Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How Long Will Desktop Linux Last?

    I've been a desktop Linux user for seventeen years. For eight of those years, I haven't had a copy of Windows installed on any machine in the house.

    Under the circumstances, I can easily drift into thinking that Linux and free software represent the whole of computing, and possibly its future as well. Increasingly, though, I find myself wondering how long desktop Linux will last, especially when I consider the growing popularity of mobile devices.

  • Project Calico, Flannel Join Forces for Policy-secured Networking

    With this in mind, two open source projects, CoreOS’ Flannel virtual networking technology, and the Project Calico, another network overlay technology with strong security controls, have joined forces to offer a single package, called Canal, that will offer policy-based secure networking for the container and microservices era.

  • 4 Container Networking Tools to Know

    With so many new cloud computing technologies, tools, and techniques to keep track of, it can be hard to know where to start learning new skills. This series on next-gen cloud technologies aims to help you get up to speed on the important projects and products in emerging and rapidly changing areas such as software-defined networking (SDN) , containers, and the space where they coincide: container networking.

  • NetworkManager 1.2.2 Adds Hostname Fix for Slackware Linux, IPv6 Improvements

    NetworkManager maintainer Lubomir Rintel today announced the release of the second maintenance version of the latest stable and most advanced NetworkManager 1.2 series.

    NetworkManager 1.2.2 arrives on May 11, 2016, as a small point release for stable GNU/Linux operating systems that use this popular open-source network connection manager by default.

  • gNewSense 4.0 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Canonical Patches Multiple OpenSSH Vulnerabilities in Supported Ubuntu OSes

    Canonical released an update for the OpenSSH packages in the Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating systems.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • CoreOS Fest: Tigera Launches Canal Container Networking Effort

    At the CoreOS Fest here one of the big pieces of news is a new networking effort called Canal. Canal is an open-source effort that combines Project Calico which has been led by Metaswitch and flannel, led by CoreOS into a new container networking project, that includes both addressing and security policy elements.

  • ReText 6.0 and PyMarkups 2.0 released

    Today I have released the new major version of the ReText editor.

  • Qvarn Platform announcement

    In March we started a new company, to develop and support the software whose development I led at my previous job. The software is Qvarn, and it's fully free software, licensed under AGPL3+. The company is QvarnLabs (no website yet). Our plan is to earn a living from this, and our hope is to provide software that is actually useful for helping various organisations handle data securely.

    The first press release about Qvarn was sent out today. We're still setting up the company and getting operational, but a little publicity never hurts. (Even if it is more marketing-speak and self-promotion than I would normally put on my blog.)

  • NixOS 16.03 released [Ed: scroll down a bit]

    NixOS 16.03 “Emu” has been released, the fourth stable release branch.

  • Chrome OS Still Growing In USA

    According to StatCounter, usage of Chrome OS in USA continues to grow, especially on weekdays when school is in. I expect schools would get better performance with Debian GNU/Linux but Debian has fewer salesmen and folks continue to spread/believe that GNU/Linux is “hard” somehow. That wasn’t my experience. Debian GNU/Linux worked for us.

  • Linaro's ARM-Based Developer Cloud

    As the adoption of ARM-based servers accelerates and IoT applications rapidly evolve, software developers are demanding access to requisite hardware and software-reference platforms. In response, Linaro released Linaro Developer Cloud, a new cloud-based native ARMv8 development environment, which can be used to design, develop, port and test server, cloud and IoT applications without substantial upfront hardware investment.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Intel's Clear Linux Distribution Switches Over To GCC 6.1 By Default

    Intel's Clear Linux operating system is now one of the first to be re-built under GCC 6 with using GCC 6.1 as its default compiler.

    Most distributions won't be migrating from GCC 5 to GCC 6 until later in the year, but this daily-updating Linux distribution out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center that continues to be focused on delivering optimized performance has already re-based from GCC 5.3 to GCC 6.1.0.

  • gNewSense 4.0 Promises a Solid Debian-Based Linux OS with 100% Free Software

    The gNewSense 4.0 GNU/Linux operating system has been released at the beginning of the month, and today we take a closer look at its new features and technologies.

  • We can repair email -- but it’s going to hurt

    Messaging and email are the most ubiquitous methods of personal communication that humans use today. We send more text messages, instant messages, and emails than we make phone calls. Many of us use these systems more often than we speak face-to-face with our friends and family. And we do so despite the fact that each is fairly broken in its own way, though SMS is probably the most robust of all the methods.

