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Misc

Leftovers: GNOME/GTK, Android-x86, Fedora, LibreOffice and More

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Misc
  • g_array_steal() and g_ptr_array_steal() in GLib 2.63.1

    Another set of new APIs in the upcoming GLib 2.63.1 release allow you to steal all the contents of a GArray, GPtrArray or GByteArray, and continue using the array container to add more contents to in future.

    This is work by Paolo Bonzini and Emmanuel Fleury, and will be available in the soon-to-be-released 2.63.1 release.

  • GNOME Shell Hackfest 2019

    This week, I have attended the GNOME Shell Hackfest 2019 held in Leidschendam, The Netherlands. It was a fantastic event, in a fantastic city! The list of attendees was composed of key members of the community, so we managed to get a lot done — a high amount of achievements for only three days of hackfest, in fact.

  • Android-x86: Run Android on your PC: Release Note 7.1-r3

    The Android-x86 project is glad to announce the release of 7.1-r3. This is the third stable release for Android-x86 7.1 (nougat-x86). The prebuilt images are available in the following site as usual:
    https://www.fosshub.com/Android-x86-old.html
    https://osdn.net/rel/android-x86/Release%207.1

    Key Features

    The 7.1-r3 is mainly a bugfixes release of 7.1-r2. It based on Android 7.1.2 Nougat MR2 security updates (android-7.1.2_r39). Some newer features are also back-ported from 8.1 release. We encourage users of 7.1-r2 or older release upgrade to this release.

  • David Cantrell: rpminspect-0.8 released (and a new rpminspect-data-fedora)

    Work on the test suite continues with rpminspect and it is finding a lot of corner-case type runtime scenarios. Fixing those up in the code is nice. I welcome contributions to the test suite. You can look at the tests/test_*.py files to see what I'm doing and then work through one inspection and do the different types of checks. Look in the lib/inspect_NAME.c file and for all of the add_result() calls to figure out what tests should exist in the test suite. If this is confusing, feel free to reach out via email or another means and I can provide you with a list for an inspection.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-42

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Fedora 31 was declared No-Go. We are currently under the Final freeze.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • New Feature in Libreoffice: Full-Sheet Previews

    The feature was developed on the cp-6.2 branch of LibreOffice code-base (which is basicly Collabora Office 6.2), and is already available in Collabora Office snaphots. And is being backported to LibreOffice master, so it will be also available in LibreOffice development builds and soon in the Collabora Office snapshots.

  • Rooting for ZFS | TechSNAP 414

    We dive into Ubuntu 19.10’s experimental ZFS installer and share our tips for making the most of ZFS on root.

    Plus why you may want to skip Nest Wifi, and our latest explorations of long range wireless protocols.

  • 2019-10-18 | Linux Headlines

    Researchers discover a kernel bug that can crash Linux devices, Fedora 31’s release date slips, Cedalo opens up its Streamsheets code, Google announces the Android NDK 21 beta, and Unix turns 50.

  • Google Launches A Refreshed Pixelbook Laptop At $649

    Say hello to a more affordable Chromebook that's lightweight and more fun to type on.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Molly de Blanc: Autonomy and consent

    When I was an undergraduate, I took a course on medical ethics. The core takeaways from the class were that autonomy is necessary for consent, and consent is necessary for ethical action.

    There is a reciprocal relationship between autonomy and consent. We are autonomous creatures, we are self-governing. In being self-governing, we have the ability to consent, to give permission to others to interact with us in the ways we agree on. We can only really consent when we are self-governing, otherwise, it’s not proper consent. Consent also allows us to continue to be self-governing. By giving others permission, we are giving up some control, but doing so on our own terms.

    In order to actually consent, we have to grasp the situation we’re in, and as much about it as possible. Decision making needs to come from a place of understanding.

  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: User Mode Linux 5.2

    User Mode Linux version 5.2 has been uploaded to Debian Unstable and will soon be available on the supported architectures. This upload took more time than usual as I ran into a build time failure caused by newer PCAP library.

    Thanks to active upstream developers, this got sorted out quick. In the longer run, we may have a much better fix for it.

  • PCLinuxOS MATE Review

    Published for Patreons on Oct 8th 2019. Available to the public Oct. 17th, 2019 – Become a Patreon today to get this plus exclusive Linux tips not found anywhere else!

  • Worn Out EMMC Chips Are Crippling Older Teslas

    Much like the rockets and spacecraft of sister company SpaceX, Tesla’s vehicles are powered by Linux running on what’s essentially off-the-shelf computing hardware. Until 2018 the Model S and X were running the open source operating system on a NVIDIA Tegra 3, at which point they switched the Media Control Unit (MCU) over to an Intel Atom solution. In either event, the Linux system is stored on an embedded Multi-Media Controller (eMMC) flash chip instead of a removable storage device as you might expect.

