Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GUI comes in For Proxies

    My last post was an overview of how this project is designed to offer proxy features through NetworkManager. NM is the server part (which configures PacRunner) and PacRunner is there inside to act as an engine for doing all stuff (Interpreting, downloading PAC File etc) Applications can call FindProxyForURL() DBus method on PacRunner DBus interface org.pacrunner.Client .

  • Pulp 2.9.0 Generally Available
  • 22 open source tools for creatives

    Whether it's visuals, audio, writing, or design, there's an open source tool out there to help get the job done.

    "It's absolutely possible to go from concept to finished, polished products, using free and open source software," said Jason.

  • Tackling spam comments on SUSE Gallery
  • Slackware notes

    This is mostly a followup to my earlier post on testing Slackware 14.2. Since then, I have spent a little time using the installed slackware. So here are some of my notes.

  • Debian: Reproducible builds, Outreachy, and I

    As some of you are aware, my world has had some significant changes since I began my Outreachy adventure.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Kernel Development - Greg Kroah-Hartman
  • SHAPING THE SCENARIO TASKS

    This week we are moving on to Creating the scenario tasks for GNOME programs. After a discussion with Jim Hall(my mentor), Allan and Jakub(GNOME design team),we decided to look back at the usability test results from the last round of Outreachy, and focus on the tasks that the participants struggled to accomplish. For example: Finding the zoom button in Image Viewer (header bar button), changing the month/year in Calendar (header bar buttons), searching (header bar button) and copying in Characters (primary window button), annotating and bookmarking in Evince (header bar menus), and other tasks in Nautilus (several were header bar menus). Re-using these scenario tasks will allow us to compare how the design patterns have improved over time.

  • Getting ready for usability tests

    In this test, Diana will ask testers to simulate an "unboxing" of a new system. The tester will turn on the laptop or computer, watch the computer start up, and login to a fresh "test" account so they get first-user experience.

  • New install medium 2016.07.09

    Dual architecture (i686 and x86_64):

    Main ISO - Live ISO image for installation and recovery.
    MATE desktop ISO - Live ISO image for installation and recovery (with MATE Desktop Environment).
    TalkingParabola ISO - Live ISO image for installation and recovery (adapted for blind and visually impaired users).

  • Google Summer of Code student focuses on next steps
  • Week 5&6 Report

    During week 5 and 6, I have been to the debian conference 2016. It was really interesting meeting with a lot of people all so involved in Debian.

  • Linux Mint 18 is here, but Linux Mint 17.3 users can't upgrade just yet

    The Linux Mint project released the final version of Linux Mint 18 “Sarah” on June 30. The project is now working on an upgrade path for Linux Mint 17.3 users.

  • Tata Elxsi to demonstrate Automotive Grade Linux-based infotainment and instrument cluster solutions at the Automotive Linux Summit 2016

    Automotive OEMs, across the world are increasingly focusing on owning the infotainment software functionality to drive a better infotainment experience, enable faster time-to-market and feature updates, to effectively address key trends such as connected and integrated infotainment systems, multi-modal interfaces and HMI design to avoid driver distraction / information overload.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Download Linux Voice issue 20

    Issue 20 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • Linux Desktop Operating System Share Crosses 2% For The First Time Ever [Ed: Linux at 2% is nonsense, especially if one counts everything (like ChromeOS). Microsoft connections to the source noteworthy.]

    According to the latest June 2016 numbers released by a data analytics firm, for the first time ever, Linux distributions have crossed 2% marketshare on the desktop. While this number remain controversial, it’s no denying the fact that Linux is continuously gaining ground and making new users.

  • A checklist for Docker in the Enterprise

    Docker is extremely popular with developers, having gone as a product from zero to pretty much everywhere in a few years.

    I started tinkering with Docker three years ago, got it going in a relatively small corp (700 employees) in a relatively unregulated environment. This was great fun: we set up our own registry, installed Docker on our development servers, installed Jenkins plugins to use Docker containers in our CI pipeline, even wrote our own build tool to get over the limitations of Dockerfiles.

    I now work for an organisation working in arguably the most heavily regulated industry, with over 100K employees. The IT security department itself is bigger than the entire company I used to work for.

  • Ubuntu on Macbook Black Screen
  • Monthly link collections with staticsite
  • SketchUp running on Ubuntu 16.04 - Tutorial

    Overall, I am pleased with this effort. PlayOnLinux has never really captivated my imagination and sympathy, but it does have its merits, and one of them is that it allows you, with a fairly okay level of certainty and stability, to run SketchUp in Linux. For those who seek this path to enlightenment, it's quite good.

    There are some small problems, and a random crash or two will always be your nemesis in a situation like this. All in all, you do have hardware acceleration, the functionality is just like in Windows, the performance is pretty good, and the program works fairly well. The setup is seamless, thanks to PlayOnLinux, and as a result of this guide, it has earned itself a second chance in the Dedoimedo testing furnace. I hope you find this little tutorial useful to your artistic needs. See you around, and do let me know if you have any other requests on testing Windows stuff on Linux, and similar tools and programs that can help us achieve this. Successfully, of course.

