Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record

    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.

  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots

    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users.

    SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.

  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian

    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.

  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started

    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.

  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier

    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory.

    The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • util-linux v2.32 -- what's new?

    This release (rc1 now) is without dramatic changes and game-changing improvements.

    We have again invested our time and love to make cal(1) more usable. The most visible change is possibility to specify calendar system.

  • GLXVND Support Lands In Git For X.Org Server 1.20

    There's been a lot of activity in xorg-server Git the past few days, making it look like the developers may be trying to wrap up the very long X.Org Server 1.20 cycle. The latest major feature work landing is GLXVND.

    GLXVND is the feature work spearheaded last year by NVIDIA for what is effectively "server-side GLVND", or taking their OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library approach from the user-space OpenGL drivers and applying the same concept to allowing multiple GLX modules to happily co-exist on the same running X.Org Server.

  • Weblate 2.19

    Weblate 2.19 has been released today. The biggest improvement are probably addons to customize translation workflow, but there are some other enhancements as well.

  • Apache Camel URI completion in VS Code XML Editor and Eclipse Che
  • Certmonger, SELinux and Keystores in random locations
  • Red Hat’s David Egts on 3 Application Migration Approaches

    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat’s public sector, told MeriTalk in an interview published Wednesday that lift and shift, augment with new layers and rewrite are three approaches government agencies and companies can adopt to modernize aging applications.

    Egts said the effectiveness of the approaches depends on the application, contextual factors and business and that agencies should work with system integrators that help execute those three app migration approaches.

  • Today’s Brokerage Rating: Tyson Foods, Inc. (TSN), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • CenturyLink, Inc. (CTL) is at $17.58 per share and Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) is listed at $134.19
  • Airtop2 Inferno Offers i7-7700K + GeForce GTX 1080 While Being Fanless
  • ‘Like a phoenix from the ashes’ – Nokia’s brand value jumped a whopping 70% last year [Ed: Maybe because they got rid of Microsoft and Windows]

    Anderson credits Nokia's rise in value to its two-pronged strategy. On the one hand, there's the core Networks business – which, despite a recent slowdown, has done well and could see a boost from ensuing 5G rollouts – and, on the other, the company's lucrative and fast-growing tech licensing operation.

    [...]

    Nokia Technologies, the company's patent licensing business, has become a major revenue source for Nokia, which has even turned to third party litigation specialists to help secure a portfolio of patents dating back to the company's heyday (Nokia ranked 9th on Brand Finance's list in 2008).

  • F-Droid: an alternative to Google Play

    It is important to talk about Android at Linux conferences like linux.conf.au, Peter Serwylo said to start his talk. Android is deployed on millions or billions of devices, but it does suffer from some problems that F-Droid, an alternative Android app store, tries to address. The title of his talk noted that F-Droid is private, secure, free, and open, all of which are desirable traits for many in our community.

    Serwylo got interested in Android because it was running on the first smart device he ever owned. He chose Android because he was getting interested in free software and recognized that Android was a well-supported version of Linux that was available on lots of different devices. But he found that the Android experience was not quite the "Linux experience that you are used to".

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Is it an upgrade, or a sidegrade?

    I went to a nearby store, looked at the offers... And, in part due to the attitude of the salesguy, I decided not to (installing Linux will void any warranty, WTF‽ In 2018‽). Came back home, and... My Acer works again!

  • How To Install KDE Plasma Mobile On Your Android Smartphone?

    New Linux-based mobile operating systems and hardware projects have been making numerous headlines in the recent months. Projects like postmarketOS, Plasma Mobile, Librem 5, etc., have managed to gain momentum and support of open source community.

    To give you a rough idea of how things are going on the Plasma Mobile land, its developers have shared two methods (Via: Softpedia) to test Plasma Mobile on an actual Android smartphone. In a previous post, they also shared virtual machine images of the OS.

  • A KDE Love Story: Translating Kalzium into Chinese

    When I was a high school student, chemistry was not my cup of tea. My grades in chemistry were not bad either, but I hated memorizing those organic compounds. Then, I decided to major in computer science at university, and from that moment, destiny tightly bonded me and Free and Open Source Software.

