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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Cockpit 176

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 176.

  • SDL2 Introducing Sensors API

    The SDL2 library that offers a cross-platform hardware abstraction layer primarily and primarily used by Linux/Windows/macOS/iOS/Android games now has a sensor API.

    Initial work landed in SDL2 on Tuesday by Sam Lantinga for offering a hardware sensor API as their latest major addition to the library. The API is quite generic in being able to query the number of supported sensors, sensor names, types of sensors, read the sensor data, etc.

  • They should have called it Mirrorball

    TL;DR: there’s now an rsync server at rsync://images-dl.endlessm.com/public from which mirror operators can pull Endless OS images, along with an instance of Mirrorbits to redirect downloaders to their nearest—and hopefully fastest!—mirror. Our installer for Windows and the eos-download-image tool baked into Endless OS both now fetch images via this redirector, and from the next release of Endless OS our mirrors will be used as BitTorrent web seeds too. This should improve the download experience for users who are near our mirrors.

    If you’re interested in mirroring Endless OS, check out these instructions and get in touch. We’re particularly interested in mirrors in Southeast Asia, Latin America and Africa, since our mission is to improve access to technology for people in these areas.

  • Freespire 4.0, Mozilla Announces New Fellows, Flatpak 1.0, KDevelop 5.2.4 and Net Neutrality Update

    Freespire 4.0 has been released. This release brings a migration of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS codebase to the 18.04 LTS codebase, which adds many usability improvements and more hardware support. Other updates include intuitive dark mode, "night light", Geary 0.12, Chromium browser 68 and much more.

  • Omarine 4.0 released!
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 21 August 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • New Pixel 3 XL Leak Shows Off In-box Content And Camera Samples
  • The Back to School sale is on!

    For some of you, it is a time to return your educational institution and continue the important process of learning about the world around you—maybe for some of you it is the first time being part of higher education, while some of you might be long-time academic researchers and associates. For those who are sick of their thick laptops weighing down on their backpacks and who would also want something with security in mind, what better way to start the school year than with a Purism laptop?!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • How to Install R on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to Install HTTP Git Server with Nginx on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
  • Everything You Need to Know about Linux Containers, Part I: Linux Control Groups and Process Isolation
  • Robert Roth: Five or More GSoC
  • Adventures with NVMe, part 2

    A few days ago I asked people to upload their NVMe “cns” data to the LVFS. So far, 643 people did that, and I appreciate each and every submission. I promised I’d share my results, and this is what I’ve found:

  • The Next Challenge For Fwupd / LVFS Is Supporting NVMe SSD Firmware Updates

    With UEFI BIOS updating now working well with the Fwupd firmware updating utility and Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) for distributing these UEFI update capsules, Richard Hughes at Red Hat is next focusing on NVMe solid-state drives for being able to ship firmware updates under Linux.

    Hughes is in the early stages at looking to support NVMe firmware updates via LVFS/fwupd. Currently he is hoping for Linux users with NVMe drives to send in the id-ctrl identification data on your drives to him. This data will be useful so he knows what drives/models are most popular but also for how the firmware revision string is advertised across drives and vendors.

  • [Older] Language, Networking Packages Get Updates in Tumbleweed

    There were two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this past week that mostly focused on language and network packages.

    The Linux Kernel also received an update a couple days ago to version 4.17.13.

    The packages in the 20180812 Tumbleweed snapshot brought fixes in NetworkManager-applet 1.8.16, which also modernized the package for GTK 3 use in preparations for GTK 4. The free remote desktop protocol client had its third release candidate for freerdp 2.0.0 where it improved automatic reconnects, added Wave2 support and fixed automount issues. More network device card IDs for the Intel 9000 series were added in kernel 4.17.13. A jump from libstorage-ng 4.1.0 to version 4.1.10 brought several translations and added unit test for probing xen xvd devices. Two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures fixes were made with the update in postgresql 10.5. Several rubygem packages were updated to versions 5.2.1 including rubygem-rails 5.2.1, which makes the master.key file read-only for the owner upon generation on POSIX-compliant systems. Processing XML and HTML with python-lxml 4.2.4 should have fewer crashes thanks to a fix of sporadic crashes during garbage collection when parse-time schema validation is used and the parser participates in a reference cycle. Several YaST packages receive updates including a new ServiceWidget to manage the service status with yast2-ftp-server 4.1.3 as well with yast2-http-server, yast2-slp-server and yast2-squid 4.1.0 versions.

