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  • IT Security Woes and Linux – Unleaded Hangout

    IT Security Woes and Linux are the topic of the day with the hangout crew. We discuss recent events with Equifax and how they’re not the only cybersecurity incident worth note.

  • GNOME Asia 2017

    Finally, I got opportunity to write about my first and awesome GNOME Asia 2017. This year is a special year for GNOME as it’s the 20th anniversary of GNOME and 10th anniversary of GNOME Asia conference.

    GNOME Asia was hosted at Chongqing University, Chongqing this year which happens to be known as 3D city built on and around mountains. It was also my first experience in China as a visitor. I was excited.

  • Faking cleaner URLs in the Debian BTS
  • My Free Software Activities in October 2017

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • Skylake-based touch panels offer up to IP69 protection

    Wincomm’s Linux-ready “WTP-9E66” resistive touch-panel PCs come in IP66 protected 15-, 19-, and 22-inch models, with optional PCAP, IP67, and IP69.

  • Tizen 4.0 Milestone M2: What has been released?

    Samsung has published the second milestone, so-called M2, of Tizen 4.0. This is the second release for Tizen 4.0 after Samsung hit the first milestone back in June, also announcing that Tizen is the most successful Linux-based embedded OS in the whole world. As expected, Tizen 4.0 M2 comes with a bunch of new, welcome additions and some fine-tuning for the platform.

  • Apple Quarter and Few Other Items in Smartphone Wars

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Akademy 2018 site visit

    Last week I was part of the expedition by KDE (together with Kenny and Petra) to visit the local team that is helping us organize Akademy 2018 in Vienna.

  • 12 emerging IT job titles with a bright future [Ed: They interject pure buzzwords into job titles (not new jobs). Typical Red Hat spin.]
  • At This Price, Is It Too Late To Buy Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?
  • My suggestion for QEMU

    I have been involved in open source software since 1993. And in 1994, I believed so strongly in the ability for people to come together to write code that I created the FreeDOS Project, to replicate the functionality of MS-DOS. And twenty-three years later, I'm still using and developing FreeDOS.

    My desktop system is Linux, and I run FreeDOS using QEMU (Quick EMUlator). QEMU is very easy to use, and provides great flexbility to define your virtual machine. I run FreeDOS in QEMU when I want to play an old DOS game, or when I want to test some legacy software, or when I want to write code to update a FreeDOS program.

    But one problem pops up occasionally when using QEMU. A lot of old DOS software uses the function keys to do various things. The most extreme example is WordPerfect, which was arguably the most popular commercial word processor of the day. WordPerfect is notorious for using all of the function keys, in every combination, including use of Ctrl and Alt to access all the common features. I think WordPerfect probably used all of the expanded keys too, like Home and End.

  • syspatch(8) Binary Updates Now for the Latest Release Only

     

    We intend to only build syspatches for one release in the future.  Errata patches will continue to be generated for 2 releases.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Clear Linux Reaches The Amazon EC2 Cloud
  • Freedreno MSM DRM Driver Updates Submitted For Linux 4.15

    New features and improvements in this DRM driver for Qualcomm display hardware includes preemption support for Adreno A5xx hardware, display fixes for the Snapdragon 820, async cursor plane updates, refactoring of some code, improvements to the firmware loading, and a number of GPU debugging enhancements. For the preemption support it is already available in patch form for libdrm and the Freedreno Gallium3D driver for exposing context priority support.

  • GTK+ Twitter App Corebird Has Pushed Out a New Release

    A new version of Linux Twitter app Corebird has been released with improved user autocomplete, image-only tweets, links in profile bios, and more.

  • Introducing Narabu, part 4: Decoding

    So we're at the stage where the structure is in place. How do we decode? Once we have the structure, it's actually fairly straightforward:

    First of all, we need to figure out where each slice starts and ends. This is done on the CPU, but it's mostly just setting up pointers, so it's super-cheap. It doesn't see any pixels at all, just lengths and some probability distributions (those are decoded on the CPU, but they're only a few hundred values and no FP math is involved).

