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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • MERA, Mocana, and Osaka NDS Join Automotive Grade Linux

    Automotive Grade Linux, a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, announces three new members: MERA, Mocana, and Osaka NDS.

    “With the support of 11 major automakers, we are increasingly seeing more vehicles in production with AGL,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “We look forward to working with all of our new members as we continue to expand the AGL platform and the global ecosystem of products and services that support it.”

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (php-horde-form and tika), Fedora (dcraw and libmodsecurity), Gentoo (libidn2 and screen), openSUSE (cloud-init, cni, cni-plugins, conmon, fuse-overlayfs, podman, opera, phpMyAdmin, python-mysql-connector-python, ruby2.5, strongswan, and tor), Oracle (ipmitool), Scientific Linux (ipmitool), SUSE (spamassassin and tomcat), and Ubuntu (twisted and webkit2gtk).

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl ootw: –proxy-basic

    This option has been provided and supported since curl 7.12.0, released in June 2004.

  • I had to build a web scraper to buy groceries

    Here’s the deal; very few supermarket chains in Turkey have online stores. Migros Sanalmarket is one of them and it’s arguably the best one. But they don’t have unlimited resources, obviously. When everybody decided to switch to online shopping all of a sudden, they couldn’t handle that demand spike. Even though their delivery system works from 8:30 AM to 10:00 PM every day, it’s virtually impossible to find an empty slot, that is if you play nicely.

  • How to mock in Python? – (almost) definitive guide

    Mock is a category of so-called test doubles – objects that mimic the behaviour of other objects. They are meant to be used in tests to replace real implementation that for some reason cannot be used (.e.g because they cause side effects, like transferring funds or launching nukes). Mocks are used to write assertions about the way they are used – e.g. if they were called, which arguments were used etc. It is a flagship technique of interaction-based testing – checking how objects under test use their collaborators (other objects).

  • Rich adds support for Jupyter Notebooks

    I recently added experimental support for Jupyter Notebooks to Rich.

  • How to Use any() in Python

    As a Python programmer, you’ll frequently deal with Booleans and conditional statements—sometimes very complex ones. In those situations, you may need to rely on tools that can simplify logic and consolidate information. Fortunately, any() in Python is such a tool. It looks through the elements in an iterable and returns a single value indicating whether any element is true in a Boolean context, or truthy.

  • Add developer comments to your extension’s listing page on addons.mozilla.org

    In November 2017, addons.mozilla.org (AMO) underwent a major refresh. In addition to updating the site’s visual style, we separated the code for frontend and backend features and re-architected the frontend to use the popular combination of React and Redux.

    With a small team, finite budget, and other competing priorities, we weren’t able to migrate all features to the new frontend. Some features were added to our project backlog with the hope that one day a staff or community member would have the interest and bandwidth to implement it.

    One of these features, a dedicated section for developer comments on extension listing pages, has recently been re-enabled thanks to a contribution by community member Lisa Chan. Extension developers can use this section to inform users about any known issues or other transient announcements.

    [...]

    We’d like to extend a special thanks to Lisa for re-enabling this feature. If you’re interested in contributing code to addons.mozilla.org, please visit our onboarding wiki for information about getting started.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Here's why experts say that open source software companies survive and thrive during downturns — and how the Great Recession may have been a good thing for the industry
  • Yes, you can build your business in the public cloud: Tune in live online next month to find out exactly how

    As with most key topics of IT intrigue, we have a webcast just for this: on April 30, 2020, El Reg’s Tim Phillips will be joined by Carla Arend, IDC's lead analyst for cloud in EMEA, and Yasser Eissa, VP of IBM Public Cloud for Europe.

    As well as tackling all the basic factors of a public cloud move, they’ll be going a little deeper into the practicalities, talking about how existing cloud investments can help contribute to a wider flexibility in doing more with public cloud; how open-source software can help ramp up security and enterprise-grade infrastructure in the public cloud; and how public cloud can help you avoid vendor lock-in when planning any further changes to the way you work.

  • An Open Source Shipboard Computer System

    We’re not sure how many of you out there own a boat large enough to get its own integrated computer network, but it doesn’t really matter. Even if you can’t use this project personally, it’s impossible not to be impressed with the work [mgrouch] has put into the “Bareboat Necessities” project. From the construction of the hardware to the phenomenal documentation, there’s plenty that even landlubbers can learn from this project.

    In its fully realized form, the onboard computer system includes several components that work together to provide a wealth of valuable information to the operator.

  • Karl Dubost: Week notes - 2020 w13 - worklog - everything is broken

    Coronavirus had no impact on my working life for now. The same as usual.

    Mozilla is working well in a distributed team.

    [...]

    We had an issue with the new form design. We switched to 100% of our users on March 16, 2020. but indeed all the bugs received didn't get the label that they were actually reporting with the new form design. Probably only a third got the new form.

    So that was the state when I fell asleep on Monday night. Mike pushed the bits a bit more during my night and opened.

  • Open-source Bitcoin development funded mainly by Blockstream and Lightning Labs

    Bitcoin has today become synonymous with cryptocurrencies and decentralization. What started off as project popular only among a certain group of tech enthusiasts and cryptographers has now become one of the most radical innovations in the world of finance and technology.

