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today's leftovers

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  • China builds world’s fastest supercomputer without U.S. chips

    China on Monday revealed its latest supercomputer, a monolithic system with 10.65 million compute cores built entirely with Chinese microprocessors. This follows a U.S. government decision last year to deny China access to Intel's fastest microprocessors.

    There is no U.S.-made system that comes close to the performance of China's new system, the Sunway TaihuLight. Its theoretical peak performance is 124.5 petaflops, according to the latest biannual release today of the world's Top500 supercomputers. It is the first system to exceed 100 petaflops. A petaflop equals one thousand trillion (one quadrillion) sustained floating-point operations per second.

    The most important thing about Sunway TaihuLight may be its microprocessors. In the past, China has relied heavily on U.S. microprocessors in building its supercomputing capacity. The world's next fastest system, China's Tianhe-2, which has a peak performance of 54.9 petaflops, uses Intel Xeon processors.

  • More Benchmarks From The 2016 MacBook Pro (Mac-A5C67F76ED83108C)
  • A Look At The Many Different Vulkan Engine/Renderer Projects On GitHub
  • Trisquel 8.0 Alpha Pairs A Linux-Libre Experience With MATE

    This past week marked the availability of the first alpha release of Trisequel 8.0 "Flidas", the latest installment of the Free Software Foundation endorsed GNU/Linux distribution.

    Among the changes coming for Trisquel 8.0 is using the Linux-Libre 4.4 kernel, MATE 1.12.1 is the default desktop over GNOME, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is used as the base.

  • It's official: Kondik is gone from the Cyanogen that bore his handle [Ed: Microsoft deal killed them. As usual.]

    STEVE KONDIK, the original founder of Cyanogen, has been officially ousted from the company following the closure of its Seattle base.

    As reported yesterday, Kondik told developers that he "f*cked up and was f*cked over" and that he was considering what to do next given that he had lost control of rights to the Cyanogen name when he and his co-founder had moved from developer group to business.

    Kondik, aka CyanogenMod, relinquished all control over the operation of the business taking on the moniker of chief science officer, which may or may not have been a simple honorific.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style

    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.

  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting

    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.

  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016

    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest.

    My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.

  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!

    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25.

    One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.

  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise

    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology.

    The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."

  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)

    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.

  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones

    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Micro-Application Services Require Micro-Network Services

    "TCP: Treason uncloaked!" Abhishek Chauhan, VP and CTO at Citrix, launched his LinuxCon North America keynote with a trip down memory lane, when this was an actual Linux kernel log message. What is the significance of this silly message? Chauhan says that when this message was changed to something more benign, back around 2008, he knew it was a sign that Linux was becoming a serious contender. In 2016 Linux turned 25, so he was right.

  • Vapor Brings Compute Capacity to the Edge

    The new Vapor Edge platform is a combination of OpenDCRE, Vapor Core and Vapor Compass. The Vapor Edge can run on Vapor's Chamber server or on standard x86 servers as well.

  • libSoftFloat 1.0 Released, Still Working Towards Emulated FP64 Support For GPUs

    Last week marked the release of libSoftFloat 1.0, the library working to implement double-precision operations in pure GLSL 1.30 via bit twiddling operations and integer math. This is the most hopeful effort yet for getting OpenGL FP64 support exposed for older GPUs that lack native support.

    LibSoftFloat started as a Google Summer of Code 2016 project under the X.Org Foundation umbrella for providing a "soft" FP64 implementation for older GPUs, such as the Radeon HD 5000/6000 series that with R600 Gallium3D don't currently expose OpenGL 4.0 due to lacking FP64 support while the proprietary drivers have long provided such emulated support.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — “Cutting Edge” Fedora 25, Tor Phone, And VLC 360
  • Build Your Own Computer

    The computer’s abilities depend on the type of build-your-own system kit you have. Some computer kits intended to teach children (and other newcomers) the basics of hardware and software run on their own customized operating systems — which are often variations of the free, open-source Linux code.

    Raspberry Pi and Kano are two popular computer kits that provide beginners with the bare-bones components like low-cost motherboards and wireless-networking dongles. These computer boards can be connected to existing monitors and keyboards, or used with new equipment.

