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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Microsoft to Cut Thousands of Jobs

    Microsoft is cutting more jobs.

    The business technology giant said in a regulatory filing on Thursday that it plans to lay off an additional 2,850 workers to the previously announced 1,850 jobs it said it would slash in May.

    In total, Microsoft will cut 4,700 jobs worldwide by the end of the company’s fiscal year 2017.

  • P-State Algorithm Change, Schedutil IOWait Boosting

    While still in early form and won't be merged for this next kernel cycle (v4.8), a series of patches were published on Sunday to improve CPU frequency selection under Linux, including an algorithm change for the Intel P-State scaling driver.

    Rafael Wysocki posted the [RFC][PATCH 0/7] cpufreq / sched: cpufreq_update_util() flags and iowait boosting patch series looking for feedback on some CPU frequency scaling related changes. Wysocki admits he hasn't even thoroughly tested the impact of the changes yet, but is looking to see if other developers agree it would be a step in the right direction.

  • Linux Top 3: Simplicity 16.07, LXLE Eclectica and Lubuntu 16.10

    While GNOME and KDE are perhaps the two best known and most widely deployed open source desktop environments used in Linux, LXDE is an increasingly popular choice. In this week's Linux Planet Linx Top 3 roundup we take a quick look at three LXDE distro released this past week.

  • Simplicity Linux 16.07 Has Arrived, Offers Flavors Based on LXPup and Debian

    Today, July 31, 2016, the Simplicity Linux developers proudly announced the general availability of the Simplicity Linux 16.07 GNU/Linux operating system for personal computers.

    Simplicity Linux 16.07 comes three months after the previous stable release, Simplicity Linux 16.04, to bring lots of updated components and the latest GNU/Linux technologies. As usual, the distribution ships with the Mini and Desktop editions based on the lightweight LXPup OS, a Puppy Linux derivative using the LXDE desktop environment.

  • Flatpak 0.6.8 Adds No-Desktop Mode

    Flatpak 0.6.8 was released this weekend as the newest feature release of this GNOME sandboxing tech formerly known as XDG-App.

  • Parsix 8.10 Screenshot Tour

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Upgradeable Allwinner Dev Board That's Laptop-Compatible Raises $50k So Far

    At the beginning of the month I wrote about That Open, Upgradeable ARM Dev Board Is Trying To Make A Comeback, the EOMA68-spec'ed project formerly known as the Improv Dev Board. It's still using the same (rather slow) Allwinner SoC but has since seen some improvements and there's also a laptop compatible route too. The project has now raised more than $50k USD, but their goal is still three times that at $150k they are trying to raise over the next month.

  • My Microsoft Office 365 woes: Constant crashes, malware macros – and settings from Hell

    Microsoft Office remains one of the most important software products available, despite some rather nasty flaws. For me, Microsoft Office and video games anchor me to Windows. While video games seem set to remain largely Windows-only for the foreseeable future, Office is losing its grip.

    For a long time, I used Office because it was faster. Perhaps more importantly, I knew most of it worked, and I could fairly quickly make a fresh installation do what I wanted. Office 365 has changed all of that.

    To be perfectly honest, I'm not entirely certain why I got Office 365. I was perfectly happy using Office 2010 that had been beaten about the ears enough to look and feel identical to Office 2003. It was quick, the context menus gave me access to all the commands I wanted, and I managed to get rid of both the spacing after the paragraphs and all those dumb "smart quotes."

    Perhaps someone sent me a file that wouldn't open in 2010. Perhaps it was yet another attempt to make Lync work. I will probably never remember. Regardless, the shift to Office 365's version of Office 2013 – and eventually 2016 – has been a descent into madness.

  • Deploy Kubernetes with ansible on Atomic
  • Install Zulip on Ubuntu
  • Parabola 2016.07.27 Screenshot Tour
  • Create two, three, many openSUSE Guides
  • Friday Session Wrap for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • On managing Ruby versions

    This is a little thought on packaged Ruby versions (mostly in Linux-based systems) and why I don’t get many people advising newcomers to start by installing RVM when in reality they just want to program Ruby.

