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Misc

How ProPublica Illinois Uses GNU Make to Load 1.4GB of Data Every Day

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GNU
Misc

I avoided using GNU Make in my data journalism work for a long time, partly because the documentation was so obtuse that I couldn’t see how Make, one of many extract-transform-load (ETL) processes, could help my day-to-day data reporting. But this year, to build The Money Game, I needed to load 1.4GB of Illinois political contribution and spending data every day, and the ETL process was taking hours, so I gave Make another chance.

Now the same process takes less than 30 minutes.

Here’s how it all works, but if you want to skip directly to the code, we’ve open-sourced it here.

[...]

GNU Make is well-suited to this task. Make’s model is built around describing the output files your ETL process should produce and the operations required to go from a set of original source files to a set of output files.

As with any ETL process, the goal is to preserve your original data, keep operations atomic and provide a simple and repeatable process that can be run over and over.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • VK_KHR_8bit_storage Gets Wired Into Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver, Patches Available

    One of three new Vulkan extensions introduced in this weekend's Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update is VK_KHR_8bit_storage for providing 8-bit types is now available in patch form for the Intel open-source "ANV" Vulkan Linux driver.

  • Arch monthly June

    The Arch Archive has been cleaned up, the discussion started in this mail thread. The archive server was running out of space and therefore needed some cleaning, all packages which are not required for reproducible builds where removed (and where from 2013/2014/2015). Packages from these years should also be available at the internet archive.

  • What Really Matters? – Darden Restaurants, Inc. (DRI), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?
  • What is the most supported MIME type in Debian in 2018?

    Five years ago, I measured what the most supported MIME type in Debian was, by analysing the desktop files in all packages in the archive. Since then, the DEP-11 AppStream system has been put into production, making the task a lot easier. This made me want to repeat the measurement, to see how much things changed.

  • Raspberry Pi’s Own App Store Is The Newest Reason To Love This Mini Computer

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation keeps updating its Debian-based Raspbian operating system from time to time. The developers keep adding new features to make the device a more attractive option for beginners who wish to start learning programming or get into DIYing.

    The latest Raspbian update brings a bunch of new features and updates. First things first, this release ships with a new program called “Recommended Software”; the developers are calling it their version of Apple App Store.

  • Shared-Mode Executables in L4Re for MIPS-Based Devices

    I have been meaning to write about my device driver experiments with L4Re, following on from my porting exercises, but that exercise took me along various routes and I haven’t yet got back to documenting all of them. Meanwhile, one thing that did start to bother me was how much space the software was taking up when compiled, linked and ready to deploy.

    Since each of my device drivers is a separate program, and since each one may be linked to various libraries, they each started to contribute substantially to the size of the resulting file – the payload – needing to be transferred to the device. At one point, I had to resize the boot partition on the memory card used by the Letux 400 notebook computer to make the payload fit in the available space.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 Mobile Workstations with Ubuntu Preinstalled Now Available, Linux Ultimate Gamers Edition Launched Its 5.8 ISO, Feral's GameMode Coming Soon to Fedora, CentOS 6.10 Released, Security Upgrades for Ubuntu and More

    The Mobile Workstations are powered by the latest Intel Core or Xeon processors, and "feature blazing-fast RAM, professional AMD or Nvidia graphics cards, and are certified for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system". Prices for the "world's most powerful 15" and 17" laptops with Ubuntu pre-installed" begin at $1,091.14 for the 7530 and $1,371.37 for the 7730.

  • Meet the founder of Linux Weekly News

    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report.

  • RandR Lease Support Appears Ready For AMDGPU X.Org Driver

    RADEON --
    Keith Packard doing his contract work for Valve to improve the Linux display infrastructure for VR head-mounted displays has been wrapping up his efforts with recently landing the Vulkan bits into Mesa and now the necessary xf86-video-amdgpu patches also are set to be merged there in the days ahead.

    The bits touching the xf86-video-amdgpu X.Org driver are for handling RandR lease support. The CRTC/output leases are handled through the modesetting DDX and is for allowing the SteamVR compositor (or other compositors) to have exclusive access to the display/output of the VR HMD without the conventional desktop compositors getting in the way. As part of the xf86-video-amdgpu patches is also the tracking of "non-desktop" properties such as is currently quirked in the kernel for the HTC Vive VR headset so it won't be setup as a conventional desktop output.

  • Best Easy To Use Linux Firewalls

    Have you ever wondered whether Linux is strong enough to secure your system? This is a frequently asked question especially for those starting out with Linux. The answer is yes. But the second consideration here narrows down to, what is your experience level with Linux if you can configure some of its firewalls or just the capability to use these firewalls which sometimes can be a nut to crack.

  •  

  • How to Run Windows Apps on Android with Wine

    Wine (on Linux, not the one you drink) is a free and open-source compatibility layer for running Windows programs on Unix-like operating systems. Begun in 1993, it could run a wide variety of Windows programs on Linux and macOS, although sometimes with modification. Now the Wine Project has rolled out version 3.0 which is compatible with your Android devices.