  • Red Hat Inc Risk Points versus Technology
  • 10 Efficient Raspberry Add-ons To Enhance Performance - Part 8

    Sometimes you may find yourself in great need to improve the functionality of your Raspberry Pi. There is a good chance your Raspberry does not support the functionality you want. There is also a chance that it supports your dream functionality but with the help of an external tool. An add-on in other words. It is pretty obvious that your dream add-on exists in the market or someone somewhere is cracking an algorithm to build. Never mind, here we compile a list of the best add-ons to get for your Raspberry in 2018.

  • Secure Email Service Tutanota sees F-Droid Release

    Back in February, I reviewed an email provider called Tutanota. If you read the article, you will remember that I thought very highly of the service.

    In my eyes, there were very few downsides to using the encrypted mail service, one of them being that you couldn’t use third-party email clients like Thunderbird for desktop computers or K-9 Mail for mobile devices.

  • Motorola Announces Android Pie Updates for 8 smartphones excluding Moto E5 & G5
  • How To Unsend Emails On Gmail For Android?
  • Nerd Knobs and Open Source in Network Software

    Tech is commoditizing. I've talked about this before; I think networking is commoditizing at the device level, and the days of appliance-based networking are behind us. But are networks themselves a commodity? Not any more than any other system.

    We are running out of useful features, so vendors are losing feature differentiation. This one is going to take a little longer… When I first started in network engineering, the world was multiprotocol, and we had a lot of different transports. For instance, we took cases on IPX, VIP, Appletalk, NetBios, and many other protocols. These all ran on top of Ethernet, T1, Frame, ATM, FDDI, RPR, Token Ring, ARCnet, various sorts of serial links ... The list always felt a little too long, to me. Today we have IPv4, IPv6, and MPLS on top of Ethernet, pretty much. All transports are framed as Ethernet, and all upper layer protocol use some form of IP. MPLS sits in the middle as the most common "transport enhancer." The first thing to note is that space across which useful features can be created is considerably smaller than it used to be.

  • Meetings that make people happy: Myth or magic?

    People tend to focus on the technical elements of meeting prep: setting the objective(s), making the agenda, choosing a place and duration, selecting stakeholders, articulating a timeline, and so on. But if you want people to come to a meeting ready to fully engage, building trust is mission-critical, too. If you need people to engage in your meetings, then you're likely expecting people to come ready to share their creativity, problem-solving, and innovation ideas.

  • Building microprocessor architectures on open-source hardware and software

     

    "The real freedom you get from open source projects is much more, and more important than the fact that you don't have to pay for it," Frank Gürkaynak, Director of ETHZ's Microelectronics Design Center, writes in an article posted on All About Circuits. "Researchers can take what we provide and freely change it for their experiments. Startup companies can build on what we provide as a starting point and concentrate their time and energy on the actual innovations they want to provide. And people who are disturbed by various attacks on their systems [1, 2] have the chance to look inside and know what exactly is in their system."

  • Create DIY music box cards with Punchbox

    That first time almost brought tears to my eyes. Mozart, sweetly, gently playing on the most perfect little music box. Perfectly! No errors in timing or pitch. Thank you, open source—without Mido, Svgwrite, PyYAML, and Click, this project wouldn't have been possible.

  • Fund Meant to Protect Elections May Be Too Little, Too Late

    The Election Assistance Commission, the government agency charged with distributing federal funds to support elections, released a report Tuesday detailing how each state plans to spend a total of $380 million in grants allocated to improve and secure their election systems.

    But even as intelligence officials warn of foreign interference in the midterm election, much of the money is not expected to be spent before Election Day. The EAC expects states to spend their allotted money within two to three years and gives them until 2023 to finish spending it.

    Election experts have expressed skepticism that the money will be enough to modernize election equipment and secure it against state-sponsored cyber threats.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers and howtos

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Misc
HowTos
  • Project curl governance

    Over time, we've slowly been adjusting the curl project and its documentation so that we might at some point actually qualify to the CII open source Best Practices at silver level.

    We qualified at the base level a while ago as one of the first projects which did that.

    Recently, one of those issues we fixed was documenting the governance of the curl project. How exactly the curl project is run, what the key roles are and how decisions are made. That document is now in our git repo.

