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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Why Linus is right (as usual)

    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable.

    This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs.
    The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.

  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes

    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies.

    One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5

    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.

  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28

    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.

  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse

    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!

  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0

    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people.

    Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.

  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC

    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project.

    Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.

  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room

    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.

  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code

    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing.

    Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017.

    In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”

  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang

    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack.

    Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.

  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem

     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Blockchain Moves Beyond its 'Moonshot' Phase
  • Some reading

    I've complained previously about disliking benchmarking. More generally, I'm not really a fan of performance analysis. I always feel like I get stuck at coming up with an approach to "it's going slower, why" beyond the basics. I watched a video of Brendan Gregg's talk from kernel recipes, and ended up going down the black hole1 of reading his well written blog. He does a fantastic job of explaining performance analysis concepts as well as the practical tools to do the analysis. He wrote a book several years ago and I happily ordered it. The book explains how to apply the USE method to performance problems across the system. This was helpful to me because it provides a way to generate a list of things to check and how to check them. It addresses the "stuck" feeling I get when dealing with performance problems. The book also provides a good high level overview of operating systems concepts. I'm always looking for references for people who are interested in kernels but don't know where to start and I think this book could fill a certain niche. Even if this book has been out for several years now, I was very excited to discover it.

  • Introducing container-diff, a tool for quickly comparing container images

    The Google Container Tools team originally built container-diff, a new project to help uncover differences between container images, to aid our own development with containers. We think it can be useful for anyone building containerized software, so we’re excited to release it as open source to the development community.

  • NATTT – A Modern Multi-Platform Time Conscious Tracker App

    It’s not that there aren’t already a lot of time tracker apps but my conscience wouldn’t let me sleep if I didn’t tell you about NATTT. So grab your cup of whatever you’re probably drinking as we delve into this app a little.

    NATTT is an acronym for “Not Another Time Tracking Tool”; a free and multi-platform app with which you can keep track of your work and how much you have spent at it.

  • Running Bitcoin node and ElectrumX server
  • todo.txt done
  • GNOME's Calendar & TODO Applications Are Looking Better For v3.28

    Adding to the growing list of changes for GNOME 3.28 are improvements to the Calendar and To Do applications by Georges Stavracas.

    Stavracas has been reworking the month view of GNOME Calendar and it's looking much better, some applications for Calendar via libdazzle, and more.

  • Compact DAQ systems offer a choice of 12- or 16-bit I/Os

    Advantech’s Linux-ready “MIC-1810” and “MIC-1816” DAQ computers offer 12- and 16-bit analog I/O, respectively, plus 24x DIOs, Intel CPUs, and 4x USB ports.

    Advantech’s MIC-1810 and MIC-1816 are digital acquisition computers that run Linux or Windows 7/8/10 on Intel 3rd Gen “Ivy Bridge” processors. If the aging CPU is a turn-off, keep in mind that many DAQ applications don’t require that much processing power, and perhaps Advantech’s “entry-level” label for the systems extends to the price, as well. The 165 x 130 x 59mm, DIN-rail mountable systems should also prove useful for environments with limited space.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to Install OpenVPN on CentOS 7
  • How to turn your website into a desktop app
  • The Quantum of Firefox: Why is this one unlike any other Firefox?

    The Mozilla Foundation has officially launched a radical rewrite of its browser, a major cross-platform effort to regain relevance in a world that seems to have forgotten Firefox. The much-rewritten browser claims to be 30 per cent faster with half the memory load, although this comes at the cost of compatibility, as Scott Gilbertson found here.

    The proof’s in the pudding, and this pudding doesn’t feel like the old Firefox behemoth at all. It’s long overdue.

    "Firefox is 13 years old – and very few applications have been around for 13 years without accruing technical debt,” Nick Nguyen, Mozilla’s VP of technology told us.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • AMD Stoney Ridge Audio Supported By Linux 4.15

    The sound driver changes have been submitted for the Linux 4.15 kernel and includes finally supporting AMD Stoney Ridge hardware.

    Takashi Iwai of SUSE today sent in the sound updates for the Linux 4.15 kernel window. The noteworthy mentions are a new AC97 bus implementation and AMD Stoney platform support. There was also some hardening work of USB audio drivers, cleanups to the Intel ASoC platform code, and a variety of other low-level changes.

  • ​Kubernetes vendors agree on standardization

    Everyone and their uncle has decided to use Kubernetes for cloud container management. Even Kubernetes' former rivals, Docker Swarm and Mesosphere, have thrown in the towel. Mesosphere came over in early October and Docker added Kubernetes support later the same month. There was only question: Would all these Kubernetes implementations work together? Thanks to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), the answer is yes.

