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today's leftovers

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  • Windows 10 update bug locks machines running Chrome, Cortana and others

    Microsoft working on fix for machines and suggests temporary solutions to bug caused by installation of April 2018 update

  • How Kubernetes Aligns with Cisco's Intent Based Networking

    Cisco first announced its Intent Based Networking strategy in June 2017 and has expanded it with assurance and IoT capabilities in the months since.

    "Intent Based Networking is really a big step from traditional networking where you log in and configure individual switches and configuration is supposed to match some goal," Tucker said. "When you reverse that, you become explicit, and say here is what i want to achieve. and let automation make it so."

    "Kubernetes is starting right from that premise," Tucker added. "It has always been about, here is the model i want to see in the world and then the Kuberentes engine makes that so."

    In Tucker's view, the Kubernetes model is going to fit very well with Cisco's intent based networking model as well.

  • The Last Of The X.Org Server 1.20 Patches Posted

    Release manager Adam Jackson has sent out the last planned patches for integrating into xorg-server 1.20 prior to its long-awaited release.

    On Monday were four more patches with the final cleanups and polish for this X.Org Server update that's been in the making for more than the past year and a half.

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2018

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu Flavours, GIMP 2.10, FFmpeg 4.0, neofetch, Clonezilla | This Week in Linux 27
  • The ultimate guide to EAPI 7

    Back when EAPI 6 was approved and ready for deployment, I have written a blog post entitled the Ultimate Guide to EAPI 6. Now that EAPI 7 is ready, it is time to publish a similar guide to it.

    Of all EAPIs approved so far, EAPI 7 brings the largest number of changes. It follows the path established by EAPI 6. It focuses on integrating features that are either commonly used or that can not be properly implemented in eclasses, and removing those that are either deemed unnecessary or too complex to support. However, the circumstances of its creation are entirely different.

  • Hands on with Docker, openSUSE Leap 15

    This blog is part of a series of technical blogs leading up to the release of openSUSE Leap 15. All of the blogs provide a use case regarding openSUSE Leap and the packages available in the distribution. Happy reading.

    [...]

    Docker implements a high-level Application Programming Interface to provide lightweight containers that run processes in isolation.

    Because Docker containers are so lightweight, a single server or virtual machine can run several containers simultaneously.

  • LXD Clusters: A Primer

    Since its inception, LXD has been striving to offer a fresh and intuitive user experience for machine containers. LXD instances can be managed over the network through a REST API and a single command line tool. For large scale LXD deployments, OpenStack has been the standard approach: using Nova LXD, lightweight containers replace traditional hypervisors like KVM, enabling bare metal performance and very high workload density. Of course OpenStack itself offers a very wide spectrum of functionality, and it demands resources and expertise. So today, if you are looking for a simple and comprehensive way to manage LXD across multiple hosts, without adopting an Infrastructure as a Service platform, you are in for a treat.

  • Rugged, Ubuntu-ready computers are on a mission from Intel

    Diamond has launched three rugged, Linux-friendly “SabreCom” mission computers with MIL-spec connectors and IP67 protection, based on its Aries (Bay Trail), Venus (Skylake), and Zeta (Apollo Lake) boards with mini-PCIe and PC/104 expansion.

  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC offers eMMC and dual mini-PCIe slots

    Aaeon’s 3.5-inch “GENE-APL6” SBC ships with an Intel Apollo Lake SoC, SATA storage, a pair each of GbE, USB 3.0, and mini-PCIe, and up to 128GB eMMC.

  • Star Wars Jedi Challenges Gets Lightsaber Versus Mode, Version 0.1 of Kubeflow Released, Arch Linux 2018.05.01 Snapshot Now Available and More

    Google today announced the release of version 0.1 of the open-source Kubeflow tool, which is "designed to bring machine learning to Kubernetes containers". According to TechCrunch, "the idea behind the project is to enable data scientists to take advantage of running machine learning jobs on Kubernetes clusters. Kubeflow lets machine learning teams take existing jobs and simply attach them to a cluster without a lot of adapting."

  • DigitalOcean Brings Kubernetes Orchestration to Its Cloud Platform

    Developer focused cloud company DigitalOcean is bringing Kubernetes to its platform and upping its CNCF membership from silver to gold.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rugged Braswell industrial computer supports triple displays

    Adlink’s Linux-ready “MXE-1500” industrial computer offers a choice of Intel Braswell SoCs, as well as 3x GbE, triple display support, vibration and shock resistance, and an extended temperature model.