  • Are You Satisfied With Your Ubuntu Phone? (Poll)

    Ubuntu OTA 12 will have completed its phased roll out by the time you read this, and feedback to the changes it brings will not doubt have begun to roll in. Now that we’re almost 18 months on from the launch of the very first Ubuntu Phone I’m curious as to you are getting on with your Ubuntu Phone?

  • Snappy Sprint Heidelberg

    I recently attended Snappy Sprint Heidelberg, the first Snappy sprint focused on upstream and cross-distribution collaboration.

    Snappy is a technology with an interesting history: initially started to provide App Store-like semantics (atomicity, declarative security) for the Ubuntu Phone project, it has since expanded to be a platform for desktop application deployment (e.g. VLC), as well as server applications and the IoT space.

  • ReactOS 0.4.2 Nears With Many Features

    The first release candidate to the upcoming ReactOS 0.4.2 release is now available, the project aiming to be an open-source re-implementation of Microsoft Windows.

  • Software Freedom Kosova Conference SFK’16 Call for Speakers

    SKF | Software Freedom Kosova is an annual international conference in Kosovo organized to promote free/libre open source software, free culture and open knowledge, now in its 7th edition. It is organized by FLOSSK, a non governmental, not for profit organization, dedicated to promote software freedom and related philosophies.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • iTWire - Microsoft to reduce global workforce
  • Microsoft Faces Two Lawsuits For Aggressive Windows 10 Upgrade Campaign

    The series of lawsuits against Microsoft doesn’t seem to terminate sooner.

  • Controlling access to the memory cache

    Access to main memory from the processor is mediated (and accelerated) by the L2 and L3 memory caches; developers working on performance-critical code quickly learn that cache utilization can have a huge effect on how quickly an application (or a kernel) runs. But, as Fenghua Yu noted in his LinuxCon Japan 2016 talk, the caches are a shared resource, so even a cache-optimal application can be slowed by an unrelated task, possibly running on a different CPU. Intel has been working on a mechanism that allows a system administrator to set cache-sharing policies; the talk described the need for this mechanism and how access to it is implemented in the current patch set.

  • Why Blockchain Matters

    If your familiarity with Bitcoin and Blockchain is limited to having heard about the trial of Silk Road’s Ross Ulbricht, you can be forgiven -- but your knowledge is out of date. Today, Bitcoin and especially Blockchain are moving into the mainstream, with governments and financial institutions launching experiments and prototypes to understand how they can take advantage of the unique characteristics of the technology.

  • Our Third Podcast, with Cybik, is Out Now

    Cybik comes back on how he came to know and use Linux in the first place, his gaming habits, how he got involved into the Skullgirls port, and shares with us his outlook on the Linux gaming landscape. The podcast is just an hour long and you can either download it below, and use our RSS feed (that has the additional benefit of making it easy for you to get new episodes from now on):

  • GSoC: final race and multi-disc implementation

    It’s been a while since I wrote a post here. A lot has happened since then. Now Gnome-games fully supports PlayStation games, with snapshoting capabilities. The next thing I’m working on is multi-disc support, specially for PlayStation titles. So far, there’s a working propotity although a lot needs to be re-engineered and polished. This last part of the project has involved working both in UI, persistance and logic layers.

  • This Week in GTK+ – 11

    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 22 commits, with 6199 lines added and 1763 lines removed.

  • [Solus] Replacement of Release Schedule

    In the not so distant past, Solus followed a static point release model. Our most current release at this time is 1.2, with a 1.2.1 planned to drop in the near future. However, we also recently announced our move to a rolling release model. As such, these two schools of thought are in contradiction of one another.