  • Igalia is Hiring

    Igalia is hiring web browser developers. If you think you’re a good candidate for one of these jobs, you’ll want to fill out the online application accompanying one of the postings. We’d love to hear from you.

    We’re especially interested in hiring a browser graphics developer. We realize that not many graphics experts also have experience in web browser development, so it’s OK if you haven’t worked with web browsers before. Low-level Linux graphics experience is the more important qualification for this role.

  • Lunduke goes 100% indie – Leaves SUSE & Network World

     

    It also means that I am completely independent.  I am not employed by any company that can influence the words that I say or the topics that I cover.

  • Writing Installer Images Directly With WebUSB
  • End of PHP 7.2 FTBFS marathon
  • Compact COM Express-based subsystem packs plenty of DAQs
  • Microsoft Sued Over ‘Baseless’ Piracy Threats

     

    Microsoft and the BSA are accusing Rhode Island-based company Hanna Instruments of pirating software. Despite facing threats of millions of dollars in damages the company maintains its innocence, backed up by license keys and purchase receipts. The BSA's lawyers are not convinced, however, so Hanna have decided to take the matter to court.  

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux 4.14 Release Provides Long Term Support and Larger Memory Limits

    Linus Torvalds officially released the Linux 4.14 kernel on Nov. 12, providing users of the open-source operating system with new features and long term support. Linux 4.14 is a special release in that it has been designated as an LTS (Long Term Support) meaning that it will be maintained for at least the next two years.

    Linux 4.14 is the fifth new major Linux kernel release in 2017, following the Linux 4.13 kernel that debuted on Sept. 3.

    "Go out and test the new 4.14 release, that is slated to be the next LTS kernel - and start sending me pull request for the 4.15 merge window," Torvalds wrote in his release announcement.

  • Intel Vulkan Driver Preparing For Faster MSAA Performance

    Jason Ekstrand of Intel who contributes significantly to the development of their open-source "ANV" Vulkan driver has prepped a new patch series.

  • VP's ARMA 3 1.76 beta now out, compatible with Windows for now

    As stated by Bohemia Interactive themselves, this means the game is at least temporarily compatible with the Windows version when it comes to multiplayer. However, there are no guarantees that the Linux port will remain in sync with the Windows version when the game next updates

  • We Are Likely To See More Vulkan Driver Fixes From Feral

    Feral developer Alex Smith is requesting commit rights to the Mesa code-base.

    Alex Smith is the developer at the Linux/macOS game porting company Feral Interactive who previously worked on AMD_shader_info for RADV, various Vulkan driver bug fixes, and other RADV updates as well as some minor work too for the Intel ANV driver.

  • My Free Software Activities in October 2017

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Rakuten TV to add more 4K HDR content for Samsung TV Plus

    The European video-on-demand (VOD) service Rakuten TV has announced that it will release 100 Ultra HD HDR movies for Samsung Smart TVs by the end of this year.

    According to Rakuten TV (formerly Wuaki.tv), titles like Baywatch, Transformers: The Last Knight, Baby Driver and Spider-Man: Homecoming are already available in 4K HDR quality. They will be adding more to the list soon. The content, with Dolby Digital Plus sound, will be only available through Samsung’s TV PLUS service for Tizen Smart TVs.

  • 15 Smart Ways To Re-Purpose Your Old Android Smartphone And Give It A New Life

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • GNU/Linux Is Still Cooking

    t’s true that smartphones have taken a huge share of personal computing away from desktops and notebooks but there are still huge limitations around screen-size, computing power, storage etc. where smartphones are not enough. I’ve long recommended using smartphones and desktop equipment together. Every time I find my text runs outside a text-box or some page is viewable only in portrait mode in Android/Linux, I long for some way to get to GNU/Linux. Today, I get up off the sofa and walk to my desk. Perhaps some day, I’ll dock the smartphone and carry on. Now, I have to reopen work from the desktop PC I call Beast.

  • Samsung teases Linux desktops on Galaxy S8 and Note 8 smartphones, thanks to DeX
  • Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Episode 8 | CYA!
  • The Latest In Our Massive Linux Benchmarking Setup - November 2017

    Two and a half years ago was the start of the continually evolving effort around turning a basement into a big Linux server room and last year having shared a one year redux in the effort but having been late in a second year redux into this effort and how the systems are configured for our Linux/BSD/open-source benchmarking at scale, here is an update.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Atom, Football Manager 2018, Kdenlive + More

    It’s a Sunday, which means it’s time for a concise roundup of recent Linux releases that didn’t merit their own dedicated post.