  • SoftIron Raises $34M in Series B Funding for Global Expansion of Purpose-Built Enterprise Data Center Appliance Business
  • SoftIron, the Ceph storage startup, raises $34m
  • SoftIron scores $34 million to help fund global expansion
  • Elizabeth Warren for President open-sources its 2020 campaign tech
  • Open Source Tools From the Warren for President Tech Team

    In our work, we leaned heavily on open source technology — and want to contribute back to that community. So today we’re taking the important step of open-sourcing some of the most important projects of the Elizabeth Warren campaign for anyone to use.

  • Open Source Fonts Are Love Letters to the Design Community

    Font families can sell for hundreds of dollars. Gotham, a popular typeface used by President Barack Obama’s campaign and many others, costs nearly $1,000 to license a complete set of 66 different styles. But The League of Moveable Type, gives all of its fonts away for free. What's more, it makes them open source, so that other people can modify the fonts and make their own versions of them.

    And people have. Raleway, designed by Matt McInerney and released in 2010, was expanded from a single weight into a family with nine weights, from “thin” to bold to “black,” each with matching italics, in 2012 by Pablo Impallari, Rodrigo Fuenzalida, and Igino Marini. It's now one of the most popular font families on Google Fonts, a collection of free fonts hosted by the search giant.

  • AidData: Powerful lessons in global development

    As a research lab of the university’s Global Research Institute, AidData facilitates innovative research projects that bring students and faculty together to solve global problems.

  • Divio Technologies publ : supports fight against COVID-19 through new open-source information-sharing tool

    Divio Technologies AB (publ) today announced the availability of CoReport - an open-source information-sharing tool designed to help local governments manage their resources in addressing COVID-19. CoReport was developed and launched on the Divio platform, in response to a request from a local government region of Switzerland.

  • Using a 40‐year Old Markup Language on the Web

    Historically, troff has been a widely used typesetting language that looks back at a long history.[0] Today’s arguably biggest use of troff are man pages. Man pages come actually in two flavors: ‐man and ‐mdoc macros. The ‐man macros are the ones originally used to typeset the first volume of the UNIX manuals back in the 1970s.[1] In the 80s, the ‐mdoc macros were developed on BSD. The major difference between the two is how much semantic input they allow. ‐man is purely presentational. ‐mdoc is highly semantic; for example, .Pa is a macro to indicate a path. GNU and the entire Linux ecosystem seem strangely attached to the ‐man macros. Furthermore, most "anything to man page" converters output ‐man because they cannot possibly infer the ‐mdoc macros from presentational markup; this is e.g. the case with Mark‐ down. Meanwhile, every BSD, illumos and macOS have moved to ‐mdoc. For more details, see: Kristaps Dzonsons, “Fixing on a Standard Language for UNIX Manuals,” ;login: 34(5), pp. 19‐23, USENIX, Berkeley, CA (October 2009).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SMLR 321: Stay 127.0.0.1

    Tony Bemus, Tom Lawrence, Phil Porada and Jay LaCroix

  • 2020-03-27 | Linux Headlines

    Ardour and Ubuntu Flavors call for testing of their upcoming major releases, Google aims to ease the burden of developing for ARM on x86, and Blender gains a new Corporate Gold-level sponsor.

  • Some Of The Features To Look Forward To With Linux 5.7

    With the Linux 5.7 cycle kicking off in April with its merge window opening upon the release of Linux 5.6, here is a look at some of the changes and new features that have been on our radar for this next version of the Linux kernel.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q1.4 Vulkan Driver Brings Direct Display Improvements

    AMDVLK 2020.Q1.4 is out today as the fourth and last open-source AMD Radeon Vulkan driver code drop of the quarter.

    AMDVLK 2020.Q1.4 simply notes that the immediate and mailbox modes have been enabled for the Vulkan direct display functionality. AMD has supported the VK_EXT_direct_mode_display direct mode display extension back to 2018. Vulkan's direct display mode is for taking exclusive control of display(s) and geared for VR HMD use-cases. What's new now is supporting the immediate and mailbox swapchain presentation modes under the direct display functionality.

  • Linux Mount And Umount Command for using a partition of hard disk 2020
  • Cyber Warranties: Market Fix or Marketing Trick?

    Theoretical work suggests both the breadth of the warranty and the price of a product determine whether the warranty functions as a quality signal. Our analysis has not touched upon the price of these products. It could be that firms with ineffective products pass the cost of the warranty on to buyers via higher prices. Future studies could analyze warranties and price together to probe this issue.

    In conclusion, cyber warranties—particularly cyber-product warranties—do not transfer enough risk to be a market fix as imagined in Woods.5 But this does not mean they are pure marketing tricks either. The most valuable feature of warranties is in preventing vendors from exaggerating what their products can do. Consumers who read the fine print can place greater trust in marketing claims so long as the functionality is covered by a cyber-incident warranty.

