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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • LinuxQuestions.org Turns Eighteen

    I'm proud to announce that LQ turned 18 today! I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation and feedback. While there is always room for improvement, that LQ has remained a friendly and welcoming place for new Linux members despite its size is a testament to the community.

    To say that feedback has been absolutely critical to our success is an understatement. As has become tradition, I'd like to use this thread to collect as much feedback as possible about LQ. What are we doing well and where can we improve? Where are we failing? What can we do to ensure long time members remain engaged and willing to help? What can we do to ensure new members feel welcome? What should we be doing differently?

    As part of our 18 year anniversary, we'll be randomly selecting 18 posts from this thread and upgrading that member to "Contributing Member" status for one year. Stay tuned, and thanks again for being a member. Together, I think we can make LQ even better.

    --jeremy
     

  • 5 open source puzzle games for Linux

    Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games are often not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

  • Weekly Roundup and News – weeks 24 & 25

    For the longest time our wiki main page has been very plain and simple; our own Zalappy has designed a new look, and the modifications are almost ready! Keep watching, because it’s looking really good! Thanks to Zalappy for his artistic flair, and to apb for his hard work making it happen.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 533

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 533 for the week of June 17 – 23, 2018. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Jolla's Sailfish OS Ported To The Gemini PDA

    While the popularity of Jolla's Sailfish OS seems to be waning, if you are interested in their Linux-based, partially open-source software stack, it's now available on the Gemini PDA device.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Stable channel support for Linux Apps delayed to Chrome OS 69
  • Oracle Linux now supported on 64-bit Armv8 processors

    Oracle’s announced that the version of its GNU/Linux for Arm processors is now generally available and signalled its intentions to help “build out a very viable server/cloud platform for Arm.”

    Big Red revealed its efforts in November 2017 with the debut of an unsupported developer release of Oracle Linux 7 Update 3. Come February 2018 and the company updated the release to one based on Oracle Linux 7 update 4, again with dire warnings it was for play, not work, and had no support.

  • Lamps Plus Sheds Light On Modernization Integration

    Discussions about modernization continue to tie top management in knots. Questions about the time, the effort, and the risks to the business are difficult to answer with precision, so organizations habitually focus on obstacles rather than opportunities.

    “If you stay in that mindset, you will never move,” says Derrick Lindsey, a modernization project lead at Lamps Plus, the nation’s largest specialty lighting retailer and a leading manufacturer of lighting and home furnishings. “There’s a lot less risk in modernizing existing applications on the IBM i than migrating off of the IBM i platform to other platforms such as Unix, Linux, or Windows servers, and this approach has proved beneficial for us.”

    There’s been a modernization initiative at Lamps Plus for the past six years. It’s involved the use of service programs, exportable functions/procedures, SQL views and SQL global variables leading to modular programming with reusable business logic that’s decoupled from executable programs. It has no conclusion. No modernization initiative does. But it’s had and continues to have phases with goals for completion.

  • Open source jobs report: 3 hot skill areas now
  • Patches Revised Taking RadeonSI OpenGL Compatibility Profile To v4.0

    -
    After getting the RadeonSI OpenGL compatibility profile support to GL 3.3, Valve's Timothy Arceri has been working on OpenGL 4.4 compatibility profile support. However, with one of those extensions taking a while to wire up, for now he sent out the patches bumping the support to OpenGL 4.0 under this compatibility mode.

    See the earlier articles if you are unfamiliar with the OpenGL compatibility profile mode as an alternative to the OpenGL core context in order to make use of deprecated GL functionality while still using modern versions of OpenGL.

  • SDL2 Wayland Now Supports XDG Shell's XDG_WM_Base

    The SDL2 library has revised its XDG Shell unstable code into offering xdg-wm-base support from the stable XDG Shell protocol.

    The "xdg_wm_base" interface is for creating desktop-style surfaces with spinning Wayland surfaces (wl_surfaces) into windows in a desktop environment that can be dragged, resized, maximized, etc. It's documented in full via wayland-protocols.