    Now under normal circumstances, this wouldn’t be an issue. There are literally billions of devices running Linux from an eMMC chip. But any competent embedded Linux developer would take the steps necessary to make sure the operating system’s various log files are not being written to a non-replaceable storage device soldered onto the board

    Unfortunately, for reasons that still remain somewhat unclear, the build of Linux running on the MCU is doing exactly that. What’s worse, Tesla’s graphical interface appears to be generating its own additional log messages. Despite the likelihood that nobody will ever actually read them, for every second a Tesla is driving down the road, more lines are being added to the log files.

    Now, it appears that the near continuous writing of data to the eMMC chips on the older Tegra-based MCUs has finally started to take its toll. Owners on Tesla forums are reporting that their MCUs are crashing and leaving the expensive vehicles in “Limp Home Mode”, which allows the car to remain drivable but unable to charge. The prescribed fix for this issue by Tesla is a complete MCU replacement at the cost of several thousand dollars. As this failure will almost certainly happen after the factory warranty has lapsed, the owner will have to foot the bill themselves.

  • Seven more videos from the auditorium at LibreOffice Conference 2019

    Yes, here’s anther bunch of videos from our recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain.

  • Self-publishing using LibreOffice Writer 6

    My new book, Self-publishing using LibreOffice Writer 6, is now available in paperback or PDF.

  • Montreal Subway Foot Traffic Data

    STM kindly sent me daily values for each subway stations from 2001 to 2018. Armed with all this data, I decided to play a little with R and came up with some interesting graphs.

    Behold this semi-interactive map of Montreal's subway! By clicking on a subway station, you'll be redirected to a graph of the station's foot traffic.

  • Is your Internet up-to-date?

    Modern Internet Standards provide for more reliability and further growth of the Internet. Are you using them?

  • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare ditches loot boxes for a battle pass

    Popularized by Fortnite, the battle pass system allows for players to buy the pass at the beginning of the season, and unlock a variety of items as they progress. Modern Warfare’s system sounds like it’ll be extremely similar to the Fortnite model (which has since been adopted by other major titles, like Destiny 2 and PUBG). Players will be able to buy a pass at the beginning of a season, with full transparency as to what the items included are, and how and when they’ll be unlocked.

  • Innr Smart White A19 bulb review: This inexpensive smart bulb seamlessly connects with a Philips Hue Bridge

    If you’re shopping for your first smart bulb and you’re not ready to invest in a hub, an Innr bulb isn’t the cheapest way to go. Instead, you’d be better off with a Bluetooth- or Wi-Fi-enabled bulb that can operate with just a smartphone app. The latest Philips Hue White bulb, for example, which can be controlled via Bluetooth as well as Zigbee), or a Wi-Fi-connected bulb like the $8 Wyze Bulb, which offers the bonus of being color-temperature-tunable.

  • The Untold Story of the 2018 Olympics Cyberattack, the Most Deceptive [Computer Attack] in History [iophk: Windows TCO]

    All nine of the Olympic staff's domain controllers, the powerful machines that governed which employee could access which computers in the network, had somehow been paralyzed, crippling the entire system. The staff decided on a temporary workaround: They set all the surviving servers that powered some basic services, such as Wi-Fi and the internet-linked TVs, to bypass the dead gatekeeper machines. By doing so, they managed to bring those bare-minimum systems back online just minutes before the end of the ceremony.

  • [Old] Olympic Destroyer Takes Aim At Winter Olympics

    The purpose is to copy the initial stage to the remote system in %ProgramData%\%COMPUTERNAME%.exe and to execute it via a VBScript.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google Ejects Open-Source WireGuard From Android Play Store Over Donation Link In App

    Apparently Google doesn't appreciate donation links/buttons within programs found on the Google Play Store even when it's one of the main sources of revenue for open-source programs. WireGuard has been reportedly dropped over this according to WireGuard lead developer Jason Donenfeld.

    After waiting days for Google to review the latest version of their secure VPN tunnel application, it was approved and then removed and delisted -- including older versions of WireGuard. The reversal comes on the basis of violating their "payments policy". Of course, Google would much prefer payments be routed through them so they can take their cut...

  • [Older] Sourcehut makes BSD software better

    Every day, Sourcehut runs continuous integration for FreeBSD and OpenBSD for dozens of projects, and believe it or not, some of them don’t even use Sourcehut for distribution! Improving the BSD software ecosystem is important to us, and as such our platform is designed to embrace the environment around it, rather than building a new walled garden. This makes it easy for existing software projects to plug into our CI infastructure, and many BSD projects take advantage of this to improve their software.

