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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Linux-Based Photographic Workflow on Android with Termux

    The title is a bit of a mouthful, but the basic idea is pretty simple; Instead of schlepping around a Linux machine, you can transform an Android device into a lightweight Linux-based platform for organizing, processing, and backing up photos and RAW files when you are on the move. The key ingredient of this solution is the Termux, a small open source app that combines a terminal emulator and a lightweight Linux environment. The app comes with its own software repository that has all the tools you need to set up a simplified photographic workflow. The Linux Photography book explains exactly how to can go about it, but here are a few pointers to get started.

  • NVIDIA Announces The GeForce GTX 1050 Series

    NVIDIA this morning is expanding the Pascal family with the announcement of the GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti lower-cost graphics cards.

  • GStreamer Conference 2016 Videos, Vulkan Support Was Among The Talks

    The annual GStreamer Conference took place last week in Berlin alongside the Linux Foundation's Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The videos from this multimedia open-source conference are now available.

    The folks from Ubicast have once again done a nice job recording all of the presentations from this GStreamer event. Conference talks ranged from the "stage of the union" to the state of VA-API with GStreamer, GStreamer Video Editing, dynamic pipelines, Vulkan, and more.

    When it comes to Vulkan support in GStreamer, there is work underway on vulkansink and vulkanupload elements, basic Vulkan support modeled on GStreamer's libgstgl API, and more, but much more work is needed before it will be at the level of OpenGL support.

  • Solus 1.2.1 Released With Budgie Desktop Updates, Ships RADV Driver

    Version 1.2.1 of the promising Solus Linux distribution is now available and also premieres a MATE edition ISO to complement its original Budgie desktop.

  • Bill Belichick rants against NFL tablets: 'I'm done'

    After the image of the New England Patriots coach slamming a Microsoft Surface tablet on the sideline in a Week 4 game against the Buffalo Bills went viral, Belichick explained Tuesday why he is fed up with the product.

today's leftovers

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  • Useful Vim editor plugins for software developers - part 2: Syntastic
  • halting problem :: Constraints
  • Release Candidate Available for openSUSE Leap 42.2

    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidate 1 (RC1).

    Since mid-May, the project has been guiding the development of the next openSUSE community release Leap 42.2, which will be released in 29 days. The release of RC1 completes the development process for openSUSE Leap 42.2 based on source code from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) Service Pack (SP) 2.

  • Using feedback loops for greater work satisfaction

    In August I wrote about using feedback loops in your personal life to get unstuck from unproductive habits. This month I'll talk about some new helpful feedback loops for your workplace. I'm going to make this easy for you: Here are my top three, and they're always good ones to start with.

  • Red Hat study shows virtualization will keep growing

    With the rise of exciting new technologies like containers, virtualization might sometimes seem like it’s old hat. But not according to Red Hat, whose latest research shows that enterprise adoption is still on the rise.

    In a new survey of over 900 enterprise information technology pros, Red Hat discovered that virtualization is still gaining traction thanks to its ability to drive server consolidation, reduce provisioning times, serve as platform for app development and deployment and save enterprises money.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • VMware & AWS Offer Combined Private and Public Cloud Service

    VMware and Amazon Web Services (AWS) today confirmed rumors they will deliver a joint service that lets customers run their vSphere private clouds from VMware alongside their applications in AWS’s public cloud.

  • Is there a competition law issue lurking on the horizon of cloud computing?

    This in itself is an interesting comment. This Kat is hoary enough to remember the antitrust case against IBM, filed in 1969, which dragged on until 1982. There, the issue was IBM’s alleged anti-competitive conduct based on its alleged dominance of the mainframe computer industry. What is notable is that this decade-long lawsuit came to an end because the US Depart of Justice ultimately decided to dismiss the case. Developments in the computer world had moved on since the filing of the law suit in the late 1960’s, and the capacity of IBM to dominate the computer world had passed.

  • The Hyperledger Project Continues to Grow Rapidly; Executive Director Brian Behlendorf Elaborates on Strategy and Goals

    The Hyperledger Project, a collaborative cross-industry effort to advance blockchain technology led by The Linux Foundation, continues to announce new organizations joining the project to help create an open standard for distributed ledgers for a new generation of transactional applications. The project now has more than 85 members, which represents a growth of nearly 200 percent over the last six months.