  • Last week in Kube
  • fwupd now tells you about known issues

    That one little URL for the user to click on is the result of a rule engine being added to the LVFS. Of course, firmware updates shouldn’t ever fail, but in the real world they do, because distros don’t create /boot/efi correctly (cough, Arch Linux) or just because some people are running old versions of efivar, a broken git snapshot of libfwupdate or because a vendor firmware updater doesn’t work with secure boot turned on (urgh). Of all the failures logged on the LVFS, 95% fall into about 3 or 4 different failure causes, and if we know hundreds of people are hitting an issue we already understand we can provide them with some help.

  • I love free software… and Gentoo does! #ilovefs

    Some people care if software is free of cost or if it has the best features, above everything else. I don’t. I care that I can legally inspect its inner workings, modify and share modified versions. That’s why I happily avoid macOS, Windows, Skype, Photoshop.

  • Multiplexing Input or Output on a Raspberry Pi Part 1: Shift Registers

    A Raspberry Pi doesn't have that many GPIO pins, and neither does an Arduino Uno. An Arduino Mega does, but buying a Mega to go between the Pi and the keyboard kind of misses the point of scavenging a $3 keyboard; I might as well just buy an I2C or MIDI keyboard. So I needed some sort of I/O multiplexer that would let me read 31 keys using a lot fewer pins.

    There are a bunch of different approaches to multiplexing. A lot of keyboards use a matrix approach, but that makes more sense when you're wiring up all the buttons from scratch, not starting with a pre-wired keyboard like this. The two approaches I'll discuss here are shift registers and multiplexer chips.

  • Fanless, Linux-friendly Kaby Lake mini-tower drives seven 4K displays

    Compulab’s rugged “Airtop2” mini-tower runs Linux Mint or Win 10 on a Xeon E3-1275 or Core i7-7700 CPU with optional Nvidia Quadro P4000 graphics plus up to 64GB DDR4, a 6-drive NVMe/SATA subsystem, up to 7x display ports, and optional M.2 and FACE modules.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 2017 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners

    The polls are closed and the results are in. We once again had some extremely close races and the large number of new categories this year certainly kept things interesting. Congratulations to each and every nominee.

  •  

  • MATE 1.20 Released
  • Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

    This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

    A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

    This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Flickergate: Users Put Surface Pro in Freezer to Fix Issue Microsoft Ignores

    A screen flickering issue impacting Microsoft’s Surface Pro is pushing owners to some extreme workarounds, including putting their devices in freezers.

    As weird as this may sound, this solution solves the problem temporarily, removing the flickering completely and returning the display to normal.

    A group of Surface Pro owners launched a website called “Flickergate” to explain the issue in detail and to emphasize that Microsoft has until now ignored all reports despite hundreds of post being published on its very own forums. One such thread on Microsoft Community has no less than 140 pages of users complaining about the issue since early 2017.

  • Containers from user space

    In a linux.conf.au 2018 keynote called "Containers from user space" [...]

    Frazelle started by noting that she has recently moved to Microsoft — "selling out has been amazing"...

  • Too many lords, not enough stewards

    For anyone who has followed Daniel Vetter's talks over the last year or two, it is fairly clear that he is not happy with the kernel development process and the role played by kernel maintainers. In a strongly worded talk at linux.conf.au (LCA) 2018 in Sydney, he further explored the topic (that he also raised at LCA 2017) in a talk entitled "Burning down the castle". In his view, kernel development is broken and it is unlikely to improve anytime soon.

    He started by noting that this talk would be a "rather more personal talk than others I give". It is his journey from first looking in on the kernel in high school to learn how operating systems work. The kernel developers were his heroes who created this awesome operating system by discussing things out in the open.

    Eventually he started scratching his own itch in the graphics subsystem, which led to him getting hired to work on Linux graphics professionally on a small team. He got volunteered to be the kernel maintainer for that team, which grew from three to twenty people in a year or two. In that time he learned the tough lesson that "leading teams is leading people". But he has learned that the way kernel maintainers work is making developers unhappy, including him. The talk would be a look at how he learned just how broken things are.

