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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google Kahlee: The First AMD-Powered Chromebook

    After years of many Intel and ARM Chromebooks, the first AMD-powered Chromebook appears to be gearing up for release.

    Continuing with tradition, the AMD Chromebook is using Coreboot. Thus we have the first signs of it via Coreboot code review with this new Google board being codenamed "Kahlee." The Coreboot code began appearing for review just minutes ago after other Kahlee references in the Chrome OS world have been found in recent weeks.

  • Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

    Next week Microsoft will begin the slowish rollout of its big update to Windows 10, the Creators Update.

    Right now, it's doing a little damage control, and preempting complaints about privacy, by listing the types of information its operating system will automatically and silently leak from PCs, slabs, and laptops back to Redmond.

    When Windows 10 came out, Reg readers were alarmed by the volume of information the software was collecting and sending back to base. Ever since then, Microsoft has been fighting a PR battle to reassure people that such data slurping isn't all bad – it's "just" telemetry and diagnostics and potentially your files.

    Now Redmond's had a little rethink for the Creators Update, and decided to come clean on exactly what the software will phone home – even insisting the closed-source operating system will scoop up less surveillance this time.

  • Can Linux OpenSwitch Project help startups get network 5G ready?

    The network bottleneck needs all the tech talent startups can throw at it. The Linux Foundation’s OpenSwitch Project wants to remove lower-stack roadblocks that might stifle their innovation.

    “We’re seeing startups come in and do really, really interesting things really, really well,” said Drew Schulke (pictured), vice president of converged networking at Dell EMC.

    However, they could do more in less time if the foundation of their work were provided in advance, he added. To this end, Dell contributed the base operating system for the OpenSwitch Project.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.10.8, Receives Flatpak 0.9

    openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio is back with news for users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system series, informing them about the latest technologies and updated applications that landed in the repositories.

    The developer starts his weekly report by reminding us that openSUSE Tumbleweed was the first GNU/Linux distribution to ship the latest GNOME 3.24 desktop environment to its users. A total of eighteen snapshots appear to have been released for Tumbleweed users, bringing all the newest apps, including the Mozilla Firefox 52.0.1 web browser and KDE Plasma 5.9.4 desktop environment.

  • Red Hat and Fedora Teams Welcome Ubuntu to GNOME and Wayland with Open Arms
  • Canonical Refocus

    And, Mark, Jane, I know this will have been a tough decision to come to, and this will be a tough day for the different teams affected. Hang in there: Ubuntu has had such a profound impact on open source and while the future path may be a little different, I am certain it will be fruitful.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Linux Foundation: Not a Friend of Desktop Linux, the GPL, or Openness

    The Linux Foundation has no respect for FOSS. Nor does it seem care about any users of Linux who aren't connected with the enterprise. It's been that way since the beginning. It now appears that the Foundation also has little respect for the GPL...you know, Linux's license. Nor does it appear to be much of a believer in the notion of transparency.

  • Nageru 1.5.0 released

    I just released version 1.5.0 of Nageru, my live video mixer. The biggest feature is obviously the HDMI/SDI live output, but there are lots of small nuggets everywhere; it's been four months in the making.

  • Manipulated, a short puzzle-platformer where you need some brains

    Manipulated [Steam] is a short puzzle-platformer that warns you about having to think. It's certainly not wrong.

  • Shovel Knight’s 3.0 patch lands, with plenty of new content

    The fun and charming platform inspired by 8-bit era visuals has gotten a shiny new campaign. This isn’t the only major addition and there’s plenty other new content available to enjoy.

  • Conference to have Daily Keynote Speakers

    The openSUSE Conference is about seven weeks away and this year will again have high-quality keynote speakers.

    Keynote speakers for this year’s conference at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 26 – 28 will be from SaltStack, KDE and Free Software Foundation Europe.

    Matthias Kirschner, President of FSFE, will take the stage on May 26 at 10 a.m. and provide attendees an exorbitant amount of information about governance and open source.

