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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MoltenVK 1.0.20 Released To Continue Advancing Vulkan On macOS

    MoltenVK continues getting better for offering Vulkan graphics/compute support on macOS by leveraging it on top of Apple's Metal drivers.

    MoltenVK 1.0.20 is out as the latest feature update to this Vulkan-over-Metal layer. MoltenVK is notably used by Valve's Dota 2 on macOS, is becoming used by Wine, presumably will also be picked up for Windows Steam Play on macOS in the future, and so far also seems to being used by at least a few different indie game studios on macOS or iOS. This is good news for Linux users with ensuring Vulkan is a common denominator across platforms, avoiding fragmentation if VKD3D/DXVK had to be rewritten for Mac, etc.

  • Book review Mastering Vim Quickly From WTF to OMG in no time

    The vim editor is a free and open source text editor. It is a clone of vi text editor. Vim is extremely popular among the Linux, macOS and Unix-like system users. Vim has many commands. It comes with a pretty extensive built-in manual too. One might get lost in the built-in manual. Let us see if “Mastering Vim Quickly From WTF to OMG in no time” can help a new or experienced vim user to increase productivity.

  • Matlab Alternatives on Linux

    The well-known standard for mathematical research on computers is Matlab but except for being costly, it is not always the best alternative. To solve mathematical problems and vizualise different mathematical concepts you can use many other alternatives. The ones listed below are common in both academia and industry for a wide variety of reasons. This article compares the different packages and shows how easy it is to use for projects with the GUI and with other methods.

  • Krita’s 2018 Google Summer of Code

    This year, we participated in Google Summer of Code with three students: Ivan, Andrey and Michael. Some of the code these awesome students produced is already in Krita 4.1.1, and most of the rest has been merged already, so you can give it a whirl in the latest nightly builds for Windows or Linux. So, let’s go through what’s been achieved this year!

    Ivan’s project was all about making brushes faster using vectorization. If that sounds technical, it’s because it is! Basically, your CPU is powerful enough to do a lot of calculations at the same time, as long as it’s the same calculation, but with different numbers. You could feed more than 200 numbers to the CPU, tell it to multiply them all, and it would do that just as fast as multiplying one number. And it just happens that calculating the way a brush looks is more or less just that sort of thing. Of course, there are complications, and Ivan is still busy figuring out how to apply the same logic to the predefined brushes. But here’s a nice image from his blog:

  • Recent Cachix downtime

        

    On the 22nd there was no action from my side; the service recovered itself. I did have monitoring configured and I received email alerts, but I have not noticed them.

    [...]

    On 23rd I have immediately seen the service was down and I've rebooted the machine.

    I have spent a significant amount of time trying to determine if a specific request caused this, but it seems likely that it was just an overload, although I have not proved this theory.

  • wiki.debian.org: The Java Packaging Guide

    Good things come to those who wait. I always wanted to improve our Java Packaging documentation a little. When I started to contribute to Debian Java in 2012, I often struggled to find the right information and examples that would explain how I could package my own libraries or applications for Debian. After six years of trial and error and helpful advice on the debian-java mailing list, I figured it would be time to document this journey.

    At DebConf 2018 in Hsinchu I began to work on updating the wiki documentation. The current status of this work will always be visible at:

    [...]

    Despite the fact that some upstream projects come without a proper build system, they are often very simple to compile. Instead of one or two source files, you just have to compile dozens in one single directory. We have a Java helper tool called….Javahelper that does exactly that for you. A good start is to read the docs at /usr/share/doc/javahelper/tutorial.txt.gz also replicated here.

    Of course the Java world has invented the most powerful build systems in existence that are even able to bend light and can throw galaxies around. Let’s welcome Ant, Maven and Gradle. Everything else is irrelevant but don’t trust me.

  • August 2018 report: LTS, Debian, Upgrades

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Release Roundup: VLC, Wireshark, Geary + More

    The Linux landscape exists in a state of constant flux, with new distro releases, kernels, apps and other updates appearing all the time. In our Linux Release Roundup series we try to collate the notable new app, software and distro releases and other key software updates released during the past 7 days

  • GNOME Tweaks 3.30

    GNOME 3.30 will be released within a few days. That makes this a good time to showcase the improvements in GNOME Tweaks 3.30.