  • Seven of the Best Hidden Features in Android
  • The Best Web Browsers for Android
  • DXUP: Taking Direct3D 10 To 11 For Running On Vulkan

    While there is VK9 for getting Direct3D 9 implemented over Vulkan and then the very successful DXVK for running Direct3D 11 over Vulkan with a focus on Wine games and then also the less mature VKD3D for Direct3D 12 over Vulkan, there hasn't been a solution for those wanting Direct3D 10 accelerated by Vulkan. But an indirect solution is now in the works via DXUP.

  • Customizing your text colors on the Linux command line
  • You're a failure! Now what?

    Failure is inevitable; the important thing is to know what to do after you fail, says Michael Gat, a project manager and data science consultant, in his Lightning Talk, "You're a Failure! Now What?" at the 16th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE).

    With good humor, Michael's presentation offers ways to tackle failure in order to succeed. One way to be successful in your failures, he says, is to know what types of failures you're best at.

  • Swift for TensorFlow Now Open Source on GitHub

    Google's integration of its TensorFlow machine learning framework with Apple's Swift programming language, known as Swift for TensorFlow, is now an open source project on GitHub.

    Google's TensorFlow is a popular open source computational framework for developing machine learning (ML) models built around the concept of computational graphs that describe how data flows among mathematical operations. It provides APIs for Python, C++, Haskell, Java, Go, and Rust, and there's a third-party package for R. Swift is Apple's a general-purpose, compiled language for iOS, macOS, watchOS, tvOS and Linux.

  • AWS Open Sources and Expands Serverless Application Model (SAM) Implementation [Ed: Oopenwashing the lock-in which is "serverless" (you have no control over your services)]
  • DIAL Open Source Center Announces Catalytic Grant Recipients and Categories for Second Round of Funding to Support Technology for Development Projects

    Today, the Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL) Open Source Center is thrilled to announce the recipients of its first round of catalytic grants to support technology for development (T4D) projects. The Open Source Center's Catalytic Grants program is an offering of financial support for free and open source software projects working in the humanitarian response and international development sectors. These grants are intended to support vital work that has been traditionally neglected or not completed. The three grant recipients include Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, OpenDataKit, and LibreHealth.

  • Open-source biomedical devices for reinventing the medical industry

    The UBORA project brings together European and African universities and their associated technological hubs, biomedical prototyping laboratories and incubators, national and international policymakers, and committed stakeholders. Propelled by a series of summer schools and competitions, consortium partners have within the project’s first year already advanced the conception, development and validation of the UBORA e-infrastructure. In Swahili, the word ubora means excellence.

    The platform is for collaborative design of biomedical devices and for sharing developed projects, following open-source schemes. UBORA couples the open design philosophy with Europe’s leadership in quality control and safety assurance, guaranteeing better health and opportunities for sustainable growth. The work has led to creation of a sort of Wikipedia of medical devices, with device classification and identification of horizontal standards as well as blueprints, documentation and performance data. Several devices have been collaboratively developed for testing, improving and validating the e-infrastructure. This has been done on the basis of systematic identification and selection of uncovered medical needs.

  • The Anxiety of Open Source: Why We Struggle With Putting It Out There

    You’ve just finished your project. Well, not finished, but it works and you’ve solved all the problems worth solving, and you have a thing that works for you. Then you think about sharing your creation with the world. “This is cool” you think. “Other people might think it’s cool, too.” So you have to take pictures and video, and you wish you had documented some more of the assembly steps, and you have to do a writeup, and comment your code, and create a repository for it, maybe think about licensing. All of a sudden, the actual project was only the beginning, and now you’re stressing out about all the other things involved in telling other people about your project, because you know from past experience that there are a lot of haters out there who are going to tear it down unless it’s perfect, or even if it is, and even if people like it they are going to ask you for help or to make one for them, and now it’s 7 years later and people are STILL asking you for the source code for some quick little thing you did and threw up on YouTube when you were just out of college, and of course it won’t work anymore because that was on Windows XP when people still used Java.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Vega 12/20 Added To AMDGPU LLVM, Confirms New GCN Deep Learning Instructions For Vega 20

    Hitting mainline LLVM and Clang compilers today were support for Vega 12 "GFX904" and Vega 20 "GFX906" graphics processors.