    Some of this software is foundational stuff, and their improvements trickle down to the entire BSD ecosystem. Let’s highlight a few great projects that take advantage of our BSD offerings.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (sudo), Debian (libsdl1.2 and libsdl2), Mageia (e2fsprogs, kernel, libpcap and tcpdump, nmap, and sudo), openSUSE (GraphicsMagick and sudo), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, jss, and kernel), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk and java-11-openjdk), Scientific Linux (jss), SUSE (gcc7 and libreoffice), and Ubuntu (leading to a double-free, libsdl1.2, and tiff).

  • Grasp Docker networking basics with these commands and tips

    Docker communicates over network addresses and ports. Within Docker hosts, this occurs with host or bridge networking.

    With host networking, the Docker host sends all communications via named pipes. This method, however, can pose a security risk, as all traffic flows across the same set of containers with no segregation.

    The other approach from Docker, bridge networking, provides an internal network that connects to the external one.

    Use the docker network ls command to see a list of available networks. This command should return results that look similar to the output in Figure 1.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Required update to recent libarchive

    The compression algorithm zstd brings faster compression and decompression, while maintaining a compression ratio comparable with xz. This will speed up package installation with pacman, without further drawbacks.

    The imminent release of pacman 5.2 brings build tools with support for compressing packages with zstd. To install these packages you need libarchive with support for zstd, which entered the repositories in September 2018. In order for zstd compressed packages to be distributed, we require all users to have updated to at least libarchive 3.3.3-1. You have had a year, so we expect you already did update. Hurry up if you have not.

  • openSUSE to have Summit in Dublin

    The openSUSE Community is going to Ireland March 27 and 28, 2020, for openSUSE Summit Dublin.

    Registration for the summit has begun and the Call for Papers is open until Feb. 14.

    The summit will begin at the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

    Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encouraged to register for the summit and submit a talk.

    The schedule for the openSUSE Summit Dublin will be posted on Feb. 17.

  • Khronos Opens Door For Allowing More Open-Source Drivers To Reach Conformance Status

    Khronos president Neil Trevett was at this month's XDC2019 conference in Montreal and he clarified their position on accepting conformance submissions by the open-source drivers.

    He clarified that any of the open-source driver projects working on a conformant implementation for OpenGL / OpenCL / Vulkan can indeed submit to Khronos without paying any vendor fees, etc. That includes all drivers, just not those part of (or not) Khronos Group members.

  • TURNIP Vulkan Driver Gets MSAA Working

    Mesa's TURNIP Vulkan driver that provides open-source Vulkan API support for Qualcomm Adreno hardware in recent weeks has been back to seeing new activity and this week more useful contributions are being made.

    On Tuesday a number of TURNIP commits were made by Jonathan Marek as well as Eric Anholt. The latest work includes a number of fixes, adding the ASTC texture compression format layout, VK_KHR_sampler_mirror_clamp_to_edge, and ultimately getting basic MSAA working. The multi-sample anti-aliasing support for this open-source TURNIP driver for Adreno graphics has been described as "not perfect but gets through some tests."

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Fedora Removes 32bit, System76 Coreboot, Flatpak, Valve, Atari VCS, Docker | This Week in Linux 84

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we talk about Fedora Removing 32-bit, well sort of. System76’s announced two laptops using Coreboot firmware. There is some interesing news regarding Docker and its future. Then we’ll check out some Linux Gaming news with some really exciting news from Valve! 

  • PostgreSQL 12 boosts open source database performance

    Performance gains are among the key highlights of the latest update of the open source PostgreSQL 12 database.

    PostgreSQL 12 became generally available Oct. 3, providing users of the widely deployed database with multiple enhanced capabilities including SQL JSON query support and improved authentication and administration options. The PostgreSQL 12 update will potentially affect a wide range of use cases in which the database is deployed, according to Noel Yuhanna, an analyst at Forrester Research.

    "Organizations are using PostgreSQL to support all kinds of workloads and use cases, which is pushing the needs for better performance, improved security, easier access to unstructured data and simplified deployments," Yuhanna said. "To address this, PostreSQL12 improves performance by improving its indexing that requires less space and has better optimization to deliver faster access."

  • Olimex Launches NB-IoT DevKit Based on Quectel BC66 Module for 19 Euros

    There are three LPWAN standards currently dominating the space LoRaWAN, NB-IoT, and Sigfox. 

  • Intel Denverton based Fanless Network Appliance Comes with 6x Ethernet Ports, 2x SFP Cages
  • Heading levels

    the headings would be “Apples” (level 1), “Taste” (level 2), “Sweet” (level 3), “Color” (level 2). Determining the level of any given heading requires traversing through its previous siblings and their descendants, its parent and the previous siblings and descendants of that, et cetera. That is too much complexity and optimizing it with caches is evidently not deemed worth it for such a simple feature.

