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today's leftovers

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  • Oracle v. Google: What the verdict means for open source | InfoWorld

    The decade-long legal battle between two of the world’s largest tech companies has finally come to an end. The result was a victory for the open-source software community.

    In case you need a refresher on the Oracle v. Google case, Oracle sued Google in 2010 for copyright infringement on Google’s use of Oracle’s Java API in its Android smartphone operating system. The District Court ruled in favor of Google, but that decision was later reversed on appeal. The case ultimately landed in the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled six to two in Google’s favor this April.

  • Jupyter Labs Desktop App: What Is It & Do We Need It?
  • Apple's M1 MacBook screens are stunning – stunningly fragile and defective, that is, lawsuits allege

    Aggrieved MacBook owners in two separate lawsuits claim Apple's latest laptops with its M1 chips have defective screens that break easily and malfunction.

    The complaints, both filed on Wednesday in a federal district court in San Jose, California, are each seeking class certification in the hope that the law firms involved will get a judicial blessing to represent the presumed large group of affected customers and, if victorious, to share any settlement.

    Each of the filings contends Apple's 2020-2021 MacBook line – consisting of the M1-based MacBook Air and M1-based 13" MacBook Pro – have screens that frequently fail. They say Apple knew about the alleged defect or should have known, based on its own extensive internal testing, reports from technicians, and feedback from customers.

  • A Burger King where the only Whopper is the BSOD font

    Bork goes back to its roots today, with a screen of purest blue showing its unwanted face outside a US Burger King branch.

    At least it makes a change from McDonald's, very much the DNS of Bork when it comes to failures.

    In this instance, it looks like it is the exterior signage, normally showing a slideshow of tasty (and frequently greasy) treats, that has succumbed to the curse of Microsoft.

  • RISC-V Launches the Open Hardware Diversity Alliance

    RISC-V International, a global open hardware standards organization, announced the launch of the Open Hardware Diversity Alliance. The global Alliance, created by CHIPS Alliance, OpenPOWER Foundation, RISC-V, and Western Digital, will develop and provide learning and networking programs, mentorship opportunities and inclusive environments across the expansive ecosystem of open hardware. The Alliance will be focused on supporting professional advancement and encouraging equal participation for women and underrepresented individuals in the open hardware community.

  • ASUS Tinker Board 2S: High-performance Raspberry Pi alternative

    The long-awaited ASUS Tinker Board 2S is out. And there's a lot packed into the 85 x 56 mm Raspberry Pi form factor.

    At the heart of the Tinker Board 2S is a Rockchip RK3399 chipset that combines two ARM Cortex-A72 cores, four ARM Cortex-A53 cores, and an ARM Mali-T860 MP4 GPU.

    The board comes with 2GB or 4GB of LPDDR4 RAM, and 16 GB of eMMC flash.

  • Value Stream Management: Bringing Lean Manufacturing Techniques To IBM i Development - IT Jungle [Ed: Another example of grotesque conflict of interest by IBM. This ‘article’ is about IBM and is also sponsored by IBM.]
  • Open Mainframe Project Announces Continued Growth in Community Contributions and Adoption as Mainframes Accelerate Innovation in Enterprise Hybrid Technology [Ed: "Linux" Foundation is openwashing IBM to make a monopoly seem like "community"]

    The Open Mainframe Project kicked off the 2nd annual Open Mainframe Summit today with news of record growth in contributions - with more than 105.31 Million Lines of Code written and over 9,600 commits submitted by Open Mainframe Project communities so far this year. This is 100 percent more code than last year with an increased number of active participants in the 20 project and working groups. These numbers will only increase as Open Mainframe continues to be the cornerstone of governance and innovation for modernizing the mainframe and its path to IoT, Cloud and Edge Computing.

today's leftovers

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Proprietary Software Leftovers

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Misc
  • OpenMandriva switching to Github Issues [Ed: OpenMandriva cannot be taken seriously anymore and it is not "Open". It outsources to Microsoft's proprietary software monopoly]

    To make things easier and simpler for users to file issue reports we are switching to Github Issues.