  • FogChain’s RadJav Platform Provides Full Linux Support
  • Enea to Demo Unique Linux Real-Time Acceleration at Mobile World Congress Shanghai
  • Interview with Natasa

    First of all it has an Animation Studio included, I haven’t done 2D animation in years and now I can do it at home, on my PC. Yay! The brush engine is second to none quite frankly and yes I’ve tried more than Krita before I reach that conclusion. I love the mirror tools, the eraser system and that little colour pick up docker where you can attach your favorite brushes as well. Love that little bugger, so practical. Oh and the pattern tool.

  • Skrooge 2.14.0 released

    The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.14.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

  • Arch-Based Manjaro 18.0 Beta 3 Available For Testing

    For fans of the Arch-based Manjaro Linux distribution, the third beta of their next major update is now available for evaluation.

    Manjaro 18.0 Beta 3 in its default Xfce flavor is available as of today. This third beta offers updated themes, the latest Pamac, an updated version of the Calamares installer, and updated Xfce packages. Manjaro 18.0 is currently relying upon the latest point release of the Linux 4.16 kernel.

  • Debian 8.11 Has Been Released | The Last Maintenance Release For Debian 8 (Jessie)

    The last maintenance for the long term support release Debian 8.11 (Jessie) has been released. Debian 8.11 brings several bug fixes and resolved various security issues. Check the release notes and update instructions down below.

    Debian 8.11 received tons of updates addressing security issues for many packages such as Mozilla Firefox, Mozilla Thunderbird, Asterisk for VOIP services, curl, PHP 5, Bind 9, Exim, LibreOffice, Apache2, and more. Linux Kernel has been updated as well Linux 3.16.56-1. ClamAV definitions database have been updated.

    Debian 8 (Jessie) is expected to reach end of life by June 30, 2020 as per the long term support program and it could be support by the extended long term support program for commercial usage.

  • Canonical: Two-thirds of Ubuntu 18.04 users agreed to data collection

    IT APPEARS that there are still some tech companies that we trust.

    In the first report since Ubuntu first started requesting analytics, maker Canonical has revealed that most users have opted in - and the results are interesting.

    67 per cent have decided that Canonical is OK to collect their data from Ubuntu 18.04 LTE (desktop version only). Given that many people choose Linux to have more control over their privacy, this seems way high and we can only assume (barring a mistake) that Ubuntu users trust Ubuntu way more than Windows users trust Microsoft.

  • WhatsApp problem on Tizen Phones, here is the Fix to get you going

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Equus WHITEBOX OPEN: A Line Of Coreboot/LinuxBoot-Ready Xeon Scalable Servers

    Equus Compute Solutions has announced the release of their new WHITEBOX OPEN server platform that is intended to be cost-optimized and an open hardware platform.

  • LKML archives on lore.kernel.org

    We collected LKML archives going as far back as 1998, and they are now all available to anyone via a simple git clone. We would like to extend our thanks to everyone who helped in this effort by donating their personal archives.

  • PulseAudio 12 Open-Source Sound System Released with AirPlay, A2DP Improvements

    PulseAudio 12.0, a major version of its open-source sound server program designed to work on a wide-range of POSIX operating systems like Linux, BSD, macOS, and others, was released with numerous improvements and new features.

    Highlights of PulseAudio 12.0 include better latency reporting with the A2DP Bluetooth profile, which also improves A/V sync, more accurate latency reporting on AirPlay devices, the ability to prioritize HDMI output over S/PDIF output, HSP support for more Bluetooth headsets, and the ability to disable input and output on macOS.

  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Part 2

    In my last post (link), I gave an overview of Welcome window integration in Pitivi. I started working on this task from the first coding day of Google Summer of Code 2018, i.e. May 14, 2018 and after one amazing month of coding it finally got merged (commit) on June 19, 2018. Apparently it was a large change consisting of 702 additions and 329 deletions (link) involving 75 code-review discussions and 29 versions. A special thanks to my mentor aleb for giving constructive reviews on my code.

