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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 6 Excellent Console Linux File Managers

    A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator (such as GNOME Terminal or the aforementioned Terminator). Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.

  • PHP Tour 2016 Clermont-Ferrand
  • Enlightenment's EFL Getting New DRM Library

    Chris Michael of Samsung has been working on a new DRM library for the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) with a number of improvements.

    The initial implementation of this new library, Ecore_Drm2, has been added to EFL Git.

  • Antergos 2016.05.28 Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo Linux 20160514 Screenshot Tour
  • First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code

    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.

  • OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid

    I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details.

  • vcswatch is now looking for tags

    About a week ago, I extended vcswatch to also look at tags in git repositories.

    Previously, it was solely paying attention to the version number in the top paragraph in debian/changelog, and would alert if that version didn't match the package version in Debian unstable or experimental. The idea is that "UNRELEASED" versions will keep nagging the maintainer (via DDPO) not to forget that some day this package needs an upload. This works for git, svn, bzr, hg, cvs, mtn, and darcs repositories (in decreasing order of actual usage numbers in Debian. I had actually tried to add arch support as well, but that VCS is so weird that it wasn't worth the trouble).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What is Linux?
  • The Rumors Aren’t True

    I was listening to my usual round of amazing Linux Podcasts this week (you know who you are) and one of the discussions that made the rounds was about hardware compatibility issues with Linux. One of the hosts was bemoaning the issues with running linux on a repurposed MacBook and trying to get the wireless drivers to work. That led to a discussion about proprietary vs. non-proprietary drivers and you can pretty much guess how the conversation went from there.

  • Download Linux Voice issue 19

    Issue 19 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • LabXNow – Code, Develop, and Test Software From Anywhere on the Cloud

    LabXNow is a cloud service provider that offers a free and personal online environment to different users with direct access from a web browser. You can think of it as your personal remote lab, where you can play around, code, develop or whatever you want. You can access it from anywhere with an Internet connection.

  • BoilingSteam has a nice podcast episode with the creator of SteamOS tools
  • Please, Don’t Touch Anything now supports Linux, don't you dare touch that button

    You all just want to buy it so you can press the button don't you? I know I do. Please, Don’t Touch Anything is now officially available on Linux with a nice discount.

  • Meet KDE Neon, A New Linux Distro Based on Ubuntu Linux

    KDE Neon is the latest and probably the best technology the KDE Community has developed, and I stand to be corrected if it is not so. You can call it a new Linux distro but KDE Neon is basically built comprehensively on Ubuntu Linux as the core, to bring the latest and hottest software developed by the KDE Community in a rolling release format to KDE desktop environment users.

    The KDE Neon project is intended to provide users cutting-edge features on a highly configurable and yet stable desktop in a single package. The packages made in KDE Neon are based on Ubuntu and are not compatible with other Linux distros such as Arch Linux and OpenSUSE as stated by Jonathan Riddell, one of the project heads and who was previously in charge of the Kubuntu Linux project.

  • Do you like Windows 10 Look but Love LINUX? Here are Windows 10 GTK Themes for you!

    Many people liked the Interface of Windows 10 because now it carries all those features which Linux already have from years. Do you like the look of Windows 10 but don't want to use it? Here we brought Windows 10 GTK themes for you, this theme offers two versions Light and Dark, you can use whatever you like. But hold on, now many people will say like 'why you are so obsessed by other operating systems and so, Linux is great OS', yeah I do agree that many geeks consider Linux above all operating systems. The superiority of the Linux shows that you can do whatever you like to do with your OS, change look/design and so, that's called freedom. We should appreciate new comers to Linux instead of letting them down, and people leave Linux because they think it is quite difficult to survive with this OS.

  • Manjaro Update 2016-05-22 (stable)

    We are happy to announce our first update for Manjaro 16.06-rc1 (Daniella)!

  • Hackfest 1.2 (Day 2)

    Welcome to Day 2 of the Solus Hackfest 1.2!

  • This Week in Solus – Install #29
  • Unixstickers Gives Back to FOSS Projects
  • Chalet OS 16.04LTS
  • ChaletOS 16.04 - See What's New
  • New Gentoo LiveDVD "Choice Edition"
  • Chromium 51 packages available
  • Debian: Outreachy, Debian Reproducible builds Week 1 Progress Report
  • Puppet 4 uploaded to Debian unstable

    Puppet 4 has been uploaded to Debian unstable. This is a major upgrade from Puppet 3.

    If you are using Puppet, chances are that it is handling important bits of your infrastructure, and you should upgrade with care.

    Here are some points to consider.

  • Pocket CHIP $49 Indie Game Console

    Last year, we were impressed by Next Thing Co's $9 CHIP computer. At Maker Faire 2016, we were able to check out their PocketCHIP housing, which puts CHIP into a portable console package that runs Linux and indie game console Pico-8. Here's what you can do with the $49 system!

  • Finnish Govt Disappointed with Microsoft’s Job Cuts, Says They Impact Economy

    Microsoft has recently announced a new round of job layoffs at its Mobile unit in Finland, as it moves forward with its restructuring and reorganization plan following the acquisition of Nokia’s Devices and Services unit.

