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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The People Who Support Linux: SysAdmin Rigs Raspberry Pi for Racing Pigeons

    “I got a very minimal Linux running (kernel 0.93p11) and then later bought a set of disks from Duke University (kernel 0.93p13still SLS),” he said. “My first really useful Linux was Kernel 1.2.8 Slackware 2.3. I couldn't get X Windows to run but this was MS DOS days so color Bash was pretty cool. I had an offline packet reader for mailing lists from bulletin boards. I also used minicom to dial up GEnie. Later I started using SLIP to get to to the Internet and dropped GEnie.”

  • Google Not Scoffing at AI, Files Patent Applications

    Linus Torvalds was interviewed by Slashdot last week and his comments on artificial intelligence has been making the rounds since. He basically said AI would not lead to human-like robots because the neural network would remain limited. Despite that, Google has "applied for at least six patents on fundamental neural network and AI." In other news, Kali Linux 2.0 is expected at DEFCON 23 and the Free Software Foundation has approved another Linux OS for its "fully free" list. Docker 'Tinkerer Extraordinaire' said Open Source is hostile to women and Megatotoro posted Pisi Linux is still alive and kicking.

  • The Other Companies Participating The Most In Mesa/DRI Discussions
  • AMD Catalyst 15.7 Stable Linux Driver Released After a Long Absence

    The AMD developers have announced that a new Catalyst Linux driver, 15.7, has been released and is now available for download. It's been a while since we had a stable version of the Catalyst driver, but it's still not all that impressive.

  • Unvanquished Alpha 41 Released, Still Moving Towards NaCl VM Usage

    It's been a while since last reporting on Unvanquished (mostly because it seems their RSS feed is broken), but they've continued moving along with their open-source game and Daemon engine. This first person shooter is now up to its 41st monthly alpha release.

  • Pisi Linux...Still Alive!

    I'm happy that Pisi is still with us. It has become too silent and almost secluded, but I still hope Pisi does not go extinct.

  • Alpine Linux 3.2.1 Is Out Now. Text Based Installation Steps

    The design goal for Alpine Linux is to provide a secure and lightweight distribution, which should cater the needs of most of the Linux users. It is based on musl and BusyBox; today Alpine Linux 3.2.1 has been released, in this article we will be reviewing the noteworthy features of this Linux distribution and the installation process for this latest release.

  • Kali Linux 2.0 Release Day Scheduled

    We’ve been awfully quiet lately, which usually means something is brewing below the surface. In the past few months we’ve been working feverishly on our next generation of Kali Linux and we’re really happy with how it’s looking so far. There’s a lot of new features and interesting new aspects to this updated version, however we’ll keep our mouths shut until we’re done with the release. We won’t leave you completely hanging though…here’s a small teaser of things to come!

  • Point Linux 3.0 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Flock, unified globalization, weak dependencies, end of life vs. end of world…

    Flock is our big, annual contributor conference, where we get together to talk about what we’re working on and what we want to do in future releases, and also actually get in rooms together to hack on ideas. It’s also great fun, and a celebration of our “Friends” foundation.

  • libav and FFmpeg: switch over
  • Snappy Personal Desktop

    " It is still a WIP and it is also quite early, but if you want to try out Snappy Personal Desktop," http://carla-sella.blogspot.co.uk/2015/07/snappy-personal-desktop.html

  • Ubuntu Making Progress On Snappy Personal Desktop

    For those interested, it's becoming possible to play with Ubuntu's Snappy next-generation package manager from a personal desktop.

  • Lenovo To Ship Laptops With Ubuntu In India, Starting At 48,000 INR

    Lenovo is preparing to ship laptops preloaded with Ubuntu in India. The first of these systems will be the Lenovo Thinkpad L450, featuring only one of two CPUs, but the selection may widen over time and expand to other countries.

  • Canonical partners with Lenovo to launch Ubuntu-powered ThinkPad L450 laptops in India

    Canonical, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, has partnered with computer OEM Lenovo to launch the ThinkPad L450 series running the Linux distro in India. Starting at Rs 40,000, the laptops will be available to purchase from selected commercial resellers and distributors.

  • Ubuntu Version Of Intel Compute Stick Available For $110 at Amazon, Newegg And Best Buy
  • Open Source Virtual Reality Platform now Supports Android

    The Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR), an organization working towards an open standard for virtual reality devices, has announced that OSVR software now accommodates Android devices, adding to existing distribution for Windows and Linux.

