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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release with Updated Components

    Matthias Clasen was pleased to announce today, April 12, 2017, the availability of GNOME 3.24.1, the first point release to the latest GNOME 3.24 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions.

    GNOME 3.24 launched three weeks ago as the most advanced version of the open-source desktop environment used by default in numerous Linux-based operating systems, including Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS, openSUSE, and many others. As mentioned before, GNOME 3.24.1 is the first maintenance update to the stable series, adding various improvements and bug fixes.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Analyst’s Long Term Pick
  • Tizen SCM Tools Packages Released – Version 17.01.2

    Hey Tizen Developers or Devs, the Tizen Tools team are proud to announce the latest release of the Tizen SCM Tools packages, taking it to version 17.01.2, which has the following updates: gbs 0.24.6, MIC Image Creator 0.27.4 and repa 0.5.

  • Openness is key to working with Gen Z

    Leaders and managers everywhere collectively groan with the thought of a new cohort to manage. Boomers and Gen Xers typically try to align the new kids on the block with Millennials—which would be a mistake. While Gen Z and Millennials have similarities, their motivators and influencers are vastly different. Each of the differences affects attraction, recruitment and retention of Gen Z talent.

  • Battery Venture ranks top Open-Source projects in new report

    Two of the top three highest-ranked projects in the index, Linux and MySQL, have spawned successful companies, Thakker pointed out. No. 1-ranked Linux underpins Red Hat and Ubuntu, while database company MySQL, later acquired by Sun Microsystems (now part of Oracle), is powered by MySQL technology, which ranked No. 3. And the popular version-control system Git, which ranked No. 2 on the list, has inspired companies like GitHub and GitLab.

  • 12 ways to study a new programming language

    In this article, I outline 12 suggestions for study techniques. Remember that everybody learns differently. Some of these techniques may work excellently for you, whereas others may not meet your needs at all. If you start to feel stuck with one strategy, try another and see where it gets you.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • It Looks like Netflix Doesn't Support Custom User-Agents for Firefox on Linux

    Despite his efforts to contact the Netflix customer support and explain the issue, they appear to be clueless how to solve the problem. So after some more research, Jiri Eischmann discovered that Netflix doesn't allow custom User-Agents on its video streaming platform on Linux, which means that not only Fedora users are affected but also those who use openSUSE, Debian, or even CentOS.

    Jiri Eischmann also discovered that Firefox 52 on Ubuntu was not blocked by Netflix, but some users in the comments said it didn't work for them, so the only fix right now to this annoying issue is to not use a custom User-Agent for Firefox if you want to watch Netflix shows. Simply use an add-on that lets you easily change the User-Agent to only display Linux, not a specific distro to fix the problem. Does Netflix work well on your distro?

  • Nginx might have 33% market share, Apache isn’t falling below 50%

    A better title for the original article would be: Nginx runs on 33% of top websites, supplementing Apache deployments.

    This is one of those rare occasions where 1 + 1 != 2. Nginx can have 33% market share and Apache can have 85% market share, because they're often combined on the same stack. Things don't have to add up to 100%.

  • Tiny Core 8.0 Is A Mini 16MB Linux Distro

    Anyone searching for a super small Linux Distro might be interested to know that this week Tiny Core version 8.0 has been released and takes up just 16 MB of space and will boot on most computers in just a couple of seconds.

today's leftovers

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Misc

Xfce Git Code With Docker, Spotify Web Player for Linux Discontinued, Languages for DevOps, and Linux Gaming

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Misc
  • Releases, releases, releases! Part 2

    Xfce – like many other open source projects – is not exactly following a test-driven development workflow. I would argue that we need a slight mindset change here plus we need some (standardized) infrastructure to make testing easier for people who want to get involved.

  • It's Now Easier Testing Out Xfce Git Code With Docker

    Xfce-test is a Xubuntu 17.04 based container image designed for Docker that makes it very easy to deploy some of the latest Xfce Git components.

  • Matthew James: Spotify Web Player for Linux - Discontinued
  • Top 5 programming languages for DevOps

    I've been focused on infrastructure for the majority of my career, and the specific technical skills required have shifted over time. In this article, I'll lay out five of the top programming languages for DevOps, and the resources that have been most helpful for me as I've been adding those development skills to my infrastructure toolset.

    Knowing how to rack and stack servers isn't an in-demand skill at this stage. Most businesses aren't building physical datacenters. Rather, we're designing and building service capabilities that are hosted in public cloud environments. The infrastructure is configured, deployed, and managed through code. This is the heart of the DevOps movement—when an organization can define their infrastructure in lines of code, automating most (if not all) tasks in the datacenter becomes possible.