  • How to install OwnCloud 10 on CentOS 7 and RHEL 7
  • How to Get Google Camera Port for Asus ZenFone Max Pro M1
  • How to check your CentOS Version
  • 5 Practical Examples of chgrp command in Linux
  • Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 Brings Modern Compiler Support and Security Fixes

    Trinity Desktop, the Linux desktop environment which is forked from KDE 3, has just released an update bringing Trinity Desktop to version R14.0.5.

    Because Trinity Desktop is a “traditional desktop” based on KDE 3 and focuses on function rather than a lot of special effects, its benefits are typically things like increased battery life on laptops, and just overall efficiency for the user.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 32

    I’m back from Akademy, and I can’t wait to share some of the cool stuff that happened there over the past week. I’m going to post the video of my talk as soon as it’s up. But first, I know what you’re all really waiting for: this week’s Usability & Productivity update. Though we were all quite busy, somehow everyone managed to accomplish an enormous amount of work, too!

  • Reminder: Shotwell Facebook publishing no longer working

    As announced earlier, since August 1st, 2018 Shotwell cannot publish to Facebook any more. The API that Shotwell used for that was removed and it is currently not clear to me how developers that do not use Android, iOS or Facebook’s web SDKs should provide similar functionality.

  • Gentoo on Integricloud

    Integricloud gave me access to their infrastructure to track some issues on ppc64 and ppc64le.

    Since some of the issues are related to the compilers, I obviously installed Gentoo on it and in the process I started to fix some issues with catalyst to get a working install media, but that’s for another blogpost.

    Today I’m just giving a walk-through on how to get a ppc64le (and ppc64 soon) VM up and running.

  • Industrial Mini-ITX board pumps up with Coffee Lake

    Commell’s “LV-67X” Mini-ITX board runs on 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors, with up to 32GB DDR4, 3x SATA, triple 4K displays, USB 3.1, and PCIe x16 and mini-PCIe expansion.

    The LV-67X, which shares some of the layout and feature set of its Intel Apollo Lake based LV-67U board, is the first industrial Mini-ITX board we’ve seen with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. (Going forward, we’ll likely use the caffeinated nickname rather than “8th Gen” because Intel also applies the 8th Gen tag to the transitional and similarly 14nm Kaby Lake-G chips as well as the new, 10nm Cannon Lake processors.)

  • Unofficial OpenGApps for Android Pie 9.0 Released for ARM and ARM64 Platforms

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E23 – Twenty-Three Tales - Ubuntu Podcast

    We’ve been upgrading RAM and tooting in the fediverse. We discuss Hollywood embracing open source, a new release of LibreOffice, pacemakers getting hacked and fax machines becoming selfaware and taking over the planet. We also round up the community news and events.

  • How to install InvoicePlane on Ubuntu 18.04
  • What is your favorite Linux window manager?

    While many Linux users have a strong preference for a window manager of choice, for those just making their way over from Windows or Mac, it may be hard to understand what a window manager is, or that it's even something you have a choice in. A window manager is the part of your system that dictates how individual application windows look, and how you can interact with, control, and arrange them.

    There are many choices, some more popular than others. Yesterday, we wished the GNOME Project a happy twenty-first birthday and launched a cheat sheet for interacting with GNOME 3's windows via hotkeys. But others are popular too; our article on "5 reasons the i3 window manager makes Linux better" was last week's most-read article.

  • Elive 3.0 to be released in a month

    For those of us who have been following this stunningly beautiful distro, the 8-year waiting seems to be finally coming to an end.

  •  

  • Android 9 Pie Digital Wellbeing: Here Is Everything You Need to Know

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • libinput's "new" trackpoint acceleration method

    This is mostly a request for testing, because I've received zero feedback on the patches that I merged a month ago and libinput 1.12 is due to be out. No comments so far on the RC1 and RC2 either, so... well, maybe this gets a bit broader attention so we can address some things before the release. One can hope.

    [...]

    Because basically every trackpoint has different random data ranges not linked to anything easily measurable, libinput's device quirks now support a magic multiplier to scale the trackpoint range into something resembling a sane range. This is basically what we did before with the systemd POINTINGSTICK_CONST_ACCEL property except that we're handling this in libinput now (which is where acceleration is handled, so it kinda makes sense to move it here). There is no good conversion from the previous trackpoint range property to the new multiplier because the range didn't really have any relation to the physical input users expected.