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  • KBibTeX 0.7-rc1 (0.6.95)
  • LibreELEC 8.2.0 Kodi-focused Linux distro is here, but Raspberry Pi versions are pulled

    While many folks prefer to leverage legal streaming services like Netflix on hardware such as Apple TV and Roku nowadays, other people still prefer accessing locally stored media files. Is that concept dying? Yeah, but it will be a while before it is dead completely. Not to mention, music and movie pirates will keep locally stored downloaded media content alive for quite some time.

    Don't get me wrong, not everyone that watches locally stored media files are pirates, but some certainly are. Whether you are accessing downloaded media or streaming content using an addon, the Kodi media center is a great way to experience it. Taking it a step further, a Linux-based operating system that exists just to serve Kodi is even better. Today, one of the best such distros, LibreELEC, gets a major update to version 8.2.0.

  • Ultimate Edition 5.7
  • Ethereum & OpenCL: ROCm vs. AMDGPU-PRO 17.40

    Following this week's Ethereum and OpenCL benchmarks with Radeon vs. NVIDIA using the latest Linux drivers, some premium supporters requested a fresh AMDGPU-PRO vs. ROCm comparison. So here are a couple of those OpenCL benchmarks of AMDGPU-PRO vs. ROCm on different Polaris / Fiji and Vega GPUs.

  • Why open source is increasingly key to government innovation

    Open source is at the heart of much of the innovation transforming the global economy and society today. OpenGov spoke to Mr. Dirk-Peter van Leeuwen (above), Senior vice president and General Manager, Asia Pacific at Red Hat Inc., the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, to learn about how governments are leveraging open source to deliver services at the high standards expected by citizens.

  • Do Analysts See Any Upside to Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?
  • Mender to Provide Over-the-air Software Updates for Embedded Linux

    Internet of Things and connected devices are everywhere. And though they solve a number of specific problems, these Internet of Things devices can easily be converted into the Internet of Threats if they are not patched for security vulnerabilities.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Introduction To Univention Corporate Server

    Today, I want to introduce Univention Corporate Server (UCS), an enterprise Linux distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux and built by Univention. Let me begin with Univention, the organization behind UCS. Univention builds Open Source software for organizations to make the access to applications and devices for their members as easy as possible. Basically, this involves three core topics:

  • Google Partners with Cisco for Hybrid Cloud Powered by Kubernetes

    Cisco and Google announced a new partnership on Oct. 24 in a bid to help enable a hybrid cloud solution that uses Cisco hardware on-premises and Google Cloud Platform.

  • Cisco and Google partner on new hybrid-cloud approach: Goodzilla

    On Oct. 25, Cisco and Google announced a new technology partnership, which went by the internal name Goodzilla. This will enable Cisco customers to run and move their applications between Cisco-powered data centers and the Google Cloud Platform in a new kind of hybrid cloud.

    The glue that will bind them together: Kubernetes and Istio.

    Kubernetes is an open-source container manager. Originally developed by Google as Borg, today, it's controlled by the The Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). It has quickly become the most popular container orchestration program. Except for Amazon Web Services (AWS), it's available on all major public clouds and works with all containers.

  • Many thanks to Linode

    Behind the scenes with Kubuntu, we build packages, then test and finally release to our users. We mostly rely on the building services provided by Canonical on Launchpad, but also are lucky enough to have services donated by some third parties. A lot of our developers are working on quite slow internet connections and when working with large source-code tarballs this takes a very long time, is painful and quite honestly leads to developers burning out.

  • Linux-based RFID portal designed for complex data fusion

    Italian RFID technology producer Datalogic has unveiled a high-end RFID portal reader designed for real-time inventory management in warehouse, automatic gate, and retail environments. The Linux-driven DLR-PR001 is essentially an IoT gateway for RFID and other inputs. It’s especially suited for “complex AutoID scenarios where data can be collected and fed directly to the reader from multiple sources such as smart card readers, bar code readers, GPS and other in-field sensors,” says the company.

  • Linux-friendly SBCs deliver Kaby Lake or Skylake on an ATX platter

    Both boards can run 64-bit Fedora Linux, as well as Windows builds up to 64-bit Windows 10. The boards are said to be suitable for embedded applications including digital signage, rolling stock, industrial robots, and aerospace.