  • Japan Will Create a Supercomputer to Surpass China

    Japan is bound to develop a revolutionary supercomputer able to outcome China regarding technology. The costs of this new device will reach up to $173 million. The computer was planned to be ready for launching starting with next year. The program of the 130-petaflops computer looks very promising, the developers trying to overcome the technology used by China.

  • You might want to avoid the Nvidia 375.20 driver, Nvidia recommend downgrading

    Just a word of warning, the Nvidia 375.20 driver seems to have quite a number of issues in certain games bringing performance down a lot.

    Not everyone will have issues, as it seems only certain people are affected. Some people have reported no issues, while others are being given black screens or outright terrible performance.

  • Zorin OS 12 Core
  • Zorin OS 12 Overview
  • Maui 2.1 updated ISO
  • Volatility Watch on Shares of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Today, Zacks Investment Research Downgrade Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Hold
  • Intel Compute Sticks with Apollo Lake chips coming in 2017 (leaked roadmap)

    Intel’s Compute Stick is basically a fully functional, low-power PC crammed into a device that looks like an oversized USB flash drive. Plug it into the HDMI port on a TV, connect a power source, and you can run Windows, Linux, or other operating systems on a TV, monitor, or commercial display.

  • Neo900 Prototype version 2: Last Call for Review

    On November 8, 2016, the proto_v2 schematics were updated to the current version. We finished the last few improvements and our layouter is scheduling the layout to start in one week. We repeat our invitation to give the schematics a peer review: it's your last chance to peel your eyes on these schematics and be picky about details that our engineering team might have missed. Hopefully you won't find anything, but as Joerg says:

  • Alibaba’s YunOS overtakes Apple’s iOS as China’s second-largest smartphone operating system

    YunOS, the mobile operating system developed by Alibaba Group, is on track to corner a 14 per cent share of smartphone shipments in mainland China by the end of this year, pulling ahead of Apple’s iOS to become the second-largest operating system for that device in the market, according to analysts.

    The forecasts would confirm Alibaba’s claim earlier this year that YunOS had initially passed iOS on the mainland in the three months ended March 31.

    Despite the strong strides made by the Alibaba platform, Bernstein senior analyst Mark Li told the South China Morning Post

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The miracle of Lubuntu for older computers

    When it comes to Linux distributions you generally don’t hear a lot about Lubuntu. However, this Ubuntu spin can be a great help to users with older computers who need a light-weight distribution that requires minimal hardware resources.

  • Introducing the Linux Hardware Guide

    The Linux-Hardware-Guide tests and rates all types of hardware for their Linux compatibility for the knowledge base. A test report is created for each investigated hardware component and, if necessary, additional Linux configuration help is provided. Furthermore, Linux users can add their own hardware to the database and transmit hardware details and test results with a dedicated scan software. This allows creating a broad data basis and semi-automatic filling of the knowledge base. The Linux-Hardware-Guide is not limited to a single Linux distribution but instead tries to support all distributions and as many Linux users as possible. Currently, it supports 27 different Linux distributions. Additionally, the Linux-Hardware-Guide facilitates the knowledge transfer between Linux users who have exactly the same hardware under operation, because problem finding and solving often is much easier if someone else with exactly the same hardware is available.

  • My Lightning Talk from All Things Open 2016: 25 years of Linux in 5 minutes
  • Citrix Linux Virtual Desktop provides Windows VDI alternative

    Windows isn't going anywhere, but with Citrix's Linux Virtual Desktop, VDI admins who want to work with open source desktops can actually do so.

  • Skype Updates Linux Version to 1.12 [Ed: spyware]
  • JSON Home Tests and Keystone API changes
  • A tale of cylinders and shadows

    Like I wrote before, we at Collabora have been working on improving WebKitGTK+ performance for customer projects, such as Apertis. We took the opportunity brought by recent improvements to WebKitGTK+ and GTK+ itself to make the final leg of drawing contents to screen as efficient as possible. And then we went on investigating why so much CPU was still being used in some of our test cases.

    The first weird thing we noticed is performance was actually degraded on Wayland compared to running under X11. After some investigation we found a lot of time was being spent inside GTK+, painting the window’s background.