  • Exchange/Outlook Autodiscover Bug Spills $100K+ Email Passwords

    The flaw has caused the Autodiscover service to leak nearly 100,000 unique login names and passwords for Windows domains worldwide, Serper said in a technical report released this week.

    “This is a severe security issue, since if an attacker can control such domains or has the ability to ‘sniff’ traffic in the same network, they can capture domain credentials in plain text (HTTP basic authentication) that are being transferred over the wire,” he said.

  • Google Issues Warning For 2 Billion Chrome Users

    In an attempt to protect users and buy them time to upgrade, Google is keeping the details surrounding CVE-2021-37973 a closely guarded secret. All the company would provide were its threat ranking, what part of Chrome had been exploited and that it was discovered in-house by Google employees:

    High — CVE-2021-37973 : Use after free in Portals. Reported by Clément Lecigne from Google TAG, with technical assistance from Sergei Glazunov and Mark Brand from Google Project Zero on 2021-09-21

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • OpenBSD on the Vortex86DX CPU

    This is the OpenBSD counterpart of my article about running NetBSD on the Vortex86DX CPU, and its purpose is mostly to archive a dmesg entry and various benchmarks for this machine. I should note that with only 256MB of RAM, the machine is too constrained to do kernel and libraries relinking in a timely manner, due to swapping.

  • The brains behind the books - part IX: Meike Chabowski | SUSE Communities

    Linux and I share the same birthday – it probably was just kismet that we met. No wonder that I seized my chance when I saw a job opening from SUSE in the newspaper – they were looking to hire somebody into the Marketing /PR department for press relations. I applied for the job, and got it – strike! This was in 2000 – more than 21 years ago. The first 6 weeks I worked as PR manager, and published my first press release about SUSE Blinux, a Braille screen reader developed by our former colleague Marco Skambraks. In the meantime, we had got a new Marketing director. And one fine day, he asked me if I would move over from PR to Product Marketing. Quite overrun, I said “why not, let’s try it”. And for the next 16 years, I worked as a product marketing manager on many different and interesting topics. I am very proud that, in 2000, I was among those that brought the very first Enterprise Linux server to market – it all started in 2000 with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for S/390 (IBM mainframes). The mainframe (today IBM Z and LinuxOne) was my first love, but I also was responsible for High Performance Computing for a very long time, and I am still addicted to this technology area, as HPC is so much impacting our daily life without us realizing it. Other topics I worked on were UNIX to Linux, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server in general, SUSE Linux Enterprise Point of Service, and also SUSE Manager. Already during my time in Product Marketing, I wrote technical feature guides, and together with subject matter experts, technical whitepapers focussing on many different topics (A NUMA API for Linux from Andi Kleen, for example, is still out there, and regularly referred to).

  • Bespoke shenanigans

    A bit over a week ago, I found a DAW called Bespoke. It features a rich set of composable audio and modulation modules that can be freely instantiated and connected (and I thought Reaper’s routing was cool).

    More importantly, there’s a scripting module. It offers note, pulse and modulation inputs, note outputs, and api-based integration with other Bespoke modules.

  • Chromium compiled for 15 hours before failing

    Ha ha, the saga continues! Yesterday's post:
    https://bkhome.org/news/202109/chromium-compiled-for-12-hours-before-failing.html
    This time, using Chromium version 93.0.4577.82. Running EasyOS 3.0pre, Lenovo PC with Intel i3 CPU and 8GB RAM. The build is happening on an external USB3 500GB SSD. There is a swap partition, 24GB internal HDD.
    Failure point looks like the same place. It is trying to create 'libblink_platform.so'.
    Normally, the build is configured to create static libraries and there is a massive final link creating a huge single binary. However, I have used the "is_component_build=true" configure option, which causes a smaller final binary with lots of shared libraries.

  • Python as a build tool

    Normally, when starting a Java project (or any other programming project, really), you don’t want to reinvent the wheel. You go with the de-facto build system, folder structure, environment etc. The ones that rest of the world is using.

    Yet, both Skija and JWM are built using Python scripts instead of more traditional Ant/Maven/Gradle/SBT. Why? Let’s find out!

  • In a setback for Apple, the European Union seeks a common charger for all phones.

