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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Chromebooks Getting All-New Wallpaper Picker and Support for Exporting Passwords

    We have some good news for you if you're a Chromebook user, as Google has added a bunch of goodies to Chrome OS, which you can try right now from the Canary experimental channel.

    Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort recently shared details about several new features that have been added to the Chrome Canary experimental channel for Google's Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, including a brand-new wallpaper picker, support for exporting passwords, and a revamped keyboard shortcut viewer.

  • Mesosphere Extends DC/OS to the EDGE, Adds Multi-Cloud, Kubernetes Support
  • SOGo v4.0.0 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of SOGo v4.0.0. This is a major release of SOGo which focuses on new features, various enhancements and improved stability over previous versions.

  • An argument against proxies

    Proxies? In companies getting started with an upstream first concept this is what people are called who act as the only interface between their employer and an open source project: All information from any project used internally flows through them. All bug reports and patches intended as upstream contribution also flows through them - hiding entire teams producing the actual contributions.

    At Apache projects I learnt to dislike this setup of having proxies act in place of the real contributors. Why so?

    Apache is built on the premise of individuals working together in the best interest of their projects. Over time, people who prove to commit themselves to a project get added to that project. Work contributed to a project gets rewarded - in a merit doesn't go away kind-of sense working on an Apache project is a role independent of other work committments - in the "merit doesn't go away" sense this merit is attached to the individual making contributions, not to the entity sponsoring that individual in one way or another.

  • HDCP 2.2 Content Protection Being Worked On For The i915 DRM Driver [Ed: DRM in Linux]

    With the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle there will be initial support for HDCP with the i915 DRM driver. That High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) support in its initial form is limited to v1.4 on HDMI/DP connectors, but HDCP 2.2 is now being tackled.

    Building off that HDCP v1.4 support done by Google's Chrome OS developers for the i915 DRM Linux driver, Intel developers are now working on extending that to HDCP v2.2 capabilities. HDCP2 is an entirely different link protection design from HDCP1. HDCP 2.x support for newer devices supports more encryption standards, supports WirelessHD and Miracast wireless display standards, a new authentication protocol, and other changes effectively making it a clean sheet design but with some commonalities between the versions.

  • How to create a cron job with Kubernetes on a Raspberry Pi
  • herbstluftwm – A Manual Tiling Window Manager for X11

    herbstluftwm is an open-source tiling window manager with which you can manually organize your screens into mutually non-overlapping frames. i.e app windows will be stacked above each other instead of the typical overlapping window settings.

    herbstluftwm offers a swift operation and since its configuration file is a script that runs at startup, it is configured at runtime via ipc calls from herbstclient same as wmii/musca. It makes use of tags (read workspaces) which can be added or removed at runtime.

  • Device Integration

    I’ve been working on some groundwork features to sneak into Builder 3.28 so that we can build upon them for 3.30. In particular, I’ve started to land device abstractions. The goal around this is to make it easier to do cross-architecture development as well as support devices like phones, tablets, and IoT.

  • 20 questions DevOps job candidates should be prepared to answer [Ed: more of that inane "DevOps" hype in Red Hat sites]
  • Infrastructure 2.0: Whatever We’re Calling it Now, It’s Here [Ed: "DevOps" again, Now with 2.0.]
  • Another motive To buy these stock: DiamondRock Hospitality Company (DRH), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • An intro to ONLYOFFICE – now available as a snap

    Two years ago ONLYOFFICE developers released a desktop office suite that combined viewers and editors for text documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

    Last week ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors was released as a snap – the universal Linux packaging format. This blog explains with closer insight how the editors were created, the technological aspects, and why we decided to build the snap.

  • Kotlin programming language now available as a snap for Ubuntu
  • Purism Partners with Cryptography Pioneer Werner Koch to Create a New Encrypted Communication Standard for Security-Focused Devices

    Purism, maker of security-focused laptops has announced today that they have joined forces with leading cryptography pioneer, Werner Koch, to integrate hardware encryption into the company’s Librem laptops and forthcoming Librem 5 phone. By manufacturing hardware with its own software and services, Purism will include cryptography by default pushing the industry forward with unprecedented protection for end-user devices.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Chromebooks Will Soon Get a Docked Magnifier Accessibility Tool, Try It Out Now

    Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort shares today with us a new experimental feature that's coming to a Chromebook near you later this year and it's now available for public testing.

