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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's howtos and leftovers

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Misc

today's leftover

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Misc
  • There’s cloud, and it can even be YOURS on YOUR computer

    The openstack.org market place lists 23 public cloud providers using OpenStack, so there is now no excuse to use any other type of cloud: for sure, there’s one where you need it. If you use a free software solution like OpenStack, then the question if you’re running on your own hardware, on some rented hardware (on which you deployed OpenStack yourself), or on someone else’s OpenStack deployment is just a practical one, on which you can always back-up quickly. That’s one of the very reason why one should deploy on the cloud: so that it’s possible to redeploy quickly on another cloud provider, or even on your own private cloud. This gives you more freedom than you ever had, because it makes you not dependent anymore on the hosting company you’ve selected: switching provider is just the mater of launching a script. The reality is that neither the FSFE or RMS understand all of this. Please don’t dive into the FSFE very wrong message.

  • Hacking with posters and stickers

    The FIXME.ch hackerspace in Lausanne, Switzerland has started this weekend's VR Hackathon with a somewhat low-tech 2D hack: using the FSFE's Public Money Public Code stickers in lieu of sticky tape to place the NO CLOUD poster behind the bar.

  • Valve's Timothy Arceri Lands Gallium3D NIR Optimizations

    Timothy Arceri who has been for the past year working on Linux GPU driver optimizations for Valve has just merged his latest patch series providing optimizations for the Gallium3D NIR linking phase.

    Arceri has been spending the past few weeks on NIR linking optimizations for Gallium3D drivers. While Freedreno and VC4 currently make use of the NIR intermediate repres

  • Rhumbline Advisers Trims Holdings in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Fedora 27 Workstation Installation Steps with Screenshots

    Fedora has recently released its stable version of Fedora 27 in 3 different editions namely, Fedora 27 Workstation, Fedora 27 Server and Fedora 27 Atomic Host edition. In this article, we’ll looking at the step by step guide on installing Fedora 27 Workstation easily in your desktop or laptop.

  • My Free Software Activities in November 2017

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • My Debian Activities in November 2017

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Docker for Data Science

    Docker is a tool that simplifies the installation process for software engineers. Coming from a statistics background I used to care very little about how to install software and would occasionally spend a few days trying to resolve system configuration issues. Enter the god-send Docker almighty.

    Think of Docker as a light virtual machine (I apologise to the Docker gurus for using that term). Generally someone writes a *Dockerfile* that builds a *Docker Image* which contains most of the tools and libraries that you need for a project. You can use this as a base and add any other dependencies that are required for your project. Its underlying philosophy is that if it works on my machine it will work on yours.

  • PAWARUMI gets updated! New level and Linux support!

    With a few weeks into early access, Pawarumi get its first update, on Monday 17th, with a lot of tweaks asked by the community and Linux support! Also, the last level of the game is now playable!

  • Last Weeks Activity in Elisa

    Elisa project has now an official mailing list hosted by kde (Elisa mailing list). Alexander Stippich is now a regular KDE developer and we felt a list was good to coordinate work on Elisa. I am also very happy, to nine years after I joined KDE, to have the honor to recommend somebody. I still remember how excited I was at that time.

    Following blog post from Kevin Funk on binary-factory service (KDE binary factory), Elisa windows installers are regularly built. Thanks a lot to the KDE windows contributors. They do a lot of work to help projects like mine.
    2017-11-30 14_28_43-

  • AWS partnership helps Red Hat manage cloud computing’s rapid growth

    With the rapid advancements and innovation dominating most conversations around cloud computing, it can be easy to neglect the issues around maintaining reliable core products while remaining competitive through the data revolution.

    As an early pioneer of open source, Red Hat Inc. is continuing to innovate through its AWS partnership while keeping a strong focus on maintaining standards and supportive frameworks for additions to new and existing offerings.

