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today's leftovers

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  • Linux 4.14 Release Provides Long Term Support and Larger Memory Limits

    Linus Torvalds officially released the Linux 4.14 kernel on Nov. 12, providing users of the open-source operating system with new features and long term support. Linux 4.14 is a special release in that it has been designated as an LTS (Long Term Support) meaning that it will be maintained for at least the next two years.

    Linux 4.14 is the fifth new major Linux kernel release in 2017, following the Linux 4.13 kernel that debuted on Sept. 3.

    "Go out and test the new 4.14 release, that is slated to be the next LTS kernel - and start sending me pull request for the 4.15 merge window," Torvalds wrote in his release announcement.

  • Intel Vulkan Driver Preparing For Faster MSAA Performance

    Jason Ekstrand of Intel who contributes significantly to the development of their open-source "ANV" Vulkan driver has prepped a new patch series.

  • VP's ARMA 3 1.76 beta now out, compatible with Windows for now

    As stated by Bohemia Interactive themselves, this means the game is at least temporarily compatible with the Windows version when it comes to multiplayer. However, there are no guarantees that the Linux port will remain in sync with the Windows version when the game next updates

  • We Are Likely To See More Vulkan Driver Fixes From Feral

    Feral developer Alex Smith is requesting commit rights to the Mesa code-base.

    Alex Smith is the developer at the Linux/macOS game porting company Feral Interactive who previously worked on AMD_shader_info for RADV, various Vulkan driver bug fixes, and other RADV updates as well as some minor work too for the Intel ANV driver.

  • My Free Software Activities in October 2017

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Rakuten TV to add more 4K HDR content for Samsung TV Plus

    The European video-on-demand (VOD) service Rakuten TV has announced that it will release 100 Ultra HD HDR movies for Samsung Smart TVs by the end of this year.

    According to Rakuten TV (formerly Wuaki.tv), titles like Baywatch, Transformers: The Last Knight, Baby Driver and Spider-Man: Homecoming are already available in 4K HDR quality. They will be adding more to the list soon. The content, with Dolby Digital Plus sound, will be only available through Samsung’s TV PLUS service for Tizen Smart TVs.

  • 15 Smart Ways To Re-Purpose Your Old Android Smartphone And Give It A New Life

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • GNU/Linux Is Still Cooking

    t’s true that smartphones have taken a huge share of personal computing away from desktops and notebooks but there are still huge limitations around screen-size, computing power, storage etc. where smartphones are not enough. I’ve long recommended using smartphones and desktop equipment together. Every time I find my text runs outside a text-box or some page is viewable only in portrait mode in Android/Linux, I long for some way to get to GNU/Linux. Today, I get up off the sofa and walk to my desk. Perhaps some day, I’ll dock the smartphone and carry on. Now, I have to reopen work from the desktop PC I call Beast.

  • Samsung teases Linux desktops on Galaxy S8 and Note 8 smartphones, thanks to DeX
  • Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Episode 8 | CYA!
  • The Latest In Our Massive Linux Benchmarking Setup - November 2017

    Two and a half years ago was the start of the continually evolving effort around turning a basement into a big Linux server room and last year having shared a one year redux in the effort but having been late in a second year redux into this effort and how the systems are configured for our Linux/BSD/open-source benchmarking at scale, here is an update.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Atom, Football Manager 2018, Kdenlive + More

    It’s a Sunday, which means it’s time for a concise roundup of recent Linux releases that didn’t merit their own dedicated post.

    A rather diverse set of apps and projects made releases in the past week, including two of the most popular code editing apps, what is (arguably) the best open-source video editor, and a desktop favoured by an enlightened few.

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  • An Introduction to Linux Mint 18.2
  • [Slackware] LibreOffice 5.4.3 packages available

    The Document Foundation released the third update for LibreOffice 5.4 last week, as you can read on their blog where they write about the new LibreOffice 5.4.3 . My manic-depressive mood-swings are on the manic side at the moment so next to baking sausage rolls (brabantse worstenbroodjes for which I will publish an updated recipe on this blog soon) and a batch of sourdough bread, I finally had the energy to fix the admin interface for the SlackDocs mailing lists, wrestled myself through 14,000+ emails in my administrative mailboxes, wrote a plan to migrate my LAN services from the ageing server to the new server I bought this summer (which involves conversion of several large databases to InnoDB and loads of custom packages), plus I binge-watched almost 2 full seasons of Stranger Things in 3 days’ time. I know I will crash hard in a couple of days but I hope to have a new Plasma ‘ktown’ update before that happens.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What Is Arch Linux 32? How To Migrate To This New Fork As Arch Linux 32-Bit Support Ends?

    About nine months ago, the Arch Linux developers announced the end of the support for 32-bit architecture. As a result, Arch Linux 2017.02.01 was the last release to ship a 32-bit ISO as well. It was followed by a depreciation period.

  • Trading Watch on Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Mellanox Announces First Major Production Deployment of Linux Kernel-Based Open Ethernet Switch
  • Cloud Foundry: Focusing on Flexibility and Choice for a Cloud-Native World

    For some organizations working outside of technology hubs such as Silicon Valley, there is a vast shortage of developer talent to choose from. As a result, many have taken a proactive learning approach to help bring their developers up-to-speed with the demands of today’s cloud-native software platforms.