  • 4 open music players compared: VLC, QMMP, Clementine, and Amarok

    In August 2016, I wrote about about why I like the Guayadeque music player, and then I used the six characteristics that seemed most important to me to evaluate other music players: Quod Libet, Gmusicbrowser, DeaDBeeF, Audac

  • How to spin up OrangeHRM as a virtual machine in less than 5 minutes
  • Outreachy Deadlines Are Due Next Week For Winter Open-Source Internships

    For women and other select groups, the GNOME Outreachy Winter 2016 internship program has its application deadline due next week for those wishing to get involved in open-source / free software development.

    Outreachy is preparing for its Winter 2016 program that will run from December to March. Like past rounds, interns get paid $5,500 USD for their work on various open-source projects.

  • Game: Temple Run 2 Finally on the Tizen Store
  • VMS will be ready to run on x86 in 2019!

    VMS Software Inc (VSI), which became the custodian of the venerable OpenVMS in 2014, is getting close to its Holy Grail of running the OS on x86.

    HP had decided that the operating system it inherited from DEC was end-of-life back in 2013, but in 2014 signed over an exclusive licence to VSI.

    At that time, the company's CEO Duane Harris said VSI's “passion for taking OpenVMS into future decades” would see it ported to Itanium and then x86 architectures.

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  • TNS Guide to Serverless Technologies: The Best of FaaS and BaaS

    Like the terms “microservices” and “containers” before it, “serverless” is a loaded word. Countless blogs have argued about the meaning or importance.

    The first, obvious statement everyone makes is that, yes, there are servers or hardware of some sort somewhere in the system. But the point of “serverless” is not that servers aren’t used; it’s just that developers and administrators do not have to think about them.

    Serverless architectures refer to applications that significantly depend on third-party services. “Such architectures remove the need for the traditional ‘always on’ server system sitting behind an application,” said software developer Mike Roberts, in an article on Martin Fowler’s site. Inserting serverless technologies into systems can reduce the complexity that needs to be managed, and could also potentially save money.

  • One Day Is a Lifetime in Container Years

    The average life span of a container is short and getting shorter. While some organizations use containers as replacements for virtual machines, many are using them increasingly for elastic compute resources, with life spans measured in hours or even minutes. Containers allow an organization to treat the individual servers providing a service as disposable units, to be shut down or spun up on a whim when traffic or behavior dictates.

    Since the value of an individual container is low, and startup time is short, a company can be far more aggressive about its scaling policies, allowing the container service to scale both up and down faster. Since new containers can be spun up on the order of seconds or sub seconds instead of minutes, they also allow an organization to scale down further than would previously have provided sufficient available overhead to manage traffic spikes. Finally, if a service is advanced enough to have automated monitoring and self-healing, a minuscule perturbation in container behavior might be sufficient to cause the misbehaving instance to be destroyed and a new container started in its place.

    At container speeds, behavior and traffic monitoring happens too quickly for humans to process and react. By the time an event is triaged, assigned, and investigated, the container will be gone. Security and retention policies need to be set correctly from the time the container is spawned. Is this workload allowed to run in this location? Are rules set up to manage the arbitration between security policies and SLAs?

  • Linus Torvalds: “Linux Kernel 5.0 Will Be Released When We Hit 6 Million Git Objects”

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds has shared the news that we are half-way between Linux 4.0 and 5.0 as the Git object database has crossed the 5 million object mark. Some of you might be knowing that major version transition happens at every two million objects in the database. So, after 1 more million Git objects, we can expect the release of Linux kernel 5.0 in 2017.

  • GNOME 3.22.1 Released

    For those on rolling-release distributions that tend to wait until the first point release before upgrading your desktop environment, GNOME 3.22.1 is now available as the first update since last month's GNOME 3.22 debut.

  • Cyanogen's Android Alternative Goes Modular
  • Google Pixel: Devices are a dangerous distraction from the new AI interface

today's leftovers

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  • Wire, the Encrypted Chat App, Is Now Available for Linux

    Wire is an open-source messaging service that offers fully encrypted calls, video and group chats — and now it’s available for Linux. Wire for Linux beta is available to download from today via the Wire website. It has the same feature set as Wire’s other desktops and mobile apps, including always-on end-to-end encryption.