    However, throwing out the entire feature and requiring everyone to use h1 through h6 forever, adjusting them accordingly based on the document they end up in, is not very appealing to me. So I’ve been trying to come up with an alternative algorithm that would allow folks to use h1 with sectioning elements exclusively while giving assistive technology the right information (default styling of h1 is already adjusted based on nesting depth).

    The simpler algorithm only looks at ancestors for a given heading and effectively only does so for h1 (unless you use hgroup). This leaves the above example in the weird state it is in in today’s browsers, except that the h1 (“Color”) would become level 2. It does so to minimally impact existing documents which would usually use h1 only as a top-level element or per the somewhat-erroneous recommendation of the HTML Standard use it everywhere, but in that case it would dramatically improve the outcome.

  • openSUSE OBS Can Now Build Windows WSL Images

    As Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) is becoming a critical piece of Microsoft’s cloud and data-center audience, openSUSE is working on technologies that help developers use distributions of their choice for WSL. Users can run the same WSL distribution that they run in the cloud or on their servers.

    The core piece of openSUSE’s WSL offering is the WSL appx files, which are basically zip files that contain a tarball of a Linux system (like a container) and a Windows exe file, the so called launcher.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Intel Firmware Binaries Land For AX200/AX201 Bluetooth Linux Support

    With devices beginning to hit store shelves using the new Intel WiFi 6 AX200 series chipsets, the firmware binaries have landed in linux-firmware.git for rounding out support for these latest WiFi/Bluetooth adapters.

    For a few kernel releases now since earlier this year these new Intel wireless chipsets have been supported by the mainline kernel but the firmware hasn't been part of the de facto linux-firmware.git tree that houses the various firmware binaries for different hardware component support under Linux.

  • Improving distfile mirror structure

    The Gentoo distfile mirror network is essential in distributing sources to our users. It offloads upstream download locations, improves throughput and reliability, guarantees distfile persistency.

    The current structure of distfile mirrors dates back to 2002. It might have worked well back when we mirrored around 2500 files but it proved not to scale well. Today, mirrors hold almost 70 000 files, and this number has been causing problems for mirror admins.

  • LibreOffice 6.2.7 packages available for Slackware 14.2

    There was a recent update in my repository of LibreOffice packages, but that libreoffice-6.3.2 was just for slackware-current.

    There’s a recent release in the LibreOffice 6.2 stable series as well (ok… five weeks ago, not that recent…), and so I decided to use my build box’s free weekend to come up with packages for LibreOffice 6.2.7.
    This release has a security improvement over previous versions, in that it will popup a warning to the user if a document tries to run an embedded script (similar to existing warning mechanism for embedded macros).

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Postgres Is Underrated—It Handles More than You Think

    After reading this article, you may want to list down the features you want from your data store and check if Postgres will be a good fit for them. It’s powerful enough for most applications.

  • After nine years, Bill McDermott is stepping down as SAP CEO
  • Dav1d 0.5 Released With AVX2, SSSE3 & ARM64 Performance Improvements - Benchmarks

    Friday marked the release of dav1d 0.5 as the newest version of this speedy open-source AV1 video decoder. With dav1d 0.5 are optimizations to help out SSSE3 most prominently but also AVX2 and ARM64 processors. Here are some initial benchmarks so far of this new dav1d video decoder on Linux.

    The SSSE3 code path for dav1d is now upwards of 40% faster with the v0.5 release. There is also single digit improvements for the AVX2 code path and up to 10% performance improvements for 64-bit ARM. There are also VSX, SSE2, and SSE4 optimizations among the work in this latest release as well as some decoder fixes. Dav1d 0.5 can be found at VideoLAN.org.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • FPgM update: 2019-41

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. The Go/No-Go meeting is next week. We are currently under the Final freeze.

    No office hours next week, but normally I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • 5 Best Magento Extensions That Can Boost On-page SEO

    Therefore, if online resellers want to get the most out of this multifunctional development platform Magento, it is very important to establish an effective expansion on the shopping page. This helps to expand various functionalities and offers users a wide experience of shopping online, as well as brings high profits and optimize Magento 2 Speed.

    Currently, there are many extensions available on the Internet, and it is necessary to choose the most useful ones. This task can be challenging for business owners. To help you choose the best extensions, we have prepared a list of excellent Magento plug-ins that you can install and improve the performance of your website and help you gain an edge over the competition.

