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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The Dracut Initramfs Generator Is Slow - Could Be Much Faster As Shown By Distri's Minitrd

    Dracut that is used for generating the initramfs image on Linux distributions like Fedora / RHEL, Debian, openSUSE, and many other distributions could be much faster.

    Former Debian developer Michael Stapelberg recently demonstrated that Dracut is quite slow and could be much faster. Stapelberg was researching the initramfs generation speed by Dracut as part of his work on Distri, the experimental Linux distribution project researching fast package management. Distri remains just a research project for constructing a simple and fast package management system for constructing a Linux distribution built off Stapelberg's frustrations with Debian.

  • What's your favorite Linux distribution?

    What's your favorite Linux distribution? Take our 7th annual poll. Some have come and gone, but there are hundreds of Linux distributions alive and well today. The combination of distribution, package manager, and desktop creates an endless amount of customized environments for Linux users.

    We asked the community of writers what their favorite is and why. While there were some commonalities (Fedora and Ubuntu were popular choices for a variety of reasons), we heard a few surprises as well. Here are a few of their responses:

    "I use the Fedora distro! I love the community of people who work together to make an awesome operating system that showcases the greatest innovations in the free and open source software world." — Matthew Miller

    "I use Arch at home. As a gamer, I want easy access to the latest Wine versions and GFX drivers, as well as large amounts of control over my OS. Give me a rolling-release distro with every package at bleeding-edge." —Aimi Hobson

    "NixOS, with nothing coming close in the hobbyist niche." —Alexander Sosedkin

    "I have used every Fedora version as my primary work OS. Meaning, I started with the first one. Early on, I asked myself if there would ever come a time when I couldn't remember which number I was on. That time has arrived. What year is it, anyway?" —Hugh Brock

  • Manjaro KDE 19.0 pre3 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Manjaro KDE 19.0 pre3.

  • Noodlings | Kontact Solaar through a VPN

    The killer feature of the Plasma Desktop has been the KDE Personal Information Manager, Kontact. I have been using it since 2004 time frame and although we have had a tenuous relationship over the years, specifically the switch to the Akonadi and the pain that came with it in the early years. I actively use Kontact on multiple machines for the feature richness of it and haven’t found anything in existence that I like better. I also exclusively use Kontact on openSUSE Tumbleweed with the Plasma Desktop Environment.

    I have decided to publish my reference concerning the maintenance it requires. I could be an edge case since I have five mail accounts and multiple calendar accounts as well. Historically, I have had issues where losing network connection, regaining it, suspending and resuming my machine over a period of time would cause the thing to have fits. So, here are my fixes, whenever the need arises.

    You know those stories of people that have these crazy habit ts that don’t make sense, things they do that don’t really help or solve a problem like making sure the spoons are organized in just the right fashion? Yeah, well that could be what this whole post is and my obsessive-compulsive tenancies are in full expression. So, take all that into account should you choose to use any of these references.

  • Snøhetta Selected to Design the New Visual Identity for the Open-Source Platform Wikipedia

    The Wikimedia Foundation selected multidisciplinary firm Snøhetta to develop the new brand identity for Wikipedia, its free open platform. Aiming to create visuals that push forward Wikimedia’s international commitment to “setting knowledge free”, the process will be entirely documented.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • TriggerMesh Aims to Orchestrate Serverless Computing on Kubernetes

    TriggerMesh has raised $3 million in additional funding to advance the integration of Kubernetes clusters with serverless computing frameworks. In addition, the company announced it has made available open source integrations between its namesake orchestration for serverless computing frameworks and IBM MQ event sources, VMware vSphere event sources and the Microsoft Azure Event Hub channel controller.

    The TriggerMesh platform provides access to a cloud bus to facilitate application flow orchestration and the consumption of events emanating from any data center application or cloud source. It is designed to trigger serverless functions using a declarative application programming interface (APIs) and a set of tools for defining event flows and functions.

    Company co-founder Mark Hindle says that as IT organizations embrace modern application development platforms, a transition is occurring in terms of how stateless and stateful applications are constructed. Initially, organizations limited container use to building stateless applications. Now, however, many stateless applications are being built using functions that access serverless computing frameworks.

    [...]

    Unfortunately, serverless computing standards, de facto or otherwise, are a work in progress. Google and its allies are making a case for a set of open source Knative middleware that integrates Kubernetes clusters with any number of open serverless computing frameworks. However, the adoption of open serverless computing frameworks is still relatively nascent. The most widely used serverless computing framework is the proprietary AWS Lambda service. However, the adoption of rival frameworks is expected to increase substantially in 2020—a report published this week by Allied Market Research predicts the global serverless architecture market will reach $22 billion by 2025, representing a compound annual growth rate of 27.8% between 2018 and 2025.

  • 2020-01-24 | Linux Headlines

    Permissive licenses are on the rise, Open GApps comes to Android 10, Intel unexpectedly joins the CHIPS Alliance, and KDE receives another large donation.

  • Meet the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Default Wallpaper
  • Blocking spammers in https://progress.opensuse.org

    But our ticket system is not really planned to become a ticket system: we run Redmine, which originally is intended to be a project management software. The ability to create issues (or tickets, as we call them) in the system by sending an Email was not really intended in the beginning. So the ability to detect and mark Spam Emails as such simply does not exist. Even worse: every Email results in a user, that get's created automatically, to allow us to send out an Email to this person as answer to his ticket.

    All of this is not really problematic: you learn to deal with it. But with over 14,000 "users" in the database (and over 17,000 real tickets), the system started to become slow. So we invested a bit of our time and looked into the user list. Good for us: most of the Spammers seen to have special days to submit their stuff. And even more interesting: they do it at the same time from multiple accounts!

  • A forum for Flathub

    Flathub is primarily built around GitHub, where applications manifests and infrastructure code live. Unsurprisingly, it turns out that code hosting platform isn't exactly a go-to place for the community to connect, even if one slaps a discussion label on an issue. Timezones and personal commitments mean that IRC is also not an ideal platform for discussion, and Flathub does not have a mailing list for discussion and announcements.

  • F31-20200122 Updated Live isos released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated F31-20200122 Live ISOs, carrying the 5.4.12-200 kernel.

    This set of updated isos will save considerable amounts of updates after install. ((for new installs.)(New installs of Workstation have 1GB+ of updates)).

    A huge thank you goes out to irc nicks dowdle, Southern-Gentleman for testing these iso.