  • First release of official ArchStrike ISO files! [Ed: last week]
  • July ’16 security fixes for Java 8

    On the heels of Oracle’s July 2016 security updates for Java 8, the icedtea folks have released version 3.1.0 of their build framework so that I could create packages for OpenJDK 8u101_b13 or “Java 8 Update 101 Build 13” (and the JRE too of course).

  • Pipelight update

    I decided to do an update of my “pipelight” package. I had not looked at it for a long time, basically because I do not use it anymore, but after I upgraded my “wine” package someone asked if I could please write up what could be done for wine-pipelight.

    As you know, pipelight is a Linux plugin wrapper for Mozilla-compatible browsers which lets you install and use Windows plugins on Linux. This configuration enables you to access online services which would otherwise be unavailable to you on a Linux platform. The pipelight plugin wrapper uses wine to load the Windows software.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Current Analyst Ratings
  • Friday Session Wrap for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora @ EuroPython 2016 - event report
  • Android 7.0 Nougat could be release as soon as next month
  • Android gains anti-spam caller ID feature
  • Amazon Cloud Revenue Hits $2.9B
  • ServerMania – Discover High Availability Cloud Computing, powered by OpenStack

    Cloud computing is fast growing in the world of computer and Internet technology, many companies, organizations and even individuals are opting for shared pool of computing resources and services. For starters, Cloud computing is a type of Internet-based computing where users consume hosted services on shared server resources.

    There are fundamentally three types of cloud computing available today: private, public and hybrid cloud computing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Windows 10 pain: Reg man has 75 per cent upgrade failure rate

    As your humble HPC correspondent for The Register, I should probably be running Linux on the array of systems here at the home office suite. But I don't. I've been a Microsoft guy since I bought my first computer way back in 1984.

    You, dear readers, can rip me for being a MStard, but it works worked well for my business and personal needs.

    I've had my ups and downs with the company, but I think I've received good value for my money and I've managed to solve every problem I've had over the years.

    Until yesterday, that is.

    Yesterday was the day that I marked on my calendar as "Upgrade to Windows 10 Day." We currently have four systems in our arsenal here, two laptops and two desktops.

    The laptops are Lenovo R61 and W510 systems, and the desktops are a garden variety box based on an Asus P7P55D Pro motherboard. The other desktop is my beloved Hydra 2.0 liquid cooled, dual-processor, monster system based on the EVGA Classified SR-2 motherboard. These details turn out to be important in our story.

  • Rygel/Shotwell/GUADEC
  • How to setup HTTP2 in cPanel/WHM Linux VPS using EasyApache3
  • Pushed Fedora Graphical upgrade via Gnome software utility
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/30
  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Available for System76 PCs, Ubuntu 15.10 Users Must Upgrade

    As reported by us last week, Canonical announced the first point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and it looks like the guys over System76 were pretty quick to push the update to users' computers.

    Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS is the latest, most advanced version of the Xenial Xerus operating system, and we recommend that you upgrade to it as soon as possible if you didn't do it already. This is an important point release because it also opens up the upgrade path for users of the Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS (Trusty Tahr) distribution.

  • A Reminder Of Why I Hate Ubuntu

    Yesterday I was reminded why I hate Ubuntu. I suddenly was unable to SSH into Odroid-C2. From Odroid-C2 I could do everything as normal. It turned out the IP address had changed despite my HOST declaration in Beast’s DHCP server and Odroid-C2 being set to use DHCP, or so I thought. Nope. There was a dhclient.conf file in Odroid-C2 which requested everything and the kitchen sink from DHCP, stuff I had no use of like netbios… The man page for the dhclient.conf file says it all: “The require statement lists options that must be sent in order for an offer to be accepted. Offers that do not contain all the listed options will be ignored. There is no default require list.”

  • Thin Mini-ITX board taps Braswell SoCs, offers 4K video

    IEI’s “tKINO-BW” Mini-ITX board features Intel Pentium and Celeron “Braswell” SoCs, 4K video, triple display support, and optional remote management.