  • The latest Humble Monthly has The Escapists 2 and new games in the Humble Trove

    For those looking for some extra games to pass the time during the hot summer months, the new Humble Monthly once again has some Linux offerings.

  • GSoC :: Coding Period – Phase One (June 13th to July 7th): Font color implementation in Poppler and Okular

    As per the agreed timeline, I have patched the poppler-qt5 with the font color by introducing the ‘rg’ operator in the GooString which formats the font color in the RGB color model. The signature of setTextFont function is changed to pass both the QFont and the QColor arguments. In Okular, the font color chooser is introduced in the typewriter annotation setting dialogue which sets both the text annotation’s color and the engine color and hence colorize the typewriter icon color accordingly. The generator side and the doctype XML metadata for saving text color are also adapted. It is well supported in PagePainter too. The review comments (if any) from my mentor, Tobias Deiminger, is yet to come.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Is Approaching With DNF/RPM4, KDE Plasma 5.13, Linux 4.17~4.18

    It has been nearly two years since the debut of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, but fortunately it's soon going to be succeeded by OpenMandriva Lx 4.0.

  • [Slackware] June/July Updates

    It's been a month since my last post about SBo DMCA Takedown, and i wanted to share some updates in the Slackware development progress. It has been an amazing progress and most of my wishlist (from one year ago) have been realized, while two remaining.

    The recent upgrade in Slackware brought GCC 8.1, the latest major release of GNU C Compiler. It brings new language features as well as better code optimizations, BUT it also comes with a stricter rules (which might affects scripts in the SBo projects). Amazingly Pat has stated that all packages have been tested for build failures against this new version of compiler.

  • AWS, HPE, Red Hat on 8 secrets of customer success with your SaaS vendor
  • Will you bet on these, Brighthouse Financial, Inc. (BHF), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • In which scenario Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) and Associated Banc-Corp (ASB) are Trading Now?
  • Snooping passwords from literally hot keys, China's AK-47 laser, malware, and more

    Canonical has issued a rash of new security patches for its Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution – updates that should be installed as soon as possible.

    Not all of these fixes are alike. If you're running a system with an AMD processor, one patch removes an earlier update that was supposed to address the Spectre CPU vulnerability. That microcode-level mitigation left some AMD-powered systems unable to boot, and now has been given the boot from Ubuntu Linux computers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Red Hat Reinforces Commitment to Asia Pacific Partner Ecosystem
  • Which Stock will you hold for a while, Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) or Chubb Limited (CB)
  • The Strategy to Trade Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in June 2018

    This month I accepted 166 packages and rejected only 7 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 216.

  • Coffee Lake module features shock and vibration resistance

    Adlink’s rugged “Express CF/CFE” COM Express Basic Type 6 integrates an 8th Gen Core or Xeon chip with up to 48GB RAM and loads of SATA, USB 3.1, and PCIe. There’s also a carrier board with a Live Linux USB stick.

  • How To Send SMS From Your PC Using Android Messages?
  • Google patents new AI-driven fitness feature for its Wear OS platform

    There's not much happening in the wearables market right now but that doesn't mean companies aren't working on something behind the scenes. A new patent by Google was unearthed giving us a sneak peek of what the tech giant is preparing for its future Wear OS release.

  • Using Android without Google: A (Kind of) Guide

    If you’re interested in using Android but don’t want all the Googly-ness of it, there are ways to go completely Google-free. With the right set of tools, you can have a truly open Android experience.

  • Reply: open data is 'intellectual infrastructure'

    According to Jason Hill, Executive Partner from Reply, open data is as it sounds – open and accessible data that is available to anyone.

    Hill further states that open data must be interoperable so it can be shared, adapted and reused with other datasets.

  • Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 18

    If you follow the desktop 3D printer market, it probably won’t surprise you to hear that nearly every 3D printer on display at the inaugural East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) was made in China. Even Printrbot CEO Brook Drumm had to admit that this was the year his company may finally bite the bullet and begin selling a branded and customized printer built overseas.

  • My First Clang Bug

    Part of the role of being a packager is compiling lots (and lots) of packages. That means compiling lots of code from interesting places and in a variety of styles. In my opinion, being a good packager also means providing feedback to upstream when things are bad. That means filing upstream bugs when possible, and upstreaming patches.

    One of the “exciting” moments in packaging is when tools change. So each and every major CMake update is an exercise in recompiling 2400 or more packages and adjusting bits and pieces. When a software project was last released in 2013, adjusting it to modern tools can become quite a chore (e.g. Squid Report Generator). CMake is excellent for maintaining backwards compatibility, generally accomodating old software with new policies. The most recent 3.12 release candidate had three issues filed from the FreeBSD side, all from fallout with older software.  I consider the hours put into good bug reports, part of being a good citizen of the Free Software world.