  • An interview with Beamdog about Linux gaming, they say it’s worth it

    I had the pleasure of speaking to two different teams at game developer and publisher Beamdog, notable for Baldur’s Gate: Enhanced Edition and the soon to be released Planescape: Torment: Enhanced Edition.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • All FreeDesktop.org Projects Now Appear To Have A Contributor Covenant

    X.Org, GStreamer, Wayland, LibreOffice, Mesa, VA-API, Harfbuzz, and SPICE are among the many projects hosted by FreeDesktop.org that now appear to be on a contributor covenant / code of conduct.

    The Contributor Covenant for those unfamiliar with it is trying to promote a code of conduct for open-source projects that is trying to promote diversity and equality of contributors to libre software projects. From the covenant's website, "Part of this problem [of "free, libre, and open source projects suffer from a startling lack of diversity, with dramatically low representation by women, people of color, and other marginalized populations"] lies with the very structure of some projects: the use of insensitive language, thoughtless use of pronouns, assumptions of gender, and even sexualized or culturally insensitive names."

  • Dell introduces two Ubuntu Linux laptops that are the most powerful in the world right now

    Ubuntu Linux-powered machines that feature impressive hardware are few and far between but Dell has introduced two of the most powerful portable notebook workstations running a completely different operating system. The exciting part is that both of these machines are available to purchase on Dell’s online website right now, but let us walk you through the specifications first to see which machine is the right one for you.

  • Old Vista Laptop Into A Linux ZFS File Server

    You might be surprised at how much potential for usefulness still remains in older equipment.

    My wife’s old laptop originally booted with Windows Vista, which (apart from being a generally substandard OS – Microsoft employees ran into so many problems with it, they reportedly didn’t even use it internally*) is no longer supported*(2). Mainstream support for Vista ended back in 2012, and as of April 11 2017, Vista will be officially dead

  • Vulkan 1.0.47 Released

    Another week, another update to the Khronos Vulkan specification. This Saturday morning brought the Vulkan 1.0.47 release.

  • GP10B & GP107 NVIDIA Support Land For Nouveau Linux 4.12

    Ben Skeggs has queued up some of the last patches from NVIDIA's open-source enabler who last week left the company and queued up the code in DRM-Next for introduction in Linux 4.12.

    These patches authored by Alexandre Courbot include enablement of the GP10B and GP107 for this open-source NVIDIA DRM driver. GP10B is the GPU found within the Tegra X2 SoC on the recently released Jetson TX2 board. This is a mobile Pascal graphics processor that packs a fair punch on this SoC. As usual for Maxwell+ GPUs, GP10B requires some new firmware images.

  • RHEL 7 STIG v1 updates for openstack-ansible-security
  • Univention Corporate Server 4.2 released
  • Skylake takes flight on industrial EBX and Mini-ITX boards

    Perfectron announced a rugged, Linux-ready EBX SBC with Skylake-H Xeon and Core CPUs, plus an industrial Skylake-S Mini-ITX board.

    Perfectron, which recently announced a rugged, 3.5-inch OXY5361A SBC with Intel 6th Gen Core Skylake-U CPUs, has unveiled EBX and Mini-ITX boards with 6th Gen Skylake-H and Skylake-S chips, respectively. The rugged, EBX form-factor OXY5739A SBC lists support for Fedora 20 and Ubuntu 13.04/13.10/14.04 in addition to Windows, while the full-height Mini-ITX INS8349B makes no mention of OS support.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google Kahlee: The First AMD-Powered Chromebook

    After years of many Intel and ARM Chromebooks, the first AMD-powered Chromebook appears to be gearing up for release.

    Continuing with tradition, the AMD Chromebook is using Coreboot. Thus we have the first signs of it via Coreboot code review with this new Google board being codenamed "Kahlee." The Coreboot code began appearing for review just minutes ago after other Kahlee references in the Chrome OS world have been found in recent weeks.

  • Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

    Next week Microsoft will begin the slowish rollout of its big update to Windows 10, the Creators Update.

    Right now, it's doing a little damage control, and preempting complaints about privacy, by listing the types of information its operating system will automatically and silently leak from PCs, slabs, and laptops back to Redmond.