    The European Union unveiled plans on Thursday to make USB-C connectors the standard charging port for all smartphones, tablets and other electronic devices sold across the bloc, an initiative that it says will reduce environmental waste but that is likely to hit Apple the hardest.

  • Ultimate Off-Site Setup | Self-Hosted 54

    Alex is abroad and uses the opportunity to build out not one but two ultimate self-hosted off-site servers. We share the hardware, software, and networking details.

    Plus, how Chris built a Nest-type thermostat using parts he already had.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Design and Web team summary – 10 September 2021

    The Web and design team at Canonical run two-week iterations building and maintaining all of the Canonical websites and product web interfaces. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration.

  • Cloud Native and Arch Linux

    In this article I want to give a short overview over the current state of Arch Linux with respect to cloud native technologies. I would like to show why I think Arch Linux is perfect as a daily driver in the cloud native ecosystem and how the current state of cloud native software in Arch Linux looks like.

  • New Book: Krita Secrets by Bohdan Kornienko

    “Krita Secrets” is a book that aims to deliver as short tutorials as possible. Each tutorial covers one specific action with its result. The tutorials range from how to do little tricks, like draw Parallel Lines, to complex tools such as Gradient Mesh. By September 22, 2021 the book contains 60 tutorials and it keeps growing.

    The intent is to create a compendium of short tutorials that each aim to solve one single problem. This way people will not have to spend a lot of time reading through pages online, or watching video after video, while figuring things out. Hopefully with the help of this book artists would spend more time creating than searching online for instructions.

  • How To Zoom Tmux Panes For Better Text Visibility In Linux - OSTechNix

    I have been using GNU Screen and Tmux terminal multiplexers for many years now. They comes in handy when performing different tasks in multiple terminal windows simultaneously. Today I learned one of the useful feature of Tmux - Zooming panes. Yes, we can zoom Tmux panes to fit them into the full size of current Terminal window for better text visibility and for viewing more of its contents.

    It is useful when you need more space or focus on a specific task. After finishing that task, you can zoom out (unzoom) the Tmux pane back to its normal position or size.

  • Linux Release Roundup #21.39: GNOME 41, Sailfish OS "Verla", Ubuntu Touch OTA-19 and More New Releases - It's FOSS News

    In the Linux Release Roundup series, we highlight the new distribution and application version releases in the past week. This keeps you informed of the latest developments in the Linux world.

  • Full Circle Magazine #173
  • Make Linux look like Windows 10

    As the days pass, Linux is on its way to becoming the go-to operating system for users. With its superior command-line interface, better security, and a helpful community that offers support and fixes for most issues, no doubt switching to Linux-based distributions seems like a tempting option.

    If you’re coming from a Windows 10 background, switching to the graphical user interface (GUI) of Linux would seem like unknown territory to you. Navigating through the unfamiliar GUI might be a little confusing.

    If we just described your situation, then fear not; the purpose of this guide is to make sure that you get that familiar OS feeling of Windows 10 on your Linux system. With all that out of the way, let’s take a look at the methods to make Linux look like Windows 10.

Free Software Stigma and Upcoming Events

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Misc
  • Why Do Companies Still Have a Fear of Open Source?

    Open Source Software, since its birth, has made people wonder about its effects. The debate is never-ending, and for the right reasons. Giants like Apple have often viewed Open Source skeptically because they are mostly unfounded. However, one cannot deny that these sources are functional and flexible. They are also partly responsible for bringing the technological world in the right direction. But are they worth it? In this article, we shall learn all about open source companies and why use open source software, and why open source software is still not greeted warmly by certain companies. Therefore, without further ado, let's start right away.

  • Samuel Iglesias: X.Org Developers Conference 2021

    Last week we had our most loved annual conference: X.Org Developers Conference 2021. As a reminder, due to COVID-19 situation in Europe (and its respective restrictions on travel and events), we kept it virtual again this year… which is a pity as the former venue was Gdańsk, a very beautiful city (see picture below if you don’t believe me!) in Poland. Let’s see if we can finally have an XDC there!

    [...]