  • Welcome Prometheus

    Hi - my name is Alexis Richardson and I’m the chairman of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation TOC - Technical Oversight Committee. The TOC is an elected board of nine people. Representing the interests of CNCF’s members, we define and execute the CNCF’s technology strategy. I’m also the CEO and co-founder of Weaveworks, a CNCF member company.

  • Software is Eating the Ops World

    One thing I've thought a lot about is how the role of the system administrator is changing. This reflection was prompted by a couple of things: one, I'm a co-chair for talks at one of the longest running system administration conferences, so I should probably think about this kind of thing seriously when planning what talks we'll accept, etc. The other thing, though, is that I've read what some peers have had to say about the tone of the Google Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) book. My own interpretation is that the book thinks of traditional system administrators as "button pushers" who solely operate something that someone else gave them; similar to what you see in many large organization IT departments. There's a heavy emphasis on Engineering™, which isn't present in large organization IT departments. I haven't really dug in to the book -- so I'm going to leave those thoughts here and circle back in a few.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 6 Material-Inspired Themes/Icons for Your Linux Desktop

    What is a Linux desktop if it ain’t filled with eye candy? Here we have a list of Material inspired/flat-feeling Themes and Icons to beautify the GUI of your system so you may customize it to your hearts’ content.

    While there are more than a few themes and icons that will effectively function with your Linux system, I’ve scoured the web to make this compilation particularly because I’ve grown a liking for all things flat in relation to the looks and feel of any operating system.

  • Microservices Require Robust API Management

    As the microservices approach is becoming more prevalent in application development, API operations, or API Ops, is increasingly being recognized as a requisite skill amongst enterprise and startups.

    Microservices architecture breaks down services and assets into discrete, composable units. And they use APIs to communicate and connect with each other. Which in turn means dev teams are needing to build up their API design and creation skills (which requires testing and other ops tasks), as well as outsource functionality like security.

  • Infrastructure 'Coming to Life in a New Way,' SDN Inventor Says

    There are those that believe the era of infrastructure is gone, but Martin Casado is not among them. Casado, now a venture capitalist at Andreessen Horowitz, discussed during a keynote address at the Interop conference here why we're now on the cusp of an evolutionary shift in the infrastructure market.

  • MachineWorks to Release Polygonica v1.3 for Linux, Mac

    MachineWorks Ltd., leading provider of CNC simulation and verification software and polygonal mesh processing software, announced that future versions of Polygonica will include support for Linux and Macintosh operating systems.

  • Two of the Best Password Manager GUI Apps for Linux

    If you either manage a number of systems (regardless of platform), or simply have a lot of passwords for computers, services, sites, and so forth, keeping track of those authentication credentials can be a serious strain to your memory. On top of that, these days passwords should not be such that you can easily memorize them. The more challenging they are, the harder they are to crack. Because of this, anyone with more than one password necessary to navigate through the daily grind (which would be just about everyone) should immediately make use of a password manager.

  • Enlightenment Brings Session Recovery Support To Wayland

    Enlightenment's Wayland support continues to become more feature complete with the latest feature work being for session recovery support.

    With the latest work brought yesterday to Enlightenment Git, there's now support throughout under Wayland for session recovery support. This makes it possible where if the compositor were to die, there's support for reconnecting Wayland applications.

  • Fedora 24 Beta status is GO, release on May 10, 2016
  • The PPA Problem

    One of the things I frequently get questions about is why we recommend against the use of PPAs with Bodhi Linux. For those who are unaware PPAs, which is short for Personal Package Archives, are software repositories that contain software compiled for compatibility with specific versions of Ubuntu.

  • Mark Shuttleworth Talks Ubuntu Watches, Unity 8 and The Future of Free Software

    The man, the myth, and the space-faring market-disrupting legend, but also a very busy man.

    Yet, in the weeks following each new release of Ubuntu, Mark Shuttleworth manages to find some time to talk to the community and answer any pressing questions it has for him.

    Everyone, from the novice to the developer to grammatically deficient blogger, gets the same opportunity to ask Ubuntu’s’Self-Appointed Benevolent Dictator for Life’ anything they like.

    A video of his latest hour-long Q&A can be viewed by clicking play on the video above. If you are short on time you can scroll on down to read a transcript of highlights from the session.