  • Laura Abbott: What's a kernel devel package anyway
  • Intel’s 7th Gen NUCs Are Now “Ubuntu Certified”

    If you’ve had your eye on an Intel NUC for dev work, IoT shenanigans, or to use as an entertainment hub in the living room, you’ll be pleased to know you can install and run Ubuntu 16.04 LTS without encountering any major issues.

    Yes: I did say Ubuntu 16.04 LTS there and not Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the most recent long-term support release. Only the Xenial Xerus is currently certified for use on these device.

  • Ubuntu Suru Icon Theme Now Covers More Filetypes

    As you may know, developers plan to revamp the look and feel of Ubuntu for its next release by shipping the new Communitheme GTK and GNOME Shell theme and the new Suru icon set by default.

  • Toyota Research Institute supports development of open-source automated driving simulator

    Toyota Research Institute (TRI) is furthering its support of open source platforms by donating $100,000 to the Computer Vision Center (CVC) to accelerate its development of an open source simulator for automated driving, Car Learning to Act (CARLA).

    “Technological advances and growth are made possible through collaboration and community support,” said Vangelis Kokkevis, director of Driving Simulation at TRI. “Fostering the development of a common open simulation platform will allow TRI and its academic and industrial partners to better exchange code, information and data.”

  • Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Technology will Propel “Open Source” Banking

    The banking system today is a closed-source banking system. It is one that recreates every function, competes with other banks, is accountable to governments, and are driven by quarters. An open-source banking system, on the other hand, shares every function, collaborates on standards, are verifiable by people, and are incentivized by tokens.

    Burton noted one of the most significant problems with the existing banking model is the misalignment of goals. The incentives are unclear because of “back-handers, sweetheart deals, and cheeky kickbacks.”

  • EOS (EOS): Resource Planner is live, know all about the open source tool

    EOS (EOS) announced on Medium that they started working on the EOS Resource Planner three months ago and finally the network is now live. They have finished with the MVP which can be found at https://www.eosrp.io/.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Initial Keynotes for Open Networking Summit Europe

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open Networking Summit Europe, taking place September 25-27 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

  • Rep of the Month – May 2018

    Please join us in congratulating Prathamesh Chavan, our Rep of the Month for May 2018!

    Prathamesh is from Pune, India and works as a Technical Support Engineer at Red Hat. From his very early days in the Mozilla community, Prathamesh used his excellect people skills to spread the community to different colleges and to evangelise many of the upcoming projects, products and Mozilla initiatives. Prathamesh is also a very resourceful person. Due to this, he did a great job at organizing some great events at Pune and creare many new Mozilla Clubs across the city there.

  • GitHub Coders to Microsoft: Cut Ties With ICE or We'll 'Take Our Projects Elsewhere'

    More than five dozen Github contributors on Thursday signed a letter threatening to abandon the website unless Microsoft canceled its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) contract.

    Microsoft, which acquired GitHub, the internet’s largest source code repository, for $7.5 billion earlier this month, is one of several tech companies facing heat for its work on behalf of ICE as a result of the Trump administration policy of separating families at the U.S. border.

  • Moving On From Picasa

    The cross-platform, open-source GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) software is another versatile photo-editing program, but might be a little more technical than some entry-level applications. If it piques your interest, GIMP has an online user manual you can browse before downloading.

  • Bradley M. Kuhn: The Everyday Sexism That I See In My Work

    Back in 2014, Karen and I collaboratively talked about what role would make sense for her and me — and we made a choice together. We briefly considered a co-Executive Director situation, but that arrangement has been tried elsewhere and is typically not successful in the long term. Karen is much better than me at the key jobs of a successful Executive Director. Karen and I agreed she was better for the job than me. We took it to Conservancy's Board of Directors, and they moved my leadership role at Conservancy to be honorary, and we named Karen the sole Executive Director. Yes, I'm still nebulously a leader in the Free Software community (which I'm of course glad about). But for Conservancy matters, and specifically donor relations and major decisions about the organization, Karen is in charge.