    One problem with moving power settings from Tweaks into Settings a year ago was that the Power panel only had one setting. GNOME Designer Allan Day suggested we use a new General panel to include the remaining power switch, the sound Over-Amplification switch, and the Animations switch.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in August 2018
  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities August 2018
  • Who’s Using Ubuntu

    A look at who’s using Ubuntu and their hardware.

  • Joe’s thoughts on Linux Mint 19, Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Ubuntu MATE 18.04

    Linux Mint 19 is just about put but it may not be as polished as we’re used to. I also ramble on about my experiences with some Ubuntu flavors.

  • Magisk 17.1 Introduces Tons of Fixes Including OTA Updates With A/B Partition Devices

    For quite a while now, Magisk has been the top rooting method (or at least the most preferred method) in the Android rooting community, due to the advantages of having a systemless root versus a system root. Magisk Modules have also helped bridge the gap of pros vs cons, by allowing users to install apps that typically require a system root into a systemlessly rooted device, and replacing files on the Android’s /system partition without actually touching the /system partition – which means Magisk doesn’t (usually) trip SafetyNet and other root-detection methods.

  • First Ever Crash Of Apple’s Self-driving Car Confirmed In Silicon Valley

    According to a report filed with the California DMV, it has been confirmed that one of Apple’s self-driving cars recently met with an accident in Silicon Valley.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Open source hypervisor technical support, update considerations

    Even though open source software itself is completely free to obtain and use, effective hypervisor technical support options for production environments might cost money.

    [...]

    Ultimately, an open source hypervisor might lack a meaningful development roadmap. Features, compatibilities and optimizations might take years to arrive, if ever, depending on the skills and objectives of the developer community. And effective technical support options might cost money, even though the open source software itself is completely free to obtain and use. This means it's extremely important for potential adopters to perform extensive due diligence testing before adopting an open source hypervisor.

  • pvmove speed

    The left part is with pvmove. The right part, two and a half times as fast, is with… tar piping to tar.

    Oh well, I remember the days when pvmove was 1–2 MB/sec. But it's still not very impressive Smile

  • Valve’s Steam for Linux compatibility tool already has 1,000 perfectly playable games

    Last week, Valve brought Windows game compatibility to Linux in the form of an official tool for Steam. The team had been working on this new compatibility tool for around two years and now that it is in public beta, the community has been quick to test it. While Valve’s initial wave of officially approved games was fairly small, community testers have figured out that close to 1,000 games are already perfectly playable on Linux now.

  • SUSE builds momentum with innovative open source offerings

    Jay Lyman, principal analyst for 451 Research, said, “Over the past few years, SUSE has expanded its portfolio into new areas, such as storage, cloud, containers and application delivery. With new independence and backing from Swedish private equity (PE) firm EQT Partners, SUSE is answering market demand for a neutral, yet comprehensive hybrid cloud platform that supports multiple public and private clouds as well as on-premises infrastructure integration with software such as its SUSE Linux Enterprise 15.”

  • SUSE Builds Momentum with Innovative Open Source Offerings, Revenue Growth and Commitment to Enterprise Customers

    SUSE® is an open source pioneer that has provided enterprise-grade software to tens of thousands of organizations for more than 25 years. As SUSE prepares to embark upon its next phase of corporate development as a stand-alone company*, it continues to grow and build momentum with its core products, emerging solutions, communities and partners while expanding its presence in new market segments. SUSE is better positioned than ever before to shepherd enterprises through the demands of digital transformation with open source innovation and expertise in software-defined infrastructure, application delivery and cloud technologies.

  • Latest Oxygen OS Update Brings Front Portrait And Gaming Mode 3.0 To OnePlus 5/5T
  • Changing Our Approach to Anti-tracking

    Anyone who isn’t an expert on the internet would be hard-pressed to explain how tracking on the internet actually works. Some of the negative effects of unchecked tracking are easy to notice, namely eerily-specific targeted advertising and a loss of performance on the web. However, many of the harms of unchecked data collection are completely opaque to users and experts alike, only to be revealed piecemeal by major data breaches. In the near future, Firefox will — by default — protect users by blocking tracking while also offering a clear set of controls to give our users more choice over what information they share with sites.