    A rather diverse set of apps and projects made releases in the past week, including two of the most popular code editing apps, what is (arguably) the best open-source video editor, and a desktop favoured by an enlightened few.

  •  

  • An Introduction to Linux Mint 18.2
  • [Slackware] LibreOffice 5.4.3 packages available

    The Document Foundation released the third update for LibreOffice 5.4 last week, as you can read on their blog where they write about the new LibreOffice 5.4.3 . My manic-depressive mood-swings are on the manic side at the moment so next to baking sausage rolls (brabantse worstenbroodjes for which I will publish an updated recipe on this blog soon) and a batch of sourdough bread, I finally had the energy to fix the admin interface for the SlackDocs mailing lists, wrestled myself through 14,000+ emails in my administrative mailboxes, wrote a plan to migrate my LAN services from the ageing server to the new server I bought this summer (which involves conversion of several large databases to InnoDB and loads of custom packages), plus I binge-watched almost 2 full seasons of Stranger Things in 3 days’ time. I know I will crash hard in a couple of days but I hope to have a new Plasma ‘ktown’ update before that happens.

today's leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • State of Linux Containers
    In this video from the Stanford HPC Conference, Christian Kniep from Docker Inc. presents: State of Containers. “This talk will recap the history of and what constitutes Linux Containers, before laying out how the technology is employed by various engines and what problems these engines have to solve. Afterward, Christian will elaborate on why the advent of standards for images and runtimes moved the discussion from building and distributing containers to orchestrating containerized applications at scale. In conclusion, attendees will get an update on what problems still hinder the adoption of containers for distributed high performance workloads and how Docker is addressing these issues.”
  • ONS 2018: Networking Reimagined
    For the past seven years, Open Networking Summit (ONS) has brought together the networking industry’s ecosystem of network operators, vendors, open source projects, leading researchers, and investors to discuss the latest SDN and NFV developments that will shape the future of the networking industry. With this year’s event, taking place March 26-29, 2018 in Los Angeles, ONS will evolve its approach as the premier open source networking event. We’re excited to share three new aspects of this year’s ONS that you won’t want to miss:
  • AT&T contributes code to Linux open source edge computing project
    The Linux Foundation recently announced a new project, dubbed Akraino, to develop an open source software stack capable of supporting high-availability cloud services for edge computing systems and applications. To kick off the project, AT&T will contribute code made for carrier-scale edge computing applications running in virtual machines and containers.
  • AT&T Brings Akraino Networking Project to Edge of the Linux Foundation
    The Linux Foundation has been particularly busy in 2018 thus far consolidating its existing networking project under a single umbrella, known as LF Networking. That umbrella might need to get a bit larger, as on Feb. 20 the Linux Foundation announced the new Akraino project, with code coming initially from AT&T.
  • FreeOffice 2016 – An Efficient Alternative to Microsoft Office
    FreeOffice 2016 is the latest version of the Office software from SoftMaker. In fact, you wouldn’t be wrong if you called it the free version of SoftMaker Office 2018 seeing as it features the same suite of applications.
  • Stellaris 2.0 'Cherryh' patch & Stellaris: Apocalypse expansion released, over 1.5 million copies sold
    Stellaris: Apocalypse [Steam], the latest expansion for the grand space strategy game from Paradox Development Studio is out. The big 2.0 'Cherryh' patch is also now available. Paradox has also announced today, that Stellaris has officially passed 1.5 million copies sold making it one of their most popular games ever made. I'm not surprised by this, as I consider Stellaris their most accessible game.
  • Action-packed platformer with local and online co-op 'Vagante' has left Early Access
    After being in Early Access for quite some time, the action-packed platformer 'Vagante' [Steam, Official Site] has now officially left Early Access.
  • Gentoo has been accepted as a Google Summer of Code 2018 mentoring organization
  • Getting Debian booting on a Lenovo Yoga 720
    I recently got a new work laptop, a 13” Yoga 720. It proved difficult to install Debian on; pressing F12 would get a boot menu allowing me to select a USB stick I have EFI GRUB on, but after GRUB loaded the kernel and the initrd it would just sit there never outputting anything else that indicated the kernel was even starting. I found instructions about Ubuntu 17.10 which helped but weren’t the complete picture. What seems to be the situation is that the kernel won’t happily boot if “Legacy Support” is not enabled - enabling this (and still booting as EFI) results in a happier experience.
  • Dell PowerEdge T30
    I just did a Debian install on a Dell PowerEdge T30 for a client. The Dell web site is a bit broken at the moment, it didn’t list the price of that server or give useful specs when I was ordering it. I was under the impression that the server was limited to 8G of RAM, that’s unusually small but it wouldn’t be the first time a vendor crippled a low end model to drive sales of more expensive systems. It turned out that the T30 model I got has 4*DDR4 sockets with only one used for an 8G DIMM. It apparently can handle up to 64G of RAM.
  • Quad-Ethernet SBC and controller tap new Renesas RZ/N1D SoC
    Emtrion’s Linux-ready “SBC-RZN1D” SBC, which will soon power a “Flex2COM” controller, features a Renesas dual-core -A7 RZ/N1D SoC and 4x LAN ports, and is designed for multi-protocol fieldbus communications. Emtrion, which recently announced its emCON-RZ/G1H module based on an octa-core Renesas RZ/G1H SoC, has unveiled a Renesas based, quad-LAN port SBC-RZN1D SBC focused on industrial communication. The SBC-RZN1D taps the Renesas RZ/N1D (R9006G032), one of a new line of RZ/N1D SoCs launched last year by Renesas for industrial multi-protocol communications. Renesas recently collaborated with Avnet to ship its own dual-Ethernet Renesas RZ/N1D Solution Kit (see farther below).
  • Postage-Stamp Linux
    There was a time when big operating systems ran on big iron. IBM, Data General, Burroughs, DEC, and other computer makers built big machines with big, blinking lights, and big price tags. They ran grown-up software and they supported multiuser operating systems. If you wanted a toy, you built a microcomputer. If you wanted a real machine for serious work, you bought a mainframe. Maybe a minicomputer, if it were for lesser tasks.
  • Most Popular Android Versions In February 2018 (Always Updated List)
    Android is the most used operating system on the planet. In fact, it’s almost omnipresent in the mobile ecosystem. Even the Android versions, like Nougat, Marshmallow, Lollipop, etc. have been able to build their individual fan following.