  • CircleCI automates Continuous Delivery to multiple clouds

    Modern software development is fast, continuous, and automated. Today, by research company Statista's count, 88% of organizations are using Agile methods and Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD). Yet there remains one major stumbling block: Moving a freshly minted program from a CI pipeline to delivery to a cloud or other service provider. That's where DevOps company CircleCI comes in with a new suite of orb integrations with 20 partners such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud, Salesforce, and others. These enable developers to automate remote deployments in minutes from their CI/CD pipeline.

    [...]

    CircleCI's partners are happy with the expansion of orbs. Rayn Veerubhotla, Google Cloud's Director of Hybrid Partnerships, said: "Google Cloud Run helps developers run stateless containers and focus on writing high-value code, without worrying about the underlying infrastructure. By launching these new tools, CircleCI is enabling developers to further streamline and simplify their experience on Cloud Run, ultimately helping businesses bring new services and products to their customers more quickly."

    The same is true of all the clouds that orbs are now supporting. If you find your CI/CD team slowed down by final step deployment issues, you should check this new offering out. It could save you time, work, and money.

  • Dfinity launches an open-source platform aimed at the social networking giants

    And to prove out the concept of how an application would run on its new network, Dfinity today demonstrated an open social network called LinkedUp.

    The startup has rather cheekily called this “an open version of LinkedIn,” the Microsoft-owned social network for professionals. Unlike LinkedIn, LinkedUp, which runs on any browser, is not owned or controlled by a corporate entity.

    LinkedUp is built on Dfinity’s so-called Internet Computer, its name for the platform it is building to distribute the next generation of software and open internet services.

  • Introducing The Lunduke Journal - New Name, New Website

    With so many people reading the articles, obviously those articles need to live somewhere under my control.

    Up until now I've been publishing them over on Patreon. I made those articles free for everyone to read, but utilized Patreon as simply a publishing platform. This worked well enough for the occasional article... but that needed to change.

    You can now find every article published under the Lunduke Journal name right here at Lunduke.com. You can also find an always up to date RSS feed of the articles right here as well. That way you can get notified the moment a new article (and corresponding episode, audio and video) is published.

    If you've been enjoying the content over the last few months, never fear. No significant changes to any of that, outside of the name, branding, and website changes. The meat of what made The Lunduke Show is exactly the same in The Lunduke Journal.

  • Themes from Real World Crypto 2020

    Over 642 brilliant cryptographic minds gathered for Real World Crypto 2020, an annual conference that brings together cryptographic researchers with developers implementing cryptography in the wild. Overall, RWC 2020 was an impressive conference that demonstrated some amazing work. Here we explore three major themes that emerged: [...]

  • Results of the Pan-European Quantum Internet Hackathon

    In November 2019, we organised the first ever multi-location Quantum Internet hackathon.

    [...]

    Since the Quantum Internet is still really new, most practical results were obtained by sharing existing software and protocols and receiving feedback on how to improve them. Actual bug fixes, additional features and new software were also valuable outcomes of the event. All the links to the produced software were collected on the PEQI2019 pages on GitHub.

  • How fast can a new internet standard for sharing patient data catch fire?

    Six big tech companies -- Microsoft, Google, Amazon, IBM, Oracle and Salesforce -- have also joined to support FHIR and broader sharing of health care data through a government-endorsed project called Blue Button, which is intended to make it easier for patients to view and download their health records.

    Consumer advocates and cybersecurity experts warn that personal health information shared on the web could be compromised. They want to make sure the risk is minimized before any widespread rollout of FHIR products. Patients do not have a say in how their health providers store medical information, but patients can request their records be sent in the format they prefer, including paper.

    Facilitating access to all that data for both patients and providers without first determining how to keep it secure may open a Pandora's box that can never be shut, warned David Finn, executive vice president of strategic innovation for CynergisTek, a Mission Viejo, California, and Austin, Texas-based cybersecurity consulting firm.

  • California to resume Elsevier talks after signing deals elsewhere

    The 10-campus California system -- now more than six months without access to Elsevier's library of 2,500 journals -- announced that the two sides will hold "a meeting to explore reopening negotiations" early this year.

    Given the open access deals the California system has signed elsewhere, the system's library leaders said in a statement, "we are hopeful that this suggests that the publisher is ready to discuss deals that align with UC's goals".

    The California-Elsevier showdown has been watched nationally and globally, a reflection of the size and importance of the two players and the multibillion-dollar stakes surrounding the challenge across academia of making published research findings open to all.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • KDE Connect Website SoK 2020 Week 2

    Today marks the end of my second week of Season of KDE. This week had been great for me, I came in contact with many teams in KDE and got to work with many new people who are quite helpful and encouraging. Variety of changes came on the website which are linked above with links to commits.

    The Website can be viewed here.

    You can check out my proposal here. The repository that has the KDE Jekyll themed site is here.

    This week started off by discussion on the Web Telegram chat on how the website behaved weird on devices with large screen and how some users and even my mentor Carl Schwan felt it a bit weird. So I went onto make the website more important. I decided to try the website out on all types of screen provided by the developer tools in Firefox and Chrome and also checked for Portrait and Landscape modes of all those devices. I can assure you that the website looks as it is intended on all these devices. So it should work fine on relatable devices. All this work was done with CSS. Below are images of the website on large screen and the developer tools.

  • GhostBSD 20.01 overview | A simple, elegant desktop BSD Operating System.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of GhostBSD 20.01 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Freexian's report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Arduino Education Unveils Four New STEAM Kits for Pupils and Students
  • Intel and Softbank Beware. Open Source Is Coming to the Chip Business

    After revolutionizing software, the open-source movement is threatening to do same to the chip industry.

    Big technology companies have begun dabbling with RISC-V, which replaces proprietary know-how in a key part of the chip design process with a free standard that anyone can use. While it’s early days, this could create a new crop of processors that compete with Intel Corp. products and whittle away at the licensing business of Arm Holdings Plc.

    In December, about 2,000 people packed into a Silicon Valley conference to learn about RISC-V, a new set of instructions that control how software communicates with semiconductors. In just a few years, RISC-V has grown from a college teaching tool into an open-source standard being explored by industry giants including Google, Samsung Electronics Co., Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., Qualcomm Inc. and Nvidia Corp.

    “Most of the major companies are putting substantial efforts into RISC-V,” said Krste Asanovic, a computer scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, who was part of the team that developed the standard. He’s co-founder of SiFive Inc., a startup that sells chip designs based on RISC-V (pronounced “risk five”).

  • The App Store is down

    Midday on Friday it appeared that Apple’s App Store, a critical piece of the digital and mobile economies, struggled with uptime issues. Apple’s own status page indicated that the application vendor was having an “ongoing” issue that affected “some users.”