    Big shout-out to the XDC 2021 organizers (Intel) represented by Radosław Szwichtenberg, Ryszard Knop and Maciej Ramotowski. They did an awesome job on having a very smooth conference. I can tell you that they promptly fixed any issue that happened, all of that behind the scenes so that the attendees not even noticed anything most of the times! That is what good conference organizers do!

  • Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021

    This month has been nothing short of hectic, with back to back to back conferences filling up the calendar. Following Linaro Virual Connect, XDC, and Linux Plumbers (which ends today), Collaborans will be attending (virtually) next week's Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021.

    Connecting the open source ecosystem under one roof, the conference is "a unique environment for cross-collaboration between developers, sysadmins, devops, architects and others who are driving technology forward". Taking place from September 27-30, the event will be held in a hybrid format for the first time, with both in-person and virtual offerings, to ensure that everyone who wants to participate is able to do so.

Proprietary Software: WSL Compromised, Windows Bug Doors Again, and More

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  • Found a hidden malware on Windows… in Linux? [Ed: This is a Windows problem; WSL is just Microsoft's attack on GNU/Linux; The solution to WSL/WSL2 woes is to delete Windows completely and install/use the real thing.]

    This strange weird world of computing continues to amaze us. From ‘s Microsoft love of all that is open-source to the publication of Edge on Linux , these two worlds – once poles apart and with great feuds between their users – are increasingly mixing.

    But you have to be careful to mix things up, especially when you can’t have 100% control between the two cohabiting environments.

    [...]

    Black Lotus Labs recommends that you enable and monitor the WSL system, if you have it installed, at the time to check for suspicious activity. While waiting for this new attack vehicle to be detected as well.

  • A New Bug in Microsoft Windows Could Let Hackers Easily Install a Rootkit
  • Google Warns of a New Way Hackers Can Make Malware Undetectable on Windows
  • NYT Crossword Decision Puzzles Many | Hackaday

    Central to this issue are Across Lite .puz files, a format which hasn’t been upgraded in twenty years. Despite being aged and proprietary, an entire community of solvers, developers and checkers has sprung up around the availability of puz files, making them a de-facto standard. Not only are puz files used to distribute daily crosswords, the NYT maintains an archive of all its crosswords in puz format going back to 1993, even before online puzzles were introduced. There are various newer formats floating around, but with the entrenchment of the puz format none has emerged as a clear winner. The Across Lite team even developed a new format at the request of NYT in back 2015, but strangely, the NYT has never used it.

    [...]

    Based on the information made available so far, several things don’t make sense to many in the community. Why the sudden notice, and not a transition period to give the community time to make an orderly transition to this new “something”? Why is the archive of puz files being removed, given that the problem is with preparing puz formatted files, not maintaining them? Almost overnight, scripts have popped up to convert the NYT website crossword into puz format, and similar scripts have been around for some time. This begs the question, just how difficult is it to prepare puz files? And other than printing your puzzle on paper, this announcement ends the ability to solve puzzles offline, such as when you’re flying.

    Many third-party puzzle app and program developers have reached out to Ms. Mason asking that she reconsider.

Standards/Consortia Milestones

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  • Celebrating 30 Years of Europe’s First Root Name Server

    The root name servers sit at the top of the DNS hierarchy. Today, there are 13 root name server identifiers in the world. As the first step in a DNS lookup, they are responsible for referring DNS resolvers to the appropriate Top-Level Domain (TLD) name servers. The I-root service operated by Netnod handles several hundred million DNS queries a day using anycast nodes deployed in more than 70 locations across the world. But how did we get here, and what challenges did we face in regards to the root servers in the early days of the Internet?

  • Europe proposes USB-C as common port for digital devices

    In a statement, the EC, the executive arm of the European Union, said these proposals had been advanced to cut down on electronic waste and also to avoid inconvenience to customers.

    The EC said USB-C would become the standard port for all smartphones, tablets, cameras, headphones, portable speakers and hand-held game consoles.

    Another step would be unbundle the sale of chargers from devices, as the first two changes would ensure that a single charger could be used across devices.

  • EU proposes mandatory USB-C on all devices, including iPhones

    In addition to phones, the rules will apply to other devices like tablets, headphones, portable speakers, videogame consoles, and cameras. Manufacturers will also be forced to make their fast-charging standards interoperable, and to provide information to customers about what charging standards their device supports. Under the proposal, customers will be able to buy new devices without an included charger.