  • WordPress 4.9.7 Update Fixes a Pair of Security Vulnerabilities

    WordPress 4.9.7 was released on July 5, providing users of the popular open-source content management system with patches for a pair of security vulnerabilities.

    The security vulnerabilities are both arbitrary file deletion issues that could expose WordPress sites to risk. The first issue was publicly reported on June 26, by researchers at RIPS Tech, while the second was discovered by WordPress security firm WordFence on July 2. In addition to the two vulnerabilities, WordPress 4.9.7 provides fixes for 17 other bugs to help improve stability.

  • Keyboard Attack “Thermanator” Steals Your Passwords Using Body Heat [Ed: Likely BS. Here's why: 1) body might not be warm enough. 2) need big equipment. 3) don't know order of strokes. 4) already have physical access anyway. 5) more keystrokes after password entry.]

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • They grow up so fast: Spam magnet Hotmail turned 22 today

    The migration to Microsoft's platform took a while, with an impossibly young Andrew Orlowski writing in The Register at the end of 2001 that Hotmail still ran on Unix. Windows Server 2000 dealt with front edge duties.

    While Microsoft fiddled with Hotmail, competition arrived in the form of Yahoo! Mail in 1997 and the all-conquering GMail from Google in 2004. Hotmail, however, had other problems with which to contend.

  • Supercomputer Market Analysis by Type (Linux, Unix), by Application (Commercial Industries, Research Institutions), and Technological Growth Predication to 2023
  • OpenGL 4.5 Compat Being Worked On For RadeonSI, Helping Out No Man's Sky & Others

    What does Valve's Linux GPU driver developer Timothy Arceri do now that he took the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver up to OpenGL 4.4 in its compatibility profile mode? Work on OpenGL 4.5 compatibility profile support, of course.

    While the recent effort from taking the OpenGL compatibility profile mode in RadeonSI from OpenGL 3.1 to OpenGL 4.4 means a great deal of more games/applications are now working with this open-source Radeon GCN OpenGL driver, Arceri is working on OpenGL 4.5 support for this context that allows deprecated OpenGL features to still be mixed in with newer versions of OpenGL.

  • Slack didn’t kill email — and it might have made it stronger

    At many workplaces, if you’re at work, you’re also expected to be available on Slack. For some people, that means the thing that “replaced” email is something much more demanding.

  • Easy ARIA tip #8: Use aria-roledescription to selectively enhance the user experience
  • Gnome: execute a script at login
  • Kdenlive: "Test our beta, test the future"

    Apart from re-writing a lot of the internals to clean up the code and make Kdenlive more efficient and easier to stabilize, this beta adds a bunch of new and interesting features. For example, the video and audio from clips are now automatically separated when dropped in the timeline, the slow motion effect now works and insert/lift/overwrite should also work reliably. Another thing you can do is install new keyboard layouts with one click. This means that, if you are coming from another video-editing software and relied on its shortcuts, you can still be equally productive with Kdenlive. For a full list of the new features in Kdenlive 18.08 Beta 17, take a look at the article on the projects site.

  • Krita, GNOME Builder, FFmpeg Get Updates in Tumbleweed

    The four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week are trending quite stable as new major version packages have been updated this week.

    Among the packages updates this week were FFmpeg, KDE Plasma, GNOME Builder and Krita along with a kernel update.

    The most recent snapshot, 20180702, put out the first update ffmpeg 4.0 with a refresh of patches and an enablement for ffnvcodec when building with NVIDIA support. The snapshot brought about another 4.0 version with checkmedia upgrading from 3.8 to the new 4.0 version. The tools and libraries package to work with Extensible Firmware Interface variables, efivar, had a major update as well and adjusted its libefiboot-export-disk_get_partition_info.patch to work with the new 36 version. That wasn’t the last major version update either. The package for userspace components for the Linux Kernel‘s drivers/infiniband subsystem, rdma-core, updated to version 18.1; the new major version fixed compilations with recent glibc. Among the other packages in the snapshot there were updated were spec-cleaner 1.1.0, brotli 1.0.5 and System Security Services Daemon (sssd) 1.16.2.

  • Mageia Final Call for RMLL, the Wiki and a Roundup

    Final Call for RMLL volunteers RMLL/LSM

    Mageia will be present with a stand in at RMLL in Strasbourg, but we have very few volunteers who have put their names down for the stand: https://framadate.org/dbLxWJPnci6o6aqb If you’re going to be there, please go to that signup page and let us know – RMLL starts this coming Saturday, so we need you urgently!

  • Raphael Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in June 2018

    I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Git Your July 2018 Issue of Linux Journal: Now Available
  • Docker Compose

    I glanced back over my shoulder to see the Director approaching. Zhe stood next to me, watched me intently for a few moments, before turning and looking out at the scape. The water was preturnaturally calm, above it only clear blue. A number of dark, almost formless, shapes were slowly moving back and forth beneath the surface.