    Cloud Foundry is evolving its technology to benefit these users’ goals, explained Cloud Foundry Executive Director Abby Kearns, in this live-streamed episode of The New Stack Makers podcast recorded at Cloud Foundry Summit Europe last month.

  • Kubernetes by the numbers: 10 compelling stats

    How quickly has Kubernetes’ popularity soared? By most accounts, very quickly. Earlier this year, Cloud Native Computing Foundation executive director Dan Kohn penned a blog post that dug into that claim. People regularly tout Kubernetes as one of the highest velocity projects ever in open source history: Does the data back it up?

    As Kohn found, there may not be a single definitive metric, but they all point in the same conclusion: “You can pick your preferred statistic, such as that Kubernetes is in the top 0.00006% of the projects on GitHub,” Kohn wrote. “I prefer to just think of it as one of the fastest moving projects in the history of open source.”

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers: Linux and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Misc
  • Intel User-Mode Instruction Prevention Support Revised For The Linux Kernel

    An Intel engineer over the weekend sent out the latest patches for implementing the company's User-Mode Instruction Prevention (UMIP) support within the Linux kernel.

    User-Mode Instruction Prevention appears to be on track for upcoming Cannonlake processors and prevents certain instructions from being executed if the ring level is greater than zero. These instructions include the store task register, store machine status word, store global descriptor table, and store interrupt descriptor table. To fend off possible escalation attacks, Intel's UMIP security feature will prevent these instructions from being executed outside of the highest level privileges.

  • Mesa 17.3 Features - Vulkan Updates, Better Performance

    Mesa 17.3 is due out in the days ahead as the Q4'2017 installment of Mesa 3D for delivering the updated open-source OpenGL and Vulkan driver stacks for Linux and other platforms. As usual, this quarterly update to Mesa introduces a ton of new features, performance improvements, and other enhancements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • IT Security Woes and Linux – Unleaded Hangout

    IT Security Woes and Linux are the topic of the day with the hangout crew. We discuss recent events with Equifax and how they’re not the only cybersecurity incident worth note.

  • GNOME Asia 2017

    Finally, I got opportunity to write about my first and awesome GNOME Asia 2017. This year is a special year for GNOME as it’s the 20th anniversary of GNOME and 10th anniversary of GNOME Asia conference.

    GNOME Asia was hosted at Chongqing University, Chongqing this year which happens to be known as 3D city built on and around mountains. It was also my first experience in China as a visitor. I was excited.

  • Faking cleaner URLs in the Debian BTS
  • My Free Software Activities in October 2017

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • Skylake-based touch panels offer up to IP69 protection

    Wincomm’s Linux-ready “WTP-9E66” resistive touch-panel PCs come in IP66 protected 15-, 19-, and 22-inch models, with optional PCAP, IP67, and IP69.

  • Tizen 4.0 Milestone M2: What has been released?

    Samsung has published the second milestone, so-called M2, of Tizen 4.0. This is the second release for Tizen 4.0 after Samsung hit the first milestone back in June, also announcing that Tizen is the most successful Linux-based embedded OS in the whole world. As expected, Tizen 4.0 M2 comes with a bunch of new, welcome additions and some fine-tuning for the platform.

  • Apple Quarter and Few Other Items in Smartphone Wars

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Akademy 2018 site visit

    Last week I was part of the expedition by KDE (together with Kenny and Petra) to visit the local team that is helping us organize Akademy 2018 in Vienna.

  • 12 emerging IT job titles with a bright future [Ed: They interject pure buzzwords into job titles (not new jobs). Typical Red Hat spin.]
  • At This Price, Is It Too Late To Buy Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?
  • My suggestion for QEMU

    I have been involved in open source software since 1993. And in 1994, I believed so strongly in the ability for people to come together to write code that I created the FreeDOS Project, to replicate the functionality of MS-DOS. And twenty-three years later, I'm still using and developing FreeDOS.

    My desktop system is Linux, and I run FreeDOS using QEMU (Quick EMUlator). QEMU is very easy to use, and provides great flexbility to define your virtual machine. I run FreeDOS in QEMU when I want to play an old DOS game, or when I want to test some legacy software, or when I want to write code to update a FreeDOS program.

    But one problem pops up occasionally when using QEMU. A lot of old DOS software uses the function keys to do various things. The most extreme example is WordPerfect, which was arguably the most popular commercial word processor of the day. WordPerfect is notorious for using all of the function keys, in every combination, including use of Ctrl and Alt to access all the common features. I think WordPerfect probably used all of the expanded keys too, like Home and End.