    The new feature we're talking about here is a docked magnifier tool that will be available from the accessibility settings of the Chrome OS operating system and promises to let you magnify the top section of your screen. Users will be able to choose between a 2x and 20x zoom level value.

  • OpenMAX Tizonia H.264 Encoder/Decoder Land In Mesa 18.1 Git

    It was last summer that a GSoC student developer worked on an OpenMAX Tizonia state tracker for Gallium3D to replace the existing and out-of-date "Bellagio" code. Finally today that new Tizonia code has landed in Mesa 18.1-devel Git.

  • Termshot - Take Image Screenshot of Command Line Output

    In this article, I'll show you how to turn a command line output in Linux into an image using Termshot. Termshot is Linux tool which turns a cli command's output into a screenshot including colors and interactive text. This is of the essence if working on something that you need to screenshot for sharing, reference or documentation purposes. Sometimes you would copy terminal output in a text format but when you paste it on a different platform like CMS, it will lose original formatting and its colors giving it an atrocious look.

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  • Back to Basics Part 4 – using grep in GNU/Linux

    One of the really confusing things for users who are new to messing with the command line, can be trying to search with specifics. A useful little tool for aiding in this process, is called grep, or “global regular expression print,” which will search for regular statements in anything you pipe it through, and show you matches for what you looked for (if any exist.)

  • Way of the Passive Fist is out and it’s finger-aching fun

    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam] is not the type of brawler I expected it to be, but it’s still a very fun experience.

  • The Linux beta of Arma 3 has been updated to 1.80, compatible with Windows again for a time

    The Linux beta of Arma 3 [Steam] is once again up to date with the Windows client at version 1.80 (meaning for now multiplayer with Windows gamers is possible), this also brings compatibility with the Tac-Ops Mission Pack.

  • MX-17.1-RC1 Release Candidate 1 available for testing

    We are pleased to offer MX-17.1-RC1 for testing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Data Destroyer, Testdisk, Boot-repair and Windows7

    Nevertheless, the laptop became unusable. I could not boot it from HDD. I had to save it. I managed to create a Live USB with Kubuntu 16.04 image using another laptop I had. But even then, HDD partition table was destroyed. Linux operating system could not read anything from the disk.

    Here comes Testdisk. This is a small CLI utility to help in these situations. I installed it in the Live Kubuntu 16.04 and let it run. It took some time for Testdisk to scan my 1TB drive. I must admit that the interface of Testdisk is far from perfect, and you can easily null the scan results by pressing just one button. That made my work iterative before I finally managed to rescue my drive.

    Testdisk found partitions on my HDD, and even helped me to copy files from the data partition to an external HDD. At least, I saved my data.

    The next step was to recreate partition table. There were certain partitions for Linux, Linux Swap, OS restore and data. But the main Windows partition was lost, and instead I saw couple dozen broken bit-size partitions. Using Testdisk, I managed to recreate the partition table. Live Kubuntu could mount these partitions normally, which was already a big achievement. Few more files were copied from the Linux partition to the external drive, just in case.

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  • The Engine Of HPC And Machine Learning

    The GPU motor has come a long way since the “G80” GPU was launched by Nvidia back in 2006, laying the groundwork for what has evolved into the Volta GPU, arguably them most complex and rich computing engine yet put into the field for parallel processing. This GPU had eight shader cores, each with sixteen processing elements, introducing a much more parallel architecture than prior chips from Nvidia.

  • DRI3 v1.2 Lands In X.Org Server 1.20

    We knew it was coming still for X.Org Server 1.20, but now the DRI3 v1.2 support has landed in the server.

    Along with the X.Org Server bits are support within the modesetting DDX driver and GLAMOR acceleration for the new DRI3 v1.2 capabilities. This includes support for multiple planes and buffer modifier requests. The modesetting DDX work includes atomic mode-setting support and supporting buffer formats/modifiers. The multi-plane support should be particularly useful for ARM/embedded Linux devices.