    "Is everything in readiness?" zhe queried, sounding both impatient and resigned at the same time. "And will it work?" zhe added. My predecessor, and zir predecessor before zem, had attempted to reach the same goal now set for myself.

    "I believe so" I responded, sounding perhaps slightly more confident than I felt. "All the preparations have been made, everything is in accordance with what has been written". The director nodded, zir face pinched, with worry writ across it.

    I closed my eyes, took a deep breath, opened them, raised my hand and focussed on the scape, until it seemed to me that my hand was almost floating on the water. With all of my strength of will I formed the incantation, repeating it over and over in my mind until I was sure that I was ready. I released it into the scape and dropped my arm.

    The water began to churn, the blue above darkening rapidly, becoming streaked with grey. The shapes beneath the water picked up speed and started to grow, before resolving to what appeared to be stylised Earth whales. Huge arcs of electricity speared the water, a screaming, crashing, wall of sound rolled over us as we watched, a foundation rose up from the depths on the backs of the whale-like shapes wherever the lightning struck.

  • More Intel ARB_gl_spirv Code Lands In Mesa, But Still Not Ready To Finish Up OpenGL 4.6

    The end of July marks one year since the release of OpenGL 4.6 but sadly it doesn't look like the Mesa drivers will meet that anniversary for having working open-source OpenGL 4.6 compliance in the mainline Mesa code-base.

    As has been the case for months, the Intel "i965" OpenGL driver and the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver have been blocked from OpenGL 4.6 due to pending ABR_gl_spirv / ARB_spirv_extensions work. They have long ago completed the other OpenGL 4.6 extensions, but this big addition that allows SPIR-V to be used now within OpenGL has been a big undertaking for the open-source OpenGL drivers.

  • YouTube Music Support Arrives in Google Play Music Desktop Player

    You might have heard about YouTube Music, Google’s latest effort at creating a music streaming service able to rival Spotify and Apple Music.

    Anyone with a Google account can search for and listen to music on new service through their web browser, just like regular YouTube.

    But there’s a flaw: Google don’t provide a YouTube Music app for the desktop, not on Windows, not on macOS and not on Linux — something that its bigger, badder, and far better-known competitors do.

  • My month in KWin/Wayland

    June has been a busy month in KWin, with me working on fixing remaining Wayland functionality and upcoming legend Vlad Zagorodniy working on polishing and cleaning up all the effects.

    In this blog I’ll talk about the more interesting bits of kwin work that I did during June.

  • Going to GUADEC

    Another year, another GUADEC, and here I am crossing oceans to see my fellow GNOMEies. This time, it’s going to be particularly challenging: 32 hours of travel, 4 connections, no vegan meal available. I heard GNOME are resilient folk though, perhaps this is the proving?

  • Bodhi Linux 5.0.0 Release Candidate

    Today I am very pleased to share the hard work of the Bodhi Team with our latest 5.0.0 pre-release disc which we are tagging as a “Release Candidate”. These disc images have no major issues that our team has been made aware of and will likely be fairly close to the images we will tag as a stable release later this Summer. Past providing our rock solid Moksha Desktop on an Ubuntu 18.04 base, these disc images are the first to feature our fresh new look which is a modified version of the popular “Arc Dark” theme colorized in Bodhi Green. Also included are a fresh default wall paper, login screen, and splash scenes as your system starts up.

  • Next DevNation Live: Feature toggles and hypothesis-driven development, July 5th, 12pm EDT

    Can you “foresee the feature?” Do you know if proposed changes to your application will have the desired impact to your business? Let’s drop the crystal ball approach and start practicing some hypothesis-driven development so you can test your assumptions. Not every new feature is guaranteed to be a success. Some might just waste time and increase your technical debt. Join us for the next online DevNation Live on July 5th at 12pm EDT for Feature Toggles and Hypothesis-driven Development, presented by Red Hat director of Developer Experience, Edson Yanaga.

  • An open wave of continuous change across the Midwest

    You hear it everywhere today, “every company is a technology company.” And it’s true. Technology is changing at a pace like never before, and the companies that learn to continually adapt to a changing technology landscape are the competitive enterprises of the future. Those that don’t are likely to lose out. We want to make sure you don’t lose out, and we’re taking our show on the road.

    As Forbes contributor Adrian Bridgwater noted recently, Red Hat aims to Fuse businesspeople into 'Citizen Integrators' by enabling “business users and developers alike to more rapidly integrate applications and services using more than 200 predefined connectors and components.” Business people of all disciplines are going to be getting more involved with code and the creation and management of the software systems that we use to run enterprise organizations.

  • Here is How To Play Bottom in Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), SS&C Technologies Holdings, Inc. (SSNC)
  • [Week 7] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek Sharma
  • Towards Debian Unstable builds on Debian Stable OBS

    Lately, I have been working towards triggering Debian Unstable builds with Debian OBS packages. As reported before, We can already build packages for both Debian 8 and 9 based on the example project configurations shipped with the package in Debian Stable and with the project configuration files publicly available on OBS SUSE instance.