    Later that evening, there will be entertainment and a Brazilian style barbecue, so stick around for the Friday night fun.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New Regulations Appear To Authorize Chinese Law Enforcement To Hack Into Computers Anywhere In The World

    A recurrent theme here on Techdirt has been the way in which the West has ceded the moral high ground in so many areas involving the tech world. For example, in 2010, we noted that the US had really lost the right to point fingers over Internet censorship. The moral high ground on surveillance went in 2013 for people, and in 2014 for economic espionage. Meanwhile, the UK has been shown to be as bad as the most disreputable police states in its long-running blanket surveillance of all its citizens.

    The UK's most recent move to cast off any pretense that it is morally superior to other "lesser" nations is the Investigatory Powers Act, which formalizes all the powers its intelligence services have been secretly using for years. One of the most intrusive of those is the power to carry out what is quaintly termed "equipment interference" -- hacking -- anywhere in the world.

  • Android 7.1.2 Nougat Update Now Rolling Out to Nexus and Pixel Devices; Brings Fixes for Numerous Issues
  • Waze for Android Auto is finally on its way as beta testing prepares to kick off
  • Mouser Boosts Open Source Lineup with DFRobot, Globally Distributes Plug-and-Play Sensors Series

    Mouser Electronics, Inc., the New Product Introduction (NPI) leader that empowers innovation, announces a global distribution agreement with DFRobot, a leading robotics and open source hardware provider. The agreement brings DFRobot's robotics and maker-focused products to Mouser's growing open source lineup.

    [...]

    The Gravity Arduino Starter Kit is a plug-and-play electronics toolkit that helps beginners easily learn how to work with sensors and the Arduino platform. The kit includes a DFRduino UNO R3 microcontroller, which functions exactly the same as Arduino UNO, and 12 popular Gravity components and sensors. The Gravity 27-Piece Sensor Kit for Arduino offers a robust selection of sensors that are fully compatible with the Arduino platform. The kit features a bundle of the most popular DFRobot Gravity sensors, including those for light, CO2, sound, touch, and distance, plus an accelerometer and a relay module. Both the Starter Kit and Sensor Kit use the IO Expansion Shield for connecting sensors to the Arduino board.

  • 5 cool C/C++ app dev tools

    As compelling as new languages like Rust are for building systems, C and C++ remain fundamental for writing applications that run close to the metal, despite the waxing and waning of their usage statistics.

    What's more, the culture of tools for C/C++ development remains deep and fruitful. Here are five C-related projects -- compilers, libraries, and support tools -- that caught our eye recently, whether for bolstering existing projects or starting new ones.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tesla’s software update for internet browser, Linux update and new features coming in ~6 weeks, says Elon Musk

    When Tesla started pushing its 8.1 software update to its fleet this week, it was really light on UI improvements and instead focused almost entirely on Autopilot 2.0 updates.

    Several of the changes that CEO Elon Musk previously associated with the upcoming 8.1 update have been pushed another ~6 weeks.

    We are talking about the expected internet browser update, Linux kernel update, and several bug fixes – especially having to do with Tesla’s media app.

  • Linux-Fu: Applications on the Web

    Did you know you can run remote Linux GUI programs in a browser with HTML5 support? It’s even secure because you can use SSH tunneling and that little trick means you don’t even need to open additional ports. If this sounds like gibberish, read on, it’s actually pretty easy to get up and running.

    I recently was a guest on a Houston-based podcast, and the hosts asked me if the best thing about writing for Hackaday was getting to work with the other Hackaday staff. I told them that was really good, but what I like best was interacting with people (well, most people) in the comments. That sometimes you’d post an article and someone would bring a topic up in comments that would really knock your socks off. This is how I wound up with this nearly ideal remote access solution, that requires nothing on the remote side but a web browser.

  • Philips Hue Uses Kubernetes to Keep the Lights On

    The open-source Kubernetes container management and orchestration system isn't just for hyper-scale data center operators, it can also benefit consumer electronics vendors. Speaking at the Kubecon / Cloud Native con even in Berlin this week, Mark Van Straten, Senior Developer at development firm Q42, detailed how Philips embraced Kubernetes to help enable the next generation of the Philips Hue smart light bulb product.

  • Netrunner Desktop 17.03 'Cyclotron' Debian-based KDE Linux distro now available

    When you choose a Linux-based operating system, you also choose a desktop environment. For many users, the DE sort of is the operating system. In other words, for some, they will really only interact with the user interface -- especially if they avoid the command line. A good operating system will get out of the user's way, allowing them to focus on the apps and tools they need.