  • Media Subsystem Changes Head Into Linux 4.16: NVIDIA Tegra Decoder, Xbox One TV Tuner

    While the Linux 4.16 merge window is nearing the end of the line, there still are some feature updates still being sent in, including a big batch of media subsystem changes sent in on Tuesday.

  • RadeonSI VCN Encode Now Supports HEVC Main

    More video acceleration related commits landed in the Mesa 18.1-dev Git tree this week.

    The code that was merged on Monday by AMD's Boyuan Zhang allows for HEVC/H.265 GPU-accelerated video encoding when using the VCN block. The "Video Core Next" hardware is initially just found on Raven Ridge APUs but almost certainly coming to next-generation discrete GPUs.

  • How to set up LXD on Civo (new UK VPS provider)
  • CodeWeavers has Released CrossOver 17.1.0 for Linux and MacOS

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 17.1.0 for both macOS and Linux. CrossOver 17.1.0 has many improvements to the core Windows compatibility layer and also specific enhancements for several popular applications.

  • Quarter Window Tiling Support added to the MATE Desktop

    Support for quarter window tiling has been added to the MATE desktop. The feature is one of several improvements shipping in the latest stable release of the ‘retrospective’ desktop environment, which was forked from GNOME 2 back in 2011. Specifically its MATE’s window manager Marco that’s been gifted support for ‘quadrant window tiling’.

  • MATE 1.20 Released With HiDPI Abilities, Global Menu Support

    After nearly one year in development, lead MATE developer Martin Wimpress has announced version 1.20 of this GNOME2-forked desktop environment.

  • Updates on the Endless App Center / GNOME Software

    The great majority of my work at Endless is to (try to) tame GNOME Software and apply the changes that make it what we simply call “the App Center” (repo here) in the Endless OS.
    This is a lot of work and usually I’d love to share more often what I am doing but end up neglecting the blog due to the lack of time. So here’s a summary of what I have done the past few months.

  • Manjaro XFCE Linux Review – For The Record

    Manjaro XFCE Linux Review. Today I take a look at Manjaro XFCE and I must say, there’s a lot to like about it. I also share some tidbits that I like about this release in addition to some issues I didn’t quite understand as well.

  • Kali Linux 2018.1 Released For Ethical Hackers — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here

    In 2016, Offensive Security–the developer of Kali Linux ethical hacking distro–decided to switch to a rolling release model. However, from time to time, they keep releasing the Kali snapshots with all the latest patches, fixes, and updates. Following the same tradition, the developers have pushed the first snapshot for 2018.

  • OSMC's January update is here

    OSMC's January update is ready with a wide range of improvements and fixes to keep your OSMC device running in tip-top shape.

  • ASU student named finalist for Red Hat’s 'Women in Open Source' award

    When a teenaged Nikki Stevens built her first website, she did not foresee the barriers she would encounter in pursuit of her newfound passion. Now a doctoral candidate with Arizona State University's School for the Future of Innovation in Society, she has founded two organizations, works a lucrative career as a technical architect and freelance software engineer and has been selected as a finalist for Red Hat’s “Women in Open Source Award.”

  • Investor Watch: Looking at the Numbers for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 06 February 2018

    Below is a summary of uploads to the development and supported releases.

  • LXD weekly status #33
  •  

  • Deal Alert! Get exclusive offers on Samsung wearables this Valentine

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New open source platform for machine learning on Kubernetes hits

    Seldon.io has announced the release of a new open-source platform that enables data science teams to run and manage models in production at scale. Seldon Core focuses on solving the last step in any machine learning project to help companies put models into production, to solve real-world problems and maximize the return on investment.

     Traditional infrastructure stacks and devops processes don’t translate well to machine learning, and there is limited open-source innovation in this space, which forces companies to build their own at great expense or to use a proprietary service. Data engineers with the necessary multidisciplinary skillset spanning ML and ops are very scarce. These inefficiencies cause data scientists get pulled into quality-of-service and performance-related challenges that takes their focus away from where they can add the most value  -  building better models.