  • Kali Linux For Windows 10 Arrives In Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux for Windows 10 now available in Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux now available for download from Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux hits the Microsoft Store (for Windows Subsystem on Linux)

    It still feels weird writing that a Linux distribution is something you can download and install from the Microsoft Store. But it’s been true for a while now. Windows 10 has an optional feature called the Windows Subsystem for Linux that lets you load a command-line Linux operating system that runs inside of Windows, allowing you to use Linux tools without rebooting or opening a virtual machine.

  • Redcore Linux Hardened 1803 Jupiter Alpha

    We are very happy to announce that Redcore Linux Hardened 1803 (Jupiter) reached Alpha status. This development cycle we are leaving new features on a second plan, and we are focusing mostly on the security aspect of the distribution.

today's leftovers: MX Linux 17, tiled map editor for GNU/Linux and more

Filed under
Misc
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.11 | PreShrink-VM and A Look At MX Linux 17
  • A Look at Tiled – Tiled map editor for GNU/Linux

    I’ve been a D&D Player for a long time, but have been without a campaign now for a few years. I’ve spoken to some friends, and there seems to be some building interest in starting an online campaign on such a website like Roll20.

    I started looking into options for building maps, outside of just using the Roll20 editor itself, and discovered a program called Tiled, which was exactly what I was looking for. It didn’t take me long after downloading it, to fall in love.

  • Encrypted files in Dropbox
  • How to Setup ConkyMatic on Arch Linux
  • UBPorts Is Working On Unity 8 For Debian

    The UBPorts community continues pushing Unity 8 for their mobile/convergence vision in the absence of Canonical as well as making other improvements. Besides offering Unity 8 to Ubuntu users, they are also working on Debian support.

    In today's latest Ubuntu Touch Q&A, there is a small reference near the end that they are working on the Unity 8 desktop environment as an option for Debian too. "Yes... But shhh this is a secret..."

  • Open-source trusted computing for IoT

    At this year's FOSDEM in Brussels, Jan Tobias Mühlberg gave a talk on the latest work on Sancus, a project that was originally presented at the USENIX Security Symposium in 2013. The project is a fully open-source hardware platform to support "trusted computing" and other security functionality. It is designed to be used for internet of things (IoT) devices, automotive applications, critical infrastructure, and other embedded devices where trusted code is expected to be run.

    A common security practice for some time now has been to sign executables to ensure that only the expected code is running on a system and to prevent software that is not trusted from being loaded and executed. Sancus is an architecture for trusted embedded computing that enables local and remote attestation of signed software, safe and secure storage of secrets such as encryption keys and certificates, and isolation of memory regions between software modules. In addition to the technical specification [PDF], the project also has a working implementation of code and hardware consisting of compiler modifications, additions to the hardware description language for a microcontroller to add functionality to the processor, a simulator, header files, and assorted tools to tie everything together.

    Many people are already familiar with code signing; by default, smartphones won't install apps that haven't been approved by the vendor (i.e. Apple or Google) because each app must be submitted for approval and then signed using a key that is shipped pre-installed on every phone. Similarly, many computers support mechanisms like ARM TrustZone or UEFI Secure Boot that are designed to prevent hardware rootkits at the bootloader level. In practice, some of those technologies have been used to restrict computers to boot only Microsoft Windows or Google Chrome OS, though there are ways to disable the enforcement for most hardware.

  • Longer upgrade cycles and growing purchases of used smartphones said to threaten flagship sales

    Longer upgrade cycles and an increasing number of consumers opting to buy used models poses a threat to future sales of flagship smartphones, argue industry commentators.

    Back in 2014, the average upgrade cycle was 23 months – likely attributable to most consumers upgrading every two years, while a much smaller number upgraded every year. But that number has already hit 31 months, says BayStreet Research, and is set to climb higher still  …

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Using AMD Open Source and the amdgpu-pro OpenCL driver for image processing

    I have a AMD grahpics card and use the great Open Source driver which comes with my Linux distribution. However for image processing I want the OpenCL support of my graphics card. Currently that’s only provided by the amdgpu-pro driver.