    [...]

    Interestingly but disturbingly, these incidents teach how institutional sexism operates in practice. Every time I'm approached (which is often) with some subtle situation where it makes Karen look like she's not really in charge, I'm given the opportunity to pump myself up, make myself look more important, and gain more credibility and power. It is clear to me that this comes at the expense of subtly denigrating Karen and that the enticement is part of an institutionally sexist zero-sum game.

  • Goodman One is an Open-Source, 3D-Printed Analog Camera

    Dora Goodman, a maker of handcrafted cameras and straps, has released a new open source camera called the Goodman One that anyone can make if they have access to a 3D printer.

    Goodman tells PetaPixel that she has been working on the design of the Goodman One for the past two years, and she’s now working to share the camera with as many photography lovers as possible.

  • Security updates for Friday

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 6th Birthday of It’s FOSS: Win Linux Laptop, Stickers and more Gifts
  • Five Useful Features That Are On Their Way To The Chrome OS
  • HackUp is a Desktop Hacker News Client for Linux

    Avid readers of social news sharing site Hacker News might be interested in a new app recently added to Flathub.

    Called HackUp, it is a Hacker News desktop client written in Vala. It lets you browse and read Hacker News submissions without needing to open a web browser (which for a legendary procrastinator like me, is a good thing).

  • Why use Chef for automation and orchestration

    Chef has been a leading open source tool for automating the provisioning and configuration of servers for the better part of a decade. In recent years the company added InSpec and Habitat to the portfolio, open source projects that automate policy compliance testing and the deployment and configuration of applications, respectively. The company’s flagship commercial offering, Chef Automate, brings all of these pieces together.  

  • Xfdesktop 4.13.2 Released As Another Step Towards Xfce 4.14

    As another step towards the long-awaited Xfce 4.14 desktop environment release, Xfdesktop 4.13.2 is now available as the latest development release for this important piece of the Xfce desktop stack.

    Xfdesktop is the component that manages the desktop background, the pop-up list of applications, drawing icons on the desktop, etc. Xfdesktop 4.13.2 is the first development release since Xfdesktop 4.13.1 one year ago.

  • Monday Markdown

    I’ve spent the first portion of the coding period focused on improving the documentation browser for GNOME Javascript. In 2015/16 ptomato began porting GIR sources (the source of most GJS documentation) to [DevDocs.io], an open-source documentation browser, using g-ir-doc-tool in gobject-introspection. He did excellent work and produced a functioning product that now lives at [devdocs.baznga.org]. My goals were to take the current product and incorporate GNOME theming, fix issues with incorrect documentation, rebase the project on upstream, and reorient some of the project’s features to better serve an object oriented and GNOME model.

  • Refactor: Backend and UI

    Fractal is currently structured into two parts: The API part (fractal-matrix-api) and GTK part (fractal-gtk). The first one mostly just does the https calls to the Matrix server, the GTK part does everything else. This post will not talk about the API part since that will remain more or less the same (at least for now).

  • Open source board lets you analyze SPI connections on a USB-connected laptop

    Excamera Labs has launched an open source, $27 and up “SPIDriver” board on Crowd Supply for analyzing and testing SPI-connected displays, sensors, flash, and other components on a laptop or via a built-in color LCD display.

    Monitoring SPI devices such as LCD panels, LED arrays, sensors, and SPI flash may not be quite as gnarly as managing I2C gizmos, but either of these short-distance, serial data transfer protocols can be a hassle. While Arduino boards provide libraries for SPI monitoring, there’s still a lot of guesswork involved due to lack of real-time feedback about the SPI bus state.

  •  

  • Cooperative Learning

    I’ve got some under-utilised KVM servers that I could use to provide test VMs for network software, my original idea was to use those for members of my local LUG. But that doesn’t scale well. If a larger group people are to be involved they would have to run their own virtual machines, use physical hardware, or use trial accounts from VM companies.