  • DragonBox Pyra: Crowdfunding an open source, modular handheld PC (LPX Show)

    Before their was Kickstarter, before there were iPads, and before the smartphone market has really even taken off, there was the Pandora. It was designed to be a Linux-powered handheld computer which could be used for gaming and other tasks… but the crowd-funded project was plagued with shipping delays, which left a bitter taste in some people’s mouths.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC offers ISA, PCI, and PCIe expansion

    Versalogic’s “BayCat” is a rugged PC/104-Plus SBC with an Atom E3800 SoC, numerous I/O ports, ISA, PCI, and miniPCIe expansion, and -40 to 85°C operation.

  • Qualcomm patches widespread vulnerability, but most phones will remain at risk

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Podcast Season 4 Episode 8

    In this episode: Bitcoin scandal. RMS wins an award. Savers and rich people can buy the DragonBox Prya (thanks Canseco!) and Devuan reaches beta. Plus loads of Finds, Neurons and a long-stewing Voice of the Masses.

  • Interop: SDN Growing to $12.5B, SD-WAN to $6B

    "Open source is not just at the bottom of the networking stack, it now goes from layer 2 all the way up to network and security services," Casemore said. "It's significant fact in the market landscape and vendors have to give it due consideration."

  • RcppArmadillo 0.6.700.6.0

    A second Armadillo release 6.700.6 came out in the 6.700 series, and we uploaded RcppArmadillo 0.6.700.6.0 to CRAN and Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now 220 packages using.

  • Vivaldi Browser's New Snapshot Adds Editable Mouse Gestures, Tab Improvements

    We've been informed by Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard about the availability of a new snapshot build of the proprietary Vivaldi web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

    Vivaldi Snapshot 1.2.470.11 is now live for those who want to get an early taste of what's coming in the next stable update of the cross-platform web browser, which it looks like it gets a lot of attention lately, especially from those who want to migrate from Chromium-based browsers like Google Chrome or Opera. And today's snapshot introduces editable mouse gestures.

  • GNOME's Nautilus File Manager: "Its Best Moment Since It Was Created"

    At various points in GNOME's history the Nautilus file manager has been less than maintained, but these days the situation is much brighter.

    GNOME developer Carlos Soriano has come out to write about how great the Nautilus situation is these days. Soriano wrote in a new blog post, "as far as I can see the development status of Nautilus it’s in its best moment since it was created, and part of that is thanks of the status of gtk+ development and the values and vision of GNOME as a project."

  • Neptune Linux 4.5.1 ISO Out Now with USB 3 Boot Support, KDE Plasma 5.6.2

    Neptune developer Leszek Lesner announced the release and general availability of a new Live ISO image for his Neptune Linux rolling operating system, version 4.5.1.

    The new Neptune Linux 4.5.1 ISO is now ready for download and includes all the updated packages and security patches released in the distribution's main software repositories since Neptune 4.5.

  • My free software activities, April 2016
  • m23 rock 16.2 brings support for Ubuntu 16.04 clients

    From this version on, m23 offers support for m23 clients using Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus. A set of desktop environments is, of course, included for the new Ubuntu. Friends of the Univention Corporate Servers will be happy to hear that the m23 app is now available in the Univention App Center. As always, several small improvements have also been made to various parts of the software.

  • Unity 8 and Snaps Are the Future of the Ubuntu Desktop, After Ubuntu 16.10

    Today, May 5, 2016, is the last day of the Ubuntu Online Summit 2016, and we've just attended a very exciting session where the Ubuntu developers have discussed the future of the Ubuntu Desktop after Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak).

    You can watch the entire session below if you don't want to read the next paragraphs, but as usual, we'll try to detail and explain a few things for you so that you know now what to expect from future versions of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, on the desktop, of course.

  • Router hackers reach for the fork: LEDE splits from OpenWRT

    A split seems to have emerged in the Linux-router-OS community, with a breakaway group splitting from OpenWRT.

    OpenWRT is the chief open router firmware implementation, but it has run into headwinds of late. For example, downtime for the group earlier this year was traced back to the small organisation running a single, small, server without redundancy.

  • Samsung’s 360 degree camera will cost just about $350, oh and it runs Tizen !