    If you are moving from Windows to Linux, KDE can be a great desktop environment. It is very reminiscent of the traditional Windows 95 to Windows 7 experience. Unfortunately, KDE can be a bit tedious to set up. Sure, it works fine "out of the box," but customizing it can be daunting. Luckily, there is a Debian-based operating system that is configured beautifully -- especially for those leaving Microsoft's OS. Called "Netrunner Desktop," it comes pre-loaded with many useful programs, making it an absolute joy to use. Today, it reaches version 17.03, code-named "Cyclotron."

  • Technicals in Focus for Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • This was Fedora at CS50x.ni

    On Tuesday, March 14th, the Fedora Nicaragua community and the CS50x.ni staff, with the support from Fundación UNO and the Fedora Project, we had the opportunity to meet to see a series of lectures in which the speakers shared their experience using Free Software, the importance and benefits of the different software tools used in the CS50x.ni course. The lectures were aimed for anyone who is taking the CS50x.ni course currently, or who wants to take it in the future or people interested in learning more about free software and more specifically about the Fedora Project.

  • When the 'S' in HTTPS also stands for shady

    Just when we'd learned the importance of HTTPS in address bars, spammers and malicious hackers have figured out how to game the system.

    Let's Encrypt is an automated service that lets people turn their old unencrypted URLs into safely encrypted HTTPS addresses with a type of file called a certificate. It's terrific, especially because certificates are expensive (overpriced, actually) and many people can't afford them. So it's easy to argue that the Let's Encrypt service has done more than we may ever realize to strengthen the security of the internet and users everywhere.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Red Hat - Another Quarter And A Totally New Set Of Investor Perceptions
  • BIG open-source love Microsoft and Google? You still won't catch AWS [Ed: Microsoft does not love FOSS (or loved by it); it actively attacks FOSS.]

    Open source wasn’t supposed to matter in the cloud. After the Free Software Foundation’s failed attempt to rein in network-delivered software services, some wrung their hands and waited for the open source apocalypse. Instead of imploding, however, open source adoption has exploded, with ever more permissive licenses rising to largely eliminate the need to contribute anything back.

  • Open Source Data:The Last Frontier of the Fintech Revolution

    In the early days of computing, programmers and software developers shared their creations learned from each other and therefore advanced computing and software engineering to new heights.

  • The cheap arm project: An affordable, open-source robotics project

    What do you get when you put together wood and rope? Well according to Plymouth University’s Professor Guido Bugmann: a low-cost, open source, 2 meter tall robot! All buildable for under £2000. The Cheap Arm Project (CHAP) began as an MSc project aimed at developing an affordable mobile robot arm system that could be used by wheelchair users to access daily objects at inaccessible heights or weights (the extreme case being 2 litre bottle).

  • European Interoperability Framework: Commission presents new guidance for digital public services

    The announcement will be made today, at the Digital Day in Rome, together with other initiatives that aim to promote cooperation between EU Member States to better prepare society to reap the full potential of the digital transformation. Many EU Member States are digitising their public administrations to save time, reduce costs, increase transparency, and improve the quality of services that they offer to citizens and businesses. Doing this in a coordinated way ensures that the public sector is not only digital but also interoperable. The EU framework published today will help Member States to follow a common approach when making their public services available online, also across countries and policy areas. This will contribute to reducing bureaucracy for people and businesses, for example, when requesting certificates, enrolling to services, or handing in tax declarations.

  • Carbon Black warns of over reliance on 'nascent' machine learning security

    Security professionals cited high false positive rates and the ease with which machine learning-based technologies can be bypassed – at present – as the most serious barriers to adoption.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • DRM display resource leasing (kernel side)

    So, you've got a fine head-mounted display and want to explore the delights of virtual reality. Right now, on Linux, that means getting the window system to cooperate because the window system is the DRM master and holds sole access to all display resources. So, you plug in your device, play with RandR to get it displaying bits from the window system and then carefully configure your VR application to use the whole monitor area and hope that the desktop will actually grant you the boon of page flipping so that you will get reasonable performance and maybe not even experience tearing. Results so far have been mixed, and depend on a lot of pieces working in ways that aren't exactly how they were designed to work.