  • Alienware do a pretty nice job of advertising their Steam Machine & SteamOS in this new video

    A new promotional video from Alienware showing off their Steam Machine has surfaced recently and it's a pretty nice video.

    It does still highlight an issue with SteamOS showing non-SteamOS games on the store. Valve are being far too slow to act on this issue. It should show only SteamOS compatible games everywhere by default, Windows games should be the checkbox, not the other way around. I've mentioned this many times before, but it's a real shame it's still an issue.
    It's as dumb as showing Xbox games on a PS4, it just shouldn't happen.

    I do love the look of the Alienware Steam Machine, but their new editions are a bit on the pricey side.

  • How to recover deleted text messages on your Android smartphone
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Gets Android 6.1 Marshmallow Update
  • Nice Concept, Shame About The Hardware And Software

    Edsger Dijkstra (or Donald Knuth or maybe someone else) noted that testing can only confirm the presence of bugs. It has also been noted that software wears in rather than wears out. So, would you rather run software which was written last week by an obnoxious kid or would you rather run software which has been run on five million computers for 10 years? The latter reduces problems by at least a factor of 10. Although, the remainder can surprise. As examples, a critical Microsoft Windows bug was found after 15 years and a severe GNU bug was found after 18 years. Some of the innocuous but more numerous bugs may hang around for more than 25 years before being fixed.

  • Red Hat open source awards for two women

    Red Hat has made presentations to two women under its Women in Open Source Award initiative which was started by the company last year.

    This year's awards were given to Jessica McKellar, director of engineering and chief of staff to the vice-president of engineering at Dropbox, and Preeti Murthy, a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University.

  • DebConf17 Debian Conference to Take Place August 6-12, 2017 in Montréal, Canada

    Today, July 9, 2016, Laura Arjona Reina from the Debian Project informed the Debian GNU/Linux community that the DebConf16 developer conference is now over, and the dates for the next year's DebConf17 event have been set.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LQ Turns 16 so We Talk With Founder Jeremy Garcia

    LinuxQuestions.org (LQ) recently turned 16, which means we can sing the Chuck Berry song “Sweet Little Sixteen” to it. Even better, this means the site is old enough to drive in most states. Hot stuff! And today’s interviewee, Jeremy Garcia, is the founder and still head LQ-er. In this video, he’ll tell you how he once expected to get *maybe* 100 members, and talks about how he would (or wouldn’t) do things differently if he was starting LQ today.

  • Will Linux run well on a MacBook?

    When you think of Linux, you probably don’t think of Apple or its products. But some Linux users actually prefer to run it on Apple’s MacBook laptops. A MacBook owner recently asked if Linux would run well on his laptop, and he got some interesting responses in the Linux subreddit.

  • Kubernetes 1.3 Steps Up for Hybrid Clouds

    The Kubernetes community on Wednesday introduced Version 1.3 of its container orchestration software, with support for deploying services across multiple cloud platforms, including hybrid clouds.

    Kubernetes 1.3 improves scaling and automation, giving cloud operators the ability to scale services up and down automatically in response to application demand, while doubling the maximum number of nodes per cluster, to 2,000, says Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) Product Manager Aparna Sinha in a post on the Kubernetes blog. "Customers no longer need to think about cluster size, and can allow the underlying cluster to respond to demand," Sinha says.

  • Container Trends: Plans, Orchestration and CI – A Dataset from Bitnami

    Once again the level of manual deployment, be it either with a CI system or as a completely manual approach was very surprising, looking further into this data, we did a breakdown across the main orchestration tools, and looked at which CI tools participants are using in conjunction with the various orchestration tools.

  • uTidylib 0.3

    Several years ago I've complained about uTidylib not being maintained upstream. Since that time I've occasionally pushed some fixes to my GitHub repository with uTidylib code, but without any clear intentions to take it over.

    Time has gone and there was still no progress and I started to consider becoming upstream maintainer as well. I quickly got approval from Cory Dodt, who was the original author of this code, unfortunately he is not owner of the PyPI entry and the claim request seems to have no response (if you know how to get in touch with "cntrlr" or how to take over PyPI module please let me know).

  • GPS for Linux

    After a typically long period of deliberation, I finally decided to buy myself a proper GPS tracker for recording my MTB rides. I have had a GPS tracker/mapper on my phone for some time now, but with the possibility for ranging further a field on a potential bike-packing trip in future, I did not want to rely on my mobile phone. I also wanted to get a wireless HRM that would work with the GPS tracker so that I could understand how hard I was working on my various routes.

  • Bluetooth LED bulbs

    The best known smart bulb setups (such as the Philips Hue and the Belkin Wemo) are based on Zigbee, a low-energy, low-bandwidth protocol that operates on various unlicensed radio bands. The problem with Zigbee is that basically no home routers or mobile devices have a Zigbee radio, so to communicate with them you need an additional device (usually called a hub or bridge) that can speak Zigbee and also hook up to your existing home network. Requests are sent to the hub (either directly if you're on the same network, or via some external control server if you're on a different network) and it sends appropriate Zigbee commands to the bulbs.