  • Apple pushes back against EU common charger, warns of innovation risks

    iPhone maker Apple on Thursday pushed back against EU lawmakers’ call for a common charger, warning the move could hamper innovation, create a mountain of electronic waste and irk consumers.

  • The Debogonisation of 2a10::/12

    We are getting ready to start allocating from 2a10::/12, a new block of IPv6 addresses. In this process we did a couple of 'pre-flight' checks to check the usability of address space in this /12 block.

  • Microsoft previews Visual Studio update with added Linux love, many new features [Ed: Microsoft Tim perpetuates the myth that Microsoft has Linux "love" by pushing proprietary software/malware into it]
  • Telegram Update Adds New Poll Options, Message Scheduling

    Telegram 1.9.7 for Windows, macOS and Linux builds on the changes introduced in the previous stable release by adding a crop of interesting new options to its interactive ‘polls’ feature.

    Didn’t know you could create polls in Telegram? Well, yup, you can — but only in groups and channels (which makes sense: a poll with only recipient isn’t really a poll).

    With the latest Telegram desktop release three new kinds of polls are available:

    Visible votes (as the name might tell you) now lets users see who voted for which option in a given poll. Previously, all Telegram polls were anonymous (and that option is, apparently, still available).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New Linux System Call Proposed To Let User-Space Pin Themselves To Specific CPU Cores

    A "pin_on_cpu" system call has been proposed for the Linux kernel as a new means of letting user-space threads pin themselves to specific CPU cores.

    User-space processes requesting to be run on specific CPU cores can already e done by the likes of Linux's sched_setaffinity to get/set the CPU affinity mask while pin_on_cpu would be a new and simpler way.

  • First ‘ktown’ Plasma5 update for Slackware in 2020

    Slackware and Plasma5… what will 2020 bring?

    For starters, Pat just added Kerberos to Slackware-current! That is the first (small but significant) step towards a big change in Slackware which will unfold over the coming period. And at the end of that, I expect that Plasma5 gets folded into the distro as well. Here’s hoping!

    In any case, I just released KDE-5_20.01 and the packages are available for download from my ‘ktown‘ repository. As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a full installation of Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2.

  • An Open Source Effort to Encrypt the Internet of Things

    End-to-end encryption is a staple of secure messaging apps like WhatsApp and Signal. It ensures that no one—even the app developer—can access your data as it traverses the web. But what if you could bring some version of that protection to increasingly ubiquitous—and notoriously insecure—internet-of-things devices?

  • Why UK leaders need open technology for the disrupted future

    We’re not quite past the post with Brexit, but thankfully, we have moved beyond the Brexit hiatus. And, it’s time we did. Whatever your views on the merits of Brexit, as the UK’s Prime Minister has stressed, it’s time to move on and move forward.

    In fact, there may be no better time to spread the word about being open for business by highlighting the benefits of open technology. It is a task that all business leaders in the UK need to embrace. By seizing the moment to “get open done”, we can not only develop and sustain the UK’s leadership in open technology, but also carve out our status on the world stage for many years to come.

    The timing couldn’t be better. It’s a pivotal moment to demonstrate how declaring our independence of European markets does not equate with a lack of collaboration or creativity.

    Brexit offers us a convenient pause; a time for us to take stock and reflect on who we are as a nation and what we can offer global markets. We’ve had our fair share of inventors and game-changers in the past. Now, we have an opportunity to show the UK can lead in technology.

  • Acculturation Guide

    The Acculturation Guide is a hands-on “boot camp” for those interested in the configuration, administration and operation of applications on YottaDB. This file is the script (or workbook) for the workshop, consisting of the exercises below.

    At the end of these exercises, you should have a basic working knowledge of the essential aspects of YottaDB Administration and Operation. While this workshop alone will not by any means make you a YottaDB expert, the basic working knowledge it will give you will help you to quickly understand the concepts explained in the user documentation and put you on the path to becoming an expert.

    The workshop is not a course in programming with YottaDB. Familiarity with Linux® (or at least UNIX®) will allow you to move faster through the material, but is not absolutely required. If you have no experience whatsoever with Linux or UNIX, supplementary tutorial material on the side will increase your level of comfort.

  • Where InfluxDB time series database is going

    Paul Dix: So in mid-2012, I started this company and basically we wanted to build a SaaS [software as a service] product for doing real-time metrics and monitoring. Initially my idea was I wanted to do anomaly detection and machine learning on data sets, but to build that we first had to build all the infrastructure, so we could collect time series data at scale and query it.

    Fast forward, basically another year, and we went to Y Combinator, we did the winter of 2013 batch and this product wasn't really taking off. But I could see that there was something from an infrastructure perspective. We did have some customers paying us and I talked to them, asked why they were paying us. They told us that they were using our product as a time series platform.

    So we pivoted and the goal was initially to build a database, but that later morphed into being an entire platform for working with time series data. My goal was to build something that was generally useful for developers to create their applications with.

  • Accessibility checker and support for PDF/UA specs

    PDF/UA or ISO 14289 is a specifications that defines the requirements for accessibility in a PDF document. The specification defines the required structure and formatting of the document (also refers to WCAG specification from W3C for use on the web) and PDF features, which should be enabled or disabled so the document is better suited for accessibility (for example PDF tags are required).

    Thanks to the Dutch Standardisation Forum for financially sponsoring and Collabora Productivity in cooperation with Nou&Off for the work on implementing this specification into LibreOffice.

  • Cops: Waze App Directs Casino-Bound Drivers Into Wilderness

    “The address on the ad lists 1 Borgata Way in Atlantic City NJ, which is correct, the location pinned with the ad is actually in the middle of the Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area, near Lake Success.”

  • Senators to Trump administration: Protect small businesses from Iranian [cracking] threat [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The advisory from DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency warned of Iran’s history of “disruptive and destructive cyber operations against strategic targets” and advised U.S. organizations to consider whether they make an attractive target for the Iranians. According to the FBI, those potential private-sector targets include cleared defense contractors.

  • Python Bytes Episode #165: Ranges as dictionary keys - oh my!
  • mintCast 326.5 – Biscuits and a Thinkpad

    In our Innards section, we talk all things ‘Lenovo Thinkpads’

  • Microsoft is testing ads in WordPad in Windows 10

    Over the years Microsoft has taken numerous controversial decisions with Windows 10, including installing sponsored apps, using the Start menu to advertise apps it thinks you might be interested in, and -- of course -- the various forms of data-collecting telemetry.