  • AMDGPU 18.0 X.Org Driver Released

    It had been a half-year since the release of the last AMDGPU DDX release, xf86-video-amdgpu 1.4.0, but today that has been succeeded by xf86-video-amdgpu 18.0 as they also embark on a year-based versioning scheme.

    xf86-video-amdgpu 18.0.0 was released today as they move to a year-based versioning scheme with X.Org/DDX driver releases becoming less frequent thanks to the maturing xf86-video-modesetting generic driver and also more users moving to Wayland-based Linux desktops.

  • Google Updates: I/O is go, Linux in Chrome, free apps by the load

    IN A WEEK when so much attention has been focused on Barcelona, there's a few stories that still managed to sneak in under the radar, Google-wise. For everything we've already covered you can go here.

    Firstly, there's indications that we're going to start seeing Linux containers that can run in Chrome OS, much as Snaps do for Windows in Linux.

    Its' been possible through a hack for a while, but this appears to be the real deal, with a "Project Crostini" being the name for the integration.

  • Project Crostini: Chrome OS prepares to support Linux apps

    Similar to Microsoft’s attempts, it’s clear Google believes supporting Linux will ensure developers spend as much time on their respective platforms as possible. While it may seem counterintuitive, it means developers are more likely to make native apps for the platform they’re using in their spare time.

  • The Kubernetes Lesson

    When Kubernetes was first announced in 2014, reactions were mixed. Some pointed to its pedigree and that of its creators, Brendan Burns, Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda, as reason enough to pay attention. Others focused on the fact that it was derived from Google’s Borg software but was not itself Borg, dismissing it as “Borg-lite” or little more than an interesting science project. Both camps were forced to acknowledge, however, that it was entering a crowded and fragmented software market. It was one project among a rapidly expanding array of options.

    In this first quarter of 2018, however, Kubernetes is arguably the most visible of core infrastructure projects. Kubernetes has gone from curiosity to mainstream acceptance, crossing any number of chasms in the process. The project has been successful enough that even companies and projects that have competing container implementation strategies have been compelled to adopt it.

  • Open Source Disk Cleaner App BleachBit Gets First Update After 19 Months

    Brief: Open Source system cleaner application BleachBit version 2.0 has been released. The new version brings some improvements and new features to the most used system cleaning application on Linux.

  • A site for reviews of Tumbleweed snapshots

    As leading-edge rolling distributions go, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed is relatively stable, but it is still true that some snapshots are better than others. Jimmy Berry has announced the creation of a web site tracking the quality of each day's snapshot.

  • The Impact of Open Source Software on Developing IoT Solutions

    Global IoT spending could reach $1 trillion by 2020. This growth means that IoT development will accelerate and open source software solutions are critical.

  • IoT Developer Survey – Deadline March 5, 2018

    We are seeking input from Internet of Things (#IoT) developers to better understand their needs for software and related tools. Whether you’re a hacker instrumenting your home with Raspberry Pi, or an IT developer working on Industrial IoT solutions, we want to know how you’re using open source technologies to build your IoT solution. The output from this survey will help the open source community focus on the resources most needed by IoT developers.

  • Is The Stock A Good Investment? – Red Hat Inc (NYSE: RHT)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Relative Momentum Indicator Trending Higher
  • Schroder Investment Management Group Purchases 4,156 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Snapdragon 820 based system can identify faces, age, gender, and emotion

    The VIA Smart Recognition Platform is a facial and object recognition board that runs Android 7.1.1 or Linux on a Snapdragon 820 by way of VIA’s SOM-9X20 module.

    VIA Technologies has re-spun its Snapdragon 820 based SOM-9X20 module and SOM-DB2 evaluation board as a VIA Smart Recognition Platform. The boards appear to be the same except that the SOM-9X20 is pre-loaded with a facial and object recognition stack.

  • Hot Chips Face Off at MWC and Embedded World

    This week’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona and Embedded World in Nuremberg are primarily designed to showcase smartphones and embedded systems, respectively. Yet, increasingly the shows are focused on the processors that drive them.