    The support was added to LLVM and Clang though don't shed too much light on these yet-to-be-launched GPUs, but does confirm deep learning instructions present for Vega 20. In fact, it's the addition of these instructions that are making the commit rather larger.

  • 10 Best RSS Readers for Ubuntu

    Even if most of the tech experts actively claim that RSS (Rich Site Summary) is dead especially after Google Reader was discontinued 5 years ago but it isn’t yet as still many people rely on RSS to get the latest news, podcasts, videos etc. and almost every website is still offering an RSS feed.

    Many users who are new to the Linux environment might find it difficult to choose the best RSS reader for Ubuntu. So today we are coming up with top 10 RSS readers for Ubuntu from which you can choose the one that best suits you.

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  • ‘Stardew Valley’ Multiplayer Beta Launches on PC, Mac and Linux

    Publisher Chucklefish first announced the new feature in August 2017. At the time, it expected to start the beta test at the end of the year, then release a patch in early 2018. Obviously, getting multiplayer up and running is taking longer than expected, but after several months of internal testing and quality assurance, Chucklefish said it’s decided to open the beta up to a wider audience.

  • Atari VCS to ship in 2019, pre-orders open May 30th for $199 and up

    Atari plans to re-enter the gaming hardware business next year by shipping the Atari VCS in spring, 2019. The company has been teasing the upcoming device for nearly a year, and from what I can gather, it’s basically a Linux-based computer stuffed in a small box designed to resemble a classic Atari game console.

  • Facing disruption? Optimize for stability or speed
  • Making data-intensive processing efficient and portable with Apache Beam
  •  

  • How to run Ubuntu Linux inside Windows 10

    “Oh Lordy, no, not that Linux again!” cries out the rightly indignant Maximum PC reader. “Stop trying to foist that beardy, communist-inspired, open-source nonsense on us!” No one wants to install a whole operating system, just to mess around with a bit of terminal-based garbage, so Microsoft did the right thing, and brought Linux inside Windows, using the Windows Subsystem for Linux. Partnering with one of the leading Linux developers, Canonical, it developed the WSL to enable you to effectively install the core of the Ubuntu Linux OS inside of Windows. No mess, no fuss, just pure, simple Windows, with added Linux on top, erm, inside.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Netflix Open Sources Its Container Management Platform "Titus"

    Netflix announced the open source release of their container management platform called Titus. Titus is built on top of Apache Mesos and runs on AWS EC2.

    Netflix, which runs its services on virtual machines on AWS, started moving parts of its systems to containers to take advantage of the benefits of a container-based development and deployment model. Netflix's unique challlenges included an already-existing cloud-native infrastructure, which meant that moving to a container model should not involve too many changes. Hybrid deployments of both VMs and containers, a mix of microservices and batch jobs, and ensuring reliability with the additional layer that containers would introduce were some of the technical challenges.

    These challenges led to the development of its own container management platform called Titus. Currently, Netflix runs video streaming, recommendations and machine learning (ML), big data, content encoding, studio technology, and internal engineering tools in containers, which add up to half-a-million containers and 200,000 clusters per day.

  • It's Time for the Personal Datasphere (Finally!)

    When it comes to the blockchain, most people fall into one of two camps: the hand-wavers that think the blockchain will disrupt and benefit the world as profoundly as the Internet, and those who are scratching their heads and just can't see how that could be possible. I confess that I fall more into the second camp than the first, but I do recognize that blockchain technology can provide a far superior tool to tackle some challenges than any that we've had to work with before.

    I identified just such a challenge many years ago when the Internet was really taking off, and suggested that individuals needed to seize control of their personal information before commercial interests ran off with it instead, locking it away inside proprietary databases. The date of that article? February 2004, the same month that a little Web site called Facebook went live. Back then the problem was (and it still is) that the critical keys to avoiding data lock in are standards, and the process that develops those standards wasn't (and still isn't) controlled by end users.

  • AMD AOCC 1.2 Compiler Released For Zen Systems, Brings FLANG & Retpolines

    AMD has released a new update to their AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler (AOCC).

    AOCC 1.2 is their second major update since debuting this LLVM Clang downstream compiler one year ago following the launch of the Ryzen/EPYC processors. AMD AOCC continues carrying various patches atop the LLVM/Clang compiler tool-chain to cater towards the performance of these "znver1" CPUs.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Heptio Debuts Gimbal Kubernetes Load Balancer Project

    Kubernetes startup Heptio has added another project to its roster of open-source efforts that provide expanded capabilities for container orchestration users.