    Over the last year, numerous Mini-ITX boards based on Intel’s “Braswell” family of 14nm SoCs have reached market, but there have been far fewer models billed as being “thin.” This somewhat arbitrary term refers to boards with low-profile coastline port layouts, generally for space-constrained embedded applications rather than big gaming boxes.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Comic-Con and FOSS Comic Book Solutions

    After whetting his appetite at this year’s Comic-Con, our resident Linux newbie discovers free and open source apps for reading digital comics, as well as a treasure trove of available sources for free comics online.

  • Linux Kernel 3.12.62 LTS Improves SPARC Support, Updates the Networking Stack

    Linux kernel developer Jiri Slaby announced the release of the sixty-second maintenance update for the long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series, which will receive support until 2017 because of SUSE Enterprise Linux.

    Linux kernel 3.12.62 LTS is a modest update, and looking at the diff from the previous maintenance release, version 3.12.61, we can notice that it changes a total of 96 files, with 1213 insertions and 1053 deletions. Among the changes, we can notice lots of fixes for the SPARC hardware architecture, but there are various other improvements for the ARM, MIPS, PA-RISC, and x86 instruction set architectures.

  • ‘Anatine’ Is a Simple Desktop Twitter App for Linux

    Anatine describes itself as a 'pristine Twitter app for Linux', but is it anything more than a wrapper around the mobile website?

  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.3 Released With Small Bug Fixes

    A small bug fix update to Skype for Linux alpha is now available, and fixes, among many changes, errant close to tray behaviour on the Cinnamon desktop.

  • On the killing of intltool

    Say thanks to Daiki Ueno for his work maintaining gettext and enhancing it to make change practical, and to Javier Jardon for pushing this within GNOME and working to remove intltool from important GNOME modules.

  • On discoverability

    I've discussed elsewhere that usability is about real people doing real tasks in a reasonable amount of time. Some researchers also refer to "learnability" and "memorability" to define usability—this is very similar to discoverability. Can you discover the features of the system just by poking at it? Is the user interface obvious enough that you can figure it out on your own?

  • This is Lubuntu 16.10’s New Default Wallpaper

    The default wallpaper of Lubuntu 16.10 — yes, that's Lubuntu, with an 'l' — has been unveiled — but will fans of the lightweight Ubuntu spin like it?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Last gasp: Microsoft updates Get Windows 10 nagster, KB 3035583, yet again

    With nine days to go, Microsoft really, really wants you to claim your free upgrade to Windows 10. Come to think of it, Microsoft has really, really wanted you to upgrade your Windows 7 or 8.1 PC to Windows 10 for more than a year, and backed it with the GWX subsystem -- first installed by KB 3035583 in March 2015, 15 months ago.

  • AMD FireRender is now the open-source Radeon ProRender
  • NWM: An X11 Window Manager Written In Node.js

    In case you ever wanted to have a Node.js window manager, there's now one that works for X11 environments that works on Chrome OS, Debian, and friends.

  • We’ve come a long way from where we began!

    After working for several weeks on our WikiRating:Google Summer of Code project Davide, Alessandro and I have slowly reached up to the level where we can now visualize the entire project in its final stages.

  • Bringing your kids to GUADEC 2016
  • GNOME Keysign - Report #2 GSoC 2016

    More than a week ago I blogged about the new GUI made with GtkBuilder and Glade [1]. Now, I will talk about what has changed since then with the GUI and also the new functionality that has been added to it.

    I will start with the new "transition" page which I've added for the key download phase. Before going more in depth, I have to say that the app knows at each moment in what state it is, which really helps in adding more functionality.

  • Introducing: openSUSE heroes

    During the last weeks, the openSUSE board and others expressed their concern about the current state of some openSUSE infrastructure: especially the reaction times to change something in the setup were mentioned multiple times. Looks like we lost some administrators and/or contact points at SUSE who helped out in the past to eliminate problems or work together with the community.