    The only major chip announced in conjunction with this week’s conferences was Intel’s Stratix 10 TX FPGA, which is also the only chip covered here that doesn’t run Linux. Several other processors were announced earlier in the month, including AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 and Epyc Embedded 3000. Meanwhile, new details were leaked about Intel’s 10nm Cannon Lake and Ice Lake chips, as well as some new 8th-Gen “Coffee Lake” models.

  • 8 Best Android Office Apps To Boost Your Productivity In 2018

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Closer look at Samsung’s Linux on Galaxy (use a phone like an Ubuntu desktop PC)

    There are a number of ways to run a desktop Linux environment on a smartphone, but usually it involves installing third-party software. Samsung is one of the first major phone makers that plans to offer official software that lets you use the company’s Android phones as Linux desktop PCs.

  • Purism Announces Most Secure Laptops, Qualcomm Introduces Snapdragon 700 Mobile Phones, Red Hat Honors Open Source Educators

    Purism announced yesterday that it has added "tamper-evident features" to its laptops, making it the "most secure laptop under customer control". The laptops are integrated with Trammel Hudson’s Heads security firmware, giving users full control of the boot process.

  • How to make your first upstream Kubernetes contribution

    Choosing your first issue to work on depends on the motivation for your contribution as well as your level of technical comfort. You may choose to fix an existing issue or file a new one.

    Choosing a contribution may happen organically as part of using Kubernetes. Let's say you notice a bug and you would like to fix it, or you think of a feature that would be nice to have and you would like to add it. You are familiar enough with the languages and tools that this would not be too difficult for you.

  • Wayland's Weston Gets Patch For High Priority GPU Support

    Last year Intel open-source developers squared away priority GPU scheduling support within their kernel DRM driver and from Mesa are exposing support for "high priority" GPU processes via the EGL_IMG_context_priority extension. There hasn't been any major real-world user of this support yet, but a patch would allow Wayland's Weston OpenGL renderer to make use of it.

    Chris Wilson of Intel who was also involved in the driver's GPU priority scheduling support has now added support to libweston's OpenGL renderer code to make use of EGL_IMG_context_priority when available.

  • Rostkatze: Vulkan Over Direct3D 12 With C++

    A prolific contributor to Mozilla's GFX-RS project, the Rust programming language, and also an author to a Rust-based SPIR-V shader compiler is now working on a C++-based Vulkan-over-D3D12 implementation.

  • We have a bunch of Wild Terra Online keys to give away again

    We have teamed up with the folks at Juvty Worlds once again to offer up a bunch of Wild Terra Online [Steam] keys!

  • Urban Terror 4.3.3 Released, An Ioquake3-Powered Game Still Going

    Many ioquake3-powered games like OpenArena, Smokin' Guns, World of Padman, and others have faded away or at least not put out a new release in a number of years, but I was surprised this morning waking up to a new Urban Terror release.

    There is the Urban Terror Resurgence (formerly Urban Terror HD) still being worked on as a modern remake of the game with Unreal Engine 4. But as that's not out yet and those wanting to relive an ioquake3-powered first person shooter, Urban Terror 4.3.3 is now available.

  • Searching for hardware on the LVFS

    You can now search for firmware and hardware vendors — but the algorithm is still very much WIP and we need some real searches from real users. If you have a spare 10 seconds, please search for your hardware on the LVFS. I’ll be fixing up the algorithm as we find problems. I’ll also be using the search data to work out what other vendors we need to reach out to. Comments welcome.

  • Designing a system that helps the best ideas win

    In effect, it's a system for implementing meritocracy—which makes it particularly interesting to open organization practitioners and advocates.

  • First Distribution named a Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider

    First Distribution, South Africa's leading distributor for data centre, enterprise and cloud solutions, today announced that it has joined the Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider programme, offering customers and independent software vendors greater confidence from a partner ecosystem when building their next-generation IT projects using Red Hat solutions.

  • How to add fonts to Fedora
  • Fedora December 2017, January 2018 and February 2018 Worklog
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GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.