  • 15 Tips On How to Use ‘Curl’ Command in Linux
  • Disassembling JITed code in GDB
  • PSA: Workaround for a working MTP

    KDE Connect is awesome, we all know that. But sometimes you still want (or need) to acces the files on your Android phone via a good old USB cable. And to do so, you need a working implementation of the MTP protocol.

    Many people on bugzilla complain that the MTP support in Plasma is just broken. And indeed the MTP implementation we have has always been ignoring a fundamental limitation of MTP: the protocol doesn’t allow parallel operations, unlike the old Android USB mass storage did. In practice, if more than one process spawns an mtp ioslave, everything breaks.

  • Museum Day, or, the Benefit of Skiving Off

    Tomorrow, there’s the fund raiser training session. Given that we’ve been raising funds for Krita since time immemorial (our first fund raiser was for two Wacom tablets and art pens so we could implement support for them, the second to let Lukas Tvrdy work on Krita for a couple of months and after that, we’ve had the kickstarters), that might seem superfluous. But I’m still hoping to learn lots. After all, it’s not like we’re exactly awash in money.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google’s New Chromebook Might Come With A Snapdragon 845 And A Detachable 2K Display

    It’s been sometime since we saw a Chromebook from Google. Although the Chromebook series didn’t do well with consumers, Google didn’t stop development on it.

    Multiple codes uploaded on Gerrit (web-based team code collaboration tool) on Chromium OS has given us a lot of information on the next Chromebook or the Pixelbook previously. The device is codenamed Cheza (As seen on the Code on 14th line).

  • Builder Session Restore

    People have asked for more advanced session restore for quite some time, and now Builder can do it. Builder will now restore your previous session, and in particular, horizontal and vertical splits.

    Like previously, you can disable session restore in preferences if that’s not your jam.

  • packer renamed to packer-aur

    The famous AUR helper `packer` has been renamed to `packer-aur` in favor of the Hashicorp image builder `packer` (community/packer)

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Dropbox plans to drop encrypted Linux filesystems in November

    Linux users are calling on Dropbox to reverse a decision to trim its filesystem support to unencrypted EXT4 only.

    The company's supported file system list, here, is missing some formats – including various encrypted Linux filesystems.

    Until that list was revised, Dropbox said it supported NTFS, HFS, EXT4, and APFS on Linux; as the new requirements makes clear, Linux users will only be able to run unencrypted EXT4.

  • MacBuntu 18.04 Transformation Pack Ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    MacBuntu (Macbuntu Mojave/High Sierra/El Capitan/Yosemite) transformation pack is ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver, we were constantly asked for this pack to be available on our site, so here it is for you guys. In this transformation pack we are featuring many themes for almost every desktop, so you don't have to worry about the desktop you are using whether it is Gnome Shell, Mate, Xfce, Cinnamon or any other desktop. You can simply install it in Ubuntu/Linux Mint or any other Ubuntu based distribution and make your desktop look like Mac OS X. The Unity desktop is still supported in case you are using unofficial version of Unity desktop. In this pack you will find plenty of light variants as well as dark versions, which is managed by different creators and I would like to thank all of them for contributing these themes (McOS-themes, macOS High Sierra, macOS 11, macOS High Sierra - ELBULLAZUL).  There are two themes for cursors, for dock we recommend you to install Plank dock and we are providing themes for it as well (credits: KenHarkey and erikdubois. Also we are including themes for Gnome Shell, for Cinnamon, and three icon packs in this transformation pack.

  •  

  • TensorFlow Pi port is latest salvo in battle for edge analytics

    The recent port of TensorFlow to the Raspberry Pi is the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers.

    Google’s recent announcement that it had ported its open source TensorFlow machine intelligence (ML) library for neural networking to the Raspberry Pi was the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers. The competition is a part of a wider battle with Amazon, Microsoft, Intel, and others to bring cloud analytics to the edge in IoT networks to reduce latency, increase reliability, and improve security.

  • 9 Android Pie Hidden Features: Best Android 9 Tricks You Might Have Missed
  • TicWatch Pro: Reviewing the 30-Day Battery Smartwatch

today's leftover

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  • Linux 4.18 Arrives With Some Big Changes
  • IBM S/390 Linux 4.19 Kernel Code Sees More Spectre Updates, Boot Code Rework

    The IBM System/390 "s390" architecture code has seen a number of improvements for Linux 4.19.