  • stardicter 0.10
  • Skype for Linux users can crash-test video calls in v1.10 Alpha
  • SolarWinds' SAM simplifies management of Linux and Windows environments
  • Qt 5.6.2 Released With ~900 Improvements
  • Intel's new 7th-gen CPUs sail into System76's updated Lemur laptop

    System76 said on Tuesday that it has updated its Lemur-branded laptop with Intel’s new seventh-generation “Kaby Lake” processors. This laptop specifically ships with Ubuntu 16.04.01 LTS (64-bit) installed, thus offering a cheaper price point than an identical solution packing Windows 10. Pricing for the Lemur starts at $700.

    According to the product page, this laptop provides five areas that can be configured: processor, memory, operating system drive, additional storage, and the type of Wireless AC connectivity. On the processor front, there are only two choices: the Intel Core i3-7100U (default) and the Intel Core i7-7500U (an added $160).

  • Indulge Your Nostalgia With This Ubuntu Timeline Wallpaper

    It’s Ubuntu 16.10 release week, which means you might be feeling a little nostalgic for releases past.

    You could take a look back at every Ubuntu default wallpaper, from the very first release to this week’s pending one, or you could set every Ubuntu wallpaper as your desktop background.

  • Raspberry Pi VC4 Graphics Driver Working To Support QPU Shaders

    The latest Raspberry Pi graphics driver hacking by Eric Anholt of Broadcom has been working to support QPU shaders by this open-source driver stack. QPUs are the shader core of the graphics hardware found in the Raspberry Pi SoC, but come up short of supporting OpenCL or OpenGL compute shaders.

  • Cyanogen mods self away from full Android alternative [Ed: Good riddance to another Microsoft proxy (which didn’t have to become that 2 years ago)]

    Android alternative Cyanogen looks to have given up on trying to sell a full mobile operating system.

    The shine has gone off the outfit of late, and in July, it reportedly axed 30 staffers. While there's a core of users who stick with the CyanogenMod code that's the genesis of the company, mobe-makers taking Cyanogen licenses are in short supply (the company claims 20 phones and millions of customers; IDC says nearly 345 million smartphones shipped in 2015).

  • Google sets the date for first sniff at Android 7.1

    Developers can get their hands on Android 7.1 by the end of the month, Google has said.

    And almost all Nexus owners will have it implanted in their gadgets by the end of the year, albeit with some reservations.

    The next chewy chunk of Nougat includes support for better storage management and telephony software, App shortcut APIs to build single click links directly into core directories, and UI changes to build cuddlier and more numerous graphics into the background. There’s also support for Google’s Daydream VR system, for the few phones that can handle it.

today's leftovers

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  • A Look At The Most Promising Next-Gen Linux Software Update Mechanisms

    With traditional software package management solutions like APT and Yum showing their age and not adapting well to the embedded world and the slew of new areas for Linux like IoT, a new generation of atomic-based Linux software update solutions continue to be worked on. Matt Porter of the Konsulko Group is presenting at this week's Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2016 with a comparison of these update technologies.

    Incremental atomic updates have been what's being pursued by multiple Linux software vendors for delivering more reliable distribution updates, smaller sized updates via binary deltas, and generally allow rollbacks in case of problems. Some of the new distribution update mechanisms covered included SWUpdate, Mender, OSTree, and swupd. Interestingly, not mentioned in the slide deck is Ubuntu's Snappy.

  • No SDN Kubernetes

    How these requirements are implemented is up to the operator. In many cases this means using a software defined network “SDN” also called an overlay network (e.g. flannel, weave, calico) or underlay network (MACvlan, IPvlan). The SDNs all accomplish the same three goals but usually with different implementation and often unique features.

    But the networking requirements doesn’t mean you have to run an SDN. It also means you can implement a traditional SDN product in a non-traditional way. Let’s look at the simplest solution for networking in Kubernetes.

  • Skype 1.10 Linux Alpha Restores Video Calls Support
  • The Network Capture Playbook Part 1 – Ethernet Basics
  • GNOME's Epiphany Browser Is Quick To Working On 3.24 Features

    It's been just over two weeks since GNOME 3.22 was released while already a ton of feature work has been landing in Epiphany, GNOME's Web Browser.