  • Lunchtime brown bags

    Over the Summer I’ve come to organise quite a number of events in Mozilla’s London office. Early Summer we started doing lunchtime brown bags, where staff give a 10 ~ 15 minute informal talk about what they are currently working on or a topic of their interest.

  • The Commons Clause - For Good or Bad

    The current debate about the Commons Clause, and other attempts to place restrictions on open source licences, is dividing opinion. But before taking sides first we need to understand what the Commons Clause does and why it is necessary.

    According to the README.md on its GitHub repo the Commons Clause is a Licence Condition contributed by FOSSA, a company which offers open-source licence management and drafted by Heather Meeker, a lawyer specializing in open source software licensing, including IP strategy, compliance, transactions, and disputes.

    The Commons Clause can be added as a commercial restriction on top of an open source licence to transition an existing open source project to a source availability licensing scheme, which means that while the source can be viewed, and in some cases modified, it is no longer fully open source. The restriction it imposes is that it denies the right to sell the software.

  • California Bill Is a Win for Access to Scientific Research

    The California legislature just scored a huge win in the fight for open access to scientific research. Now it’s up to Governor Jerry Brown to sign it.

    Under A.B. 2192—which passed both houses unanimously—all peer-reviewed, scientific research funded by the state of California would be made available to the public no later than one year after publication. There’s a similar law on the books in California right now, but it only applies to research funded by the Department of Public Health, and it’s set to expire in 2020. A.B. 2192 would extend it indefinitely and expand it to cover research funded by any state agency. EFF applauds the legislature for passing the bill, and especially Assemblymember Mark Stone for introducing it and championing it at every step.

    A.B. 2192’s fate was much less certain a few weeks ago. Lawmakers briefly put the bill in the Suspense File, a docket of bills to be put on the back burner because of their potential impact on the California budget. Fortunately, the Senate Appropriations Committee removed A.B. 2192 from the file after EFF explained that its fiscal impact would be negligible.

  • Open source RISC-V implemented from scratch in one night

    Developed in a magic night of 19 Aug, 2018 between 2am and 8am, the darkriscv is a very experimental implementation of the opensource RISC-V instruction set.

  • Federated CI

    In the modern world, a lot of computing happens on other people's computers. We use a lot of services provided by various parties. This is a problem for user freedom and software freedom. For example, when I use Twitter, the software runs on Twitter's servers, and it's entirely proprietary. Even if it were free software, even if it were using the Affero GPL license (AGPL), my freedom would be limited by the fact that I can't change the software running on Twitter's servers.

    If I could, it would be a fairly large security problem. If I could, then anyone could, and they might not be good people like I am.

    If the software were free, instead of proprietary, I could run it on my own server, or find someone else to run the software for me. This would make me more free.

    That still leaves the data. My calendars would still be on Twitter's servers: all my tweets, direct messages, the lists of people I follow, or who follow me. Probably other things as well.

    For true freedom in this context, I would need to have a way to migrate my data from Twitter to another service. For practical freedom, the migration should not be excessively much work, or be excessively expensive, not just possible in principle.

    For Twitter specifically, there's free-er alternatives, such as Mastodon.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The End of the Sun is a first-person adventure game inspired by Slavic mythology and legends

    From the press email we got sent (thanks Xpander) Linux is a confirmed platform for the game.

  • 3D printing with Atelier

    During this year's Akademy conference, Lays Rodrigues introduced Atelier, a cross-platform, open-source system that allows users to control their 3D printers. As she stated in her talk abstract, it is "a project with a goal to make the 3D printing world a better place". Akademy is the KDE community's annual conference. This year it took place in Vienna and the program included a number of hardware-related talks as part of the conference portion held during the weekend of August 11 and 12.

    [...]

    The AtCore library's function is to provide an abstraction for the serial communication with the printer and control of it. It provides a generic layer that is independent from the user interface. AtCore can thus work with any interface, "including QML", she added. AtCore uses pure C++ with Qt for performance reasons. Rodrigues gave memory usage when printing as an example: Atelier requires 200MB of memory while other, similar programs may require 2GB. AtCore supports most open-source 3D-printer firmware using a plugin architecture to handle differences between different firmware implementations. Rodrigues showed at one point the list of the supported printer firmware, which corresponds to the list of supported printer models.