  • SUSE Releases The First Official 64-bit Linux OS For Raspberry Pi 3

    SUSE has released the first official 64-bit Linux-based operating system for Raspberry Pi 3. This release is basically a version of Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP2 that supports Raspberry Pi 3. The users need to visit SUSE’s website, make an account, and download the OS image.

  • YaST Team visits Euruko 2016

    As promised in previous posts, we want to share with you our experience and views from this year annual Ruby conference Euruko. Maybe “our” is too much to say, since we only sent one developer there. So to be precise, these are Josef Reidinger’s experience and views on the conference.

    This year Euruko took place in Sofia, capital of Bulgaria. It turned out to be a great conference place. Public transport works very well, everyone speak English and even when it uses Cyrilic alphabet, almost everything is written also in Latin one.

  • Debian stretch on the Raspberry Pi 3

    The last couple of days, I worked on getting Debian to run on the Raspberry Pi 3.

    Thanks to the work of many talented people, the Linux kernel in version 4.8 is _almost_ ready to run on the Raspberry Pi 3. The only missing thing is the bcm2835 MMC driver, which is required to read the root file system from the SD card. I’ve asked our maintainers to include the patch for the time being.

  • Debian miniconf in Cambridge

    I spent a few days in Cambridge for a minidebconf. This is a tiny version of the full annual Debconf. We had a couple of days for hacking, and another two days for talks.

  • Handset Installed Base Passed Tipping Point. Now More than Half of All Mobile Phone Handsets in Use are Smartphones

    We have passed a significant milestone for the planet's digital connectivity. As of last quarter, we passed the tipping point where now there are more smartphones in use, than dumbphones (aka 'featurephones'). The new sales of smartphones has been more than dumphones for three years but with the installed base, worldwide, it takes this long for the trends to catch up. And as smartphones now sell more than 4 out of every 5 new phones, this trend will go to its logical conclusion. In five years we're at the point where all new phones sold are smartphones; and by middle of the next decade, the last dumbphones will quietly disconnect from their networks for the last time.

  • Register Now – First ever Tizen Developer Conference for Smart TV comes to Russia, 2016

    For the first time we have a Tizen Developer Conference for Smart TV Russia 2016, taking place from November 30 – December 1, 2016. The event will be held in Moscow at the “Marriott Hotel Novy Arbat”.

    As the name suggests this will be a Tizen Developer Conference for Smart TV that will Introduce app developers to the exciting world of TV apps and educate them to the Tizen TV platform and architecture. You will be able to learn all the features and possibilities of SmartTV including multitasking, instantOn, preview, checkout on TV, etc.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Finding a Non-Mac Alternative to Microsoft

    A. If you do not care for Windows 10 but want to stick with Microsoft Office, the Mac and the macOS version of Office would probably provide the most familiarity. But if the Mac option is too expensive and you dislike Windows 10 enough to avoid it completely, you might consider switching to an alternative operating system, like a computer running Linux or a Google Chromebook. These systems often have the advantage of being less expensive than standard PC or Mac hardware, but they may require an internet connection to perform many functions.

  • [Older] The End of the General Purpose Operating System

    Containers as the unit of software

    Hidden behind my hypothosis, which mainly went unsaid, was that containers are becoming the unit of software. By which I mean the software we build or buy will increasingly be distributed as containers and run as containers. The container will carry with it enough metadata for the runtime to determine what resources are required to run it.

    The number of simplying assumption that come from this shared contract should not be underestimated. At least at the host level you're likely to need lots of near-identical hosts, all simply advertising their capabilities to the container scheduler.

  • DatArcs Is Aiming For Dynamically-Tuned, Self-Optimizing Linux Servers

    DatArcs is a new software start-up aiming to provide software to dynamically tune Linux servers for maximum performance and energy efficiency in the data-center. The DatArcs optimizer analyzes the server's workload over time and optimizes the server "several times per minute" to achieve better performance or lower power use.

  • GTK+ 3.89.1 Released As First Development Step Towards GTK4

    Matthias Clasen tagged the release today of GTK+ 3.89.1 as the first development snapshot leading towards GTK+ 4.0.