    It's looking like the Epiphany web-browser update in GNOME 3.24 will be another feature-packed release. Some of the work that's landed in the past two weeks already includes a lot of work around redoing the browser's bookmarks support, removing obsolete code in different areas, a lot of work on sync support, asynchronous Storage Server support, a new preferences dialog user-interface, and more.

  • Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 Beta released-Final release is expected at the end of month

    Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 is making its way to final release and it is now one more step closer to this by having its beta release.Yes, the Ubuntu based beauty with Moksha DE(Moksha is a forked version of well known Enlightenment DE) got its beta release i.e. Bodhi LInux 4.0.0 Beta after months of release of Alpha version.Back in July,Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 alpha released.

  • Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 Beta Out, Final Release Lands This Month Based on Ubuntu 16.04

    Today, October 10, 2016, Bodhi Linux developer Jeff Hoogland proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the Beta pre-release of the upcoming Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 operating system.

    Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 Beta comes exactly one month after the release of the second Alpha milestone, bringing the development cycle to an end, as the developer plans to launch the final version of the Ubuntu-based distribution by the end of the month. As expected, the Beta contains many improvements and fixes to some of the bugs reported by users since the Alpha builds.

  • Antergos – Best Arch based distro for beginners, whoever want to taste arch, give a try

    As we know Arch Linux is one of the best Linux Distribution ever because we can customize whatever we want. We can get all the latest software’s because of rolling release but its very difficult for freshers, installation & configuration. Today i’m going to show you, how to install Antergos – The Best Arch based distro for beginners, whoever want to taste arch Linux give a try, i can assure worth to try.

  • You Can Now Run Linux Kernel 4.8.1 on Your Slackware 14.2 System, Here's How

    GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton announced earlier, October 10, 2016, that he made a new, special kernel based on Linux kernel 4.8.1 for Slackware and Slackware-based distributions.

    Linux kernel 4.8.1 is the first point release to the Linux 4.8 series, which is the latest and most advanced stable kernel to date, and now you can install it on your Slackware operating system thanks to Arne Exton. The new build is designed for 64-bit (x86_64) installation and works with Slackware 14.2 (Current), Zenwalk, Slax, and SlackEX, but it should work on any 64-bit Slackware 14.2 derivative, such as Salix.

  • Notable Buzzer: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Broker Roundup For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Ease of 3D Printing in Fedora

    Fedora has been known to be the best OS for 3D printing already for some time, mainly due to the work of Miro (he packaged all the available open source software for 3D printing, prepared udev rules to automatically connect to 3D printers etc.), but I was still surprised how easy it is to 3D print with Fedora these days. It really took just a couple of minutes from a stock system to start of the actual printing. It’s almost as simple as printing on papers.
    There is still room for improvements though. Some 3D printing apps (Cura Lulzbot Edition is one of them) are available in the official repositories of Fedora, but don’t have an appdata file, so they don’t show up in GNOME Software. And it would also be nice to have “3D Printing” category in GNOME Software, so that the software is more discoverable for users.

  • Debian is participating in the next round of Outreachy!

    Following the success of the last round of Outreachy, we are glad to announce that Debian will take part in the program for the next round, with internships lasting from the 6th of December 2016 to the 6th of March 2017.

    From the official website: Outreachy helps people from groups underrepresented in free and open source software get involved. We provide a supportive community for beginning to contribute any time throughout the year and offer focused internship opportunities twice a year with a number of free software organizations.

    Currently, internships are open internationally to women (cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people. Additionally, they are open to residents and nationals of the United States of any gender who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latin@, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander.

  • Debian Fun in September 2016

today's leftovers

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  • Wine 1.8.5 Stable Update Adds Better Microsoft Publisher 2007 and 2010 Support
  • Dance - Sugar 0.110

    We're excited to announce Sugar 0.110.0 - a new stable release.

  • GNOME 3.24 to Feature ownCloud Integration in GNOME Music, Sharing Framework

    We already told you about the release date and schedule of the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, whose development cycle will start later this month, and today we'd love to tell you a little bit about its upcoming features.