  • GUADEC accommodation

    At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to a final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.

  • Kickstarter for Niryo One, open source 6-axis 3D printed robotic arm, doubles campaign goal

    A Kickstarter campaign for the Niryo One, an open source 3D printed 6-axis robotic arm, has more than doubled its €20,000 target after just a couple of days. The 3D printed robot is powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Robot Operating System.

  • Linux Action Show to End Eleven Year Run at LFNW

    Jupiter Broadcasting’s long-running podcast, Linux Action Show, will soon be signing off the air…er, fiber cable, for the last time. The show first streamed on June 10, 2006 and was hosted by “Linux Tycoon” Bryan Lunduke and Jupiter Broadcasting founder Chris Fisher. Lunduke left the show in 2012, replaced by Matt Hartley, who served as co-host for about three years. The show is currently hosted by Fisher and Noah Chelliah, president of Altispeed, an open source technology company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft Sued After Windows 10 Upgrade “Destroyed Users’ Computers”

    In the lawsuit documents (via The Reg), the plaintiffs explain that Microsoft did not “exercise reasonable care in designing, formulating, and manufacturing the Windows 10 upgrade,” becoming responsible for damages caused to users in the form of data loss and hardware issues.

  • WebTorrent Desktop: Instant Video Streaming App for Linux Desktop

    WebTorrent Desktop is a cross-platform open source torrent client with which you can instantly stream audio and video torrent files without waiting to completely download them.

    It features a beautiful and modern User Interface, streaming support for videos from Internet Archive, music from Creative Commons, and audiobooks from Librivox, and has the ability to talk to BitTorrent and WebTorrent peers while providing a seamless User Experience.

  • Humble Store has some noteworthy deals on this weekend
  • clr-boot-manager now available in Solus

    We’re happy to announce the rollout of clr-boot-manager in our stable repository. clr-boot-manager, from the Clear Linux Project For Intel Architecture, enables a more bulletproof update experience by handling the maintenance and garbage collection of kernels, as well as configuration of the bootloader itself (i.e. GRUB2 for Legacy Boot, goofiboot for UEFI boot on Solus). Furthermore, it enables us to retain older, known-working kernels, so in the event a kernel upgrade results in the inability to boot, you’ll still be able to roll back to the last good kernel.

  • Ubuntu vs Arch Linux

    Comparing Ubuntu to Arch Linux. Focus is entirely on the underlying system, as Arch don’t offer a specific interface to compare with Ubuntu’s Unity desktop.

  • Packaging Ishiiruka-Dolphin (GameCube/Wii Emulator)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) To Kick Off Another Week Of Big Earnings Reports
  • Debian Project Leader elections 2017

    It's that time of year again for the Debian Project: the elections of its Project Leader!

    The Project Leader position is described in the Debian Constitution.

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More in Tux Machines

ROSA Fresh R9

ROSA is a desktop distribution that was originally forked from Mandriva Linux, but now is independently developed. While the company which produces ROSA is based in Russia, the distribution includes complete translations for multiple languages. The ROSA desktop distribution is designed to be easy to use and includes a range of popular applications and multimedia support. ROSA R9 is available in two editions, one featuring the KDE 4 desktop and the second featuring the KDE Plasma 5 desktop. These editions are scheduled to receive four years of support and security updates. I decided to download the Plasma edition of ROSA R9 and found the installation media to be approximately 2GB in size. Booting from the ROSA disc brings up a menu asking if we would like to load the distribution's live desktop environment or begin the installation process. Taking the live option brings up a graphical wizard that asks us a few questions. We are asked to select our preferred language from a list and accept the project's warranty and license. We are then asked to select our time zone and keyboard layout from lists. With these steps completed, the wizard disappears and the Plasma 5.9 desktop loads. Read more

More of today's howtos

Software: Linfo, EasyTag, Simple Scan, Albert, VLC, Remote Desktop, Frogr, Brisk Menu, and OpenShot