    The general idea would be for two broad categories of sessions, ones where an expert provides a training session (assigning tasks to students and providing suggestions when they get stuck) and ones where the coordinator has no particular expertise and everyone just learns together (like “let’s all download a random BSD Unix and see how it compares to Linux”).

    [...]

    There is a Wikipedia page about Cooperative Learning. While that’s interesting I don’t think it has much relevance on what I’m trying to do. The Wikipedia article has some good information on the benefits of cooperative education and situations where it doesn’t work well. My idea is to have a self-selecting people who choose it because of their own personal goals in terms of fun and learning. So it doesn’t have to work for everyone, just for enough people to have a good group.

  • Chinese search giant Baidu creates an open-source A.I. for detecting cancer

    “We hope this open-sourced algorithm can serve as a high-quality baseline for future research in this area,” Li said. “The algorithm is only evaluated on a limited number of public datasets at this stage. However, the algorithm needs to be further assessed using much more clinically relevant data to prove it still maintains higher accuracy than experienced pathologists. Our team will continue improving the algorithm and collaborating with researchers with whom we can share new datasets.”

  • Fynd organizes Hackxagon Open Source Challenge for its Engineers

    As an initiative to give back to the open source community, Fynd, the unique fashion e-commerce portal had launched gofynd.io, a few months ago. This project enabled the engineers of the fashion e-commerce portal to learn new technologies, improve the core infrastructure and enhance the Fynd platform.

  • Netfilter Workshop 2018 Berlin summary

    Lots of interesting talks happened, mostly surrounding nftables and how to move forward from the iptables legacy world to the new, modern nft framework.

    In a nutshell, the Netfilter project, the FLOSS community driven project, has agreed to consider iptables as a legacy tool. This confidence comes from the maturity of the nftables framework, which is fairly fully-compliant with the old iptables API, including extensions (matches and targets).

  • Using W10Privacy To Boost Ubuntu WSL Performance On Windows 10
  • Get the latest in libre from the FSF Bulletin

    The biannual Free Software Foundation (FSF) Bulletin is now available online. We hope you find it enlightening and entertaining!

  • Introducing PyInstaller

    If you're used to working with a compiled language, the notion that you would need to have a programming language around, not just for development but also for running an application, seems a bit weird. Just because a program was written in C doesn't mean you need a C compiler in order to run it, right?

    But of course, interpreted and byte-compiled languages do require the original language, or a version of it, in order to run. True, Java programs are compiled, but they're compiled into bytecodes then executed by the JVM. Similarly, .NET programs cannot run unless the CLR is present.

    Even so, many of the students in my Python courses are surprised to discover that if you want to run a Python program, you need to have the Python language installed. If you're running Linux, this isn't a problem. Python has come with every distribution I've used since 1995. Sometimes the Python version isn't as modern as I'd like, but the notion of "this computer can't run Python programs" isn't something I've had to deal with very often.

  • Demoting multi-factor authentication

    Authentication was done via a Java applet, as there needs to be a verifiably(?)-secure way to ensure the certificate was properly checked at the client without transfering it over the network. Good thing!

    [...]

    Anyway I accepted, as losing so much time to grade is just too much. And... Yes, many people will be happy. Partly, I'm releieved by this (I have managed to hate Java for over 20 years). I am just saddened by the fact we have lost an almost-decent-enough electronic signature implementation and fallen back to just a user-password scheme. There are many ways to do crypto verification on the client side nowadays; I know JavaScript is sandboxed and cannot escape to touch my filesystem, but... It is amazing we are losing this simple and proven use case.

today's howtos and leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mir 0.32 Is Inching Close To Release With Many Improvements

    Canonical's developers working on the Mir display server are putting the finishing touches on the Mir 0.32 release.

    Mir 0.32 is another big release as the developers remain focus on getting their Wayland support squared away. Additionally, Mir developers have been working on Logind support that is needed so Mir shells like the EGMDE example shell or Unity 8 can be easily accessed from the GDM3 log-in/display manager.