  • A Few Clear Signs For Box, Inc. (BOX), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • The Red Hat Inc (RHT) Upgraded by Zacks Investment Research to “Strong-Buy”
  • Bodhi's new Compose object
  • Call for Translations: Arctica Greeter and Ayatana Indicators
  • Serving a static blog from a Snap

    Out of curiosity, I decided to try and package this blog as a snap package, and it turns out to be an extremely easy and convenient way to deploy a static blog!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Foundation's Open Network Automation Platform Issues Debut Amsterdam Release

    ONAP was first formed by the Linux Foundation in February 2017 as a consolidation of the AT&T led ECOMP and China Mobile led OPEN-O network automation projects. An initial code release release from ONAP came out in April, but the new Amsterdam release is the first full platform milestone.

    Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking and Orchestration at The Linux Foundation told EnterpriseNetworkingPlanetthat there were 538 contributors from 46 member organization that helped to develop the ONAP Amsterdam release. Joshipura explained that a core design goal for ONAP was to decouple and modularize elements of the OPEN-O and ECOMP project to enable agility and further development

  • Mesa 17.2.6 Linux Graphics Stack Brings Many Fixes for Intel and AMD Radeon GPUs

    While Mesa 17.3 is still in the works, the development team released this past weekend a new maintenance update to the current stable series of the open-source graphics stack for GNU/Linux distributions.

    Mesa 17.2.6 is now available and brings many new fixes for Intel and AMD Radeon GPUs, including improvements to SIMD32 and little-core for the Intel i965 OpenGL driver and a fix for a GPU hang that occurred when playing hardware-accelerated video with the MPV open-source video player.

    For AMD Radeon GPUs, the Mesa 17.2.6 update plugs not one but two memory leaks from the Radeon RADV Vulkan driver, and fixes an issue with the reversing of the tess factor components for isolines. on the r600 driver. On the other hand, Mesa 17.2.6 fixes two performance regressions for the SWR driver and addresses a use-after-free bug in the Gallium driver.

  • tmate – Instantly Share Your Terminal Session To Anyone In Seconds

    A while ago, we wrote about teleconsole which is used to share terminal instantly to anyone (whoever you trusting). Today also we are going to discuss about same kind of application called tmate.

    Why you want tmate application? this will help you to get help from your friends when you need.

  • Linux Release Roundup: gThumb, Peek Gif Recorder + More

    That said, a couple of juicy app updates did manage to squeak out during the past 7 days, including new releases of a Linux Winamp alternative, a free software stalwart, and one of my absolute favourite utilities.

  • Wine 2.22 Fixes Issues with Witcher 3, Mafia III, and Daylight Games on Linux

    The Wine 2.22 development release arrived at the end of last week with some more improvements and bug fixes for various Windows games and apps, as well as better support for latest GCC compiler.

    Continuing the project's bi-weekly release tradition, Wine 2.22 is here to improve the support for the ARM64 (AArch64) hardware architecture, adds a source selection dialog for scanners, resolves some issues with the DLL injection support, and improves the input methods.

  • Space-game 'Nimbatus' sees you build physically simulated drones, fully funded and demo available

    Few games make me excited beyond help, especially when they're on Kickstarter, but space drone building game Nimbatus [Kickstarter, Official Site] is fully funded and coming to Linux.

    There's a key point here that helped me get excited—it has a fully working demo for Linux!

  • Color Vision Deficiency individuals can now have the best TV experience with Samsung SeeColors app
  • HTC U11, Sony Xperia XZ, XZs, and X Performance Now Getting Android 8.0 Oreo

    As of today, users of the HTC U11, Sony Xperia XZ, Sony Xperia XZs, and Sony Xperia X Performance mobile phones are receiving the latest Android 8.0 Oreo software update.

  • Get a great deal on a Linux-powered System76 computer for Cyber Monday

    Today is Cyber Monday, y’all! It’s basically Black Friday, but instead of shopping at brick and mortar retailers, you shop online instead. Oh yeah, it’s a Monday rather than a Friday too. For some people, today is the ultimate shopping day as you can score some amazing deals without leaving your house -- no savage fistfights at Walmart or Target.