    Now it has been discovered that more ads could be on their way. A Windows researcher has uncovered ads in WordPad encouraging people to try out Word, Excel and PowerPoint online.

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • Road Map for 2020

    Following the last year's leitmotif of "bridging worlds", we turn our attention to the removal of the hurdles faced by aspiring developers and users. During the annual road-map discussion on our mailing list, we identified four tangible approaches towards that goal. First, making Sculpt OS more user friendly. Second, reinforcing trust in Genode by fostering the framework's high quality. Third, making the tooling around Genode a joy to use. And finally, the illustration of Genode's versatility in the form practical use cases.

  • Genode OS Draws Up 2020 Plans Of USB Audio, A Kernel Written In Ada

    The Genode operating system framework that's been going strong for over a decade and continuing to employ a micro-kernel architecture continues to plan for an interesting future.

    The twelve year old Genode OS open-source project has drawn up an interesting road-map for 2020. Some of their plans for this year include:

    - 64-bit ARM (specifically the i.MX8 SoC) support for its general purpose Sculpt OS operating system.

  • Incentivizing Accessible Design

    When scholars contemplate the legal tools available to policymakers for encouraging innovation, they primarily think about patents. If they are keeping up with the most recent literature, they may also consider grants, prizes, and taxes as means to increase the supply of innovation. But the innovation policy toolkit is substantially deeper than that. To demonstrate its depth, this Article explores the evolution of designs that help people with disabilities access the world around them. From artificial limbs to the modern wheelchair and the reshaping of the built environment, a variety of legal doctrines have influenced, for better and for worse, the pace and direction of innovation for accessible design.

    This Article argues that two of the most important drivers of innovation for accessible design have been social welfare laws and antidiscrimination laws. Both were responsible, in part, for the revolution in accessibility that occurred in the second half of the twentieth century. Unlike standard innovation incentives, however, these laws operate on the “demand side.” Social welfare laws and antidiscrimination laws increase the ability and willingness of parties to pay for accessible technology, ultimately leading to greater supply. But in doing so, these laws generate a different distribution of the costs and benefits of innovation. They also produce their own sets of innovation distortions by allowing third parties to make decisions about the designs that people with disabilities have to use.

    The law can promote innovation, and it can hinder it. The law’s relationship to the wheelchair, the most important accessibility innovation of the twentieth century, produced both results. Policymakers have choices about which legal incentives doctrines they can use and how they can use them. This Article evaluates those tools, and it provides guidelines for their use to encourage accessible technology in particular and innovation generally.

  • Introduction to the Linux terminal commands

    Those of you just beginning to learn the basics of Linux may be interested in a great video published by the YouTube channel Explaining Computers. The Linux Terminal tutorials are aimed at those of you moving from the Microsoft Windows operating system as well as users of the Raspberry Pi mini PC and similar. The 20 minute video covers a range of Linux terminal commands and Linux concepts, including navigating and manipulating drives and directories using the commands pwd, ls, lsblk, cd, mkdir, rmdir, cp, and mv.

    If you would like to play around with the Linux commands but don’t have a Linux system you can also use a terminal emulator. A program that allows the use of the terminal in a graphical environment. Here are some free, commonly-used terminal emulators by operating system : Mac OS X: Terminal (default), iTerm 2 – Windows: PuTTY – Linux: Terminal, KDE Konsole, XTerm

  • How to install Microsoft fonts on Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Think Silicon's GLOVE OpenGL-Over-Vulkan Library Now Works On Wayland, Windows + macOS

    One of several projects implementing the OpenGL graphics API over Vulkan has been Think Silicon's GLOVE library. GLOVE currently is focuses on OpenGL ES 2.0 + EGL 1.4 support and is a standalone project unlike Mesa's Zink Gallium3D driver working on OpenGL / GLES over Vulkan too. GLOVE 0.4 is out today as a big feature update.

    GLOVE 0.4 is the project's first new release in more than one year and comes with greatly expanded hardware and software support.

  • Intel's Vulkan Driver Begins Making Infrastructure Changes For Multi-GPU Support

    For months we have seen various Intel open-source Linux graphics driver patches that begin preparing for multi-GPU support where in moving forward with their Xe graphics cards there could be the iGPU + dGPU setup or even multiple Xe graphics cards in a single system. So far those Intel Linux multi-GPU preparations have been focused on their kernel-space driver while now it's reaching into user-space with their Vulkan driver seeing early infrastructure changes.

  • Samsung's Better exFAT Driver Gets Revised Ahead Of Mainline Linux Integration

    While there has been the initial Microsoft exFAT file-system driver since Linux 5.4, that code is based on a vintage snapshot of prior Samsung code. Samsung engineers meanwhile have been working to upstream a much newer and better off exFAT implementation to replace that existing driver and it looks like it could be ready for Linux 5.6.

    That current exFAT driver within the Linux kernel's staging area is on a several year old snapshot of the driver that Samsung has continued advancing internally for use on their Android devices and more. This newer Samsung driver code is more cleaned up, offers more meta-data operations, and fixes countless bugs. Once Samsung can get this driver upstream they plan to use that as their code-base moving forward.

  • GNOME Founder responds to Code of Conduct concerns

    I like Federico's straightforward stance on racism -- one that I share -- "racist behaviour will not be tolerated, irrespective of the race of those involved." Clearly the GNOME team has their heart in the right place with that.

    With that in mind, it would seem to me to make sense to modify the GNOME Code of Conduct to reflect that. In its current state the document clearly divides racism and sexism into two categories: Those the GNOME team is going to act to stop, and those the GNOME team will allow.

  • This Blog Has Moved

    I moved my blog back to a self-hosted WordPress, but am powering it with Jetpack to offer many of the same features as during the seven months it ran on WordPress.com. I am also using the same theme, just have rearranged a few things. The privacy policy was updated to reflect the new status.

  • 5G: The outsourced elephant in the room

    In a break from the usual GPS/Galileo, DNA and C++ posts, here is a bit on 5G and national security. It turns out that through PowerDNS and its parent company Open-Xchange, we know a lot about how large scale European communication service providers work - most of whom are our customers in some way.

    In addition, in a previous life I worked in national security and because of that I have relevant knowledge of how governments (your own and foreign ones) “interact” with telecommunication providers. So what follows is based on lived experience.

    Note: this article is mostly about Europe. Considerations and conditions in the US and the rest of the world are very different.