  • The Nokia Saga Predictions on This Blog: Full Listing with Links[Ed: Microsoft killed Nokia]

    So lets understand the context of when Elop came in. Nokia in 2009 sold 67.8 million smartphones globally (with 39% market share). This was a world record obivously and Nokia set record profits in its smartphone unit. In 2010 Nokia then grew 35.8 million new smartphone sales (growth rate of 53% !!!!). Nokia from 2009 to 2010 grew MORE than Apple even thought Apple released its most popular new iPhone model ever, the iPhone 4. Apple grew 22.4 million units but Nokia grew more, Nokia grew 35.8 million new smartphones. Very literally mathematically irrevocably true - Nokia was WINNING against Apple iPhone in 2010. Nokia GREW MORE than Apple with its MOST iconic new smartphone. The GAP between Nokia and Apple was NOT CLOSING, it was GROWING. Nokia was PULLING AWAY from Apple in 2010. Look at the numbers side-by-side...

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • FLOSS Weekly 389: Best Practices Badge
  • OpenGL 4.5 For The Intel Mesa Driver May Be Imminent

    Intel has been rapidly advancing their OpenGL 4.x support and OpenGL 4.5 is even in sight now.

    Kristian Høgsberg today landed GL_KHR_robustness support in the i965 DRI driver, a requirement for OpenGL 4.5.

  • Shotwell vs. digiKam

    How to manage your photos? – That is probably the biggest question for anyone doing anything with a photo camera. As resolutions of cameras grow, the data we have to manage is growing ever. In my case I am talking about more than 50000 photos and videos measuring up to about 200Gb of disk space, constantly growing. There are several photo management softwares out there, I guess the most commonly used ones are Shotwell for the Gnome desktop, digiKam for the KDE world, and FotoXX. I have not used Shotwell and digiKam for quite some time, and collect here my experiences of strength and weaknesses of the two programs. FotoXX seems to be very powerful, too, but I haven’t tested it till now.

  • Tweet your database with db2twitter

    db2twitter is developed by and run for LinuxJobs.fr, the job board of th french-speaking Free Software and Opensource community.

  • Tiny Core Linux 7.1 Screenshot Tour
  • Annoying myths about Linux that won't go away

    Linux has been around for many years, and has gotten better and better as time has gone by. Yet there are some enduring, inaccurate, and annoying myths about Linux that persist to this day.

    A Linux redditor started a thread about Linux myths and got some interesting responses from his fellow Linux users:

  • GStreamer Spring Hackfest 2016

    After missing the last few GStreamer hackfests I finally managed to attend this time. It was held in Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest city. The city is located by the sea side and the entire hackfest and related activities were either directly by the sea or just a couple blocks away.

  • My talk at OSDC 2016: Continuous Integration in Data Centers – Further 3 Years Later
  • Isenkram with PackageKit support - new version 0.23 available in Debian unstable

    The isenkram system is a user-focused solution in Debian for handling hardware related packages. The idea is to have a database of mappings between hardware and packages, and pop up a dialog suggesting for the user to install the packages to use a given hardware dongle. Some use cases are when you insert a Yubikey, it proposes to install the software needed to control it; when you insert a braille reader list it proposes to install the packages needed to send text to the reader; and when you insert a ColorHug screen calibrator it suggests to install the driver for it. The system work well, and even have a few command line tools to install firmware packages and packages for the hardware already in the machine (as opposed to hotpluggable hardware).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu specs and features

    Canonical's Meizu line of smartphones may not mean a lot to UK readers, but the Pro 5 should help to raise its profile.

    Unlike its competitors the Meizu Pro 5 runs the Ubuntu operating system. This approach means it relies less on apps and more on an integrated experience.

    It's just as powerful as the Samsung Galaxy S6, but does that mean it's worth your cash?

  • What containers and unikernels can learn from Arduino and Raspberry Pi

    Currently, unikernels seem quite similar to building printed circuits. They require a lot of upfront investment to utilize and are very specialized, providing benefits for certain workloads. In the meantime containers are quite interesting even for conventional workloads and don't require as much investment. Typically an operations team should be able to port an application to containers, whereas it takes real re-engineering to port an application to unikernels and the industry is still not quite sure what workloads can be ported to unikernels.

  • Coming soon! First ever certification for open hardware

    At the Summit, OSHWA will launch the first ever (version 1) of the open source hardware certification, administered by OSHWA. This certification is designed to benefit at least two parts of the open source hardware community.

    First, it benefits purchasers of open source hardware by making it easy to identify truly open source hardware in the marketplace. Projects and products obtaining certification and displaying the certification logo clearly communicate a commonly agreed upon definition of openness with customers and users. While certification is not a condition for openness, obtaining certification is a way to make it clear to others that a given project is open source hardware.

  • 3 alternatives to resumes for hiring talent

    By 2020, there will be 1.4 million new computer science jobs but only 400,000 computer science students. The number of computer science jobs is growing twice as fast as the national average for job growth. Hiring is not a filtering problem anymore, it's a sourcing problem. We need to "sell" our companies and hire the most qualified people before our competitors do.

  • Open-source blueprint Pepperoni released for mobile development

    Named Pepperoni, the development team behind this open-source project has been working for more than 10 months trying to build apps and learning the best ways to do it using React Native. The company powering Pepperoni is Futurice, a software consulting company that creates digital services for its customers. Futurice is also behind the open-source social impact Spice Program, where it serves as advocate of open-source projects.

  • Install GrandCMS on an Ubuntu VPS
  • Install GLPI (IT and asset Managemet Software) on Ubuntu 16.04 Server

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

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Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

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Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

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Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

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