    Before you head over to Amazon or Newegg to score some new technology devices, can I make a suggestion? Consider a Linux-powered desktop or laptop from System76. These are computers that come with an Ubuntu-based operating system pre-installed. Today only, for Cyber Monday, the company is giving some rare discounts on most of its computers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mapping the Future: Cartography Stages a Comeback

    Cartography is the new code. Increasingly, everything from your takeout delivery to your UberPool route is orchestrated not just by engineers but by cartographers. Between 2007 and 2015, the number of grads earning master’s degrees in cartography increased annually by more than 40 percent on average. And as advanced satellites, digital mapping tools, and open-source geographical software progress, the demand for cartographers is projected to grow nearly 30 percent by 2024.

  • The quest for open science

    Within two minutes of talking to Dr Richard Bowman, in his lab at the University of Bath, he’s guiding me through the physics of tractor beams in Star trek. He’s using it as a simile to explain the complicated subject of optical tweezers to a stupid person.

    He does so in a charming way, as someone familiar with explaining his complex field to journalists, but it’s clear why he’s a Prize Fellow and Royal Commission 1851 Research Fellow – his explanation ends with our imaginary tractor beam melting an object it’s trying to move before Bowman shrinks this entire sci-fi example down to demonstrate how he’s used laser beams in his past work to move tiny objects.

  • Young “Daeshgram” Hackers Flood Official ISIS Propaganda Channels With Porn
  • Q3 Smartphone Market Shares and Prelim Estimate of Full Year 2017 Top 5 (plus installed base as always)

     

    Time for some numbers. The average of the big analyst houses gives us a count of total smartphone market in Q3 globally of 383.1 million units. That is up 3% vs one year ago and up 7% vs the previous quarter ie Q2. We are on pace for something around 1.6B total smartphones sold this year, perhaps a bit under. The migration rate of new phone sales to smartphones is now at 82%. Because we have 3 quarters of data and the industry is relatively stable, I can also give you a preliminary projection for full year market shares (Top 5).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]

    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.

  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]

    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.

  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn

    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.

  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122

    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.

  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?

    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal
    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.
  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux
    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.
  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms
    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on. Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.
  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively
    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’. The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS. The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

today's howtos

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes
    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes. If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!
  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland
    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor. Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.
  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD
    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release. In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Satellite: Patch Management Overview and Analysis
    We review Red Hat Satellite, a patch management solution for enterprise Linux systems.
  • Analysts Expect Red Hat Inc (RHT) Will Announce Quarterly Sales of $761.96 Million
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Shares Move -0.17%
  • A Modularity rethink for Fedora
    We have covered the Fedora Modularity initiative a time or two over the years but, just as the modular "product" started rolling out, Fedora went back to the drawing board. There were a number of fundamental problems with Modularity as it was to be delivered in the Fedora 27 server edition, so a classic version of the distribution was released instead. But Modularity is far from dead; there is a new plan afoot to deliver it for Fedora 28, which is due in May. The problem that Modularity seeks to solve is that different users of the distribution have differing needs for stability versus tracking the bleeding edge. The pain is most often felt in the fast-moving web development world, where frameworks and applications move far more quickly than Fedora as a whole can—even if it could, moving that quickly would be problematic for other types of users. So Modularity was meant to be a way for Fedora users to pick and choose which "modules" (a cohesive set of packages supporting a particular version of, say, Node.js, Django, a web server, or a database management system) are included in their tailored instance of Fedora. The Tumbleweed snapshots feature of the openSUSE rolling distribution is targeted at solving much the same problem. Modularity would also facilitate installing multiple different versions of modules so that different applications could each use the versions of the web framework, database, and web server that the application supports. It is, in some ways, an attempt to give users the best of both worlds: the stability of a Fedora release with the availability of modules of older and newer packages, some of which would be supported beyond the typical 13-month lifecycle of a Fedora release. The trick is in how to get there.