  • Linfo – Shows Linux Server Health Status in Real-Time
    Linfo is a free and open source, cross-platform server statistics UI/library which displays a great deal of system information. It is extensible, easy-to-use (via composer) PHP5 library to get extensive system statistics programmatically from your PHP application. It’s a Ncurses CLI view of Web UI, which works in Linux, Windows, *BSD, Darwin/Mac OSX, Solaris, and Minix.
  • 2 tag management tools for organizing your music library
    These days, EasyTag seems to be my go-to tag editor. While I can't claim to have tried them all, I have mostly stopped looking now that I have this one. Generally speaking, I like its three-panel layout: file system directory on the left; selected tracks in the middle, showing file name and tags; and specific tags and cover image on the right.
  • New Simple Scan Designs Emerge; Seeking Devs to Implement Them
    Simple Scan is one of my personal favourite and perhaps even one of the "essential" apps on the Linux desktop for me. It does what it says on the tin: it's simple and it scans, with a nice preview system and enough options to be decently functional. Some new designs for the app have emerged and they are looking quite nice indeed. GNOME UX designer and Red Hat Desktop Team Member, Allan Day, showed the new mockup designs off in his blog post. Simple Scan has a pretty sparse and simplistic interface already, and I mean that in a positive way, but Allan believes that "just because it's great, doesn't mean it can't be improved" and that most of the improvements are simply "refinements", rather than major overhauls, in order to make some of the app's functions a bit easier to discover and navigate.
  • Albert – A Fast, Lightweight and Flexible Application Launcher for Linux
    A while ago, we have written about Ulauncher which is used to launch application quickly. Today we came up with similar kind of utility called Albert which is doing the same job and have some additional unique features which is not there in ulauncher.
  • 5 Tricks To Get More Out Of VLC Player In Linux
    In fact, for the desktop, VLC is much more than just a tool to play videos stored on your hard drive! So, stay with me for a tour of the lesser known features of that great software.
  • 5 of the Best Linux Remote Desktop Apps to Remotely Access a Computer
    Remote desktop apps are a very useful group of apps because they allow access to a computer anywhere in the world. While the simplest way to do this is via a terminal, if you don’t want to have to type commands but rather want a more advanced way to access a remote computer, here are five of the best remote desktop apps for Linux.
  • Frogr 1.3 released
  • Brisk Menu 0.4.0 Is Out with Super Key Support, Adapts to Vertical Panel Layouts
    Solus Project founder and lead developer Ikey Doherty is today announcing the release and immediate availability of the Brisk Menu 0.4.0 application menu for Solus and other supported GNU/Linux distributions.
  • OpenShot 2.3.3 Open-Source Video Editor Released with Stability Improvements
    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas is announcing the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform non-linear video editor.

CloudReady - Chromebook re-experienced

I haven't done any extensive testing, but then, how much testing is really needed to run a bunch of Web apps. The whole idea is to have this cloud-based operating system, with easy, flexible access to your data anywhere you go. So if you judge this from the perspective of a typical desktop, you miss the point. But that is the point. When I install something on a desktop-like form factor, I expect its behavior to match. CloudReady takes you away from that experience, and the transition is not comfortable. You feel very limited. This makes a lot of sense for schools, for instance, where you do want to lock down the devices, and make them simple for reuse. In a home setup, why would you go for just cloud, when you can have that plus any which desktop application on a typical system? After all, nothing prevents you from launching a browser and using Google applications, side by side with your desktop stuff. It's the same thing. The notion of reviving old hardware is a bit of a wishful thinking. My eeePC test shows that it gets completely crippled when you run HD content in either Firefox or Chrome. An operating system based on Chromium OS will not drastically change that. It cannot do that. Maybe you will have better performance than having Windows there, the same way I opted for a Linux setup on the Asus netbook, but there are physical limits to what old hardware can accomplish. And then, there's the whole question of cloud ... Most people might be comfy with this, after having used smartphones for a while, but I don't think this is anything novel or mindblowing. CloudReady works as advertised, it's a very cool concept, but ultimately, it gives you a browser on steroids. Google and Neverware have their own agenda for doing this, but for home users, there really isn't any added value in transforming their keyboard-and-mouse box into a browsing portal. So if you ask me, am I ready for the cloud, the answer is, only when it becomes sophisticated enough to match my productivity and freedom of creativity. And for you, do you want a simple, locked down, secure and entirely Google machine that isn't a mobile phone or a dedicated piece of hardware? The answer is 42. Read more