  • Android Candy: Google Photos
  • 8 penetration testing tools that will do the job

    If the probability of your assets being prodded by attackers foreign and domestic doesn’t scare the bejesus out of you, don’t read this article. If you’re operating in the same realm of reality as the rest of us, here’s your shot at redemption via some solid preventive pen testing advice from a genuine pro.

  • Could a Presidential Election be Hacked?

    Now that’s an intriguing question, isn’t it? Just about every other computerized process has proven to be vulnerable, and as voting becomes even more technology based, it becomes increasingly vulnerable as well. Computer systems are generic processing hosts, and to a computing platform, data is simply data. The fact that certain information tallies votes rather than credit card transactions does not make it any harder to hack. Moreover, the U.S. has a long history of documented voting fraud, so there’s no reason to assume that politicians, and their backers, have suddenly become paragons of virtue. Indeed, there’s plenty of evidence to the contrary.

    When you come down to it, the only thing that’s different today is that altering votes might be easier, and that those motivated so do so may be harder to catch. So why aren’t we hearing more about that risk?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Gummiboot Is Dead

    Gummiboot is dead, of course, because it was spun into systemd to form systemd's SD-Boot (U)EFI boot manager. SD-Boot has been in there since systemd 220 as an optional feature and can be used for doing some cool stuff.

  • Linux Top 3: Linux 4.2 rc1, 4MLinux 13 and antiX15
  • It’s okay if I die now, says Linux creator [Ed: Rewriting the headline of an old article to create bait]

    While Linux is open-source, which allows people to change it as they please, Torvalds remains the lone official arbiter of the software, guiding how Linux evolves. He is The Decider.

  • Someone Is Already Working On SPIR-V For The Nouveau Driver
  • How to use Nvidia Optimus to switch active GPUs and save power on Linux laptops
  • GNOME Commander 1.4.7 (Total Commander-like File Manager) Brings Bug-Fixes Only

    As you may know, GNOME Commander is an open-source two panel file manager similar to Norton Commander or Midnight Commander, being very popular among the Linux power users.

    Among others, it has support for tabs, permits the users to select or deselect files, has support for FTP, SAMBA, folder bookmarks and history, integrated command-line, embedded file viewer and other useful features.

  • New LibreOffice packages for Slackware 14.1 and -current

    LibreOffice galore! Last week saw the announcement of the latest in the 4.x series, and I decided to build LibreOffice 4.4.4 packages. This time however, they are created for Slackware 14.1. The stable release of Slackware deserves the latest stable office suite to keep you guys productive.

  • OpenSSL tells users to prepare for a high severity flaw

    Server admins and developers beware: The OpenSSL Project plans to release security updates Thursday for its widely used cryptographic library that will fix a high severity vulnerability.

    OpenSSL implements multiple cryptographic protocols and algorithms including TLS (Transport Layer Security), which underpins encryption on the Web as part of protocols like HTTPS (HTTP Secure), IMAPS (Internet Message Access Protocol Secure) and SMTPS (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol Secure).

  • The Mob's IT Department

    A few days earlier, small USB drives had been inserted into the company’s computers. They were programmed to intercept the nine-digit PINs that controlled access to DP World’s shipping containers. Besides fruit, metals, and other legitimate cargo, some of these containers carried millions of euros in heroin and cocaine. To get their drugs out of the port, often traffickers use low-tech methods: They hire runners to jump fences, break open containers, and sprint away before guards can catch them, earning as much as €10,000 ($11,200) a trip. Stealing PIN codes is more elegant and less risky. Whoever has the codes can pull into the terminal, enter the PIN into a keypad, wait as robot-controlled loaders put the container on their truck, and drive off—sometimes minutes ahead of the cargo’s legitimate owner.

    [...]

    There was only one condition of the release: Van De Moere had to give Okul an intensive training session on Linux, the operating system on which Metasploit, the hacking software, is based. A few weeks later, according to police and interviews, he did so over one weekend at a Holiday Inn in Ghent. In November, Van De Moere returned two antennas and had a couple of beers with Okul. That was the last either man would see of the Turks.