    As result, there was a meeting held during the openSUSE Conference 2016, including some SUSE employees and openSUSE community members to discuss the current situation and search for some possible solutions. The discussion was very fruitful and we’d like to share some of the results here to inform everyone and actively ask for help. If you want to join us, the openSUSE heroes, do not hesitate to contact us and join an incredible team!

  • Artila Releases New Cortex-A5 based industrial embedded Linux computer

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion

    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."

  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it

    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.

  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux

    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.

  • GammaRay 2.5 release

    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.

  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection

    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.

  • The new Keyboard panel

    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.

  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS

    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port.

    Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

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More in Tux Machines

Openwashing

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Achieve Global Domination in Agenda, Coming to PC, Mac, Linux on September 21
    Agenda, a strategy simulation from Exordium Games where players control an evil organization seeking world domination, will come to Windows, Mac, and Linux on Sept. 21st, 2016. Players will direct covert operations to increase their control over countries' economies, political parties, militaries, science institutions and media outlets. Operations will entail everything from low key kickbacks to military leaders to the brazen assassination of political rivals.
  • Vendetta Online 1.8.385 MMORPG Drastically Improves Chat and Effect Delays
    Guild Software announced the release of a new maintenance update for their popular and cross-platform Vendetta Online MMORPG (Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game) 3D space combat title. According to the release notes, Vendetta Online 1.8.385 is an important milestone, and it's here to drastically improve the chat and effect delays reported by users during larger capship battles by implementing a new dynamic server packet-queuing and priority change system, which was tested internally with 200 close-proximity capships per battle.
  • Looks like Subnautica from the Natural Selection 2 developers won't get Linux support
    This is quite sad, it seems we have been left wondering for a while (years) about Subnautica, but a developer has now confirmed a Linux version is not being worked on.

Leftovers: Software

  • GNOME Music 3.22 to Offer Better Sorting of Songs in Albums and Artists Views
    GNOME Music 3.22 is on its way, as well as the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, due for release next month on September 21, and it looks like we're now able to get an early taste of what's coming in GNOME's default music playback app. GNOME Music 3.22 Beta has been released, distributed as part of the first Beta development milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, and it promises to offer better sorting of tracks in the Artists and Albums views, a "new playlist" entry to the Playlist dialog, and new keyboard shortcuts.
  • bitmath-1.3.1 released
    bitmath is a Python module I wrote which simplifies many facets of interacting with file sizes in various units as python objects. A few weeks ago version 1.3.1 was released with a few small updates.
  • NetworkManager 1.4 Released
  • NetworkManager 1.4: with better privacy and easier to use
    After we released version 1.0 of NetworkManager, it took us sixteen months to reach the 1.2 milestone. This means that it took over a year for some newly added features to reach the user base. Now we are releasing the next major release after just four months.

More on Linux 'Birthday'

  • Linux celebrates its 25th birthday today
    Today marks 25 years since Linus Torvalds sent out his industry-changing message, asking for help testing a new operating system he had devised. On 25 August, 1991, he wrote: “I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones. This has been brewing since april, and is starting to get ready. I'd like any feedback on things people like/dislike in minix, as my OS resembles it somewhat (same physical layout of the file-system (due to practical reasons) among other things).”
  • Linux, the world's most widespread OS, turns 25 years old
    While Linux may not be the first operating system you think of, it is one of the most significant computing platforms ever developed. Linux powers everything from the world's largest supercomputers to Android phones. Today, it turns 25 years old.
  • Fedora project leader Matthew Miller talks world domination on Linux's 25th birthday
    Linux is now a quarter-century old. August 25, 2016 marks 25 years since the day Linus Torvalds posted a message announcing Linux to the world. “I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu),” he wrote. Since then, Linux has taken the world by storm, powering millions of servers, a countless number of embedded devices, and most of the smartphones in the world—by way of Android.
  • Linux Turns 25 Years Old
  • The Queue: How did you discover Linux?