  • GTK+ 3.22.4 Improves CPU Usage Under Wayland, Enables HiDPI Support on Windows

    A new maintenance update for the GTK+ GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit has been announced this past weekend, versioned 3.22.4, bringing many Wayland improvements and lots of bug fixes.

    GTK+ 3.22.4 is now the latest stable and most advanced version of the GUI toolkit, which is the core of the GNOME desktop environment. This version is released for the GNOME 3.22.x desktop series, and it looks like it adds many improvements for the next-generation Wayland display server.

  • Great Debian meeting in Seville

    Last week we had an interesting Debian meeting in Seville, Spain. This has been the third time (in recent years) the local community meets around Debian.

    We met at about 20:00 at Rompemoldes, a crafts creation space. There we had a very nice dinner while talking about Debian and FLOSS. The dinner was sponsored by the Plan4D assosiation.

  • In brief: Canonical hires Wildfire for Ubuntu Core brief, Dexcom appoints Lewis, Wild West enters Bristol
  • Zorin OS 12 Is A Linux-Based Alternative For Windows 10

    We understand that it can be difficult to wean yourself off Windows. It's a ubiquitous operating system that most people are used to. But Microsoft's latest operating system Windows 10 has had some persistent privacy concerns. So if you're looking for an alternative but can't bear to give up the familiar user interface (UI), you could try out the Linux-based Zorin OS. The latest release is made to look and feel like Windows 10. Here are the details.

    There have been numerous attempts to replicate the Windows UI on Linux operating systems (does anybody remember Lindows?). In recent years, Zorin OS has become a popular choice for those who want to run Linux but didn’t' want to give up the Windows UI.

  • Compare the Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3 in India and also the Fun Tizen apps

    Hey guys, we all are know that the Tizen OS, backed heavily by Samsung Electronics, increase their market share day by day as 2.3 million Tizen smartphone were sold in 2015 alone, and now it is reported that a total 50 million Tizen device are in use worldwide. They have already take the second position in Indian Smartphone OS market and the world’s fourth. In last 3 months there ar lots of flagship apps and high graphics games released in the Tizen Store. Recently Samsung announced a new app contest for increase app in Tizen store and already running a unity game contest for add game to the Tizen Store. Three Samsung smartphones based on Tizen OS have been released in Indian market and worldwide: Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3. The Samsung Z2 is the latest Tizen smartphone with 4G connectivity.

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Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

  • Stop using SHA1 encryption: It’s now completely unsafe, Google proves
    Security researchers have achieved the first real-world collision attack against the SHA-1 hash function, producing two different PDF files with the same SHA-1 signature. This shows that the algorithm's use for security-sensitive functions should be discontinued as soon as possible. SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) dates back to 1995 and has been known to be vulnerable to theoretical attacks since 2005. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has banned the use of SHA-1 by U.S. federal agencies since 2010, and digital certificate authorities have not been allowed to issue SHA-1-signed certificates since Jan. 1, 2016, although some exemptions have been made. However, despite these efforts to phase out the use of SHA-1 in some areas, the algorithm is still fairly widely used to validate credit card transactions, electronic documents, email PGP/GPG signatures, open-source software repositories, backups and software updates.
  • on pgp
    First and foremost I have to pay respect to PGP, it was an important weapon in the first cryptowar. It has helped many whistleblowers and dissidents. It is software with quite interesting history, if all the cryptograms could tell... PGP is also deeply misunderstood, it is a highly successful political tool. It was essential in getting crypto out to the people. In my view PGP is not dead, it's just old and misunderstood and needs to be retired in honor. However the world has changed from the internet happy times of the '90s, from a passive adversary to many active ones - with cheap commercially available malware as turn-key-solutions, intrusive apps, malware, NSLs, gag orders, etc.
  • Cloudflare’s Cloudbleed is the worst privacy leak in recent Internet history
    Cloudflare revealed today that, for months, all of its protected websites were potentially leaking private information across the Internet. Specifically, Cloudflare’s reverse proxies were dumping uninitialized memory; that is to say, bleeding private data. The issue, termed Cloudbleed by some (but not its discoverer Tavis Ormandy of Google Project Zero), is the greatest privacy leak of 2017 and the year has just started. For months, since 2016-09-22 by their own admission, CloudFlare has been leaking private information through Cloudbleed. Basically, random data from random sites (again, it’s worth mentioning that every site that used CloudFlare in the last half year should be considered to having fallen victim to this) would be randomly distributed across the open Internet, and then indefinitely cached along the way.
  • Serious Cloudflare bug exposed a potpourri of secret customer data
    Cloudflare, a service that helps optimize the security and performance of more than 5.5 million websites, warned customers today that a recently fixed software bug exposed a range of sensitive information that could have included passwords and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. A combination of factors made the bug particularly severe. First, the leakage may have been active since September 22, nearly five months before it was discovered, although the greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18. Second, some of the highly sensitive data that was leaked was cached by Google and other search engines. The result was that for the entire time the bug was active, hackers had the ability to access the data in real-time by making Web requests to affected websites and to access some of the leaked data later by crafting queries on search engines. "The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a blog post published Thursday. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."