  • Intrinsyc Unveils Open-Q 845 µSOM and Snapdragon 845 Mini-ITX Development Kit

    Intrinsyc introduced the first Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 hardware development platform last year with its Open-Q 845 HDK designed for OEMs and device makers.

  • Arduino MKR WAN 1310 LoRa Board Gets HW Security, Longer Battery Life and a 2MB SPI flash

    Two year ago Arduino launched MKR WAN 1300 board powered by Arduino Zero compatible Microchip Atmel SAMD21 32-bit ARM Cortex M0+ MCU and a Murata CMWZ1ZZABZ LoRa module based on Semtech SX1276...

  • Open source hardware: The problems and promise

    Open source hardware projects have struggled to gain the mass audience that popular open source software projects have. This may not matter.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (lucene-solr and ruby-openid), Fedora (krb5 and SDL2), openSUSE (kernel and libopenmpt), and Ubuntu (python2.7, python3.4).

  • Chromium updated

    Here is yet another update for Chromium 77.

    The latest release fixes 8 vulnerabilities, several of them high-risk. You can read all about it in the Google announcement.

  • October 12: International Day Against DRM 2019

    Digital Restrictions Management is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media. When a program is designed to prevent you from copying or sharing a song, reading an ebook on another device, or playing a single-player game without an Internet connection, you are being restricted by DRM. In other words, DRM creates a damaged good; it prevents you from doing what would be possible without it. This concentrates control over production and distribution of media, giving DRM peddlers the power to carry out massive digital book burnings and conduct large scale surveillance over people’s media viewing habits.

    If we want to avoid a future in which our devices serve as an apparatus to monitor and control our interaction with digital media, we must fight to retain control of our media and software.

  • Six extra videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2019

    Here’s the final set of presentations from the “Sala de Grados (Aulario IV)” room at the LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain. We have many more videos from other rooms to come, of course! (Note: for better audio, use headphones.)

  • Paul E. Mc Kenney: The Old Man and His Smartphone, Episode II

    At some point in the setup process, it was necessary to disable wifi. And I of course forgot to re-enable it. A number of apps insisted on downloading new versions. Eventually I realized my mistake, and re-enabled wifi, but am still wondering just how severe a case of sticker shock I am in for at the end of the month.

    [...]

    My new smartphone's virtual keyboard represents a definite improvement over the multipress nature of text messaging on my old flip phone, but it does not hold a candle to a full-sized keyboard. However, even this old man must confess that it is much faster to respond to the smartphone than to the laptop if both start in their respective sleeping states. There is probably an optimal strategy in there somewhere! Smile

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/41

    Just like the previous week, we have again released 4 snapshots since last Friday (1003, 1004, 1007 and 1009). 3 more have been tested but have been discarded by openQA; two of them only due to OBS being ‘too fast’ and random failures marking a snapshot as failed; likely they would have been ok. Snapshot 1010, on the other hand, was declined by openQA as the yast software management was not usable due to an ABI break. This has since been fixed and snapshot 1011 is expected to be releasable again (currently building).

  • Update on Oracle Certifications with SLES 15

    The latest versions of Oracle Database and Oracle Fusion Middleware and related products are available with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 15. This provides flexibility to customers who are migrating from SLES 12 to 15, and for Oracle customers who are still running older versions of the database and middleware products.

  • Build a simple chat app with Site.js

    This weekend, I released Site.js version 12.7.0 with improvements to its WebSocket interface. Today, I want to take you step-by-step through building and running a basic chat app using Site.js.

  • Onboarding edge applications on the dev environment
  • Kubernetes on Windows nodes hits GA in Rancher, Amazon EKS

    Rancher 2.3 and Amazon EKS were first to roll out support for Windows nodes in Kubernetes clusters this week, as well as mixed-mode clusters that encompass both Windows and Linux nodes. Most Kubernetes platforms already supported Windows containers but running on Linux host nodes; in all cases, including upstream Kubernetes, the Kubernetes master node still runs on Linux.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • System on module fully-integrated Linux system for accelerated machine learning

    Coral System on Module is a fully-integrated Linux system for accelerated Machine Learning inferencing to be integrated into existing hardware with three 100-pin connectors. The SoM is available now from Mouser. The SoM comprises the NXP iMX8M SoC, eMMC memory, LPDDR4 RAM, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and the Google Edge TPU Coprocessor for acceleration.

  • Norbert Preining: R with TensorFlow 2.0 on Debian/sid

    I recently posted on getting TensorFlow 2.0 with GPU support running on Debian/sid. At that time I didn?t manage to get the tensorflow package for R running properly. It didn?t need much to get it running, though.