  • [Old] Replacing Orange Livebox router by a Linux box

    A few months ago, I moved back to France and I settled for Orange as an ISP with a bundle combining Internet and mobile subscription. In Switzerland, I was using my own router instead of the box provided by Swisscom. While there is an abundant documentation to replace the box provided by Orange, the instructions around a plain Linux box are kludgy. I am exposing here my own variation. I am only interested in getting IPv4/IPv6 access: no VoIP, no TV.

  • How to install Linux apps on your Chromebook

    Google has finally made it such that the installation of Linux applications has trickled down to even more Chromebooks. Case in point--what was once considered the most luxurious Chromebook on the market, the Pixel 2105. At this point a large number of Chromebooks can enjoy the added layer of Linux applications.

    What does that mean? It means that the narrow-focused Chromebook becomes a much more adept and adaptable device. It means you can install a fully-functioning office suite, a powerful image editor, admin tools, and so much more.

  • A nice video introduction to the Linux terminal

    If you have a Macintosh, you can enter the Unix terminal by opening Terminal.app. (There's a way to do it in Windows, too, but I don't know how.) From there, you have command-line control of your computer. If you are a Raspberry Pi aficionado, you probably know about the Linux command line. This episode of Explaining Computers has a great introduction to the Linux terminal, and shows you some of the useful things you can do in it.

  • How To Copy MP3s from A CD

    If for some reason you don’t have access to either of these methods, you’ll have to go a little further out of your way. If you’re on Linux, try using ASunder CD Ripper. Other alternatives include SoundJuicer, RipperX, and Audex. ASunder is the easiest to find because it’s available on the Ubuntu software center. Once it’s installed, you’ll have to download the MP3 encoding library, LAME, which is a free add-on. Once you’re done it should be pretty similar to the other examples mentioned above. Just be sure to set it to the proper disc drive and set file names and the quality of the encoding – all of these are found in the preferences tab at the top.

  • Linux Gaming: How to get started

    Whether you’re tired of buggy Windows updates, Microsoft’s forced telemetry, or are just looking to try something new, you might have thought about ditching Windows and switching to Linux, one of the world’s most popular free and open-source operating systems. But the one thing holding many users back from making the switch was its lack of support for games. However, that’s no longer the case – gaming on Linux has never been easier or more accessible. Even if you’ve never touched a Linux machine in your life, you too can be playing all your favorite games in a matter of hours, with minimal hassle.

    This guide is meant as a brief overview to Linux newbies – I’m going to be simplifying and skipping a lot of the complexities that aren’t relevant. One of the coolest things about Linux is that it allows you to customize everything, down to the very fundamentals of the operating system. That being said, you accept the sensible defaults and get down to playing some games.

  • Late Night Linux - Episode 81

    The death of Windows 7 presents yet another opportunity for the wide adoption of Linux on the desktop. Is that just wishful thinking? Plus Y2K comes back, bad news for Mozilla, a great new Nexcloud release, and more in the news.

  • Building A Business On Building Data Driven Businesses

    In order for an organization to be data driven they need easy access to their data and a simple way of sharing it. Arik Fraimovich built Redash as a way to address that need by connecting to any data source and building attractive dashboards on top of them. In this episode he shares the origin story of the project, his experiences running a business based on open source, and the challenges of working with data effectively.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GNU World Order 336

    Listener feedback

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/03

    This has been a busy week when looking at the snapshots. Tumbleweed has received 6 fully tested snapshots that were published (0110, 0111, 0112, 0113, 0114 and 0115).

  • Open Mainframe Project Continues to Grow with Launch of Polycephaly and New Members

    The Open Mainframe Project (OMP), an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, continues to see rapid growth with a new project , Polycephaly, and the addition of new members.

    The project  (formally zJenkins) is based on IBM IBM Dependency Based Build (DBB) using Groovy script to build z/OS applications with Jenkins and Git, and three academic institutions from China: Beijing Institute of Technology, South China University of Technology, and Xidian University.

  • The BSC coordinates the manufacture of the first open source chip developed in Spain

    In collaboration with the Centro de Investigación en Computación of the Mexican IPN, Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica of the CSIC and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC).

    Lagarto, which is built with TSMC’s 65-nanometer transistors, is the first open source instruction set architecture (ISA) chip developed in Spain, coordinated by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC). The chip, which has performed better results than expected, is a key step in the center's strategy to become a benchmark in the open source hardware technologies’ field developed in Europe.

  • Next release will be LibreOffice 7

    Congratulations! Next release will be LibreOffice 7 instead LibreOffice 6.5. Look at that message in marketing mail list.

  • UVM Gets $1 Million From Google For Open Source Research

    Open source software can be shared and modified but UVM said the concept is about more than software. The school says the aim of the project is to broaden understanding of how people, teams and organizations thrive in technology-rich settings, particularly in open-source projects and communities.

  • UVM gets $1M from Google for open source research

    The unrestricted gift is to support open-source research. Open source is a type of computer software, where source code is released under a license, and the copyright holder grants users the rights to study, change and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose.

  • Is open source culture the answer to our technology woes?

    For that, open source culture is likely to be the most effective, if not the only, therapy. Open source means to be open about the source of knowledge that enables anyone to make something. With regard to technology, one important element of that source, but certainly not the only one, is represented by the code used to generate a given piece of software, AKA the source code.

    But you would be mistaken to think that the ability to read and write code is a necessary requirement to access this alternative technological world. In fact, open source should be understood in its broader sense of open knowledge. Should one wish, everyone can contribute in many ways such as by sharing, translating and editing instructions, creating tutorials and engaging with the ethical issues at stake in our technological society. Contrary to how things were 30 years ago, open source software is today as user-friendly and good-looking as any other proprietary and close-source counterpart. The ability to read and write code is certainly useful, but not necessary when using open source alternatives.

  • Open source: Vatican wartime archives ready for new batch of scholars

    After decades of anticipation, the Vatican archives are ready to welcome, starting March 2, scores of scholars wishing to study documents related to the wartime pontificate of Pope Pius XII.

  • How open-source code could help us survive natural disasters

    In November 2019, while on a trip to Australia to discuss the power of technology to make a difference in the aftermath of natural disasters, I saw firsthand the devastation caused by historic bushfires raging throughout the country.

    Sadly, devastating bushfires are still burning on the continent, putting more and more lives at risk and destroying entire communities. As the fires persist, the smoke in Sydney and elsewhere has rendered the air quality “hazardous.” There’s been a national spike in hospital visits, many to treat breathing problems.

    Unfortunately, Australia is not alone in being ravaged by natural disaster.