    Highlights of the s390 code updates sent in today for the just-opened Linux 4.19 kernel merge window include:

  • Hollywood Casts Open Source Software in Starring Role

    Amazing news out of Variety, the entertainment website, this weekend: Hollywood is going open source. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — best known for ‘The Oscars’ award ceremony — has teamed up with the Linux Foundation to launch the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF).

  • SIGGRAPH 2018: OpenCL-Next Taking Shape, Vulkan Continues Evolving

    It's a busy week folks as besides the AMD Threadripper 2 performance embargo expiring, it is also SIGGRAPH 2018 week in Vancouver and as well the start of the Linux 4.19 kernel cycle... No longer under wraps are the Khronos announcements from this annual graphics conference. Continue reading to learn about the latest happenings for the various Khronos industry-standard APIs and efforts like Vulkan and OpenCL-Next.

  • Dropbox drops any file system but ext4 on Linux

    Come November 7, cloud storage and synchronization provider Dropbox will drop support for any file system on Linux but ext4.

    In fact, Dropbox announced that it will support only four file systems on desktop systems going forward. Company representative Jay revealed as much on the official Dropbox forum.

  • How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux
  • Wine Had A Successful GSoC 2018, Better Direct3D Game Benchmarks

    The Wine project once again participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for furthering their open-source agenda of better support for Windows programs on Linux and other operating systems.

    The projects achieved this year were for better automated game benchmarks and implementing a subset of the concurrency namespace. (There also was a project originally listed for implementing missing bits of the Direct3D API, but that doesn't seen to have panned out and is no longer listed.)

  • Congratulations: Hanno Böck and co-authors win Pwnie!

    Congratulations to security researcher and Gentoo developer Hanno Böck and his co-authors Juraj Somorovsky and Craig Young for winning one of this year’s coveted Pwnie awards!

  • Gentoo booth at the FrOSCon, St. Augustin, Germany

    s last year, there will be a Gentoo booth again at the upcoming FrOSCon “Free and Open Source Conference” in St. Augustin near Bonn! Visitors can meet Gentoo developers to ask any question, get Gentoo swag, and prepare, configure, and compile their own Gentoo buttons.

  • Official Debian testing OpenStack image news

    A few things happened to the testing image, thanks to Steve McIntire, myself, and … some debconf18 foo!

  • Remember Palm? They will be back with a 3.3-inch mini smartphone

    The device is still known as Pepito, but the smartphone seems to be almost ready for commercial debut. However, instead of embracing the modern large-display smartphone phenomenon, the revived Palm will stick to its core principles — smaller and pocketable phones. Therefore, if the leaks are to be believed, then the Palm Pepito will sport a 3.3-inch touchscreen display with 720p picture resolution. It will be powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 435 processor paired with 3GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage.

  • Android Pie Smartphones List: Will My Phone Get Android 9 Update?

    Now that Android Pie is live, the first thing that comes to our mind is when my Android device will receive the new update. The exciting new features of Android P and the whole gesture navigation thing is not something anyone would want to miss.

  • Huawei Mate 20 Lite To Come With A 2K Display 6GBs Of Ram And Kirin 710 According to Leaks

    The Mate series have generally been Huawei’s flagship phablet series. The Mate 10 did great with consumers and reviewers alike. Infact Huawei also came out with the Mate 10 lite which had Huawei’s own Kirin 659 chip. The Kirin 659 chip at the time performed somewhat similar to the Snapdragon 625.

  • A bit more on privacy respecting health monitor / fitness tracker

    A few days ago, I wondered if there are any privacy respecting health monitors and/or fitness trackers available for sale these days. I would like to buy one, but do not want to share my personal data with strangers, nor be forced to have a mobile phone to get data out of the unit. I've received some ideas, and would like to share them with you. One interesting data point was a pointer to a Free Software app for Android named Gadgetbridge. It provide cloudless collection and storing of data from a variety of trackers. Its list of supported devices is a good indicator for units where the protocol is fairly open, as it is obviously being handled by Free Software. Other units are reportedly encrypting the collected information with their own public key, making sure only the vendor cloud service is able to extract data from the unit. The people contacting me about Gadgetbirde said they were using Amazfit Bip and Xiaomi Band 3.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Apps Are Now Available on More Chromebooks Powered by Intel Braswell CPUs

    It looks like Google is taking support for Linux apps very serious lately by recently enabling its integrated virtualization machine for running Linux apps on Chrome OS to support Chromebooks powered by Intel Braswell CPUs.