  • My Free Software Activities in September 2019

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • What are microservices? Your next software architecture

    Nearly every computer system performs multiple tasks using shared resources, and one of the questions of computer programming is how closely the bits of code that perform those tasks should be tied to one another. An increasingly popular answer is the concept of a microservice—a small, discrete chunk of functionality that interacts with other microservices to create a larger system.

    Although the basic idea of having such discrete components isn’t new, the way microservices are implemented makes them a natural foundation for both modern cloud-based applications. Microservices also dovetail with the devops philosophy, which encourages rapidly and continuously rolled out new functionality.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Announces Chinese Automaker SAIC Motor as a New Member

    AGL is an open source project at the Linux Foundation that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open, shared software platform for all technology in the vehicle, from infotainment to autonomous driving. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers and application providers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Announces Chinese Automaker SAIC Motor as a New Member

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, announces seven new members. SAIC Motor has joined as a Silver member, and German Autolabs, KPIT, MontaVista, OTAinfo, OUTCERT and Ovo Automotive join as Bronze members.

  • What?s New In Zephyr 2.0.0?

    The Zephyr Project is a small, scalable real-time operating system (RTOS) for use on resource-constrained systems supporting multiple architectures

  • openSUSE WSL images in OBS

    A fundamental concept of all openSUSE packages as well as any image offered for download is a fully transparent, reproducible and automatic build and development process based on sources.

    In openSUSE developers do not perform manual builds on some specially crafted machine in their basement and then upload the result somewhere. Instead all sources are stored in a version control system inside the open build service (OBS) instance at build.opensuse.org. OBS then automatically builds the sources including all dependencies according to defined build instructions (eg spec files for rpms). OBS also automatically adds cryptographic signatures to files that support it to make sure nobody can tamper with those files.

  • Don’t Get Left Behind, Upgrade to SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Today
  • Atari disputes reports that its retro-inspired console is doomed

    Atari put out a lengthy development update for the Atari VCS console earlier this week, on the same day that The Register reported that the project is experiencing significant difficulties. One source with knowledge of the project reportedly described it as a “shit show,” and the console is reportedly shaping up to be more of a Linux PC than a dedicated games console.

    Atari’s post sought to assure backers that the project is proceeding as planned. Amidst numerous photographs of the console’s circuit boards and chassis, the company claimed that the molds for the plastic housing of the console are “largely complete,” that its controllers and joysticks are “just about ready for mass production,” and that it expects to host hands-on preview events for the console later this fall.

  • IRS-Funded Review Confirms TurboTax Hid Free Filing From Search Engines, but Says There’s No Need for Major Changes

    A four-month outside review of the IRS’ partnership with the private tax software industry to provide free tax preparation offered mixed conclusions: It found serious problems in the program and confirmed ProPublica’s reporting this year that companies, including Intuit, the maker of TurboTax, had hidden the free option from search engines. But the report, written by an IRS contractor that has previously supported the industry’s position, also defended the program’s oversight.

    The review did not recommend sweeping changes. The mandate of the review was to narrowly assess the program to “ensure the continued operations and integrity of the Free File Program.” It did not examine the broader question of whether the premise of the program is sound or look at the IRS’ role in tax filing.

  • Digital Watchdog Adds Extensive List of Features to Spectrum IPVMS

    The DW Spectrum IPVMS server software is included with pre-configured DW Blackjack NVR servers and MEGApix CaaS edge cameras or it can be installed on third-party Windows or Ubuntu Linux-based systems.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Collapse OS is a Special Operating System for the Post-Apocalyptic Future

    As reported by Motherboard, there’s a new open-source operating system that is currently under heavy development, and it looks like it will soon be ready for a very dire scenario. Its creator, Virgil Dupras, is a person who believes there’s a good chance that by 2030, the world will have collapsed. The software developer isn’t absolutely certain about this, but he believes that the chances of the scenario are high enough to justify the development of a post-apocalyptic operating system, called “Collapse OS”.

    So, what would the ideal scavenger’s operating system be like? The simple answer to this would be “one that can run on virtually anything”. If there is one system out there that can run on almost any hardware, this is the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Collapse OS is taking things a lot further, being able to run on microcontrollers such as the ubiquitous Z80 microprocessor. Dupras considered what piece of hardware would be the easiest to find in a post-apocalyptic world, and Z80 came as the definitive answer. This 8-bit microprocessor is in cash registers, computers, music instruments, calculators, and virtually anything electronic.

  • PostgreSQL considers seccomp() filters

    A discussion on the pgsql-hackers mailing list at the end of August is another reminder that the suitability of seccomp() filters is likely more narrow than was hoped. Applying filters to the PostgreSQL database is difficult for a number of reasons and the benefit for the project and its users is not entirely clear. The discussion highlights the tradeoffs inherent in adding system-call filtering to a complex software suite; it may help crystallize the thinking of other projects that are also looking at supporting seccomp() filters.