  • Dell Adds Ubuntu as an OS Option on Two Developer’s Laptops

    Dell announced that fans of open-source operating systems can now order two more mobile workstations powered by Ubuntu out of the box. As of May 2018, the only laptop in the Precision Developer Edition series that users could order a GNU/Linux distro on was the 3530. Naturally, some people probably installed their own system software, but Dell has been hinting at increasing support for at least Ubuntu out of the box.

  • Beelink tries out a Linux-ready industrial mini-PC

    Beelink has launched a $150, Linux-compatible industrial mini-PC with extended temp support called the Beelink KT03. You get a quad-core Apollo Lake SoC, 2x mini-PCIe, 2x COM, 4x USB 3.0, 2x HDMI, and 2x GbE ports.

    Beelink sells a number of consumer oriented mini-PCs with pre-loaded Windows or Android, but the Beelink KT03 is the first barebone, industrial version we’ve seen. The Linux- and Windows-compatible system has launched on Gearbest for $150 without OS or RAM. You can load up to 8GB DDR3L using the single SODIMM slot.

  • HTC to lay off 1,500 employees from its Taiwan division in an effort to save money
  • Android P Beta 3 is now available

    Today we're rolling out Beta 3 of Android P, our next milestone in this year's Android P developer preview. With the developer APIs already finalized in the previous update, Beta 3 now takes us very close to what you'll see in the final version of Android P, due later this summer.

  • Google Officially Releases Android P Beta 3/DP4 With “Near Final” Changes

    About a month ago Google released the second public beta for Android P, and now it has launched the third one. Starting yesterday, Android P Beta 3 is now available for developers and those eager to taste the latest dessert.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • My first sysadmin mistake

    Fortunately, I'd run rm * and not rm -rf * so I'd deleted only files. The subdirectories were still there. But that didn't make me feel any better.

    Immediately, I went to my supervisor and told her what I'd done. She saw that I felt really dumb about my mistake, but I owned it. Despite the urgency, she took a few minutes to do some coaching with me. "You're not the first person to do this," she said. "What would someone else do in your situation?" That helped me calm down and focus. I started to think less about the stupid thing I had just done, and more about what I was going to do next.

    I put together a simple strategy: Don't reboot the server. Use an identical system as a template, and re-create the /etc directory.

  • Finding IT Professionals With SDN Skills Remains a Struggle

    With any major technology transition there is a gap between the time when the innovation is created and when there is a critical mass of IT professionals available with training and knowledge on how to deploy that state-of-the-art technology.

    Although software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) technology has been around for quite some time, network engineers are still reluctant to adopt the technology.

    Plus, there are many different technologies that make up the SDN/NFV ecosystem, which means there are a number of different technologies that require training, said Eric Hanselman, chief analyst for 451 Research. Without a dominant set of SDN and NFV technologies, network administrators are unsure what combination of technologies they need to master. And this comes at a time when network services are becoming more disaggregated, Hanselman noted.

    Plus, most companies are conservative when making major changes to their networks because if something goes wrong there is the potential for a ‘blast radius,’ which could become a huge problem, Hanselman said. “The entire scope of the endeavor can be huge,” he added.

  • Further Independence for SUSE

    If you’ve been keeping an eye on SUSE news, you’ll have seen that today we announced plans to partner with EQT, a development-focused growth investor with extensive experience in the software industry, in order to launch SUSE as a fully independent company. The completion of EQT’s acquisition of SUSE from Micro Focus is subject to Micro Focus shareholder and customary regulatory approvals and is expected to occur in early 2019.

  • SUSE Sold Off To Swedish Private Equity Fund

    It was just shy of four years that SUSE was effectively acquired by Micro Focus as yet another changing of the guard for this long-standing German enterprise Linux distribution. Now today it's been announced that a Swedish private equity fund will be acquiring SUSE.

  • Red Hat Shares ― Red Hat Summit 2018 recap special edition
  • AudioKit’s free and open-source Synth One looks better than many paid-for iPad instruments
  • The AudioKit Synth One is a pro-level iPad synth that’s completely free [Ed: It says "free and open-source", but it means gratis, not libre, and one needs a proprietary OS with built-in DRM to run the darn thing.]
  • The Legislative Disconnect Of The Meshed Society

    What is the “meshed society”? It is people, joined together by the Internet, able to interact — to collaborate, to create, to transact and to relate directly with each other — without the need for another person to mediate or authorise. As we discover more and more ways to disintermediate our interactions, society is transformed: from a series of hubs with privileged interconnecting spokes intermediating supply to consumers at their tips, into a constantly shifting meshed “adhocracy” of temporary connections, transactions and relationships of varying length. In the adhocracy, individuals play the roles of user, repurposer, maker, buyer, investor and collaborator in a constantly changing spectrum of combinations.

    [...]