    The second part of the team's work is the "test client": Atelier. However, it is a full 3D host system, not just a test program. It uses the KDE libraries in addition to Qt — and the AtCore library, of course. Rodrigues ran a demonstration of a number of Atelier features. The configuration she used included a laptop running Atelier and a small embedded system with the printer firmware. The demo included all stages of the printing process.

  • Akademy 2018 in Vienna

    Akademy 2018 was hosted in TU WEIN university, Vienna from 11th to 17th August, 2018.Being part of this Akadmey gave me a chance and opportunity to meet all the fellow KDE contributors in person and socialize with them.

    First two days some contributors gave presentations on their respective projects.
    Rest of the week was BoF (Bird of Feather) sessions, BoF sessions are great way to discuss things with other community members and gather feedback. There were also workshop sessions organized by KDE e.V. for community members.

  • Moving towards a software defined IoT business model

    The opportunity to capitalise on the internet of things is significant for many companies, but that doesn’t mean that it is a straightforward journey to success. Companies need to analyse their current business practices and evaluate where benefits can be gained – and for some this could be changing their business model in its entirety.

    Device manufacturers are a prime example of this. With hardware commoditisation forcing their margins downwards and low-cost competitors applying increasing pressure, manufacturers need to build a sustainable business that brings in continuous revenue beyond the initial device sale. By devising a software-led strategy, device manufacturers can transition to new business models underpinned by IoT app stores and ecosystems of 3rd party ISVs (independent software vendors).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Universim is now officially available in Early Access on Steam

    The Universim from developer Crytivo just entered Early Access today and as promised it does include the Linux build. It's been quite a long road to get here, with the Kickstarter being succesful all the way back in 2014 with nearly $400K.

    Note: Copy personally purchased a long time ago from their own store.

  •  

  • Getting started with the i3 window manager on Linux

    In my article 5 reasons the i3 window manager makes Linux better, I shared the top five reasons I use and recommend the i3 window manager as an alternative Linux desktop experience.

    In this post, I will walk through the installation and basic configuration of i3 on Fedora 28 Linux.

  •  

  • Calendar progress

    As we’re closing in on a simple but functional calendar for Kube, I’d like to share our progress with you.

    We’ve decided to start with a week view, as that seems to be a good compromise between information density and enough information for day-to-day use.
    We will eventually complement that with a month view, which is probably all we need for the time being.

  • Krita Comic Managemer: Improving the other exporters.

    There’s still more that can be done, like for example accessibility metadata entries, but for now I am pretty pleased with this.

    It is in master, so Krita 4.2 will carry the updated plugin!

  • Calibre 3.30.0 for Slackware with internal Qt5 libraries

    It took me quite a while to release a new package for Calibre, the e-book library manager. That had a reason.

    In July I switched the Qt5 package in my repositories to version 5.11 to support the latest KDE Plasma5 software and because it offers advantages over the previous 5.9 releases. Unfortunately, as I found out soon afterwards, the Calibre software fails to work with Qt 5.11 – its GUI components were not built and there was no obvious error to explain why.

    Therefore I had to re-visit the calibre.SlackBuild‘s internals and try to revive the internal functions that compile an embedded Qt library set. This was last tested in the early days of my Calibre packages when Qt4 was the running champion. Adding internal Qt5 support was quite a different beast. Qt5 is a lot bigger than the venerable Qt4 so the build process needed some pruning to keep the compilation times acceptable and the package size under control.

  • Securing apps and services with Keycloak (Watch DevNation Live video)

    The video from the last DevNation Live: Securing apps and services with Keycloak is now available to watch online. In this session, you will learn how to secure web/HTML5 applications, single-page and mobile applications, and services with Keycloak. Keycloak can be used to secure traditional monolithic applications as well as microservices and service mesh-based applications that need secure end-to-end authentication for all front- and back-end services. The examples in the video cover PHP, Node.js, and HTML/JavaScript.

    Securing applications and services is no longer just about assigning a username and password. You need to manage identities. You need to integrate with legacy and external authentication systems to provide features that are in demand like social logins and single sign-on (SSO). Your list of other requirements may be long. But you don’t want to develop all of this yourself, nor should you.