  • The Academy launches open-source foundation for media developers

    The idea is to enable them to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation and sound.

    “We are thrilled to partner with The Linux Foundation for this vital initiative that fosters more innovation, more collaboration, more creativity among artists and engineers in our community,” said Academy CEO Dawn Hudson. “The Academy Software Foundation is core to the mission of our Academy: promoting the arts and sciences of motion pictures.”

  • GSoC’18 Phase-3

    For this phase, I started with implementing Stamps feature in the Drawing activity. This feature allows users to use different stamps images in their beautiful arts. For now, I have added images from solar activity to use as stamps.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 31

    This week we’re all at Akademy–KDE’s yearly gathering of developers, designers, system administrators, and users. I’m giving a presentation later today about how we can make KDE Software irresistible!

    As such, it as a bit of a lighter week for the Usability & Productivity initiative, what with all the preparation and conference-going, but we still managed to get quite a bit done. And all the in-person interactions are setting the stage for many more good things to come.

  • Something Happened to My OpenMandriva Lx OS

    Yesterday I booted my laptop with OpenMandriva Lx and went to look for a book. When I returned to the machine, a kernel panic was waiting for me on the screen.

    Apparently, something went very wrong with the updates that I performed last week, but I did not notice.

    This has happened before, though. As the laptop boots seven OSs (OpenMandriva, Mageia, PCLinuxOS, Pisi, Elive, Fedora, and PicarOS), when I install a system that changes the OMV-controlled GRUB2, OpenMandriva gets a panic.

    I do not have the expertise to rectify things other than by performing a re-install. So, I reinstalled OpenMandriva, updated it (the process did not last more than an hour or so) and, sure enough, the OS was bootable again.

    [...]

    Maybe it is time for me to start experimenting with BSD, Haiku, or something.

  • Google Pixel 3 XL Leak Reveals 6.7-inch Screen With Triple Camera Setup
  • Intel has no chance in servers and they know it

    Intel is flying press to an Analyst day to discuss their impending server meltdown. SemiAccurate has been detailing this impending catastrophe for over a year now, it is now time for the details.

  • Journeys

    This would be a long blog post as I would be sharing a lot of journeys, so have your favorite beverage in your hand and prepare for an evening of musing.

    Before starting the blog post, I have been surprised as the last week and the week before, lot of people have been liking my Debconf 2016 blog post on diaspora which is almost two years old. Almost all the names mean nothing to me but was left unsure as to reason of the spike. Were they debconf newcomers who saw my blog post and their experience was similar to mine or something, don’t know.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: KDE4, Krita and GNOME.Asia

  • Everything old is new again
    Just because KDE4-era software has been deprecated by the KDE-FreeBSD team in the official ports-repository, doesn’t mean we don’t care for it while we still need to. KDE4 was released on January 11th, 2008 — I still have the T-shirt — which was a very different C++ world than what we now live in. Much of the code pre-dates the availability of C++11 — certainly the availability of compilers with C++11 support. The language has changed a great deal in those ten years since the original release. The platforms we run KDE code on have, too — FreeBSD 12 is a long way from the FreeBSD 6 or 7 that were current at release (although at the time, I was more into OpenSolaris). In particular, since then the FreeBSD world has switched over to Clang, and FreeBSD current is experimenting with Clang 7. So we’re seeing KDE4-era code being built, and running, on FreeBSD 12 with Clang 7. That’s a platform with a very different idea of what constitutes correct code, than what the code was originally written for. (Not quite as big a difference as Helio’s KDE1 efforts, though)
  • Let’s take this bug, for example…
    Krita’s 2018 fund raiser is all about fixing bugs! And we’re fixing bugs already. So, let’s take a non-technical look at a bug Dmitry fixed yesterday. This is the bug: “key sequence ctrl+w ambiguous with photoshop compatible bindings set” And this is the fix.
  • GNOME.Asia 2018
    GNOME.Asia 2018 was co-hosted with COSCUP and openSUSE Asia this year in Taipei, Taiwan. It was a good success and I enjoyed it a lot. Besides, meeting old friends and making new ones are always great.