    Over the last decade various legislative assemblies have built regulations in response to the Internet. I have been struck by the absence of any voice within the legislative process itself that speaks for my needs as an individual citizen in the meshed society of the 21st century. The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA), the Digital Economy Act (DEA), the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade agreement (ACTA), the Communications Data Bill (CDB), the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), the 2018 Copyright Directive — all appeared apparently from nowhere replete with terms that poison the Internet collaboration of creator-consumer citizens who are unable to fully participate in the lawmaking process.

  • Reps. Khanna and Ratcliffe: It’s Time to Modernize Government Websites

     

    The low scores resulted from a range of user issues, including the inability to get information, complete transactions, or schedule appointments with ease.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Google is Now a Platinum Member of The Linux Foundation

    oogle is now a Platinum member of The Linux Foundation. A long-time member of the non-profit organisation, Google has chosen to increase the amount of money it donates to the foundation from $100k a year to a massive $500k.

  • Coming Up: GUADEC 2018, Annual Report 2017 & Release Video 3.30

    GUADEC is coming up and I’m super excited for it! My hand luggage will be packed with socks and I plan on becoming a red shirt again this year, as is tradition. I can recommend volunteering to anyone who has tried attending GUADEC before, it is an excellent way to get to know some fellow conference attendees.

  • Your Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure questions answered

    In mid-2017, Red Hat Inc. entered the HCI market with the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure platform. Using the existing open source software in the Red Hat playbook, the company crafted a suite of products that enables customers to deploy HCI on existing hardware or hardware purchased specifically for a Red Hat HCI implementation.

    [...]

    One thing Red Hat has going for it is that its customer base is used to using open source software, including the company's own Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) OS. So, the benefit of easier management that comes with HCI appliances is less important than it might be to organizations not using Red Hat's products already.

  • Biz: How Red Hat's CEO's pay compares to his employees
  • Samsung Galaxy S9, Galaxy S8 & Note 8 Approved by the U.S. Department of Defense

    South Korean Samsung electronics company announced that several of its flagship devices have been recently approved by the Department of Defense (DoD) of the United States of America.

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) added the Samsung Galaxy S9, Samsung Galaxy S8, and Samsung Galaxy Note 8 smartphones running the Android 8.0 Oreo mobile operating system to the Approved Products List (APL), ensuring customers in the United States that these devices are safe to use for communication and everything else they need.

  • Firefox 61 for Android Fixes Recurring Crash on Samsung Galaxy S8 with Android 8

    Mozilla released the Firefox 61 web browser this week for desktops, including Windows, Linux, and Mac computers, but also for Android devices to bring better browsing for those who are always on the go.

    Firefox 61 for Android isn’t a major release, but a small maintenance update that brings a couple of performance improvements like faster scrolling by implementing a new functionality that treats touch event listeners as passive by default, and better page rendering times by improving the Quantum CSS component.

  • Deploy a VM in Amsterdam
  • Three Things Exciting Clear Linux Developers With GCC 8

    While Intel's Clear Linux platform has already been making use of GCC 8.1 since shortly after its release in early May, one of their developers has now published a blog post highlighting three performance and security features enjoyed and that helps benefit their performance-oriented Linux distribution.

    Victor Rodriguez Bahena of Intel wrote a blog post this week outlining three GCC 8 compiler improvements he finds important. Those features include improvements to interprocedural optimizations, Intel Control-flow Enforcement Technology (CET), and changes to loop nest optimization flags. The first and last items benefit the GCC performance of generated binaries while CET helps with security.

  • Rediscovering blindness products

    While in the early 2000s, cell phones were still mainly made accessible by specialized software, for example Talks or MobileSpeak for the Nokia S60 platform, or special devices such as the PAC Mate were created to bring mainstream operating systems onto special hardware with a screen reader added, the advance of iPhone and Android devices in the late 2000s brought a revolution for blind and visually impaired people. For the first time, accessibility was being built into the platform, and no special software or hardware was needed to operate these devices.

    [...]

    All good, or what? Well, I thought so, for a long time, too. I even sold some blindness-related products such as my first generation Victor Reader Stream by Humanware because I thought my iPhone and iPad could now fulfill all my needs. And for the most part, they do, but at a cost.

    And that cost is not, in most cases, technical in nature, but rather has to do with the sheer fact that the device I am running the app on is a mainstream device. Many of these problems are, in one form or another, also applicable to people who aren’t blind, but might impact them less than they do me.

    [...]

    One other problem that keeps me always on the edge when using mainstream devices are screen reader inconsistencies and inaccessible apps or websites. Any update to an app can break accessibility, any update to the OS can break certain screen reader behavior, or web content I might need or have to consume at a particular moment can prove to be inaccessible, requiring me to either fiddle around with screen reader tricks to kick it into obedience, or simply not being able to get something done at all. Yes, despite all web accessibility efforts, this is still more often the case in 2018 than any of us could want.