  • 3 Ways to Extend the Power of Kubernetes

    The ability to extend Kubernetes is its secret superpower, said Chen Goldberg, Director of Engineering at Google, speaking at the recent KubeCon + CloudNativeCon in Austin.

    In the race to build tools that help engineers become more productive, Goldberg talked about how she once led a team that developed a platform that did just that. Despite the fact the platform initially worked, it was not extensible, and it was also difficult to modify.

  • Dealing With Difficult Community Members (Interview on Late Night Linux)

    Difficult community members are something that every community struggles with from time to time. Whether abundantly obnoxious or merely a minor frustration, designing an environment where a multitude of personalities can work together is complicated and requires careful attention to detail.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #145

    39 package reviews have been added, 55 have been updated and 23 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

  • My Free Software Activities in January 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Ubuntu Snowsports & Friends Team
  • Building Slack for the Linux community and adopting snaps

    Used by millions around the world, Slack is an enterprise software platform that allows teams and businesses of all sizes to communicate effectively. Slack works seamlessly with other software tools within a single integrated environment, providing an accessible archive of an organisation’s communications, information and projects. Although Slack has grown at a rapid rate in the 4 years since their inception, their desktop engineering team who work across Windows, MacOS and Linux consists of just 4 people currently. We spoke to Felix Rieseberg, Staff Software Engineer, who works on this team following the release of Slack’s first snap last month to discover more about the company’s attitude to the Linux community and why they decided to build a snap.

  • Concurrent Real-Time Introduces RedHawk Linux for NVIDIA Jetson TX2
  • How To Get iPhone X-like Gestures On Any Android Smartphone Right Now?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SUSE polishes openSUSE Leap 15

    The development version of openSUSE Leap 15 has reached its beta phase builds and snapshots are available for testers.

    As a free and open source (FOSS) operating system, Leap is derived from the source code of SUSE Enterprise Linux (known not as SEL, but SLE) and so is positioned in much the same space as CentOS (from Red Hat) and Ubuntu (from Canonical).

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Hot Stock in Focus
  • Skylake-based Nano-ITX SBC offers 4x GbE and 8x stackable PCIe

    ADL’s rugged “ADL120S” SBC runs Linux or Windows on 6th Gen Core CPUs, and offers dual 4K DP ports, 4x GbE ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, and expansion via 2x M.2 slots and 8x stackable PCIe slots.

  • Block ads on your network with Raspberry Pi and pi-hole

    Got an old Raspberry Pi lying around? Hate seeing ads while browsing the web? Pi-hole is an open source software project that blocks ads for all devices on your home network by routing all advertising servers into nowhere. What's best is it takes just a few minutes to set up.

    Pi-hole blocks over 100,000 ad-serving domains, blocks advertisements on any device (including mobiles, tablets, and PCs), and because it completely blocks ads rather than just hiding them, this improves overall network performance (because ads are never downloaded). You can monitor performance and statistics in a web interface, and there's even an API you can use.

  • Verizon Folds To Government Pressure To Blacklist Huawei Without A Shred Of Public Evidence

    Earlier this month, AT&T cancelled a smartphone sales agreement with Huawei just moments before it was to be unveiled at CES. Why? Several members of the Senate and House Intelligence Committees had crafted an unpublished memo claiming that Huawei was spying for the Chinese government, and pressured both the FCC and carriers to blacklist the company. AT&T, a stalwart partner in the United States' own surveillance apparatus was quick to comply, in part because it's attempting to get regulators to sign off on its $86 billion acquisition of media juggernaut Time Warner.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

LMMS Guide Part 1: Creating Simple Melodies Using Sounds And Instruments

​LMMS stands for Linux Multimedia Studio. It is a very good open-source program that is used to create music tracks using sound files, predefined instruments, and sound effects. LMMS has versions for Windows and macOS in addition to Linux. Their website, of course, lists all of their features offered to users. This article will attempt to provide practical guides and tips for composing songs using LMMS. Read
more

How To Create Shell Scripts

Having to type the same command over and over again can be a daunting task and tiresome for that matter. The shell scripts are really easy to create and run saving you from a lot of misery and anguish if you really prefer using the terminal over using the GUI for running tasks. Read
more

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.