  • Anti Evil Maid 2 Turbo Edition

    Joanna Rutkowska came up with the idea of Anti Evil Maid. This can take two slightly different forms. In both, a secret phrase is generated and encrypted with the TPM. In the first form, this is then stored on a USB stick. If the user suspects that their system has been tampered with, they boot from the USB stick. If the PCR values are good, the secret will be successfully decrypted and printed on the screen. The user verifies that the secret phrase is correct and reboots, satisfied that their system hasn't been tampered with. The downside to this approach is that most boots will not perform this verification, and so you rely on the user being able to make a reasonable judgement about whether it's necessary on a specific boot.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Key Question: Is Bundling Proper?

    In both cases, bundling is either a restraint of trade or simply a wasted motion. You don’t paint a house green only to paint it red if you have any sense. The right way to do IT is to make your choice and buy/acquire what you need to accomplish your goals in the most efficient manner possible. Bundling exclusively That Other OS with all PCs was only good for an illegal monopolist and its “partners” in crime. This is not about denying businesses profits. It’s about competition in the market and freedom for users/buyers to have choice.

  • Dell Gets An Airplane Mode Switch Driver In Linux 4.2
  • Call for hosts for GUADEC 2016

    GUADEC is the biggest gathering of GNOME users and developers, which takes place in Europe every year. It includes conference days, the GNOME Foundation annual general meeting and hacking in a week of coding and discussion.

  • 4MLinux 13.0 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Tumbleweed is rolling again

    Opensuse Tumbleweed has been static since the 20150612 snapshot. But today the 20150630 snapshot was released. We are moving again.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed net-tools vs net-tools-deprecated
  • PostgreSQL 9.5 in Debian

    The package is also waiting in NEW to be accepted for Debian experimental.

  • DUCK challenge at DebConf15
  • Upgrades to Jessie, Ruby 2.2 transition, and chef update

    Last month I started to track all the small Debian-related things that I do. My initial motivation was to be concious about how often I spend short periods of time working on Debian. Sometimes it’s during lunch breaks, weekends, first thing in the morning before regular work, after I am done for the day with regular work, or even during regular work, since I do have the chance of doing Debian work as part of my regular work occasionally.

    Now that I have this information, I need to do something with it. So this is probably the first of monthly updates I will post about my Debian work. Hopefully it won’t be the last.

  • Avalue debuts Braswellian COMs and an SBC

    Avalue unveiled three Linux-friendly embedded boards based on Intel’s 14nm Braswell SoCs: a Qseven COM, a COM Express Type 6 COM, and a 5.25-inch SBC.

  • Tizen In-App Purchases(IAP) for Unity Applications goes Live!
  • 5 Best Enterprise Apps and Extensions for Google Chrome

    We have already covered a lot of enterprise applications on our site before. However, one would never expect apps in this genre to exist on a browser like Google Chrome. But, nothing could be further from the real truth. Google's effort to outsmart even the biggest players in the enterprise market are gradually paying off. Slowly spreading its wings into the business world, Google is venturing into arenas where Microsoft once reigned supreme. While the competition doesn't concern us much, but what has happened, in effect, is that the rivalry is bringing out the best in both companies.

  • Platform9 Aims to Control the Private Cloud from the Cloud [Video]
  • Teaching Email Self-Defense: Campaigns intern leads a workshop at PorcFest

    My workshop on Email Self-Defense took place at the 12th annual Porcupine Freedom Festival in Lancaster, New Hampshire. Around eight people attended, which was a few more than I expected. Christopher Waid and Bob Call of ThinkPenguin joined me in helping everyone who brought a laptop to set up GnuPG properly. Those who didn't bring a laptop participated by observing the process on the system most similar to their own and asking questions about particular steps, so as to enable them to achieve the same configuration when they returned home.

  • Security advisories for Thursday

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenVZ / Virtuozzo 7 Beta First Impressions

    There will eventually be two distinct versions... a free version and a commercial version. So far as I can tell they currently call it Virtuozzo 7 but in a comparison wiki page they use the column names Virtuozzo 7 OpenVZ (V7O) and Virtuozzo 7 Commercial (V7C). The original OpenVZ, which is still considered the stable OpenVZ release at this time based on the EL6-based OpenVZ kernel, appears to be called OpenVZ Legacy.

  • Libdrm 2.4.62 Is An Important Update For Open-Source GPU Drivers

    Libdrm 2.4.62 was released this week as a significant update to this DRM library for interfacing between the kernel DRM drivers and user-space.