    Samsung is one of those big guns from the consumer electronics market who has been betting huge on Virtual Reality. After partnering with Oculus for the Gear VR headset which has set its own benchmark for the best untethered VR solution one can buy, now that the headset has been in good shape, Samsung is working out ways to deliver content on it. Samsung have joined hands with multiple partners to provide VR experiences on its Milk VR platform and had also unveiled its own 360 degree camera at Unpacked 2016 event back in february- Gear 360 to let almost anyone to produce 360 degree content that can be viewed on the Gear VR.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • M$ Kicks Second Most Loyal Users In The Teeth [Ed: context below]
  • Windows 10 updates are now ruining pro-gaming streams

    Forcing a gaming PC to update mid-game during a livestream to up to 130,000 followers isn’t best advert for the software

  • Containers Used on over Half of New Apps in Production

    Shippable, the Seattle-based producer of a continuous delivery platform for software developers, recently quizzed 300 coders in the U.S. and found that more than half of them (52 percent) are using Docker or other container technologies to deploy their new applications in production. Fourteen percent are using containers for development and testing purposes.

    Indicating that 2016 is the year that containers cement their hold on the enterprise, a whopping 89 percent of respondents told the startup that they were very or somewhat likely to increase their use of the DevOps-enabling technology within the next 12 months.

    Developers are turning to containers when speed is of the essence. Containers have helped a majority of developers (74 percent) ship new software at least 10 percent faster. Eight percent are enjoying a 50-percent boost.

  • Divide et Impera

    But for those committed long term to an on premise model, new tactics are required. In a market that is struggling with fragmentation, solutions must become less fragmented. In some cases this will mean traditional formal partnerships, but these can be difficult to sustain as they require time and capital resource investments from companies that are certain to be short on one if not both. History suggests, however, that informal aggregations can be equally successful: the Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP combination, as one example, achieved massive success – success that continues to this day.

  • gNewSense 4.0 released

    I hereby announce the release of gNewSense 4, codenamed Ucclia. It's based on a solid Debian, modified to respect the Free Software Foundation's and is available for 3 architectures: i386, amd64 and mipsel (Lemote Yeeloong).

  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux Firewall OS Lands More OpenSSL Security Fixes

    Yesterday we reported news on the release of the IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution, which brought many security patches and improvements, along with updated components.

    Today, May 5, 2016, we're informing our readers about the immediate availability of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102, a small maintenance build to the stable IPFire 2.19 distribution that updates the OpenSSL package to version 1.0.2h, fixing a total of six vulnerabilities discovered upstream.

  • Samsung’s Artik 10, starts shipping in the US for $150

    Samsung’s Artik development boards are finally reaching hands of consumers in the US. The Artik development boards which were unveiled back in May 2015 at the IoT World 2015 have taken quite a lot of time to become consumer ready and take over the likes of the new Raspberry Pi 3, Pine 64,etc which have revolutionized the DIY Maker community with the “PC ona board” concept. And now, the Artik 10- the most powerful board from the Artik series is all set to intensify the ongoing competition. Priced at $150, which is more than what one would pay for 4 $35 priced Raspberry Pis, Samsung will sure have to do a lot to of work to impress the buyers and build a community around it.

  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • ​Why I Hate Security, Computers, and the Entire Modern Banking System

    I woke up yesterday to find that a string of mysterious credit card payments had wiped out my checking account.

    I spent the next few hours as a prisoner of the phone tree, being interrogated on the transactions that I wanted answers about. No, I did not have a Banana Republic credit card. I didn’t have a Capital One credit card either. And I had no idea who Michael was, or what he was doing with all my money.

    The woman on the other end of the phone flagged transaction after transaction. For each one, she read me a long, pre-written paragraph of instructions and disclaimers—verbatim, even if she had repeated the same words just before. “Okay, so,” I said, when she was finally done. “It looks like this person is paying off credit cards through the web. What… am I supposed to do about that? What information do they have that lets them do it?”

    “It looks like they have your routing number and account number,” she told me. “You should close this account and get a new one.”