  • Breaking the legacy virtualization cycle: How Red Hat and our partners are transforming IT through open source

    Across nearly every industry, organizations of all shapes and sizes are embracing digital transformation in an effort to modernize their IT departments. They want to deliver better, faster and more dynamic services to customers -- and they’re starting from their infrastructure, up. But for companies locked into legacy technologies, transformation isn’t always an option.

    Organizations with proprietary virtualization solutions know all too well how this technology can stifle enterprise IT innovation and advancement. For many, the cost of simply maintaining existing infrastructure investments ties up an overwhelming majority of budgets, leaving little room to invest in new technologies, and the closed vendor ecosystem can make integrating and adopting cloud-native solutions based on Kubernetes and Linux containers nearly impossible.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 28 August 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • Rugged telematics fleet computer ready to be dinked and dunked

    Nexcom’s compact, IP67 protected “VTC 1911-IPK Telematics IoT Gateway” runs on a Bay Trail Atom and offers CAN 2.0B, dual mini-PCIe and SIM slots, GPS, 2x GbE, SATA, and more. It’s resistant to shock, vibration, humidity, and -40 to 70°C temperatures.

    With flooding and sea-level rise on the rise due to climate change, there will no doubt be a lot more trucks and other heavy equipment sloshing around in the muck. The Nexcom VTC 1911-IPK Telematics IoT Gateway is ready to get wet and bumpy with the help of IP67 water and dustproofing, -40 to 70°C support, and shock, vibration, and humidity resistance. This wireless-enabled in-vehicle computer is designed for construction site management and heavy-duty vehicle fleet management working in chemical plants, construction sites, and waterfront venues.

  • IGEL Positioned to Capitalize on Fast-Growing Demand for Linux at the Endpoint

    IGEL, a world leader in endpoint management software for the secure enterprise, today announced findings from the new IDC InfoBrief, "Linux and the Thin Client Management Market." In the IDC InfoBrief, sponsored by IGEL, IDC reveals findings on the key factors driving thin client adoption growth and propelling endpoint device expansion. In addition, IDC shows findings that endpoint Linux operating system (OS) shipment shares are shifting at a global level, distinctly outpacing all other OSs.

  •  

  • Phones as Old As Moto G Can Now Download Android P, Full List of Devices Inside

    Android P is currently a hotly anticipated software update among Android users. However, the software update is not officially available on devices other than Pixel – Pixel/Pixel XL and Pixel 2/Pixel 2 XL. However, wouldn’t like to download it right now and try it out?

  • Google improves AI model training by open-sourcing framework
  • AI: Google releases open source framework for reinforcement learning
  • An Introduction to Quantum Computing with Open Source Cirq Framework

    As the title suggests what we are about to begin discussing, this article is an effort to understand how far we have come in Quantum Computing and where we are headed in the field in order to accelerate scientific and technological research, through an Open Source perspective with Cirq.

    First, we will introduce you to the world of Quantum Computing. We will try our best to explain the basic idea behind the same before we look into how Cirq would be playing a significant role in the future of Quantum Computing. Cirq, as you might have heard of recently, has been breaking news in the field and in this Open Science article, we will try to find out why.

    [...]

    It will be easier for us to understand Quantum Computing by comparing it first to Classical Computing. Classical Computing refers to how today’s conventional computers are designed to work. The device with which you are reading this article right now, can also be referred to as a Classical Computing Device.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- August 2018

    Here’s a summary of some of the bugs against the Debian Policy Manual. Please consider getting involved, whether or not you’re an existing contributor.

  • Reports from Netdev 0x12

    The Netdev 0x12 networking conference was held in mid-July. Participants at the event have put together a set of reports of the talks that were held on the last two days; Day 2 includes eleven talks, including the keynote by Van Jacobson, while Day 3 covers another ten topics.

  • Netdev day 3

    In this talk Tushar Dave presents his work on using eBPF for Reliable Datagram Socket (RDS) filtering. Tushar started his talk by explaining that RDS is a high performance, low latency connectionless protocol that sits on top of TCP (sk_buff) and IB (scatterlist) transport layers.

    The problem Tushar tried to solve was to implement RDS filtering and firewall to do DPI of a full RDS packet in a unified solution for both TCP and IB. Netfilter is a possibility but Netfilter only uses sk_buff. An alternative is eBPF which has been adopted into the Linux kernel and used for a lot of things.