  • Flash Drive-Sized VLC Adapter Plays Nice With Linux Laptops

    VLC pioneer PureLiFi has announced the LiFi XC, a USB stick-sized dongle that lets tablets and laptops connect to the internet via visible light.

    Teased earlier this year at Mobile World Congress, the LiFi XC is about three times smaller than the bulky LiFi X dongle and roughly 14 times smaller than the huge Li-Flame proof of concept product launched in 2014.

today's leftovers

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  • A REUSE compliant Curl

    The REUSE initiative is aiming to make free and open source software licenses computer readable. We do this by the introduction of our three REUSE best practices, all of which seek to make it possible for a computer program to read which licenses apply to a specific software package.

  • Cozy is a Promising New Audiobook Player for Linux Desktops

    A promising new audiobook player for Linux desktop has joined the shelves of open-source software. It’s called Cozy, uses GTK3, and is billed as providing a ‘modern’ front-end from which to browse your collection of talking books.

  • Calamares releases

    It’s been a quiet month for me for blogging, but one filled with unexpected and weird and not-really-bloggable things. There was a trip to Berlin, where I had the pleasure of meeing up with a bunch of KDE people whom I hadn’t seen for over a month. Long time. There was also an accident with maple syrup, I’m sure.

  • Some dreams about mageia 7

    As we released mageia 6 and we released Pulse 4.0 at work i had some time to think about what i would like to see, to do for mageia 7.

  • Red Hat honours IAG at its Innovation Awards for APAC

    Open source specialist Red Hat has announced that IAG has won the top honour at the 2017 Red Hat Innovation Awards for Australia and New Zealand.

    Red Hat says IAG has been chosen due to its outstanding and innovative usage of Red Hat solutions, and for the positive impact they have created in accelerating innovation through open source.

  • Updated Settings Application in Fedora 27 Workstation

    Fedora 27 Workstation is slated for release later in the year, and it ships with version 3.26 of GNOME. One of the awesome changes from upstream GNOME that is shipping in Fedora 27 is the re-designed Settings application. The new Settings has moved from a grid layout to a side panel, and several of the pages — like the display configuration — are also redesigned.

  • What I have found interesting in Fedora during the week 42 of 2017
  • The Official Ubuntu 17.10 ‘Artful Aardvark’ T-Shirt Is Here

    An official Ubuntu 17.10 t-shirt is now available to buy from Canonical’s online store.

    Canonical has produced mascot t-shirts for each release since Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ‘Hardy Heron’.

    The latest design is a dark blueish¹ color and boasts a bright orange aardvark mascot in the centre. The reverse of the shirt reads “Artful Aardvark 17.10” in orange text.

  • The Essential Phone gets a $200 price drop, now $499
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today's leftovers

  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record
    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.
  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots
    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users. SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.
  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian
    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.
  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started
    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.
  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier
    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory. The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.

Logstash 6.2.0 Released, Alfresco Grabbed by Private Equity Firm

  • Logstash 6.2.0 Release Improves Open Source Data Processing Pipeline
    The "L" in the ELK stack gets updated with new features including advanced security capabilities. Many modern enterprises have adopted the ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) stack to collect, process, search and visualize data. At the core of the ELK stack is the open-source Logstash project which defines itself as a server-side data processing pipeline - basically it helps to collect logs and then send them to a users' "stash" for searching, which in many cases is Elasticsearch.
  • Alfresco Software acquired by Private Equity Firm
    Enterprise apps company taken private in a deal that won't see a change in corporate direction. Alfresco has been developing its suite of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Business Process Management (BPM) technology since the company was founded back in June of 2005. On Feb. 8, Alfresco announced that it was being acquired by private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners (THL). Financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed.