    I thanked her and hung up. Then my head exploded.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Why Open-Source Pros Are in Great Demand
    The majority of hiring managers predict that the demand for open-source IT professionals will rise more than other recruitment-based areas of interest over the next six months, according to a recent survey from the Linux Foundation and Dice. The resulting report, "Moving Toward Professionalization: Rising Need for Open-Source Skills in 2016," indicates that these managers struggle to fill open-source positions, especially when trying to find candidates with needed cloud, networking and/or security experience. Meanwhile, when considering an offer, open-source professionals said they're most interested in working on appealing projects with cutting-edge technology challenges. Money and perks are of secondary interest, even though, given the hot market, many open-source specialists are able to negotiate a great compensation package. According to the report, "In the last decade, open-source development has experienced a massive shift: Once a mostly community and volunteer-based concern, the model has since become a mainstay of the IT industry. Flexibility in accommodating new technologies and speed at adapting to a changing market have made open source vital to modern companies, which are now investing zealously in open source and open-source talent. More and better code is the way forward, and the skilled professionals who can make it happen are highly in demand." More than 400 hiring managers and 4,500 open-source professionals took part in the research.
  • Open Source Realm Mobile Database Hits Version 1.0
    Citing advantages over the SQLite and Core Data databases commonly used in iOS and Android apps, Realm today launched version 1.0 of its namesake "mobile-first database."
  • Realm has hit the version 1.0 milestone, and now reaches over 1 billion users
    As mobile databases go, Realm was already a fan favorite. Now we get an idea of just how popular it really is, as the company notes it now reaches one billion iOS and Android users via 100,000 active developers.
  • Rackspace Adopts OX's Dovecot Pro Open Source IMAP Email Platform
    Dovecot, the open source email platform from Open-Xchange, received a significant endorsement this week from Rackspace, which announced that it will use the company's Dovecot Pro product for email hosting.
  • An Apparent Exodus Continues At OwnCloud
    This week we've now seen the announcements by Jos Poortvliet, Lukas Reschke, Björn Schießle, and Arthur Schiwon are among those leaving ownCloud Inc. Each of their blog posts confirm they are leaving but don't shed much light on the underlying situation at the company.
  • Upcoming governance workshop for the European Catalogue of ICT Standards for Public Procurement
    On the 15th June, 2016, DG Connect and DG Growth wil be co-hosting an interactive workshop for the European Catalogue of ICT Standards for Public Procurement. This catalogue of standards is being developed to assist public procurers implement interoperable ICT solutions across Member States, as well as reducing incidence of vender lock-in, and ultimately to assist in the continued development of the Digital Single Market.
  • American schools are teaching our kids how to code all wrong
    To truly impact an children’s cognitive development, and prepare them for future computing jobs that may not even exist yet, we must move beyond pop computing. I strongly believe that learning computing should become mandatory in all schools, and should be viewed in the same context as reading and writing. Students must be challenged and encouraged to think differently in each grade level, subject matter, and read/write various computing projects every day in their academic life. With this mindset and approach we’ll help this generation of students fill those one million jobs, all of which require so much more than dragging and clicking.
  • Google Inbox Notifications
    I made a Firefox addon that brings that functionality to Google Inbox. It gives you a notification when new mail arrives and updates the pages title with the unread mail count. You can get it here!
  • Upcoming Webinar on Getting Linux Certified - Tips, Tactics, and Practical Advice

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Paul Vixie on IPv6 NAT, IPv6 security and Internet of Things
    Internet pioneer Paul Vixie spoke with SearchSecurity about IPv6 NAT, IPv6 and the Internet of Things, and the long, thankless path to deploying IPv6.
  • PHP 7.0.7 Released Fixing 28 Bugs
    As is the case with a .xy update, this is mostly a bug fix update, with at least 28 different issues being fixed in an effort to make PHP 7.x more stable. Though the PHP project hasn't identified any specific security vulnerabilities that are fixed in the update, I see at least one with bug #72162.
  • Skimmers Found at Walmart: A Closer Look
    Recent local news stories about credit card skimmers found in self-checkout lanes at some Walmart locations reminds me of a criminal sales pitch I saw recently for overlay skimmers made specifically for the very same card terminals.

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: BSD

  • Faces of FreeBSD 2016: Michael Lucas
    Back by popular demand, we’re again sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD with our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. Regardless, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.
  • pfSense 2.3.1 FreeBSD Firewall Update Patches Web GUI Security Issue, Seven Bugs
    Released a week ago as the first maintenance build in the 2.3 stable series, pfSense 2.3.1 received its first update, bringing a patch for a major security issue in the Web GUI, as well as seven other bug fixes. pfSense 2.3.1 was a major point release of the FreeBSD-based network firewall distribution that introduced over 100 changes, but pfSense 2.3 brought a new pkg system that lets the project's maintainers update only individual parts of the system.