  • Textbooks are pricey. So students are getting creative.
  • HP remotely disables customer’s printer until he joins monthly subscription

    Just because you buy a product doesn't mean you actually own it; that's the new normal that the advancement of technology has been slowly establishing over the past decades. Corporations look after themselves by using copyright protections such as digital rights management, DRM, but in this process, consumers' rights are often restricted to an absurd degree.

    For example – as Ryan Sullivan has discovered and then shared on Twitter – HP will disable ink cartridges in your (or, it would seem, their) printers if you stop paying a monthly subscription for a service that's known as HP Instant Ink.

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • [Ubuntu] Design and Web team summary – 17 January 2020

    The second iteration of this year is the last one before our mid-cycle sprint next week.

    Here’s a short summary of the work the squads in the Web & Design team completed in the last 2-week iteration.

  • 5 key steps to take your IoT device to market

    IoT businesses are notoriously difficult to get off the ground. No matter how good your product is or how good your team is, some of the biggest problems you will face are just in getting to market and maintaining your devices once they’re in the field. The webinar will take a look at how Canonical’s Brand Store product allows you to get to market while catering for long term problems and the need to keep your product up to date in the future.

    More specifically, this webinar will look at the common problems we see organisations facing on their way to getting an IoT device to market, and cover five key steps to solve these problems. Along the way we will dig a little into serval case studies Canonical has done with various customers and partners to show you what has already been achieved with these solutions.

  • Fake cases — make sure yours is the real deal

    We’ve had some reports of people finding cases that pretend to be official Raspberry Pi products online — these are fakes, they’re violating our trademark, they’re not made very well, and they’re costing you and us money that would otherwise go to fund the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s charitable work. (Reminder, for those who are new to this stuff: we’re a not-for-profit, which means that every penny we makes goes to support our work in education, and that none of us gets to own a yacht.)

  • Let’s Talk With Neal Gompa of Fedora @ openSUSE Conference

    In this episode of Let’s Talk, we sat down with Neal Gompa of the Fedora community at openSUSE Conference

  • FOSSCOMM 2019 aftermath

    FOSSCOMM (Free and Open Source Software Communities Meeting) is a Greek conference aiming at free-software and open-source enthusiasts, developers, and communities. This year was held at Lamia from October 11 to October 13.

    It is a tradition for me to attend this conference. Usually, I have presentations and of course, booths to inform the attendees about the projects I represent.

    This year the structure of the conference was kind of different. Usually, the conference starts on Friday with a "beer event". Now it started with registration and a presentation. Personally, I made my plan to leave Thessaloniki by bus. It took me about 4 hours on the road. So when I arrived, I went to my hotel and then waited for Pantelis to go to University and set up our booths.

  • Fugue open sources Regula to evaluate Terraform for security misconfigurations and compliance violations

    Regula rules are written in Rego, the open source policy language employed by the Open Policy Agent project and can be integrated into CI/CD pipelines to prevent cloud infrastructure deployments that may violate security and compliance best practices.

    “Developers design, build, and modify their own cloud infrastructure environments, and they increasingly own the security and compliance of that infrastructure,” said Josh Stella, co-founder and CTO of Fugue.

    “Fugue builds solutions that empower engineers operating in secure and regulated cloud environments, and Regula quickly and easily checks that their Terraform scripts don’t violate policy—before they deploy infrastructure.”

  • Finance goes agile as open source checks the security box

    “At Northwestern Mutual, we’ve finally gotten past that curve,” said Sean Corkum (pictured, right), senior engineer at Northwestern Mutual. “Now we’re trying to make it even easier for our internal developers to participate in open source … and contribute more to the community.”

  • Top NLP Open Source Projects For Developers In 2020
  • Kiwi TCMS: Project roadmap 2020

    Hello testers, the Kiwi TCMS team sat down together last week and talked about what we feel is important for us during the upcoming year. This blog post outlines our roadmap for 2020!

  • Shift on Stack: api_port failure
  • How To Git Commit With Message

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • When Kickstarter goes wrong for indie games: Drift Stage

    A lot of the time Kickstarter (and other crowdfunding services) for indie games goes well, in fact the vast majority of the time all is fine. Sometimes though, everything breaks down as is the case with Drift Stage.

    Drift Stage was successfully funded on Kickstarter back in February of 2015, with a reasonable sum (compared with other projects) of $57,720 to make their modern take on retro racing a reality. Over the years, they released multiple demo versions and showed it off at Minecon (the Minecraft convention) in 2016 which you can still find a demo of here on itch.io and all seemed well on the surface.

    Time went on, backers noticed a lack of new details and progress on it with many trying to find out what was actually going on. In December of 2018, the Artist on the project Charles "DelkoDuck" Blanchard posted on Steam to finally clear it up and it wasn't good. The programmer and co-creator, Chase Pettit, apparently did a bit of a disappearing act, becoming hard to get in contact with and claimed they were just too busy for it.

  • Open-world puzzler 'Bonfire Peaks' has you climb mysterious ruins and set fire to your belongings

    Arriving with Linux support on May 5, from the developer of Pipe Push Paradise and Hiding Spot is the open-world puzzle game Bonfire Peaks.

    Not much info on it yet, with it only just being announced. From what the developer said it's a "difficult open world puzzle game about climbing mysterious ruins and setting fire to your belongings" that's being made in Unity. They do at least have a trailer up you can see below:

  • Running for the openSUSE Board again or: reelect (Sarah);

    I was in the openSUSE Board for 2 years in the past and I have enjoyed this time to bring along the openSUSE project.

    I want to run for the openSUSE Board again after a short break about 1 year. I am happy that the existing openSUSE Board has proceeded my idea with the foundation so successfully. But I would be happy about being allowed to finalize this/ my topic together with the other Board Members as my old idea.
    Additionally, I have watched the decreasing reputation. Public representations of openSUSE have been missing by the openSUSE Board in the last year. I would increase that on the same way I have done that at our university.

  • Top Open Source Machine Learning Tools

    Google, Facebook, IBM, Microsoft and other tech giants including renowned developers have already taken a nimble step towards the Machine learning and Artificial intelligence to make the dream of human beings of creating a highly intelligent machine. And to armed others to partake in this journey of building a conscious machine for the future, there are quite a good number of open source tools avail by tech giants to integrate artificial intelligence into applications.

    Yet, the artificial intelligence and machine learning are at very early stage, so don?t expect something like some sci-fi movie, however developers those are into AI and ML can use the open-source software we are going to discuss for writing apps for better speech recognition, Image recognization, Voice assistance, developing a neural network and more? Take a look at some of the most popular open-source solutions.