    In order to use eBPF as it was, Tushar had to add a new BPF prog type (similar to socket filter) that deals with scatterlist. In addition he had to create a new function to setup needed data structures to run filter program attached to the socket. As POC Tushar created a BPF helper to help users to traverse the sg elements in the scatterlist.

  • Netdev 2018 day 2

    The first of these saved us until ~1995, then the second and third until ~2012. Since then the problem has been increasing. Dennard's scaling stopped. Usually, the switch's speed was faster than the host speed. CPU upgrades cannot solve network problems anymore. This had a big impact on the network. Google has been working to try and address some of these issues; Van mentioned several Google authored papers: - Hull, BwE, FQ/pacing, Timely, BBR, Carousel. All these papers tried to figure out how to find the bottleneck link downstream and prevent pressure in downstream buffers. BwE discussed how to fix things at the host to prevent queue buildup in switches. FQ/pacing was about desire to prevent many packets traveling to the same destinations in bursts.

    Van argued that AFAP isn't working for us now because it's local to the host and our problems aren't local. We need a mechanism that allows for more control of packet spacing on the wire. To enforce relationships between all outgoing packets, the enforcement mechanism needs to be just in front of the NIC. Carousel is a great example of this.

  • Chrome’s New Tab Page is Finally Customizable

    Google is giving Chrome users a more configurable "new tab" page to play with, with options to add custom links and set a custom background image.

  • OBSD.ams : The setup

    For all the people who want to know what our setup looks like. Below is a write-up of our setup and configuration. There aren't any packages installed on the servers running the Virtual Machines.

  • bison-3.1 released [stable]

    We are very happy to announce the release of GNU Bison 3.1. It introduces new features such as typed midrule actions, brings improvements in the diagnostics, fixes several bugs and portability issues, improves the examples, and more.

  • Add GUIs to your programs and scripts easily with PySimpleGUI

    Few people run Python programs by double-clicking the .py file as if it were a .exe file. When a typical user (non-programmer types) double-clicks an .exe file, they expect it to pop open with a window they can interact with. While GUIs, using tkinter, are possible using standard Python installations, it's unlikely many programs do this.

    What if it were so easy to open a Python program into a GUI that complete beginners could do it? Would anyone care? Would anyone use it? It's difficult to answer because to date it's not been easy to build a custom GUI.

    There seems to be a gap in the ability to add a GUI onto a Python program/script. Complete beginners are left using only the command line and many advanced programmers don't want to take the time required to code up a tkinter GUI.

  • Containers in Perl 6

    In the first article in this series comparing Perl 5 to Perl 6, we looked into some of the issues you might encounter when migrating code into Perl 6. In the second article, we examined how garbage collection works in Perl 6. Here, in the third article, we'll focus on Perl 5's references and how they're handled in Perl 6, and introduce the concepts of binding and containers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • AMD Releases Radeon Pro V340 With Dual Vega GPUs & 32GB HBM2

    AMD used VMworld 2018 to announce the Radeon Pro V340 graphics card, which features two Vega GPUs.

    The Radeon Pro V340 features two Vega GPUs and a total of 32GB of HBM2 memory with SR-IOV/MxGPU virtual desktop infrastructure support intended for data-centers with visualization workloads and supporting up to 32 virtual machines with the graphics card (1GB vRAM per guest).

  • NVIDIA Introducing NV_memory_attachment For OpenGL

    The newest OpenGL extension being sought for inclusion into the graphics API's registry is the NV_memory_attachment.

  • AtCore/Atelier update August ’18

    It has been sometime since I’ve written about our progress with AtCore and now that I find myself with a bit of down time Its time to give you all an update. Since the end of May we have landed 32 commits from 4 contributors. I would like to first thank our newest contributor Leandro Santiago for taking time to contribute to AtCore.

  • Realtek on the LVFS!

    Realtek have been really helpful and open about the hardware, which is a refreshing difference to a lot of other hardware companies. I’m hopeful we can get the new plugin in fwupd 1.1.2 although supported hardware won’t be available for a few months yet, which also means there’s no panic getting public firmware on the LVFS. It will mean we get a “works out of the box” experience when the new OEM branded dock/dongle hardware starts showing up.