  •  

  • [Older] CentOS vs Ubuntu

    Ubuntu and CentOS are both major players in enterprise environments and in the datacenter. There's no denying that both distributions have proven themselves in the server space, but with closer examination, these are two very different animals.

    Ubuntu is an excellent all-around contender. CentOS is purpose built for the enterprise in every aspect of its design.

  • Fedora Classroom Session: Fedora QA 101/102

    Fedora Classroom sessions continue next week with a session on Fedora QA. The general schedule for sessions appears on the wiki. You can also find resources and recordings from previous sessions there. Here are details about this week’s session on Tuesday, June 19 at 1600 UTC. That link allows you to convert the time to your timezone.

  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC is loaded with options

    DFI is prepping an Ubuntu friendly 3.5-inch “AL551” SBC with an Apollo Lake SoC, triple display support, up to 2x GbE and SATA III ports, and mini-PCIe, M.2, and optional “expansion I/O” connectors.

  • Security updates for Friday

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • HP Chromebook X2 Looks to Be First Detachable Chromebook to Support Linux Apps

    Support for running Linux apps is becoming a thing among Chromebook fans, and it looks like each day new Chrome OS devices are getting Linux app support.

    During the Google I/O annual developer conference last month, Google announced it is working to bring support for Linux apps in future versions of its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, and the first Chromebook to receive support for running Linux applications is, of course, Google's Pixelbook.

  • Windows 10 alternatives: best free, open source operating systems

     

    Switching to an open source OS could involve a learning curve, but the community, customisation and lack of cost should be enough to make up for it.  

  • Laptops with 128GB of RAM are here

     

    Brace yourself for laptops with 128GB of RAM because they’re coming. Today, Lenovo announced its ThinkPad P52, which, along with that massive amount of memory, also features up to 6TB of storage, up to a 4K, 15.6-inch display, an eighth-gen Intel hexacore processor, and an Nvidia Quadro P3200 graphics card.

  • The Schedule for Open Source Summit North America Is Now Live

    Join us August 29-31, in Vancouver, BC, for 250+ sessions covering a wide array of topics including Linux Systems, Cloud Native Applications, Blockchain, AI, Networking, Cloud Infrastructure, Open Source Leadership, Program Office Management and more. Arrive early for new bonus content on August 28 including co-located events, tutorials, labs, workshops, and lightning talks.

  • IMAP Spam Begone (ISBG) version 2.1.0 is out!

    When I first started at the non-profit where I work, one of the problems people had was rampant spam on their email boxes. The email addresses we use are pretty old (+10 years) and over time they have been added to all the possible spam lists there are.

    That would not be a real problem if our email hosting company did not have very bad spam filters. They are a worker's coop and charge us next to nothing for hosting our emails, but sadly they lack the resources to run a real bayesian-based spam filtering solution like SpamAssassin. "Luckily" for us, it seems that a lot of ISPs and email hosting enterprises also tend to have pretty bad spam filtering on the email boxes they provide and there were a few programs out there to fix this.

  • Be a redshirt this GUADEC

    If you’re planning to volunteer at GUADEC this year and be part of the selfless redshirt team (we’ve got 100% survival rate so far!), please register before the end of this week so that we have a better idea of which t-shirt sizes to order. If you can’t register soon, you can still volunteer even if you register on site!

  • GStreamer CI support for embedded devices

    GStreamer is a popular open-source pipeline-based multimedia framework that has been in development since 2001. That’s 17 years of constant development, triaging, bug fixes, feature additions, packaging, and testing. Adopting a Jenkins-based Continuous Integration (CI) setup in August 2013, GStreamer and its dependencies are now built multiple times a day with each commit. Prior to that, the multimedia project used a build bot hosted by Collabora and Fluendo. At the time of this writing, GStreamer is built for the Linux (Fedora & Debian), macOS, Windows, Android, and iOS platforms. A very popular deployment target for GStreamer are embedded devices, but they are not targeted in the current CI setup.This meant additional manpower, effort, and testing outside of the automated tests for every release of GStreamer to validate on embedded boards. To rectify this, a goal was devised to integrate embedded devices into the CI.