Servers and GPUs: Theano, DevOps, Kubernetes, AWS

  • Open Source Blockchain Computer Theano
    TigoCTM CEO Cindy Zimmerman says “we are excited to begin manufacturing our secure, private and open source desktops at our factory in the Panama Pacifico special economic zone. This is the first step towards a full line of secure, blockchain-powered hardware including desktops, servers, laptops, tablets, teller machines, and smartphones.” [...] Every component of each TigoCTM device is exhaustively researched and selected for its security profile based especially on open source hardware, firmware, and software. In addition, devices will run the GuldOS operating system, and open source applications like the Bitcoin, Ethereum and Dash blockchains. This fully auditable stack is ideal for use in enterprise signing environments such as banks and investment funds.
  • Enterprises identify 10 essential tools for DevOps [Ed: "Source code repository" and other old things co-opted to promote the stupid buzzword "devops"]
    Products branded with DevOps are everywhere, and the list of options grows every day, but the best DevOps tools are already well-known among enterprise IT pros.
  • The 4 Major Tenets of Kubernetes Security
    We look at security from the perspective of containers, Kubernetes deployment itself and network security. Such a holistic approach is needed to ensure that containers are deployed securely and that the attack surface is minimized. The best practices that arise from each of the above tenets apply to any Kubernetes deployment, whether you’re self-hosting a cluster or employing a managed service. We should note that there are related security controls outside of Kubernetes, such as the Secure Software Development Life Cycle (S-SDLC) or security monitoring, that can help reduce the likelihood of attacks and increase the defense posture. We strongly urge you to consider security across the entire application lifecycle rather than take a narrow focus on the deployment of containers with Kubernetes. However, for the sake of brevity, in this series, we will only cover security controls within the immediate Kubernetes environment.
  • GPUs on Google’s Kubernetes Engine are now available in open beta
    The Google Kubernetes Engine (previously known as the Google Container Engine and GKE) now allows all developers to attach Nvidia GPUs to their containers. GPUs on GKE (an acronym Google used to be quite fond of, but seems to be deemphasizing now) have been available in closed alpha for more than half a year. Now, however, this service is in beta and open to all developers who want to run machine learning applications or other workloads that could benefit from a GPU. As Google notes, the service offers access to both the Tesla P100 and K80 GPUs that are currently available on the Google Cloud Platform.
  • AWS lets users run SAP apps directly on SUSE Linux
  • SUSE collaborates with Amazon Web Services toaccelerate SAP migrations

Chrome and Firefox

  • The False Teeth of Chrome's Ad Filter.
    Today Google launched a new version of its Chrome browser with what they call an "ad filter"—which means that it sometimes blocks ads but is not an "ad blocker." EFF welcomes the elimination of the worst ad formats. But Google's approach here is a band-aid response to the crisis of trust in advertising that leaves massive user privacy issues unaddressed. Last year, a new industry organization, the Coalition for Better Ads, published user research investigating ad formats responsible for "bad ad experiences." The Coalition examined 55 ad formats, of which 12 were deemed unacceptable. These included various full page takeovers (prestitial, postitial, rollover), autoplay videos with sound, pop-ups of all types, and ad density of more than 35% on mobile. Google is supposed to check sites for the forbidden formats and give offenders 30 days to reform or have all their ads blocked in Chrome. Censured sites can purge the offending ads and request reexamination. [...] Some commentators have interpreted ad blocking as the "biggest boycott in history" against the abusive and intrusive nature of online advertising. Now the Coalition aims to slow the adoption of blockers by enacting minimal reforms. Pagefair, an adtech company that monitors adblocker use, estimates 600 million active users of blockers. Some see no ads at all, but most users of the two largest blockers, AdBlock and Adblock Plus, see ads "whitelisted" under the Acceptable Ads program. These companies leverage their position as gatekeepers to the user's eyeballs, obliging Google to buy back access to the "blocked" part of their user base through payments under Acceptable Ads. This is expensive (a German newspaper claims a figure as high as 25 million euros) and is viewed with disapproval by many advertisers and publishers.
  • Going Home
  • David Humphrey: Edge Cases
  • Experiments in productivity: the shared bug queue
    Over the next six months, Mozilla is planning to switch code review tools from mozreview/splinter to phabricator. Phabricator has more modern built-in tools like Herald that would have made setting up this shared queue a little easier, and that’s why I paused…briefly
  • Improving the web with small, composable tools
    Firefox Screenshots is the first Test Pilot experiment to graduate into Firefox, and it’s been surprisingly successful. You won’t see many people talking about it: it does what you expect, and it doesn’t cover new ground. Mozilla should do more of this.