  • New macOS Cyberattack Focuses on Cryptocurrency Investors

    Digital criminals who are using a piece of macOS-based malware called OSX.Dummy seem to be targeting a group of cryptocurrency investors who use Discord as well as those who use Slack. OSX.Dummy isn’t a particularly sophisticated piece of software, but it does seem to allow arbitrary code execution on machines that it can get embedded into.

  • #BetaNews20 Giveaway: System76 Linux computer seller swag kit

    Today is July 1, meaning BetaNews' month-long birthday celebration is officially over. We still have some active giveaways, however -- be sure to use the below links to enter them.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft quietly cuts off Win7 support for older Intel computers

    If you have a Pentium III, for example, you may no longer be able to install Win7 Monthly Rollups or Security-only patches, in spite of Microsoft's promise to support you until January 2020. It’s all about SSE2 and some retroactively fudged documentation. Will anybody notice?

  • Tracy Rosenberg on ICE’s Corporate Collaborators, Patty Lovera on the Undercovered Farm Bill

    This week on CounterSpin: “As a company, Microsoft is dismayed by the forcible separation of children from their families at the border,” the global tech company declared in a statement. “Family unification has been a fundamental tenet of American policy and law since the end of World War II.” The same Microsoft bragged a few months ago about ICE’s use of its Azure cloud computing services to “accelerate facial recognition and identification” of immigrants, though the post has since been altered to omit the phrase “we’re proud to support this work with our mission-critical cloud.”

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Announced As a Modular Operating System for Businesses

    SUSE announced the release of the long-anticipated SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 operating system for businesses and organizations of all sizes, bringing new features, updated components, and state-of-the-art GNU/Linux technologies.

  • Fedora To Deprecate YUM in Fedora 29 Release

    Many Linux users familiar with Fedora, CentOS, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux are familiar with YUM, but are oblivious to its origins in the much lesser known Yellowdog Linux, a now discontinued PowerPC variant of CentOS. And now, it seems, YUM is heading in the same direction.

  • Fourth GSoC Report

    As announced in the last report, i started looking into SSO solutions and evaluated and tested them. At the begining my focus was on SAML integration, but i soon realized that OAuth2 would be more important.

    I started with installing Lemonldap-NG. LL-NG is a WebSSO solution writting in perl that uses ModPerl or FastCGI for delivering Webcontent. There is a Debian package in stable, so the installation was no problem at all. The configuration was a bit harder, as LL-NG has a complex architecture with different vhosts. But after some fiddling i managed to connect the installation to our test LDAP instance and was able to authenticate against the LL-NG portal. Then i started to research how to integrate an OAuth2 client. For the tests i had on the one hand a gitlab installation that i tried to connect to the OAuth2 providers using the omniauth-oauth2-generic strategy. To have a bit more fine grained control over the OAuth2 client configuration i also used the python requests-oauthlib module and modified the web app example from their documentation to my needs. After some fiddling and a bit of back and forth on the lemonldap-ng mailinglist i managed both test clients to authenticate against LL-NG.

  • Automation & Risk

    Linaro created the LAVA (Linaro Automated Validation Architecture) project in 2010 to automate testing of software using real hardware. Over the seven years of automation in Linaro so far, LAVA has also spread into other labs across the world. Millions of test jobs have been run, across over one hundred different types of devices, ARM, x86 and emulated. Varied primary boot methods have been used alone or in combination, including U-Boot, UEFI, Fastboot, IoT, PXE. The Linaro lab itself has supported over 150 devices, covering more than 40 different device types. Major developments within LAVA include MultiNode and VLAN support. As a result of this data, the LAVA team have identified a series of automated testing failures which can be traced to decisions made during hardware design or firmware development. The hardest part of the development of LAVA has always been integrating new device types, arising from issues with hardware design and firmware implementations. There are a range of issues with automating new hardware and the experience of the LAVA lab and software teams has highlighted areas where decisions at the hardware design stage have delayed deployment of automation or made the task of triage of automation failures much harder than necessary.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Investors Jumping Ship on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Callon Petroleum Company (CPE)
  • Thrivent Financial For Lutherans Trimmed Its Red Hat INC (RHT) Holding as Valuation Rose
  • Today’s Brokerage Rating: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Visa Inc. (V)
  • Microsoft has another crack at fixing Chrome problems in Windows 10

    The Windows 10 April 2018 Update (aka 1803) broke Google's Chrome browser in some configurations and while subsequent patches stabilised the troubled operating system, issues have lingered on.

  • A MongoDB Secret Weapon: Aggregation Pipeline

    MongoDB is best known for creating a document database that Web and mobile developers love to use. But developers and analysts alike may be interested in a little-known MongoDB feature called the aggregation pipeline. What’s more, the aggregation pipeline just got easier to use with MongoDB 4.0.

    The aggregation pipeline presents a powerful abstraction for working with and analyzing data stored in the MongoDB database. According to MongoDB CTO and co-founder Eliot Horowitz, the composability of the aggregation pipeline is one of the keys to its power.