  • Linux Operating System Market 2018 Global Share,Trend,Segmentation and Forecast to 2025
  • UBports Foundation releases Linux-based Ubuntu Touch OTA-4

    Canonical once had an ambitious vision of making Ubuntu a dynamic operating system that would scale to desktop computers, tablets, and smartphones. Unfortunately, this goal was ultimately a failure -- the Ubuntu Touch plan was abandoned. Later, the much-maligned Unity environment was killed off. Why did it all fail? Quite simply, as Microsoft learned with Windows Phone, it is pretty much impossible to compete with Google and Apple in mobile. Android and iOS are just too mature and too good. Ubuntu Touch had no real chance due to a lack of apps and device support.

    For those that still own devices compatible with Ubuntu Touch, all is not lost. You see, the UBports Foundation has picked up development. Today, the foundation releases version OTA-4, which is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. It is chock-full of improvements, but unfortunately, despite the "OTA" name, you apparently cannot upgrade over the air.

  • Combining the Benefits of SAS and Open Source Analytics
  • Flexera and KPMG Expand Alliance to Keep Open Source Software Clean and Safe
  • Golang 1.11 is here with modules and experimental WebAssembly port among other updates

    Golang 1.11 is here with modules and experimental WebAssembly port among other updates

    The Golang team released Golang 1.11 rc1 two weeks back, and now the much awaited Golang 1.11 is here. Golang 1.11, released last Friday, comes with changes and improvements to the toolchain, runtime, libraries, preliminary support for “modules”, and experimental port to WebAssembly.

  • Is Hyper-Threading a Fundamental Security Risk?

    Ever since Intel introduced Hyper-Threading (known generically as Symmetric Multi-Threading), debates about whether or not to disable the feature have almost entirely revolved around its impact on performance. Back when the feature debuted, it wasn’t unusual for programs to misinterpret what it meant for a system to have a virtual CPU core as opposed to a second physical chip (back then, it was one core to a socket, no exceptions, and programs didn’t differentiate between a physical and a logical CPU core). As software and operating systems were updated, HT settled down and it’s less common today to need to shut it off to preserve performance. But in the wake of Spectre, Meltdown, and Foreshadow, serious concerns have been raised about the security implications of Hyper-Threading.

  • 4 tips for better tmux sessions
  • Auto-generating news and publishing it to WordPress with Apache Camel

    WordPress is one of the most used open source tools for creating websites. More than 30% of the web is built on top of WordPress. Besides creating websites, blogs, and apps, WordPress leverages a huge plugin repository maintained by a passionate community. There are even plugins that can turn a WordPress website into an e-commerce platform.

  • Wi-Fi Not Working on Ubuntu? Here’s How to Fix it
  • 12 Easy Steps to Speed Up Ubuntu Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Civility in a systemd World

    Let me just say that I don't really know much of anything about systemd and as such, I'm not even sure I care. I know that people either like systemd or really, really, hate systemd and that there is a very slim slice of global users that don't care one way or the other. I also know that literally everything in life can be turned into a punchline joke if you link it to systemd. You don't even have to understand the specifics of the joke, you just know that if systemd is part of the punch line that you are supposed to laugh. Now after all that, here is the real reason for this post.

    I was listening to episode 262 of the Linux Unplugged podcast in which there is a discussion of Benno Rice's BSDCan 2018 keynote called "The Tragedy of systemd. First, the discussion was really, really good and certainly thought provoking. I would highly recommend listening to the discussion. It was interesting enough that I had to go and actually find the keynote presentation and watch it in it's entirety. Remember what I said at the start of this post, I don't really know anything about systemd nor do I know if I even care. And yet I am willing to say it was a very good presentation.

  • LG V20 and Q6 to Receive Android Oreo Update Along With Camera and Audio Enhancements
  • Understanding Niamey’s flood risk through open source mapping, drones, and modeling

    For thousands of years, the Niger River has been the lifeblood for not only Niger, but also its neighboring countries in the Niger River Basin. Yet, even as many Nigeriens depend on the mighty waterway for food, water, and livelihoods, the Niger River also poses a severe flood risk to the West African country during the rainy season. In the third quarter of 2017, widespread flooding due to heavy rains claimed the lives of over 50 people and displaced nearly 200,000.