  • syspatch(8) Binary Updates Now for the Latest Release Only

     

    We intend to only build syspatches for one release in the future.  Errata patches will continue to be generated for 2 releases.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Two Point Hospital, PLAY WITH ME and More

OSS: HIT, SUSE, FSFE, Meaning of Open, Bell Canada

  • How Open Source, Crowdsourcing Aids HIT Development
    HIT development is important for health IT infrastructure growth as organizations continue to go through their digital transformations. Entities are interested in the most innovative and advanced technology to assist with increased workflows and improve patient care. Open source and crowdsourcing to improve innovation are key to quickly building on technology being developed for healthcare. This is especially true when it comes to newer technology like artificial intelligence (AI) and blockchain. Healthcare organizations and healthcare technology companies cannot simply wait around for advanced technology to develop around them.
  • Open source in the enterprise: Trends and opportunities in 2018
    Some big events are set to come in 2018 – the recently announced Royal Wedding, the football World Cup in Russia and the incoming general data protection regulation (GDPR) to name just a few. And 2018 is also set to be a significant year for business technology. Some of the key trends in enterprise IT will include the continued move to hybrid cloud, the emergence of the container infrastructure ecosystem and ongoing growth in software-defined infrastructure and storage. Most interestingly, we foresee a number of significant open source developments here. So what exactly should we expect to see? And how can IT teams make the most of these emerging opportunities?
  • Keeping an Irish home warm and free in winter
    This issue would also appear to fall under the scope of FSFE's Public Money Public Code campaign. Looking at the last set of heating controls in the house, they have been there for decades. Therefore, I can't help wondering, if I buy some proprietary black box today, will the company behind it still be around when it needs a software upgrade in future? How many of these black boxes have wireless transceivers inside them that will be compromised by security flaws within the next 5-10 years, making another replacement essential? With free and open technologies, anybody who is using it can potentially make improvements whenever they want. Every time a better algorithm is developed, if all the homes in the country start using it immediately, we will always be at the cutting edge of energy efficiency.
  • The Meaning of Open
    Open systems create gravity wells. Systems that are truly open tend to attract others to join them at an ever-accelerating pace. In ecosystems that are ruled by a despot no matter how successful other participants in the ecosystem are, they fundamentally just empower the despot to have more leverage over them, because they have more to lose and their success feeds the despot’s success. In open systems, on the contrary, participants see that they don’t have to fear their own success fueling their own increasing subservience to a despot. Each individual entity who can’t plausibly build their own similarly-sized proprietary ecosystem to compete — the overwhelming majority of entities — is incentivized to pitch in on the open ecosystem. Investment in an open ecosystem by any one entity helps the entire ecosystem as a whole. This fact, combined with the fact that ecosystems generally get exponentially more valuable the more participants there are, means that in many cases over sufficient time scales truly open ecosystems create gravity wells, sucking more and more into them until they are nearly universal.
  • Bell Canada brings open source automation ONAP into production
    Bell Canada has implemented it's first automation use case using the Linux Foundation's Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) as part of the telco's Network 3.0 transformation initiative. With an initial focus on its data center network infrastructure, Bell Canada is working with its network integration and back-office partner Amdocs to reduce costs and delivery capabilities.
  • Bell Canada Reaches Milestone in Network 3.0 Vision with Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) and Strategic Partnership with Amdocs

Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed

  • Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed Until Next Week as Linus Torvalds Announces a Rare RC9
    While the Linux community was looking forwards to the final Linux 4.15 kernel release today, Linus Torvalds just delayed it for another week, announcing the ninth Release Candidate (RC) instead. It's not every day that you see a ninth Release Candidate in the development cycle of a new Linux kernel branch, but here we go, and we can only blame it on those pesky Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that affect us all, putting billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Linux 4.15 becomes slowest release since 2011
    Linus Torvalds has decided that Linux 4.15 needs a ninth release candidate, making it the first kernel release to need that much work since 2011. Torvalds flagged the possibility of an extra release candidate last week, with the caveat that “it obviously requires this upcoming week to not come with any huge surprises” after “all the Meltdown and Spectre hoopla” made his job rather more complicated in recent weeks. Fast-forward another week and Torvalds has announced “I really really wanted to just release 4.15 today, but things haven't calmed down enough for me to feel comfy about it”.
  • No 4.15 final release today
    As might have been expected from watching the commit stream, the 4.15 kernel is not ready for release, so we'll get 4.15-rc9 instead. Linus said: "I really really wanted to just release 4.15 today, but things haven't calmed down enough for me to feel comfy about it, and Davem tells me he still has some networking fixes pending. Laura Abbott found and fixed a very subtle boot bug introduced this development cycle only yesterday, and it just didn't feel right to say that we're done."

Linus Torvalds Calls Linux Patch for Intel CPUs "Complete and Utter Garbage"

The patch submitted by David Woodhouse, ex-Intel kernel engineer that now works for Amazon described a so-called new feature for Intel processors to address Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation (IBRS) by creating macros that would restrict or unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation based on if the Intel CPU will advertise "I am able to be not broken." The "x86/enter: Create macros to restrict/unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation" feature implies that the IBRS (Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation) bit needed to be set at boot time to "ask" the processor not to be broken. Linus Torvalds immediately reacted to the patch calling it "complete and utter garbage" despite the developer's efforts to explain why he implemented the nasty hack. Read more Original: [RFC 09/10] x86/enter: Create macros to restrict/unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation