a multigrid, observing the activity of each terminal simultaneously. Read more