  • Heptio Launches Kubernetes Load Balancing Application
  • The Role of Site Reliability Engineering in Microservices

    You can always spot the hot jobs in technology: they’re the ones that didn’t exist 10 years ago. While Site Reliability Engineers (SREs) did definitely exist a decade ago, they were mostly inside Google and a handful of other Valley innovators. Today, however, the SRE role exists everywhere, from Uber to Goldman Sachs, everyone is now in the business of keeping their sites online and stable.

    While SREs are hotshots in the industry, their role in a microservices environment is not just a natural fit that goes hand-in-hand, like peanut butter and jelly. Instead, while SREs and microservices evolved in parallel inside the world’s software companies, the former actually makes life far more difficult for the latter.

  • Lying with statistics, distributions, and popularity contests on Cooking With Linux (without a net)

    It's Tuesday and that means it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net), sponsored and supported by Linux Journal. Today, I'm courting controversy by discussing numbers, OS popularity, and how to pick the right Linux distribution if you want to be where are the beautiful people hang out. And yes, I'll do it all live, without a net, and with a high probability of falling flat on my face.

  • Voyage open sources its approach to autonomous vehicle safety

    In an effort to improve autonomous vehicle safety, Voyage is open sourcing its Open Autonomous Safety (OAS) library that contains the company’s internal safety procedures, materials, and test code that is intended to supplement the existing safety programs at autonomous vehicle startups. Voyage is the self-driving business from the educational organization Udacity.

  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to KubeCon Europe

    The cloud native community is gathering in Copenhagen next week for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe! Here’s your guide to the talks and events you won’t want to miss. Meet the Red Hat and CoreOS team members all week long, May 1-4 at booth D-E01.

  • Event - "GNU Health Con 2018" (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain)

    GNU Health is this year holding the III International GNU Health Conference, GNU Health Con 2018. This conference will gather the community of activists and developers who have been working on the project during the past 10 years.

  • ONNX: the Open Neural Network Exchange Format

    The good news is that the battleground is Free and Open. None of the big players are pushing closed-source solutions. Whether it is Keras and Tensorflow backed by Google, MXNet by Apache endorsed by Amazon, or Caffe2 or PyTorch supported by Facebook, all solutions are open-source software.

    Unfortunately, while these projects are open, they are not interoperable. Each framework constitutes a complete stack that until recently could not interface in any way with any other framework. A new industry-backed standard, the Open Neural Network Exchange format, could change that.

  • L.A. Lawmakers Looking To Take Legal Action Against Google For Not Solving Long-Running City Traffic Problems

    The city's government believes the traffic/mapping app has made Los Angeles' congestion worse. That the very body tasked with finding solutions to this omnipresent L.A. problem is looking to hold a private third party company responsible for its own shortcomings isn't surprising. If a third-party app can't create better traffic flow, what chance do city planners have? But beyond the buck-passing on congestion, the city may have a point about Waze making driving around Los Angeles a bit more hazardous.

    For several months, it's been noted that Waze has been sending drivers careening down the steepest grade in the city -- Baxter Street. Drivers seeking routes around Glendale Ave. traffic choke points have been routed to a street with a 32% grade, increasing the number of accidents located there and generally resulting in barely-controlled mayhem. When any sort of precipitation falls from the sky, the city goes insane. Drivers bypassing Glendale are now hurtling down a steep, water-covered hill, compounding the problem.

  • Even Microsoft's lost interest in Windows Phone: Skype and Yammer apps killed

    Microsoft’s given users of its collaboration apps on Windows Phone under a month’s warning of their demise.

    A support note from late last week advises that “Windows phone apps for Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, and Yammer are retiring on May 20, 2018.”

    “Retiring” means all three will vanish from the Microsoft store on May 20, with differing results.

  • Should You Build Your Own DIY Security System?
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Programming: Go, Bugs and LLVM

  • 3 ways to copy files in Go
    This article will show you how to copy a file in the Go programming language. Although there are more than three ways to copy a file in Go, this article will present the three most common ways: using the io.Copy() function call from the Go library; reading the input file all at once and writing it to another file; and copying the file in small chunks using a buffer.
  • The life cycle of a software bug
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