    Lying on the banks of the Niger River, the Nigerien capital Niamey is especially vulnerable to flood risk. Poorly planned development in the city, which has contributed to land degradation and soil erosion, has only exacerbated the risk. To make matters even worse, many parts of Niamey, which has seen its population balloon to over one million people, lack proper drainage infrastructure.

  • GOG Launches FCKDRM to Promote DRM-Free Art and Media

     

    GOG, the digital distribution platform for DRM-free video games and video, has launched a new initiative designed to promote content without embedded DRM. While Digital Rights Management is seen by many companies as necessary to prevent piracy, GOG believes that its restrictions are anti-consumer and run counter to freedoms that should exist alongside content ownership.  

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Cockpit 176

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 176.

  • SDL2 Introducing Sensors API

    The SDL2 library that offers a cross-platform hardware abstraction layer primarily and primarily used by Linux/Windows/macOS/iOS/Android games now has a sensor API.

    Initial work landed in SDL2 on Tuesday by Sam Lantinga for offering a hardware sensor API as their latest major addition to the library. The API is quite generic in being able to query the number of supported sensors, sensor names, types of sensors, read the sensor data, etc.

  • They should have called it Mirrorball

    TL;DR: there’s now an rsync server at rsync://images-dl.endlessm.com/public from which mirror operators can pull Endless OS images, along with an instance of Mirrorbits to redirect downloaders to their nearest—and hopefully fastest!—mirror. Our installer for Windows and the eos-download-image tool baked into Endless OS both now fetch images via this redirector, and from the next release of Endless OS our mirrors will be used as BitTorrent web seeds too. This should improve the download experience for users who are near our mirrors.

    If you’re interested in mirroring Endless OS, check out these instructions and get in touch. We’re particularly interested in mirrors in Southeast Asia, Latin America and Africa, since our mission is to improve access to technology for people in these areas.

  • Freespire 4.0, Mozilla Announces New Fellows, Flatpak 1.0, KDevelop 5.2.4 and Net Neutrality Update

    Freespire 4.0 has been released. This release brings a migration of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS codebase to the 18.04 LTS codebase, which adds many usability improvements and more hardware support. Other updates include intuitive dark mode, "night light", Geary 0.12, Chromium browser 68 and much more.

  • Omarine 4.0 released!
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 21 August 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • New Pixel 3 XL Leak Shows Off In-box Content And Camera Samples
  • The Back to School sale is on!

    For some of you, it is a time to return your educational institution and continue the important process of learning about the world around you—maybe for some of you it is the first time being part of higher education, while some of you might be long-time academic researchers and associates. For those who are sick of their thick laptops weighing down on their backpacks and who would also want something with security in mind, what better way to start the school year than with a Purism laptop?!

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Linux firewalls: What you need to know about iptables and firewalld

A firewall is a set of rules. When a data packet moves into or out of a protected network space, its contents (in particular, information about its origin, target, and the protocol it plans to use) are tested against the firewall rules to see if it should be allowed through. Here’s a simple example... Read more

Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

  • Fedora Firefox – GCC/CLANG dilemma
    After reading Mike’s blog post about official Mozilla Firefox switch to LLVM Clang, I was wondering if we should also use that setup for official Fedora Firefox binaries. The numbers look strong but as Honza Hubicka mentioned, Mozilla uses pretty ancient GCC6 to create binaries and it’s not very fair to compare it with up-to date LLVM Clang 6. Also if I’m reading the mozilla bug correctly the PGO/LTO is not yet enabled for Linux, only plain optimized builds are used for now…which means the transition at Mozilla is not so far than I expected.
  • September 2018 CA Communication
    Mozilla has sent a CA Communication to inform Certification Authorities (CAs) who have root certificates included in Mozilla’s program about current events relevant to their membership in our program and to remind them of upcoming deadlines. This CA Communication has been emailed to the Primary Point of Contact (POC) and an email alias for each CA in Mozilla’s program, and they have been asked to respond to the following 7 action items:
  • Emily Dunham: CFP tricks 1
    Some strategies I’ve recommended in the past for dealing with this include looking at the conference’s marketing materials to imagine who they would interest, and examining the abstracts of past years’ talks.

today's howtos

Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
  • This New CSS Attack Restarts iPhones & Freezes Macs
  • Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Containers After Package Manager Patch
  • GrrCon 2018 Augusta15 Automation and Open Source Turning the Tide on Attackers John Grigg