Top 5 Open Source Data Integration Tools

Businesses seeking to improve their data integration know that today's data integration software perform complex tasks. They enable applications to access data associated with other applications, and also to migrate data from one platform to another, transforming it as necessary. Given this sophistication, selecting the best data integration tool is far from easy. Adding to the complexity of the selection process: early data integration tools focused on ETL – extract, transform, and load processes. However, most of today's data integration products have much more advanced capabilities and can generally connect both on-premises and cloud-based data. Many also integrate with other data management products, such as business intelligence (BI), analytics, master data management (MDM), data governance and data quality solutions. To help sort through the complex options, the list below highlights five of the best open source data integration tools, based on vendor profile and completeness of their data integration tool set. Read more

What’s New in Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Ubuntu budgie. As part of Ubuntu 18.04 flavor this release ships with latest Budgie desktop 10.4 as default desktop environment. Powered by Linux 4.15 kernel and shipping with the same internals as Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), the Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS official flavor will be supported for 3 years, until April 2021. Prominent new features include support for adding OpenVNC connections through the NetworkManager applet, better font handling for Chinese and Korean languages, improved keyboard shortcuts, color emoji support for GNOME Characters and other GNOME apps, as well as window-shuffler capability. Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS also ships with a new exciting GTK+ theme by default called Pocillo, support for dynamic workspaces, as well as a “minimal installation” option in the graphical installer that lets users install Ubuntu Budgie with only the Chromium web browser and a handful of basic system utilities. Read more

Red Hat: Boston, US Government, OpenShift Route, VirtualBox and More

  • BU Spark! teams up with Red Hat, hosts software design workshop
    Students traveled across Boston to its Fort Point neighborhood to attend a BU Spark! workshop about interaction design Friday. There they delved into interaction design and explored how to develop user-friendly software. BU Spark! and Red Hat Inc. hosted the Interaction Design Bootcamp jointly at Red Hat’s Boston office. BU students and Spark! Interaction design fellows attended. Red Hat is a software company that specializes in information technology and has a research relationship with Boston University that includes educational elements. The programs taught by Red Hat focus on user experience design, one of Red Hat’s specializations, according to their website.
  • Open source can spark innovative business transformation in government, Red Hat leaders say
    The federal government, largely hamstrung by legacy systems, is in need of a major digital transformation. Open source technology can be the spark that sets off that revolution, leaders from open-source software company Red Hat said Tuesday. “The types of technologies that you choose matter,” said Mike Walker, global director of Open Innovation Labs at Red Hat. “It will influence the way your business operates and open new doors to new business process, and ultimately allow you to become a software company that can achieve some of those innovations and reductions in cost and time.”
  • Kubernetes Ingress vs OpenShift Route
    Although pods and services have their own IP addresses on Kubernetes, these IP addresses are only reachable within the Kubernetes cluster and not accessible to the outside clients. The Ingress object in Kubernetes, although still in beta, is designed to signal the Kubernetes platform that a certain service needs to be accessible to the outside world and it contains the configuration needed such as an externally-reachable URL, SSL, and more. Creating an ingress object should not have any effects on its own and requires an ingress controller on the Kubernetes platform in order to fulfill the configurations defined by the ingress object. Here at Red Hat, we saw the need for enabling external access to services before the introduction of ingress objects in Kubernetes, and created a concept called Route for the same purpose (with additional capabilities such as splitting traffic between multiple backends, sticky sessions, etc). Red Hat is one of the top contributors to the Kubernetes community and contributed the design principles behind Routes to the community which heavily influenced the Ingress design.
  • VirtualBox DRM/KMS Driver Proceeding With Atomic Mode-Setting Support
    The "vboxvideo" DRM/KMS driver for use by VirtualBox guest virtual machines that has been part of the mainline Linux kernel the past several cycles will soon see atomic mode-setting support. Hans de Goede of Red Hat, who has been stewarding this driver into the Linux kernel after Oracle has failed to do so, is tackling the atomic mode-setting as his latest advancement to this driver important for a VirtualBox desktop VM experience. Published today were initial patches preparing the move to atomic mode-setting but not yet the full migration to this modern display API that offers numerous benefits.
  • A Roadblock Ahead? – Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Ingersoll-Rand Plc (IR)
  • Red Hat Shares Have Even Upside-Downside Profile, JPMorgan Says In Downgrade
  • Earnings Preview: Red Hat poised to deliver earnings growth for Q2
  • J.P. Morgan Securities Slams Red Hat Stock With Downgrade Before Earnings
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Moves Lower on Volume Spike for September 18