  • X.Org Server Lands More Mode-Setting/GLAMOR Improvements, But No Sign Of 1.18
  • KDE Ships KDE Applications 15.04.3

    Today KDE released the second stability update for KDE Applications 15.04. This release contains only bugfixes and translation updates, providing a safe and pleasant update for everyone.

  • Global Shortcuts In KDE Plasma Under Wayland
  • KDE Marks Four Years In Its Process Of Porting To Wayland
  • KDE Plasma 5.3.2 Fixes Shutdown Scripts, Few Dozen Other Bugs
  • Qt 5.5 Officially Released
  • KStars Observers Management patched

    This update is a little break from my current GSoC project so i won’t talk about my progress just yet. I will talk about the current observers management dialog that is currently active in KStars. Basically, an observation session requires observer information like first name, last name and contact. Currently, an observer could be added only from the settings menu so i thought that it would be more intuitive if this functionality was placed in a more appropirate place and a proper GUI was to be implemented for a better user experience.

  • The Kubuntu Podcast Team is on a roll

    Building on their UOS Hangout, the Kubuntu Podcast Team has created their second Hangout, featuring Ovidiu-Florin Bogdan, Aaron Honeycutt, and Rick Timmis, discussing What is Kubuntu?

  • Road so far
  • July Update for KDE Applications 15.04

    Today, the KDE Community is happy to announce the release of KDE Applications 15.04.3. This release contains only bugfixes and translation updates, providing a safe and pleasant update for everyone.

  • KDE ActivityManager in Emacs

    Today I whipped up a small Emacs minor-mode to interface with KDE's ActivityManager system. It's my first minor-mode and it's janky as fuck right now, but I'm going to expand on it to eventually be able to filter, for example, to just buffers that are linked to your current activity, pushing me towards a long-standing goal of mine to create a system which flows with what I'm doing, rather than forcing me in to its workflow.

  • Convergence through Divergence

    This time around, I’m adding a mechanism that allows us to list plugins, applications (and the general “service”) specific for a given form factor. In normal-people-language, that means that I want to make it possible to specify whether an application or plugin should be shown in the user interface of a given device. Let’s look at an example: KMail. KMail has two user interfaces, the desktop version, a traditional fat client offering all the features that an email client could possibly have, and a touch-friendly version that works well on devices such as smart phones and tablets. If both are installed, which should be shown in the user interface, for example the launcher? The answer is, unfortunately: we can’t really tell as there currently is no scheme to derive this information from in a reliable way. With the current functionality that is offered by KDE Frameworks and Plasma, we’d simply list both applications, they’re both installed and there is no metadata that could possibly tell us the difference.

  • smarter status hiding

    In heavily populated IRC channels such as #debian on Freenode, a lot of idle IRC users are joining and leaving every couple of seconds. At the moment, we display a status message for every user in the room which in some cases results in a lot of visual noise.

  • Photos: future plans

    This is the third in my series of blog posts about the latest generation of GNOME application designs. In this post, I’m going to talk about Photos. Out of the applications I’ve covered, this is the one that has the most new design work.

  • West Coast Summit

    This is the last day of the GNOME West Coast Summit, and for the past three days we’ve been working and discussing topics...

  • OpenMandriva Lx 2014.2 "The Scion" Pays Tribute To Mandrake

    With Mandriva having been liquidated (allegedly due to employee lawsuits), OpenMandriva is paying tribute to it -- and its precursor, Mandrake -- with their new point release.

  • Good bye credativ [moving to Red Hat]
  • Hello Red Hat

    In my new position I will be a Solutions Architect – so basically a sales engineer, thus the one talking to the customers on a more technical level, providing details or proof of concepts where they need it.

  • Oracle Linux 6 Administration Professional Certification Now Released
  • Digital education presents new challenges and opportunities for IT

    At Red Hat, our IT organization is working with each of our business partners to help them develop digital strategies and solutions to enable them (and us) to be more effective. We’re investing in the deployment of new communication and collaboration tools in the organization. And we’re trying to better understand the needs of our end users as individuals rather than solely as a part of sales or as a part of marketing. We’re building an internal consulting capability so that we can help our end users be more efficient and effective in their jobs as a community of associates, in addition to being part of a business function.