  • A day in the life at SUSECON 2020. Here’s what to expect!

    We are roughly about 9 weeks out from SUSECON 2020 taking place in Dublin, Ireland! Wondering what you can expect from this years event? I’ve got you covered!

    Plan to be inspired by keynotes, 150+ breakout sessions and more certification opportunities than ever before! Expect the latest innovations in Linux, Ceph, Cloud Foundry, and a host of other great open source technologies now available from SUSE and from our technology partners. You can also plan to network with open source technologists and experts in their field, gain new skills in our deep dive hands-on technical sessions and gain insight through talking with peers. Your SUSECON pass brings you the best content and value of any conference in the industry, from hands-on training to complimentary certifications to meeting with experts — it’s all here!

  • Daniel Stenberg: You’re invited to curl up 2020: Berlin

    curl up is the main (and only?) event of the year where curl developers and enthusiasts get together physically in a room for a full weekend of presentations and discussions on topics that are centered around curl and its related technologies.

    We move the event around to different countries every year to accommodate different crowds better and worse every year – and this time we’re back again in Germany – where we once started the curl up series back in 2017.

    The events are typically small with a very friendly spirit. 20-30 persons

  • Kiwi TCMS 7.3

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 7.3!

    IMPORTANT: this is a critical security update for CVE-2019-19844: Potential account hijack via password reset form!

    Also migrates to Django 3.0 and includes several other improvement and bug-fixes!

  •  

  • WordPress Leaders Nominated for CMX Awards

    Two members of the WordPress leadership team were nominated for excellent work in their field in the first ever Community Industry Awards. Andrea Middleton is nominated for Executive Leader of a Community Team and Josepha Haden Chomphosy is nominated for Community Professional of the Year.

    [...]

    Andrea has been a vital community strategist for the WordPress project since 2011. Her work to build and support a vibrant community has played a part in the success around the popular open source CMS. Her work is sponsored by Automattic, where she leads a team that focuses on educational efforts, funding, and in-person community-driven events that serve a global base.

    Josepha has been the Executive Director of the WordPress project since 2019. Her work to coordinate and guide volunteer efforts spans 20 teams and involves thousands of volunteers. Her work is also sponsored by Automattic, where she leads the open source division that focuses on all aspects of open source contribution including design, development, volunteer engagement, and the health of the overall WordPress ecosystem.

  • Schneier: "It's really too late to secure 5G networks"

    Schneier points to a variety of factors contributing to 5G's intrinsic, irreparable unsuitability: first, the US government pushed for weaker security in order to ensure that it could conduct domestic surveillance; the standards themselves are so complex as to be impossible to implement securely; and the system calls for software running on dynamically configurable hardware, which "dramatically increases the points vulnerable to attack."

    Moreover, 5G is backwards compatible with earlier protocols, inheriting all their insecurities, and generating new ones where these protocols' weak spots can be chained together to create attacks that each protocol was, in and of itself immune to, but which the system remains vulnerable to.

  • The trouble with IPv6 extension headers

    It has taken longer than anybody might have liked, but the IPv6 protocol is slowly displacing IPv4 across the Internet. A quick, highly scientific "grep the access logs" test shows that about 16% of the traffic to LWN.net is currently using IPv6, and many large corporate networks are using IPv6 exclusively internally. This version of the IP protocol was designed to be more flexible than IPv4 in a number of ways; the "extension header" mechanism is one way in which that flexibility is achieved. A proposal to formalize extension-header processing in the kernel's networking stack has led to some concerns, though, about how this feature will be used and what role Linux should play in its development.
    In both versions of the IP protocol, the header of each packet contains a collection of information about how the packet is to be handled; at a minimum, it contains source and destination addresses and a higher-level protocol number. In IPv4, the contents of the header are rigidly specified; it is difficult to add new types of information to the header. When IPv6 was designed, extension headers were added as a way to (relatively) easily add new information in the future.

    A few extension header types are defined in RFC8200 (which describes IPv6). Two of particular interest are the "Hop-by-Hop" and "Destination" headers; the former is meant to be acted upon by every system that handles the packet, while the latter is only for the destination node's attention. These headers may contain one or more options, each encoded in a type-length-value (TLV) format. RFC8200 only defines a couple of options that insert padding into the header, but there is interest in adding a number of others.

    For example, In-situ Operations, Administration, and Maintenance options are meant to allow providers to collect telemetry information on packets passing through their networks. The Path MTU mechanism uses a Hop-by-Hop option to discover the maximum packet size a path can handle. Firewall and Service Tickets (FAST) are a Hop-by-Hop option that documents a packet's right to traverse a network or pass through a firewall. The Segment Routing options allows a packet to contain the path it should take through a network. And so on.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tesla Is Making Use Of The Open-Source Coreboot Within Their Electric Vehicles

    Not only is Linux increasingly used within automobiles but it turns out at least one automobile manufacturer is even using Coreboot within their vehicles.

    Tesla turns out to be utilizing Coreboot as part of their electric vehicle computer systems. Tesla Motors' open-source portal on GitHub is hosting a Coreboot repository with a big code drop having happened at the start of the new year.

    The new code added on top of the Coreboot source tree is from Tesla Motors and Samsung. Samsung manufacturers the company's current full self-driving (FSD) chip.

  • Boostnote – A Note Taking and Markdown Editor Made for Coders

    Boostnote is a 100% open-source, multi-platform Markdown editor and note-taking application designed for developers. Of course, non-programmers can use it without any technical requirements in order to take advantage of all its modern features which include full Markdown editing (with live preview) and Latex support.

    [...]

    Apart from the above-listed features, you can use hotkeys to quickly navigate through the app and search for notes among other quick actions. The tab or spacebars can be customized to your taste and you can export notes as either plain text (.txt) or markdown (.md).

    [...]

    Boostnote is open-source but that doesn’t stop it from having a paid version. The Basic version is free with 100MB cloud storage space while the Premium version features 2GB of cloud storage space for a fee of $3/month and $5 for every extra 5GB.

  • Oracle Groundbreakers Podcast: #374: Kubernetes and Beyond: An Interview with Kelsey Hightower

    Kelsey Hightower is a developer advocate, an open source aficionado, and a widely recognized expert on Kubernetes. He is the creator of the open source tutorial Kubernetes The Hard Way, available on Github, and he is a co-author of Kubernetes: Up and Running: Dive Into the Future of Infrastructure, the second edition of which is now available from O’Reilly Media. In this program his conversation with Oracle's Karthik Gaekwad encompasses Kubernetes, Open Source, cloud computing, developer advocacy and a lot more. Listen!