    Joe Conway raised the idea in an RFC patch posting. It added a way to filter system calls in the main postmaster process and, with a separate system-call list, in the per-session backends. It also showed how to generate the list of system calls that are being used by PostgreSQL under various workloads, such as the test targets in the Makefile or by running a specific application. Information on the system calls made is logged by the audit subsystem; those logs are then processed to produce the list. Once there is confidence that the list is complete—which may be a sticking point—the remaining system calls could be blocked so that executing them would cause an error.

    But Peter Eisentraut was concerned that the list is going to be incomplete due to the "fantastic test coverage" needed to generate it and that it will require constant maintenance to keep up with GNU C Library (glibc) and other changes. Beyond that, PostgreSQL extensions will need their own lists of allowed system calls. Conway seems to see the support as something that those interested will maintain for themselves, rather than having a list that the project will distribute. "Perhaps most people never use this, but when needed (and increasingly will be required) it is available."

  • mjbots quad A0: October 2019 Roadmap

    My last video gave an overview of what I’ve accomplished over the past year. Now, let me talk about what I’m planning to work on going forward:

    I intend to divide my efforts into two parallel tracks. The first is to demonstrate increased capabilities and continue learning with the existing quad A0, and second is to design and manufacture the next revision of all its major components.

  • Philip Chimento: Free software at 40°C

    It’s that time of year again, time for a belated reflection on the GUADEC conference!

    In August I traveled to Thessaloniki, Greece, to attend first the annual GNOME Foundation board handover day, then the advisory board meeting, then the GUADEC conference and associated unconference days.

    The board discussion focused quite a lot on the strategic goals for the GNOME Foundation which you can hear more about in executive director Neil McGovern’s talk. Nuritzi has also blogged about the process of putting together these strategic goals.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices/Open Hardware

  • Site.js and Pi

    Chatting about Pi, on a Pi, with a chat server running on Site.js on the same Pi.

  • This MicroATX Motherboard is Based on Phytium FT2000/4 Arm Desktop SoC @ 3.0 GHz
  • Rikomagic R6 Review – Part 1: Android Mini Projector’s Unboxing and First Boot

    Rikomagic R6 is a mini Android projector that looks like a vintage radio, or depending on your point of view a mini vintage television.

  • Brief on Behalf of Amicus Curiae Open Source Hardware Association in Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc., No. 18-2214 (Fed. Cir.)

    Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc. is a case of first impression for the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The question on appeal is whether a design patent’s scope is tied to the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent. In this amicus brief, the Open Source Hardware Association (“OSHWA”) explains the potential effects on open source hardware development, and design practice generally, of untethering design patent protection from the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent. A large percentage of open-source hardware combines both ornamental and functional elements, and industrial design routinely involves applying design concepts from disparate fields in novel ways. To engage in this practice, open-source hardware designers need to know the universe of available source material and its limits. Further, understanding the licensing requirements of open-source hardware begins with understanding how the elements that make up that hardware may or may not be protected by existing law. Accordingly, while many creators of open-source hardware do not seek patent protection for their own creations, an understandable scope of design patent protection is nonetheless essential to their ability to collaborate with other innovators and innovate lawfully. The brief argues that the District Court in the case—and every district court that has considered the issue—correctly anchored the patented design to the article of manufacture when construing the patent. The brief explains that anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture is the best approach, for several reasons. Connecting the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture calibrates the scope of design patent protection to the patentee’s contribution over the prior art. It avoids encumbering the novel and nonobvious application of prior designs to new articles of manufacture, a fundamental and inventive practice of industrial design. It aligns the scope of design patent protection with its purpose: encouraging the inventive application of a design to an article of manufacture. This balances protection for innovative designs with later innovators’ interest in developing future designs. Finally, anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture helps fulfill design patent law’s notice function by clarifying the scope of protection.

Graphics: Gallium3D and AMDGPU

  • Gallium3D's Mesa State Tracker Sees "Mega Cleanup" For NIR In Mesa 19.3

    AMD developer Marek Olšák has landed a "mega cleanup" to the Gallium3D Mesa state tracker code around its NIR intermediate representation handling. As part of getting the NIR support in good enough shape for default usage by the RadeonSI driver, Marek has been working on a number of clean-ups involving the common Gallium / Mesa state tracker code for NIR.