  • DIY Mobile Backup Device for Photographers

    Backup anxiety syndrome is not a real medical condition, but as a photographer, you might be familiar with the main symptom all too well: the constant worry about keeping your photos safe, especially when you are traveling. So what can you do to alleviate this debilitating condition? Besides the obvious, but far from practical, solution of lugging your laptop around as a glorified backup device, you have two options: splurge on something like WD My Passport Wireless Pro or build a backup device yourself. Going with the former option seems like a no-brainer: a simple financial transaction gives you a decent, albeit expensive, backup solution. So why bother wasting time and effort on reinventing the wheel and building a DIY backup device from scratch? Because it’s neither difficult nor time-consuming.

  • Android malware being created faster than it can be patched [Ed: This article is mixing two things: malware, which users have to actually install, and flaws that need patching]

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Windows, Mac or Linux... Which operating system best suits your business?

Linux is a free alternative. Apart from the zero-cost factor, it's still less prone to viruses than Windows. Most Linux machines start out as Windows computers that are reformatted. Linux is also adaptable -- Linux is an OS kernel, not a full system, but is the heart of software distributions such as Ubuntu or Fedora. As for cons, Linux is more complex to learn and use. There are also far fewer programs written for Linux systems. Of course, someone with an advanced online computer science master’s degree will help you make the most of a Linux system by supplying the skills needed to innovate and implement custom solutions for your business environment. Read more

LinuxCon, Linux at 25, and Linux Development

5 Ways to Solve the Open Source Industry's Biggest Problems

Over the last decade, open source software and its audience of end users have greatly matured. Once only used by a small subset of tech-savvy early adopters, the convenience, effectiveness and cost savings of open source solutions are now driving enterprise IT to explore more ways to take advantage of the power of open source in their daily business operations. In today's economy, enterprise IT has less to gain from developing and licensing software and more to gain from actively working with existing open source technology. However, the march toward open source still faces major obstacles before it becomes mainstream. In this slideshow, Travis Oliphant, CEO and founder of Continuum Analytics, outlines five challenges preventing enterprise IT from shifting to open source and tips for tackling them to keep the future of open source heading in the right direction. The road may be winding, but it will eventually lead companies to open source to help them innovate and as the way of the future. Read more Also: Latest attacks on privacy...

Security News

  • Jay Beale: Linux Security and Remembering Bastille Linux
    Security expert and co-creator of the Linux-hardening (and now Unix-hardening) project Bastille Linux. That’s Jay Beale. He’s been working with Linux, and specifically on security, since the late 1980s. The greatest threat to Linux these days? According to Beale, the thing you really need to watch out for is your Android phone, which your handset manufacturer and wireless carrier may or may not be good about updating with the latest security patches. Even worse? Applications you get outside of the controlled Google Play and Amazon environments, where who-knows-what malware may lurk. On your regular desktop or laptop Linux installation, Beale says the best security precaution you can take is encrypting your hard drive — which isn’t at all hard to do. He and I also talked a bit, toward the end, about how “the Linux community” was so tiny, once upon a time, that it wasn’t hard to know most of its major players. He also has some words of encouragement for those of you who are new to Linux and possibly a bit confused now and then. We were all new and confused once upon a time, and got less confused as we learned. Guess what? You can learn, too, and you never know where that knowledge can take you.
  • Automotive security: How safe is a next-generation car?
    The vehicles we drive are becoming increasingly connected through a variety of technologies. Features such as keyless entry and self-diagnostics are becoming commonplace. Unfortunately, they can also introduce IT security issues.
  • Let's Encrypt: Every Server on the Internet Should Have a Certificate
    The web is not secure. As of August 2016, only 45.5 percent of Firefox page loads are HTTPS, according to Josh Aas, co-founder and executive director of Internet Security Research Group. This number should be 100 percent, he said in his talk called “Let’s Encrypt: A Free, Automated, and Open Certificate Authority” at LinuxCon North America. Why is HTTPS so important? Because without security, users are not in control of their data and unencrypted traffic can be modified. The web is wonderfully complex and, Aas said, it’s a fool’s errand to try to protect this certain thing or that. Instead, we need to protect everything. That’s why, in the summer of 2012, Aas and his friend and co-worker Eric Rescorla decided to address the problem and began working on what would become the Let’s Encrypt project.
  • OpenSSL 1.1 Released With Many Changes
    OpenSSL 1.1.0 was released today as a major update to this free software cryptography and SSL/TLS toolkit. In addition to OpenSSL 1.1 rolling out a new build system and new security levels and support for pipelining and a new threading API, security additions to OpenSSL 1.1 include adding the AFALG engine, support for ChaChao20 in libcrypto/libssl, scrypto algorithm support, and support for X25519, among many other additions.
  • Is Windows ​10’s ‘Hidden Administrator Account’ a security risk? [Ed: Damage control from Microsoft Jack (Jack Schofield) because Microsoft Windows is vulnerable by design]