  • eLife Trialing Radical New Approach To Peer Review

    eLife, an online publisher of research in the life and biomedical sciences, is trialing a radical new approach to peer review to increase editorial transparency and promote more efficient access to innovative new research.

    According to the eLife website, “Having free and open access to the outcomes of research helps make achievements more visible, accessible and usable – ultimately accelerating discoveries and their applications.”

  • To stop another Ebola outbreak, science went open source (How science beat Ebola)

    I sat still watching a stranger die. She was just 27; her breathing became erratic, nearing a standstill, her head flopped over to look at me, her eyes glazed over and her stare became distant. She died alone, at an isolation unit known as Ebola Treatment Centre (ETC) in Sierra Leone. I could not reach out to hold her hand. With no hope, no vaccine, no effective treatment, no cure, I was overwhelmed, beaten and felt desperately hopeless, spending my time helping people to die more comfortably.

    That was three years ago. Working as a medical doctor during the West African Ebola virus epidemic of 2013–2016, it was my first encounter with this virus. Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses in the world – a haemorrhagic fever known for its bloody symptoms and mortality rate of up to 90 per cent. That outbreak was the most widespread in history the history of the virus, with 28,000 known cases and more than 11,000 deaths.

  • Open Source at Coaxial Arts

    On June 19, 2018, Coaxial Arts was the venue for a program of noise, experimental music and sound. The snug downtown Los Angeles location filled up with a congenial crowd of the knowledgeable and the curious for a concert presented by the wulf titled Open Source: Anderson, Hutson, Shiroishi, Smith. An impressive array of cables, synthesizers, mixing boards, computers and radios was spread over several tables, including a large reel-to-reel tape loop. Casey Anderson, William Hutson, Stephanie Cheng Smith and Patrick Shiroishi were on hand to bring it all to life.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Team Xecutor ‘Piracy’ Code Has DRM, Can Brick Your Nintendo Switch

     

    Hacking group Team Xecuter released a jail-breaking solution for Nintendo Switch earlier this month, opening the door to homebrew and piracy alike. However, according to a UK-based security researcher, the code contains DRM which can lock your Switch with a random password if there's an attempt to crack it for unauthorized distribution.

  • Kodi Embraces DRM to Invite Content Publishers

     

    In the present day and age, it's nearly impossible for a media distribution platform to be recognized by major content publishers without implementing DRM. This is one of the reasons why the popular Kodi media player has added "digital rights management" support in its most recent version. Several addons are already making use of this new feature, by bringing Netflix and Amazon to Kodi, for example.

  • Apple Engineers Its Own Downfall With the Macbook Pro Keyboard

    A titan of tech and industrial innovation has been laid low by a mere speck of dust. Last week, Apple quietly announced that they were extending the warranty on their flagship laptop’s keyboard to four years. As it turns out, the initial run of these keyboards, described by Jony Ive as thin, precise, and “sturdy,” has been magnificently prone to failure.

  • Apple’s Terrible Keyboards and Why Repairability Matters

    Apple is fixing busted MacBook keyboards for free, which is going to cost them money. This all could have been avoided if the keyboard were easy to repair or replace.

    As laptops become thinner repairability is compromised. Apple’s MacBook and MacBook Pro are prime examples, and the keyboard issues show why this is a problem.

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More in Tux Machines

Openwashing: Zenko (Dual), Kong (Mere API) and Blackboard (Proprietary and Malicious)

Games: Descenders, War Thunder’s “The Valkyries”

Kernel: Virtme, 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference and Linux Foundation Articles

  • Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend
    When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common. Many virtual drivers have been recently merged, useful either to test the kernel core code, or your application. These virtual drivers make QEMU even more attractive.
  • 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference
    As in previous years we’re trying to organize an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisons, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 21st in Edinburgh, the day before ELC Europe starts there.
  • How Writing Can Expand Your Skills and Grow Your Career [Ed: Linux Foundation article]
    At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, I participated in a panel discussion called How Writing can Change Your Career for the Better (Even if You don't Identify as a Writer. The panel was moderated by Rikki Endsley, Community Manager and Editor for Opensource.com, and it included VM (Vicky) Brasseur, Open Source Strategy Consultant; Alex Williams, Founder, Editor in Chief, The New Stack; and Dawn Foster, Consultant, The Scale Factory.
  • At the Crossroads of Open Source and Open Standards [Ed: Another Linux Foundation article]
    A new crop of high-value open source software projects stands ready to make a big impact in enterprise production, but structural issues like governance, IPR, and long-term maintenance plague OSS communities at every turn. Meanwhile, facing significant pressures from open source software and the industry groups that support them, standards development organizations are fighting harder than ever to retain members and publish innovative standards. What can these two vastly different philosophies learn from each other, and can they do it in time to ensure they remain relevant for the next 10 years?

Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.