  • RHEL for SAP HANA now on Amazon Web Services (AWS)
  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Update Will Bring Interesting New Features

    As you may know, Canonical has released the Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 Update and while ago, and now is working at implementing new features for the OTA-5 Update, which should get released in mid-July, if it does not get delayed for some reasons.

  • The 1TB UbuTab Ubuntu Tablet Is A SCAM!
  • How to use PPAs to install bleeding-edge software in Ubuntu and Linux Mint

    Linux users install most of their software directly from a centralized package repository managed by their Linux distribution of choice. This is a convenient, one-stop shop place to get your software—but what if the repository doesn’t have the program you need, or you want a newer version? For Ubuntu and Linux Mint users, that’s where personal package archives come in.

  • Linux Mint 17.2 officially released

    Well, it’s here. Linux Mint 17.2 is now available for download. Currently only the Cinnamon and MATE releases are out and other editions will launch later. For users on 17.0 or 17.1 more announcements will follow next week when the update is made available for those users as an upgrade. It’s not clear yet whether 17.0 users will be able to choose to go to 17.1 or 17.2 or whether 17.2 will be the single destination those users can jump to.

  • Linux Mint 17.2 Officially Released With Cinnamon/MATE Flavors

    Just a few short weeks after the Rafaela 17.2 RCs, Linux Mint 17.2 has been officially released this morning in the form of the Cinnamon and MATE desktop spins.

  • Data Translation Offers Real Time ARM-Based Data Acquisition Module
  • Tough, IP67-sealed box PC runs Linux on Atom

    X-ES unveiled a rugged, sealed embedded PC that runs Linux on an Atom E3800, and offers 4GB of ECC RAM, IP67 protection, M12 ports, and -40 to 70°C support.

  • Firefox 39 Has Been Delayed A Few Days Due To A “Last Minute Stability Issue”
  • Engine Yard's Deis Launches Support for its PaaS

    This year, Engine Yard bought Deis, an open source Platform-as-a-Service project. It provides a PaaS that can rub on public clouds, private clouds, or bare metal. Starting now, Engine Yard will offer its well-known support options to companies that want Deis support.

  • Elastic puts its open-source Big Data search engine in the cloud

    The Netherlands’ Elastic BV is ticking another item off the fairly narrow list of ways to monetize open-source software with the launch of new hosted implementations of its hugely popular free search engine for unstructured data that offer a simpler alternative to manual deployment. The launch couldn’t have come at a more opportune time.

  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • What We Call Security Isn’t Really Security

    Well, it’s probably no shock to you that the security industry can’t agree on a definition of security. Imagine if the horse industry couldn’t agree on what is a horse. Yes, it’s like that.

  • UH OH: Windows 10 will share your Wi-Fi key with your friends' friends

    Those contacts include their Outlook.com (nee Hotmail) contacts, Skype contacts and, with an opt-in, their Facebook friends. There is method in the Microsoft madness – it saves having to shout across the office or house “what’s the Wi-Fi password?” – but ease of use has to be teamed with security. If you wander close to a wireless network, and your friend knows the password, and you both have Wi-Fi Sense, you can now log into that network.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • July 2015 Issue of Linux Journal: Mobile
  • Linux Learner Bundle

    Linux, the operating system on which Android was built, is an attractive alternative to many developers and tech-savvy user who can’t get their kicks from Windows or OSX. Designed for open-source distribution, Linux was developed in 1991 and remains one of the most prominent examples of free software available. If you’re one of the folks that craves something “more” and have a desire to grow and learn, Linux is probably for you.

  • HP: Superdome X Servers Made Possible by Partner, Linux Community

    HP credits the Linux community and Red Hat partners with its breakthrough x86 Superdome X server, which Distinguished Technologist Tom Vaden showed off to CRNtv at the recent Red Hat Summit in Boston.

  • Q&A: ClusterHQ Cofounder Luke Marsden Talks Container Technology

    Container technology remains very big news, and in the container space ClusterHQ has been much in the news as the company announced the availability of Flocker 1.0. Flocker is an open source project that allows developers to run their databases inside Docker containers and make them highly portable. In addition to other annoncements, ClusterHQ is collaborating with EMC to enable Dockerized applications to use two EMC storage solutions suited for distributed applications: ScaleIO and XtremIO.