  • EU Proposes New Legislation That Would Force Apple to Bring USB-C to iPhones, iPads, and AirPods

    The proposed legislation would force all consumer electronics, not just Apple, which sell devices in Europe, to incorporate USB-C ports in a variety of products, ranging from smartphones, tablets, headphones, cameras, portable speakers, handheld consoles, and others. Calling it the ‘common port,’ the European Union claims that switching all products to USB-C would not just have benefits to the environment, but annual monetary savings for consumers that mount to $293 million.

today's leftovers

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today's howtos

  • How to use wall command in linux - Unixcop

    wall is (an abbreviation of write to all) is a Unix command-line utility that displays the contents of a computer file or standard input to all logged-in users. It is used by root to send out shutting down message to all users just before poweroff. It displays a message on the terminals of all logged-in users. The messages can_be either typed on the terminal or the contents of a file. Also usually, system administrators send messages to announce maintenance and ask users to log out and close all open programs.The messages ‘re shown to all logged in users with a terminal open.

  • Any Port in a Storm: Ports and Security, Part 1

    When IT and Security professionals talk about port numbers, we’re referring to the TCP and UDP port numbers a service is running on that are waiting to accept connections. But what exactly is a port?

  • Book Review: Data Science at the Command Line By Jeroen Janssens

    Data Science at the Command Line: Obtain, Scrub, Explore, and Model Data with Unix Power Tools written by Jeroen Janssens is the second edition of the series “Data Science at the Command Line”. This book demonstrates how the flexibility of the command line can help you become a more efficient and productive data scientist. You will learn how to combine small yet powerful command-line tools to quickly obtain, scrub, explore, and model your data. To get you started, author Jeroen Janssens provides a Docker image packed with over 80 tools–useful whether you work with Windows, macOS, or Linux.

  • How to Take a Typing Test on Linux With tt

    In the modern era of technology, typing has become one of the most common activities for a lot of professions. Learning to type faster with accuracy can help you get more things done in the same amount of time. However, touch typing is not a skill that you can master overnight. It takes regular practice and testing to improve your speed and accuracy gradually. While there are a lot of websites that help you achieve this, all you essentially need on Linux is a terminal. Let's see how.

  • FIX: Google Chrome doesn’t work on Kali linux
  • How to install OpenToonz on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install OpenToonz on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below. If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

Security and DRM Leftovers

Linux 5.15-rc3

So after a somewhat rocky merge window and second rc, things are now
actually looking pretty normal for rc3. Knock wood.

There are fixes all over, and the statistics look fairly regular, with
drivers dominating as they should (since they are most of the tree).
And outside of drivers, we have a fairly usual mix of changes -
architecture fixes, networking, filesystems, and tooling (the latter
being mostly kvm selftests).

Shortlog appended, it's not too long and easy to scan through to get a
flavor for the details if you happen to care.

Please do give it a whirl,

             Linus

Read more Also: Linux 5.15-rc3 Released - Looking "Pretty Normal" Plus Performance Fix - Phoronix

Huawei launches OS openEuler, aims to construct 'ecological base of national digital infrastructure'

Chinese tech giant Huawei launched openEuler operating system (OS) on Saturday, another self-developed OS after the HarmonyOS, as it tries to "solve the domestic stranglehold problem of lacking its homegrown OS in basic technology," and build a full-scenario covered ecosystem to prepare for more US bans. The openEuler OS can be widely deployed in various forms of equipment such as servers, cloud computing and edge computing. Its application scenarios cover Information Technology, Communication Technology and Operational Technology to achieve unifying an operating system with multi-device support, according to the company's introduction. In the ICT field, Huawei provides products and solutions such as servers, storage, cloud services, edge computing, base stations, routers, industrial control among others, all of which need to be equipped with an OS. Huawei has therefore been building capabilities to achieve a unified OS architecture, and meet the demands of different application scenarios, the firm said on Saturday. The openEuler program was initially announced back in 2019 as an open source operating system. Today's launch is an updated one. Read more