Red Hat and Fedora: David Egts, Radcom, Google Summer of Code 2018, FOSS Wave

  • Red Hat’s David Egts: Microservices Tech Could Help Simplify App Deployment
    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat’s public sector, told MeriTalk in an interview published Wednesday that the microservices technology works to help the developer split complex, large applications into small components and share them with other members of the DevOps team.
  • Radcom partners with Red Hat for NFV management
    Radcom announced it is collaborating with Red Hat to provide operators with a fully virtualized network visibility solution running on Red Hat OpenStack Platform. As operators transition to NFV, a critical first step is gaining end-to-end network visibility. This collaboration enables operators to attain cloud-native network visibility without the hassle of building their own private cloud infrastructure, the vendor said. Once the operator's transition to NFV matures, integration efforts with the NFV and MANO infrastructure can be simplified.
  • The Markets Are Undervaluing these stock’s: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Xerox Corporation (XRX)
  • Meeder Asset Management Inc. Has $1.75 Million Holdings in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Justin W. Flory: Humanitarian open source work: My internship at UNICEF
    In December, I received the happy news of an offer for a internship position at UNICEF in the Office of Innovation. The Office of Innovation drives rapid technological innovation by rapid prototyping of new ideas and building full-stack products to make a positive impact in the lives of children. This is a simple answer, but a more detailed description is on our website. My internship at UNICEF is unique: I support open source community engagement and research as my primary task for the MagicBox project. For years, I’ve done this in open source communities in my free time (namely SpigotMC and Fedora), but never in a professional role. As I navigate my way through this exciting opportunity, I plan to document some of the experience as I go through blogging. My intent is that my observations and notes will be useful to someone else in the humanitarian open source space (or maybe to a future me).
  • Fedora participating in Google Summer of Code 2018
    GSoC is a summer program aiming to bring more student developers into open source software development. It enables students to spend their summer break working with open source organizations on projects proposed by participating organizations and supported by mentors.
  • FOSS Wave with Fedora at KGISL, Coimbatore
    Recently, I was invited by Prem to NASSCOM to give a brief talk on FOSS and Technology as part of the FOSS Wave community. Prem is doing a great job there by putting his effort in helping students from Tier2 and Tier3 cities. Around twenty enthusiastic students were selected and invited to Bengaluru to take part in such events. Mine was one of them. I conducted a GitHub session after Intro to FOSS and a brief intro about Fedora Project.

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
  •  
  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]