  • openSUSE Releases Leap 15 Images for Raspberry Pi, Armv7 Devices

    Makers can leverage openSUSE Leap 15 images for aarch64 and Armv7 on Internet of Things (IoT) and embedded devices. Since openSUSE Leap 15 shares a common core SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources, makers who find success with a project or device can more comfortably transition to an enterprise product in the future should certifications become a requirement. Currently, the only IoT platform supported by SLE is the Raspberry Pi 3. However, there is no current supported migration from Leap 15 to SLE 15 with the Raspberry Pi. The barrier to entry in the IoT/embedded markets are lowered when a developer starts a project with Leap 15. Plus, the many supported arm boards can help developers circumnavigate future obstacles that might hinder project’s growth in a developing market.

  • SBo DMCA Takedown

    About 14h ago, 10:32 PM GMT+7 (Western Indonesian Time), me (and several other people who forked SBo's repository at GitHub) received a DMCA Takedown notice due to a company (Steinberg) filed a complaint to more than 200 open source repositories in GitHub that uses several of their header files (namely aeffect.h and aeffectx.h). We used that files in one of our scripts (jack-tools) which was changed over a year ago by the maintainer. At that time, it was OK to use their header files (although it has been unmaintained since 2013), but some time ago, Steinberg has made an announcement about dropping their support for VST 2 and focusing on VST 3 only. This drives the DMCA takedown action which affects SBo repositories in GitHub.

    The admins have discussed this matter last night and we came to a solution of fixing this issue permanently by removing the related commit and all the history for this script in master and 14.2 branch. This is not a trivial action as the commits involved were 11867 since 2017-02-04. Ponce did the initial testing and David did the final touch, including pushing an unexpected public update including with the mass re-base on master and 14.2 branch (Thanks David).

  • Mesa 18.1.1 is Now Available to Install on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    The latest Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack is now available to install on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    Mesa 18.1.1 is the first point release update in the Mesa 18.1.x series, which debuted back in May with Mesa 18.1.0.

    The Mesa 18.1.x series touts plenty of improvements, including better Vulkan and OpenGL performance, updated Tegra, Nouveau, and Intel drivers, as well as support for the OpenGL 4.5 API.

  • Active Searching [Ed: This good Ubuntu man could use a job. Consider hiring?]

    I generally am not trying to shoot for terse blog posts. That being said, my position at work is getting increasingly untenable since we're in a position of being physically unable to accomplish our mission goals prior to funding running out at 11:59:59 PM Eastern Time on September 30th. Conflicting imperatives were set and frankly we're starting to hit the point that neither are getting accomplished regardless of how many warm bodies we're throwing at the problem. It isn't good either when my co-workers who have any military experience are sounding out KBR, Academi, and Perspecta.

  • Astounding t-shirt art, created by marker-wielding open source hardware plotters

    Evil Mad Scientist Labs sell a bunch of cool open source hardware kits for making plotters -- basically, a very precise robot arm that draws with whatever pen or marker you screw into its grip. There's the Eggbot (for drawing on curved surfaces like eggs, balloons and balls), but there's also the Axidraw, which works on flat surfaces.

    Axidraw owners have been decorating tees with Axidraws and colored markers, creating some really smashing designs.

  • Don’t trust the tech giants? You likely rely on them anyway
  • Imagine a world without DRM

    For 12 years, we've celebrated IDAD -- making, organizing, protesting, and taking action to support the demolition of Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) -- and 2018 is no different! This year we will continue the fight against DRM and celebrate the work of activists, artists, and technologists who create DRM-free media and technology. You can read more about past IDADs online.