  • OpenDaylight Lithium Release Debuts [VIDEO]

    The OpenDayLight Project today announced its Lithium release, marking the third major platform release for the open-source Software Defined Networking (SDN) effort since the project was first created in April 2013.

  • New software helps AllJoyn smart devices play nice with other IoT protocols

    The AllSeen Alliance is expanding the reach of its AllJoyn Internet of Things framework with bridging software that lets other types of devices look like part of the same family.

  • Video: Demystifying systemd (RHS 2015)
  • Why you should avoid AMD and get a Steam Machine with Nvidia's GeForce graphics

    The hour draws nigh. Valve recently announced the first few Steam Machines available for pre-order, and beyond SteamOS itself, each one had something in common: The first announced Steam Machines from Alienware and Syber all have Nvidia graphics hardware.

  • Global shortcut handling in a Plasma Wayland session

    On X11 the daemon uses the X11 core functionality to get notified whenever key events it is interested in happen. Basically it is a global key logger. Such an architecture has the disadvantage that any process could have this infrastructure and it would be possible for multiple processes grabbing the same global shortcut. In such a case undefined behavior is triggered as either multiple actions are triggered at the same time or only one action is triggered while the others do not get informed at all.

  • GSoC: [Kdenlive] Animated Keyframe widget
  • Midterm update
  • gnome-common deprecation, round 2

    This GNOME release cycle (3.18), we plan to do the last ever release of gnome-common. A lot of its macros for deprecated technologies (scrollkeeper?!) have been removed, and the remainder of its macros have found better replacements in autoconf-archive, where they can be used by everyone, not just GNOME.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 2014.2 Officially Released as a Tribute to Mandrake Linux

    The OpenMandriva community, through Kate Lebedeff, has had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of the OpenMandriva Lx 2014.2 Linux operating system.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Analyst Rating Update
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for SAP HANA® Available on Amazon Web Services
  • Red Hat Puts Enterprise Linux For SAP HANA Up On AWS Marketplace
  • Red Hat names first Women in Open Source Award winners

    Sarah Sharp, embedded software architect at Intel, and Kesha Shah, a student at Dhirubhai Ambani Institute of Information and Communication Technology have been named as the first winners of Red Hat’s Women in Open Source Awards.

  • Extending Storage on an Fedora Atomic Host

    I had to spend some time understanding how to use docker-storage-setup on an Atomic host. The tool docker-storage-setup comes by default and makes the configuration of storage on your Atomic host easier. I didn't read any of the provided documentation (although that probably would have helped) other than the script itself. So, pardon me if this is a duplicate of other info out there. It was a great way to learn more about it. The goal here is to add more disk space to an Atomic host. By default, the cloud image that you download has one device (vda) that is 6GB in size. When I'm testing many, many docker builds and iterating through the Fedora-Dockerfiles repo, that's just not enough space. So, I need to know how to expand it.

  • You Should Not Compare Ubuntu Touch with Android or Any Other OS

    Now that Ubuntu Touch is in the hands of actual users, one of the most common critiques is that it doesn't feel like a finished product and it cannot compete with the likes of Android or iOS. The problem is not Ubuntu, but the comparison itself.

  • Unsettings Review - A Complex Tool to Configure Ubuntu's Unity

    Unsettings is an application that allows users to customize the Unity desktop environment by exposing options that are not usually available by other means. It has a lot of features, and it's one of the best that you can find.

  • Linux Mint 17.2 Now Available To Download

    Users of Linux Mint outhouse looking for a new operating system, might be interested to know that a couple of new versions of Linux Mint have been made available today in the form of Linux Mint 17.2 with the Cinnamon or MATE desktop environments.

  • Introducing the Wallpad: The 7" Open Source Modular Touch Computer

    The Wallpad is a 7" touch computer powered by HIO Project's modular expandable hardware platform. It can mount on a standard 2-gang electrical box, is powered by a Freescale ARM processor, supports Power over Ethernet (PoE) and comes with either Yocto Linux or Android preinstalled.

  • Tizen Common Q1 2015 build with Yocto Project is available

    The Tizen-distro is now synchronized with the meta-tizen needed to build Tizen-Common Q1 2015 with Yocto tools. A branch named ‘tizen_3.0.2015.q1_common’ has been created on both git trees for this release.

  • Tuesday's security advisories
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Review of Ubuntu Phone – A Work Still Under Progress

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Android M news: Release date delayed, to come out in September or October?

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