Security Leftovers

  • Change all the passwords (again)
    Looks like it is time to change all the passwords again. There’s a tiny little flaw in a CDN used … everywhere, it seems.
  • Today's leading causes of DDoS attacks [Ed: The so-called 'Internet of things' (crappy devices with identical passwords) is a mess; programmers to blame, not Linux]
    Of the most recent mega 100Gbps attacks in the last quarter, most of them were directly attributed to the Mirai botnet. The Mirai botnet works by exploiting the weak security on many Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The program finds its victims by constantly scanning the internet for IoT devices, which use factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords.
  • How to Set Up An SSL Certificate on Your Website [via "Steps To Secure Your Website With An SSL Certificate"]
  • SHA-1 is dead, long live SHA-1!
    Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you heard that some researchers managed to create a SHA-1 collision. The short story as to why this matters is the whole purpose of a hashing algorithm is to make it impossible to generate collisions on purpose. Unfortunately though impossible things are usually also impossible so in reality we just make sure it’s really really hard to generate a collision. Thanks to Moore’s Law, hard things don’t stay hard forever. This is why MD5 had to go live on a farm out in the country, and we’re not allowed to see it anymore … because it’s having too much fun. SHA-1 will get to join it soon.
  • SHA1 collision via ASCII art
    Happy SHA1 collision day everybody! If you extract the differences between the good.pdf and bad.pdf attached to the paper, you'll find it all comes down to a small ~128 byte chunk of random-looking binary data that varies between the files.
  • PayThink Knowledge is power in fighting new Android attack bot
    Android users and apps have become a major part of payments and financial services, carrying an increased risk for web crime. It is estimated that there are 107.7 million Android Smartphone users in the U.S. who have downloaded more than 65 million apps from the Google App Store, and each one of them represents a smorgasbord of opportunity for hackers to steal user credentials and other information.
  • Red Hat: 'use after free' vulnerability found in Linux kernel's DCCP protocol IPV6 implementation
    Red Hat Product Security has published details of an "important" security vulnerability in the Linux kernel. The IPv6 implementation of the DCCP protocol means that it is possible for a local, unprivileged user to alter kernel memory and escalate their privileges. Known as the "use-after-free" flaw, CVE-2017-6074 affects a number of Red Hat products including Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and Red Hat Openshift Online v2. Mitigating factors include the requirement for a potential attacker to have access to a local account on a machine, and for IPV6 to be enabled, but it is still something that will be of concern to Linux users. Describing the vulnerability, Red Hat says: "This flaw allows an attacker with an account on the local system to potentially elevate privileges. This class of flaw is commonly referred to as UAF (Use After Free.) Flaws of this nature are generally exploited by exercising a code path that accesses memory via a pointer that no longer references an in use allocation due to an earlier free() operation. In this specific issue, the flaw exists in the DCCP networking code and can be reached by a malicious actor with sufficient access to initiate a DCCP network connection on any local interface. Successful exploitation may result in crashing of the host kernel, potential execution of code in the context of the host kernel or other escalation of privilege by modifying kernel memory structures."

Android Leftovers