    When Windows 10 came out, Reg readers were alarmed by the volume of information the software was collecting and sending back to base. Ever since then, Microsoft has been fighting a PR battle to reassure people that such data slurping isn't all bad – it's "just" telemetry and diagnostics and potentially your files.

    Now Redmond's had a little rethink for the Creators Update, and decided to come clean on exactly what the software will phone home – even insisting the closed-source operating system will scoop up less surveillance this time.

  • Can Linux OpenSwitch Project help startups get network 5G ready?

    The network bottleneck needs all the tech talent startups can throw at it. The Linux Foundation’s OpenSwitch Project wants to remove lower-stack roadblocks that might stifle their innovation.

    “We’re seeing startups come in and do really, really interesting things really, really well,” said Drew Schulke (pictured), vice president of converged networking at Dell EMC.

    However, they could do more in less time if the foundation of their work were provided in advance, he added. To this end, Dell contributed the base operating system for the OpenSwitch Project.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.10.8, Receives Flatpak 0.9

    openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio is back with news for users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system series, informing them about the latest technologies and updated applications that landed in the repositories.

    The developer starts his weekly report by reminding us that openSUSE Tumbleweed was the first GNU/Linux distribution to ship the latest GNOME 3.24 desktop environment to its users. A total of eighteen snapshots appear to have been released for Tumbleweed users, bringing all the newest apps, including the Mozilla Firefox 52.0.1 web browser and KDE Plasma 5.9.4 desktop environment.

  • Red Hat and Fedora Teams Welcome Ubuntu to GNOME and Wayland with Open Arms
  • Canonical Refocus

    And, Mark, Jane, I know this will have been a tough decision to come to, and this will be a tough day for the different teams affected. Hang in there: Ubuntu has had such a profound impact on open source and while the future path may be a little different, I am certain it will be fruitful.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The Linux Foundation: Not a Friend of Desktop Linux, the GPL, or Openness

    The Linux Foundation has no respect for FOSS. Nor does it seem care about any users of Linux who aren't connected with the enterprise. It's been that way since the beginning. It now appears that the Foundation also has little respect for the GPL...you know, Linux's license. Nor does it appear to be much of a believer in the notion of transparency.

  • Nageru 1.5.0 released

    I just released version 1.5.0 of Nageru, my live video mixer. The biggest feature is obviously the HDMI/SDI live output, but there are lots of small nuggets everywhere; it's been four months in the making.

  • Manipulated, a short puzzle-platformer where you need some brains

    Manipulated [Steam] is a short puzzle-platformer that warns you about having to think. It's certainly not wrong.

  • Shovel Knight’s 3.0 patch lands, with plenty of new content

    The fun and charming platform inspired by 8-bit era visuals has gotten a shiny new campaign. This isn’t the only major addition and there’s plenty other new content available to enjoy.

  • Conference to have Daily Keynote Speakers

    The openSUSE Conference is about seven weeks away and this year will again have high-quality keynote speakers.

    Keynote speakers for this year’s conference at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 26 – 28 will be from SaltStack, KDE and Free Software Foundation Europe.

    Matthias Kirschner, President of FSFE, will take the stage on May 26 at 10 a.m. and provide attendees an exorbitant amount of information about governance and open source.

    Later that evening, there will be entertainment and a Brazilian style barbecue, so stick around for the Friday night fun.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New Regulations Appear To Authorize Chinese Law Enforcement To Hack Into Computers Anywhere In The World

    A recurrent theme here on Techdirt has been the way in which the West has ceded the moral high ground in so many areas involving the tech world. For example, in 2010, we noted that the US had really lost the right to point fingers over Internet censorship. The moral high ground on surveillance went in 2013 for people, and in 2014 for economic espionage. Meanwhile, the UK has been shown to be as bad as the most disreputable police states in its long-running blanket surveillance of all its citizens.

    The UK's most recent move to cast off any pretense that it is morally superior to other "lesser" nations is the Investigatory Powers Act, which formalizes all the powers its intelligence services have been secretly using for years. One of the most intrusive of those is the power to carry out what is quaintly termed "equipment interference" -- hacking -- anywhere in the world.

  • Android 7.1.2 Nougat Update Now Rolling Out to Nexus and Pixel Devices; Brings Fixes for Numerous Issues
  • Waze for Android Auto is finally on its way as beta testing prepares to kick off
  • Mouser Boosts Open Source Lineup with DFRobot, Globally Distributes Plug-and-Play Sensors Series

    Mouser Electronics, Inc., the New Product Introduction (NPI) leader that empowers innovation, announces a global distribution agreement with DFRobot, a leading robotics and open source hardware provider. The agreement brings DFRobot's robotics and maker-focused products to Mouser's growing open source lineup.

    [...]

    The Gravity Arduino Starter Kit is a plug-and-play electronics toolkit that helps beginners easily learn how to work with sensors and the Arduino platform. The kit includes a DFRduino UNO R3 microcontroller, which functions exactly the same as Arduino UNO, and 12 popular Gravity components and sensors. The Gravity 27-Piece Sensor Kit for Arduino offers a robust selection of sensors that are fully compatible with the Arduino platform. The kit features a bundle of the most popular DFRobot Gravity sensors, including those for light, CO2, sound, touch, and distance, plus an accelerometer and a relay module. Both the Starter Kit and Sensor Kit use the IO Expansion Shield for connecting sensors to the Arduino board.

  • 5 cool C/C++ app dev tools

    As compelling as new languages like Rust are for building systems, C and C++ remain fundamental for writing applications that run close to the metal, despite the waxing and waning of their usage statistics.

    What's more, the culture of tools for C/C++ development remains deep and fruitful. Here are five C-related projects -- compilers, libraries, and support tools -- that caught our eye recently, whether for bolstering existing projects or starting new ones.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tesla’s software update for internet browser, Linux update and new features coming in ~6 weeks, says Elon Musk

    When Tesla started pushing its 8.1 software update to its fleet this week, it was really light on UI improvements and instead focused almost entirely on Autopilot 2.0 updates.

    Several of the changes that CEO Elon Musk previously associated with the upcoming 8.1 update have been pushed another ~6 weeks.

    We are talking about the expected internet browser update, Linux kernel update, and several bug fixes – especially having to do with Tesla’s media app.

  • Linux-Fu: Applications on the Web

    Did you know you can run remote Linux GUI programs in a browser with HTML5 support? It’s even secure because you can use SSH tunneling and that little trick means you don’t even need to open additional ports. If this sounds like gibberish, read on, it’s actually pretty easy to get up and running.

    I recently was a guest on a Houston-based podcast, and the hosts asked me if the best thing about writing for Hackaday was getting to work with the other Hackaday staff. I told them that was really good, but what I like best was interacting with people (well, most people) in the comments. That sometimes you’d post an article and someone would bring a topic up in comments that would really knock your socks off. This is how I wound up with this nearly ideal remote access solution, that requires nothing on the remote side but a web browser.

  • Philips Hue Uses Kubernetes to Keep the Lights On

    The open-source Kubernetes container management and orchestration system isn't just for hyper-scale data center operators, it can also benefit consumer electronics vendors. Speaking at the Kubecon / Cloud Native con even in Berlin this week, Mark Van Straten, Senior Developer at development firm Q42, detailed how Philips embraced Kubernetes to help enable the next generation of the Philips Hue smart light bulb product.

  • Netrunner Desktop 17.03 'Cyclotron' Debian-based KDE Linux distro now available

    When you choose a Linux-based operating system, you also choose a desktop environment. For many users, the DE sort of is the operating system. In other words, for some, they will really only interact with the user interface -- especially if they avoid the command line. A good operating system will get out of the user's way, allowing them to focus on the apps and tools they need.

    If you are moving from Windows to Linux, KDE can be a great desktop environment. It is very reminiscent of the traditional Windows 95 to Windows 7 experience. Unfortunately, KDE can be a bit tedious to set up. Sure, it works fine "out of the box," but customizing it can be daunting. Luckily, there is a Debian-based operating system that is configured beautifully -- especially for those leaving Microsoft's OS. Called "Netrunner Desktop," it comes pre-loaded with many useful programs, making it an absolute joy to use. Today, it reaches version 17.03, code-named "Cyclotron."

  • Technicals in Focus for Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • This was Fedora at CS50x.ni

    On Tuesday, March 14th, the Fedora Nicaragua community and the CS50x.ni staff, with the support from Fundación UNO and the Fedora Project, we had the opportunity to meet to see a series of lectures in which the speakers shared their experience using Free Software, the importance and benefits of the different software tools used in the CS50x.ni course. The lectures were aimed for anyone who is taking the CS50x.ni course currently, or who wants to take it in the future or people interested in learning more about free software and more specifically about the Fedora Project.

  • When the 'S' in HTTPS also stands for shady

    Just when we'd learned the importance of HTTPS in address bars, spammers and malicious hackers have figured out how to game the system.

    Let's Encrypt is an automated service that lets people turn their old unencrypted URLs into safely encrypted HTTPS addresses with a type of file called a certificate. It's terrific, especially because certificates are expensive (overpriced, actually) and many people can't afford them. So it's easy to argue that the Let's Encrypt service has done more than we may ever realize to strengthen the security of the internet and users everywhere.

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Leftovers: OSS

  • Codesmith Students Garner National Praise for Open-Source Contributions
    Reactide is an Integrated Development Environment built for React, which intends to make React development easier for Software Engineers. The project has been widely praised, amassing over 6,000 stars on GitHub.
  • Airbnb’s new open source library lets you design with React and render to Sketch
    Today, Airbnb’s design team open sourced its internal library for writing React components that easily render directly to Sketch. Instead of trying to get Sketch to export to code, the Airbnb team spent its time on the opposite — putting the paintbrush in the hands of the engineer.
  • [Older] Telecoms copying cloud providers make beeline for open source, say analysts
    The supersonic growth of Amazon Web Services and other cloud providers in the past few years owes much to open-source communities that fed them cutting-edge tech free-of-charge. Now telecom is mimicking this strategy through involvement with the Linux Foundation, according to Scott Raynovich (@rayno) (pictured, right), guest host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile live streaming studio.
  • Get a Preview of Apache IoT Projects at Upcoming ApacheCon
    The countdown until ApacheCon North America has begun. The blockbuster event will be in Miami this year and runs May 16-18. The Apache community is made up of many niche communities and ApacheCon offers something for all of them. Here, Roman Shaposhnik, Director of Open Source, Pivotal Inc., who is heading the Apache IoT track at the ApacheCon conference, gave us a sneak peek of what the Apache Internet of Things community can look forward to at the event.
  • Free Webinar on Starting a Collaborative Open Source Project
  • Oracle draws curtains on OmniOS
    With its openly stated operational remit of ‘aggressive acquisitions’ (albeit positively aggressive), Oracle is (very) arguably a firm known for buying, swallowing, acquiring those companies it decides to consume.
  • Partners Healthcare, Persistent Systems to develop open-source platform
  • Libreboot Applies to Rejoin GNU
    Last week we reported that after reorganization, Libreboot was considering rejoining GNU and was seeking input from its community to determine the amount of support it had for such a move. From reading the comments posted both on our article on FOSS Force and on Libreboot’s website, it comes as no surprise that the project’s core members feel they have the necessary consesus to proceed. Last night, FOSS Force received an email — sent jointly to us and Phoronix — letting us know of the decision. Rather than repeat what’s already been written and said on the subject (for that, follow the first link above), we’re publishing a slightly edited version of the email, which will pretty much bring everyone up to date on the situation.

Security updates and no more patches from grsecurity (without a fee)

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • GrSecurity Kernel Patches Will No Longer Be Free To The Public
    The GrSecurity initiative that hosts various out-of-tree patches to the mainline Linux kernel in order to enhance the security will no longer be available to non-paying users. GrSecurity has been around for the better part of two decades and going back to the 2.4 kernel days. In 2015 the stable GrSecurity patches became available to only commercial customers while the testing patches had still been public. That's now changing with all GrSecurity users needing to be customers.
  • Passing the Baton: FAQ
    This change is effective today, April 26th 2017. Public test patches have been removed from the download area. 4.9 was specifically chosen as the last public release as being the latest upstream LTS kernel will help ease the community transition.
  • grsecurity - Passing the Baton
    Anyone here use grsecurity and have any thoughts about this?

Microsoft-Connected Forrester and Black Duck Continue to Smear FOSS

More Coverage of Kali Linux 2017.1 Release

  • Kali Linux 2017.1 Security OS Brings Wireless Injection Attacks to 802.11 AC
    Offensive Security, the developers of the BackTrack-derived Kali Linux open-source, security-oriented operating system announced the availability of the Kali Linux 2017.1 rolling release. Since Kali Linux become a rolling distro, the importance of such updated images was never the same, but Kali Linux 2017.1 appears to be a major release of the ethical hacking distro, adding a bunch of exciting new features and improvements to the Debian-based operating system.
  • Kali Linux 2017.1 Released With New Features | Download ISO Files And Torrents Here
    Offensive Security has updated the Kali Linux images with new features and changes. Termed Kali Linux 2017.1, this release comes with support for wireless injection attacks to 802.11ac and Nvidia CUDA GPU. You can simply update your existing installation by running few commands if you don’t wish to download the updated images from Kali repos.