  • DeUHD Beats ‘New’ AACS 2.1 UHD Blu-ray Disc Protection

    Russian company Arusoft has released a new version of its DeUHD ripping tool which bypasses AACS 2.1. The new encryption version appeared last month on the UHD Blu-ray discs of Fury and The Patriot and couldn't be bypassed with existing tools. The new version makes it possible for pirates to rip the discs in question, which happened soon after.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Acer Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 Will Support Linux Apps on Day One

    Acer's recently announced Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 appear to be the first Chromebooks to ship with support for Linux apps out-of-the-box at launch.

    Google already announced that it worked on implementing support for Linux apps on Chrome OS during the Google I/O conference last month, and the first Chromebook to run Linux apps is Google's Pixelbook, as expected, and the functionality was later discovered to be available on the Samsung Chromebook Plus as well.

  • Why Open Source Needs Marketing (Even Though Developers Hate It)
  • ASIFA-Hollywood Continues Commitment To Open Source Animation Technology

    “The last few years, there have been incredible advancements in the quality of open source software solutions for artists,” says Danny Young, ASIFA-Hollywood board member. “Open Source software development is more than ever serving as a counterweight to put fantastic free technology in the hands of anyone who is curious enough to explore it. By supporting ASIFA-Hollywood, you make projects like this possible. So, thank you, ASIFA membership!”

  • Collabora Office 6.0

    Today we release Collabora Office 6.0 – the Migrator’s Choice with great features to smooth our customers’ migration to an Open Source office suite as well as a hugely improved set of features and enhancements.

  • BrowserStack Announces Enhanced Open-Source Program, EU's Web Censorship Plan, Qt for Python Now Available and More

    BrowserStack this morning announced its enhanced open source program, which offers free testing of open source software on the BrowserStack Real Device Cloud. The press release states that "BrowserStack is doubling down on its support for open source projects with full and unlimited access to the BrowserStack platform and its capabilities. The goal is to empower open source developers with the tools and infrastructure necessary to test with speed, accuracy and scale." See the BrowserStack blog post "Supporting Open Source to Drive Community Innovation" for more on BrowserStack's commitment to open source.

  • Locks in the classroom – 2018

    For the sixth year now, our grade nine students have been doing 3D modeling using Blender. We ran late this year, but the final locks were finished a couple of weeks ago, and they’re finally ready for publishing.

  • CVE-2018-3665: Lazy State Save/Restore As The Latest CPU Speculative Execution Issue

    The latest speculative execution vulnerability affecting modern CPUs has now been made public: Lazy State Save/Restore, a.k.a. CVE-2018-3665.

    This vulnerability concerns saving/restore state when switching between applications. The newly-disclosed vulnerability exploits lazy-state restores for floating-point state when context switching, which is done as a performance optimization, to obtain information about the activity of other applications on the system.

  • AI Is Coming to Edge Computing Devices

    Very few non-server systems run software that could be called machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI). Yet, server-class “AI on the Edge” applications are coming to embedded devices, and Arm intends to fight with Intel and AMD over every last one of them.

  • Cortex-A76, Mali-G76, and ML chip designs pump up AI

    Arm’s Cortex-A76 design offers speed/efficiency improvements including a 4x boost in AI performance, and is paired with a new Mali-G76 GPU that is also said to aid AI. Meanwhile, Arm revealed more details on its upcoming ML co-processors.

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Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds, Microsoft's Spying Marketed as 'Security', and Xbash Hype

Games: Distance, Ballistic Overkill, GOG, Valve, and Wolfenstein: The Old Blood

today's howtos

Cozy Is A Nice Linux Audiobook Player For DRM-Free Audio Files

You could use any audio player to listen to audiobooks, but a specialized audiobook player like Cozy makes everything easier, by remembering your playback position and continuing from where you left off for each audiobook, or by letting you set the playback speed of each book individually, among others. The Cozy interface lets you browse books by author, reader or recency, while also providing search functionality. Books front covers are supported by Cozy - either by using embedded images, or by adding a cover.jpg or cover.png image in the book folder, which is automatically picked up and displayed by Cozy. When you click on an audiobook, Cozy lists the book chapters on the right, while displaying the book cover (if available) on the left, along with the book name, author and the last played time, along with total and remaining time: Read more