  • Unboxing of the Kubuntu Focus Laptop

    I got a chance to review the Kubuntu Focus laptop and this is the Unboxing and First Impressions video for it.

  • Kaby Lake edge AI system features Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080

    Ibase’s Ubuntu-ready “EC-7100” edge AI computer combines a 7th Gen Intel Core i7 with Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics. The system offers 2x M.2, mini-PCIe, 2x SATA 3.0, 4x DP, 4x USB 3.0, and up to 3x GbE ports.

    The EC-7100 is another example of the trend of adding discrete graphics cards to embedded systems to enable edge AI or high-end graphics applications. Ibase previously combined an Intel 7th Gen Kaby Laky CPU with an Nvidia MXM NV1050 graphics card in its SI-614 signage player to enable up to 4x 4K DisplayPort displays. With the EC-7100, Ibase has paired Kaby Lake with a much more powerful Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 card for AI applications. One similar system that supports the GTX 1080 is Neousys’ Intel Coffee Lake based Nuvo-8208GC.

  • Can algorithms be unethical?

    At Raspberry Pi, we’re interested in all things to do with technology, from building new tools and helping people teach computing, to researching how young people learn to create with technology and thinking about the role tech plays in our lives and society. One of the aspects of technology I myself have been thinking about recently is algorithms.

  • Best WordPress Search Plugins to Improve Your Site Search

    Are you running a multilingual WordPress website? we published an article on the best translation plugins for multilingual websites and you can improve the user experience of your site visitors who contact you using the world’s best WordPress contact form plugin. Evidently, we’re interested in boosting your WordPress experience and today we’re back with another set of plugin recommendations.

    WordPress installs with the basic setup required to run your business nicely but as you must know by now, there are 3rd party plugins that can boost its effectiveness and this is no different for the content management system’s default search.

    Yes, it works to return a result of selected text in posts and pages but the WordPress search function can do a lot more complex things than that e.g. you can search for strings of texts in PDFs, you can filter search results for specific custom post types, etc.

    If you’re interested in boosting your WordPress search functionality then today’s your lucky day because here are the best WordPress search plugins for your website listed in alphabetic order.

  • Strategic approaches to the development of digital literacies

    I’m in Kuwait City today, leading a pre-conference workshop for the AMICAL consortium of American international liberal arts institutions, who work together on common goals for libraries, technology and learning.

    This isn’t a ‘tools’ session but rather, as the title would suggest, a strategic look at developing digital literacies strategically across institutions.

  • Why everyone is talking about WebAssembly

    If you haven’t heard of WebAssembly yet, then you will soon. It’s one of the industry’s best-kept secrets, but it’s everywhere. It’s supported by all the major browsers, and it’s coming to the server-side, too. It’s fast. It’s being used for gaming. It’s an open World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the main international standards organization for the web, standard. It’s platform-neutral and can run on Linux, Macs, and Windows.

    "Wow," you may be saying, "this sounds like something I should learn to code in!" You’d be right, but you’d be wrong too; you don’t code in WebAssembly. Let’s take some time to learn about the technology that’s often fondly abbreviated to "Wasm."

  • Apple App Review: resistance is futile!

    Apple: “Computer says… blub-blub-blub’”

  • Apple App Review says “maybe”: the whims of trillion-dollar gatekeepers

    Yesterday, I wrote about how Apple’s refusal to update a couple of fields in their database has impacted the future of Better Blocker, the tracker blocker that Laura and I build at our tiny two-person not-for-profit, Small Technology Foundation.

    I also shared our plan for dealing with this situation.

    Yesterday, we were at Step 3 of our plan. We’d submitted the version 2020.1 updates to Better for macOS and iOS from our old developer account and we were waiting for Apple to approve them.

    Today, we are half-at step 4 because Apple has approved the macOS app and rejected the iOS app.

  • Linux Bonus Pack Makes SAP Hana Movers Happy

    More and more SAP customers are opting for Hana (and consequently Linux) and ERP successor S/4. According to a new forecast by German-speaking SAP user group DSAG, the percentage of existing customers using S/4 will continue to increase in the next three years – from currently 8 percent to then 50 percent.

    These numbers are impressive, and they are not even taking new customers into account. Numerous companies of all sizes and industries will also switch to SAP and S/4 in the next couple of years.

    [...]

    This company is a supplier operating in the construction industry. On the road to S/4, this company migrated its SAP systems (ECC, APO, TM and PI) to Hana with Suse Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications from its existing infrastructure with DB2, Power hardware and Power VM and AIX.

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More in Tux Machines

LibreOffice 6.4.3 Release Candidate Version 1 Released Today!

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Unifont 13.0.01 Released

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Programming: micro.sth, RProtoBuf, Perl and Python

  • Introducing micro.sth

    Many developers turn their noses up at PHP, but I have a soft spot for it. For me, it's the most approachable programming language by far. It feels intuitive in a way no other languages do, and it makes it possible to cobble together a working application with just a handful of lines of code. So whenever I can't find a tool for a specific job, I try to build one myself. The latest project of mine is a case in point. I was looking for a simple application for keeping a photographic diary, and I was sure that I'd be able to find an open-source tool for that. I searched high and low, but I came back empty-handed. Sure, there are plenty of static website generators, but I'd prefer something that doesn't require me to perform the write-generate-upload dance every time I want to post a quick update. And I need something that I can use not only to maintain a simple diary, but also store notes, manage tasks, and draft articles -- all this without getting bogged down by configuring templates, defining categories, and tweaking settings. And because I want most of my content to be private, I should be able to protect access to it with a password.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RProtoBuf 0.4.17: Robustified

    A new release 0.4.17 of RProtoBuf is now on CRAN. RProtoBuf provides R with bindings for the Google Protocol Buffers (“ProtoBuf”) data encoding and serialization library used and released by Google, and deployed very widely in numerous projects as a language and operating-system agnostic protocol. This release contains small polishes related to the release 0.4.16 which added JSON support for messages, and switched to ByteSizeLong. This release now makes sure JSON functionality is only tested where available (on version 3 of the Protocol Buffers library), and that ByteSizeLong is only called where available (version 3.6.0 or later). Of course, older versions build as before and remain fully supported.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 53: Rotate Matrix and Vowel Strings

    These are some answers to the Week 53 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxi) stackoverflow python report
  • Python: Is And ==

    In Python, == compares the value of two variables and returns True as long as the values are equal.

today's howtos