    As you might expect, the GNOME development team always comes with new ideas to improve the widely-used desktop environment, meaning the core components and applications included in the GNOME Stack. In GNOME 3.24, a lot of these applications and tools will see a large number of improvements, both visually and internally.

    GNOME Control Center appears to be the center of attraction in GNOME 3.24, and it will offer a revamped User Accounts and Printer settings panels to match the new design, along with an updated Online Accounts settings panel that should add various improvements to Kerberos integration.

  • Red Hat to demo open source technologies

    Red Hat will demonstrate how the company’s open source technologies are helping accelerate business transformation by enabling all these trends during its participation at GITEX.

    The vendor invites trade visitors and media the chance to speak with Lee Miles, General Manager, Middle East and Africa, at Red Hat and other senior company executives, to learn more about the technologies it will be showcasing at the show.

  • Massive Tech and Energy Trades Highlight Insider Selling: Facebook, Oasis Petroleum, Western Gas Partners, Red Hat and More
  • Debian-Based DebEX Barebone Live DVD Features Xfce 4.12.1 and Linux Kernel 4.8

    After informing us a couple of days ago about the release of DebEX KDE Live DVD 161001 and DebEX GNOME Live DVD 161007, developer Arne Exton now announces the general availability of DebEX Barebone Live DVD.

    DebEX Barebone Live DVD is the third and last edition of the Debian-based DebEX operating system, and it looks like the build, version 161009, is here today, October 9, 2016, pre-installed with all the latest GNU/Linux technologies and open source software projects, including the recently released Linux 4.8 kernel.

  • Tech Crunch 'professional' writer John Biggs composes exceptionally moronic article with MASSIVE errors

    I hate bad reporting. And mostly I try to ignore it, where most tech authors can have violently differing opinions about their subject matter. But when some idiots don't know basic math - that is when we need.. the STATS POLICE. This is what Tech Crunch has now done, on an article which has the correct headline (the mobile wars are over) if they intend that to be the OS wars but on that story they are years behind the curve. Typical Americans, clueless about mobile once again, mesmerized by iNonsense.

  • Game: Shooting Sporting Clay 2015 for Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3
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today's leftovers

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Android Leftovers

  • Google Pixel review: The best Android phone, even if it is a little pricey
    Welcome to the age of Google Hardware. Apparently tired of letting third-party Android OEMs serve as the stewards of Android handsets, Google has become a hardware company. (Again). Earlier this year Google, launched a hardware division with former Motorola President Rick Osterloh at the helm. With the high-ranking title of "Senior Vice President," Osterloh doesn't oversee a side project—his group is on even footing with Android, Search, YouTube, and Ads. The hardware group is so powerful inside Google that it was able to merge Nexus, Pixel, Chromecast, OnHub, ATAP, and Glass into a single business unit. The group's coming out party was October 4, 2016, where it announced Google Home, Google Wifi, a 4K Chromecast, the Daydream VR headset, and the pair of phones we're looking at today: the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL. The arrival of the Pixel phones marks the apparent death of the Nexus line; Google says that it has "no plans" for future Nexus devices. With the new branding comes a change in strategy, too. The Pixel brand is about making devices that are 100 percent Google, so despite Google's position as the developer of Android, get ready for Google-designed hardware combined with exclusive Google software.
  • Hands-on with the LeEco Le Pro3: services first, Android second
    LeEco’s flagship Le Pro3 smartphone isn’t trying to compete with the Google Pixel, which puts modern Google services in front of a stock Android backdrop. After playing with the Le Pro3 at the company’s U.S. launch event in San Francisco today, I’m left feeling that it’s an easy, low-cost way to get the full experience of LeEco’s applications. There are proprietary LeEco utility tools like the browser, email, calendar, messages, notes, and phone apps, along with bloatware like Yahoo Weather, but mostly the Pro3 is a means of distribution for the LeEco apps, like Live, LeVidi, and Le. There is also a standard-issue My LeEco app for managing services like EcoPass membership. Under it all is the EUI custom user interface. If you swipe left from the home screen, you see videos that LeEco recommends you watch — not Google Now.
  • Report: Google reaches agreement with CBS for 'Unplugged' web TV service - Fox and Disney may follow