  • AMDGPU DC Looks To Have PSR Squared Away - Power-Savings For Newer AMD Laptops

    It looks like as soon as Linux 5.5 is where the AMDGPU kernel driver could be ready with Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support for enabling this power-savings feature on newer AMD laptops. While Intel's Linux driver stack has been supporting Panel Self Refresh for years, the AMD support in their open-source Linux driver code has been a long time coming. We've seen them working towards the support since Raven Ridge and now it appears the groundwork has been laid and they are ready to flip it on within the Display Core "DC" code.

today's howtos and programming bits

  • CentOS 8 Package Management with DNF on the Command Line
  • AdamW’s Debugging Adventures: “dnf is locked by another application”
  • Managing user accounts with Cockpit
  • Download Ubuntu 19.10 ISO image to install on VirtualBox VM
  • GNU poke: Dealing with alternatives - Unions in Poke

    Computing with data whose form is not the most convenient way to be manipulated, like is often the case in unstructured binary data, requires performing a preliminary step that transforms the data into a more convenient representation, usually featuring a higher level of abstraction. This step is known in computer jargon as unmarshalling, when the data is fetch from some storage or transmission media or, more generally, decoding. Once the computation has been performed, the result should be transformed back to the low-level representation to be stored or transmitted. This is performed in a closing step known as marshalling or, more generally, encoding. Consider the following C program whose purpose is to read a 32-bit signed integer from a byte-oriented storage media at a given offset, multiply it by two, and store the result at the same offset.

  • Android NDK r21 moves to beta

    Android announced that NDK r21 is now in beta. Android NDK is a toolset for implementing parts of an app in native code. The release — which is the first long term support release — includes improved defaults for better security and performance. One of the key features in the release is an update to GNU Make to version 4.2, which provides a number of bug fixes, and enables ‘–output-sync’ to avoid interleaving output with error messages, the team explained. This is enabled by default with ndk-build. Additionally, GDB, the GNU project debugger, has been updated to version 8.3, which includes fixes for debugging modern Intel CPUs.

  • What is the history behind C Programming and Unix?

    If you think C programming and Unix are unrelated, then you are making a big mistake. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, if the Unix engineers at Bell Labs had decided to use another programming language instead of C to develop a new version of Unix, then we would be talking about that language today. The relationship between the two is simple; Unix is the first operating system that is implemented with a high-level C programming language, got its fame and power from Unix. Of course, our statement about C being a high-level programming language is not true in today’s world. This article is an excerpt from the book Extreme C by Kamran Amini. Kamran teaches you to use C’s power. Apply object-oriented design principles to your procedural C code. You will gain new insight into algorithm design, functions, and structures. You’ll also understand how C works with UNIX, how to implement OO principles in C, and what multiprocessing is.

Server: Mirantis, Containers, GraalVM and Pensando

  • Mirantis Partners With OpenStack Foundation to Support Upgraded COA Exam

    “With the OpenStack market forecasted to grow to $7.7 billion by 2022 according to 451 research, the demand for Certified OpenStack Administrators is clearly strong and set to continue growing for many years to come,” said Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation. “We are excited to collaborate with Mirantis, who has stepped up to provide the resources needed to manage the COA, including the administration of the vendor-neutral OpenStack certification exam.”

  • How to use containers with an eye on security

    Containers are all the rage. With good reason. With containers, your company’s apps and service deployments become considerably more agile, more reliable, and even more secure. This is true for software development companies (who develop apps and services for other businesses), as well as companies looking to roll out web-based and mobile applications with an unheard of speed and reliability. But with any new technology, comes hurdles. One of the biggest hurdles for any business is security. Data breaches have become rampant and it’s on the shoulders of every company to do everything in their power to make sure they are rolling out technology that is as secure as possible. This idea should certainly be applied to containers. But what can you do to use containers security? Fortunately, there are a few steps that you can take from the very beginning.

  • GraalVM: Clearing up confusion around the term and why Twitter uses it in production

    What does the “umbrella term” GraalVM stand for? We interviewed Chris Thalinger (Twitter) at JAX London 2019. Hear what he has to say about the meaning of Graal and how it can benefit Twitter as well as the environment.

  • Pensando Systems Exits Stealth Mode With Plans To Take On Amazon AWS

    While normally we don't cover hardware start-ups on Phoronix, Pensando Systems has just exited stealth and given their focus will be heavily involved with Linux and in fact already have their first kernel driver mainlined. After announcing a $145 million (USD) Series-C round, Pensando Systems exited "stealth" and revealed the first details of what they are trying to achieve with this company led by many ex-Cisco staff. [...] Pensando has been on our radar since as I wrote about last month when they were just a stealth networking startup they already upstreamed their first Linux kernel driver. In the Linux 5.4 kernel is a Pensando "Ionic" driver for a family of network adapters. In this week's press release, Pensando didn't specifically call out Ionic but presumably is the backbone to their hardware. Now that they are beginning to talk about their ambitions, hopefully we see more Linux kernel patches from them soon.