  • Dr. Lucie Guibault on What Scientists Should Know About Open Access

    These actions are not surprising given the urgency of the current situation. In our previous post, “Now Is the Time for Open Access Policies—Here’s Why” we explain that rapid and unrestricted access to scientific research and educational materials is necessary to overcome this crisis. However, while we applaud the recent moves by organizations, publishers, and governments to open access to scientific research related to COVID-19, we believe the same level of sharing should be applied to all scientific research. Not only for the public good but also for the good of science. Science can only function properly if results, data, and insights are made openly available. “Universality is a fundamental principle of science,” explains the open access consortium cOAlition S, “only results that can be discussed, challenged, and, where appropriate, tested and reproduced by others qualify as scientific.”

  • What If C++ Abandoned Backward Compatibility?

    Some C++ luminaries have submitted an intriguing paper to the C++ standards committee. The paper presents an ambitious vision to evolve C++ in the direction of safety and simplicity. To achieve this, the authors believe it is worthwhile to give up backwards source and binary compatibility, and focus on reducing the cost of migration (e.g. by investing in tool support), while accepting that the cost of each migration will be nonzero. They're also willing to give up the standard linking model and require whole-toolchain upgrades for each new version of C++.

    I think this paper reveals a split in the C++ community. I think the proposal makes very good sense for organizations like Google with large legacy C++ codebases that they intend to continue investing in heavily for a long period of time. (I would include Mozilla in that set of organizations.) The long-term gains from improving C++ incompatibly will eventually outweigh the ongoing migration costs, especially because they're already adept at large-scale systematic changes to their code (e.g. thanks to gargantuan monorepo, massive-scale static and dynamic checking, and risk-mitigating deployment systems). Lots of existing C++ software really needs those safety improvements.

  • POCL 1.5-RC1 Released As The Portable OpenCL Implementation For CPUs + Other Targets

    POCL 1.5 is on the way for release in April as the first feature update to this Portable OpenCL implementation since the previous release last September. 

    POCL for those that don't know about it is a portable OpenCL implementation that can be run on CPUs of various architectures. Beyond that, this OpenCL 1.2~2.0 implementation has also gained support for running OpenCL on NVIDIA GPUs over CUDA, on AMD GPUs via HSA, and other accelerator targets thanks to building off LLVM's Clang. 

  • How much power and influence do Open Source foundations have?

    “I finally switched over to Linux full time. Yay! How much power and influence do open source foundations have and how much does it affect me as a consumer of open source software?" - Evan First off, welcome to Club Linux, Evan! You'll find the waters here to be, overall, warm and relaxing. As for the question of how much influence various foundations actually have in the Open Source, Free Software, and Linux world… well… that's a tricky question that will take us, meandering, through the wilderness.

  • The Warren Campaign Is Gone—but Its Tech May Live On [Ed: Warren chose Microsoft as staffers for her campaign, so no wonder all her work is now being outsourced to a proprietary prison of Microsoft (GitHub)]

    BEFORE IT ENDED earlier this month, Elizabeth Warren’s presidential campaign developed a reputation for two things: detailed plans to solve concrete problems and a robust ground game. Those attributes came together on the campaign’s tech team, which built a grassroots organizing machine on the backend. That wasn’t enough to win Warren the nomination, but veterans from the team are trying to make sure their work wasn’t all for naught. They’re making seven in-house software projects available to everyone for free on GitHub, the most popular destination for open-source software on the web, in the hope that other Democratic campaigns can build on what they developed during the campaign.

    “We believe we’ll be the biggest open-sourcing of political tech that has happened,” said Mike Conlow, who was the campaign’s chief technology strategist. Few political campaigns are big and well-funded enough to develop their own software. Fewer still make that software open source.

    The tools themselves are not exactly revolutionary; they’re more in the vein of filling in gaps in commercially available political tech. In its early days, the campaign relied on off-the-shelf software. But as the tech team grew to nearly 20 people, it was able to take on software projects of its own. “We were focused on choosing projects where we didn’t think there was an adequate vendor tool out there on the market,” Conlow added. Campaign organizers noticed, for example, that the onboarding process for new volunteers could use more of a personal touch than the system they were using provided. When a new volunteer signed up, they would only receive an automated message. So the team built a tool, which they called Switchboard, that made it easy for organizers to personally reach out to volunteers as soon as they signed up.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/13

    During this week, we have released 6 snapshots to the public (0318, 0319, 0320, 0322, 0324, 0325). The changes were more under the hood than spectacular, but here they are:

  • FSFE in times of Corona: How a virus affects us

    Among all the serious diseases and deaths it causes, the SARS-CoV-2 virus and its accompanying COVID-19 disease also keep the FSFE and the whole Free Software community in suspense. For our community and other charitable organisations we would share our experiences and lessons learnt from the Corona crisis.

    First of all, we are glad that we can fall back on years of experience with remote collaboration crossing borders and continents. Since its foundation, the FSFE has had its roots in all over Europe, working together with people and organisations in various time zones. Luckily, we are trained to use asynchronous communication tools. But the FSFE as an organisation and community still has to deal with new challenges and serious drawbacks that make our work for Free Software much harder. Your help is needed to balance these!

  • Business Source License Adoption

    The summary is that, many well-known databases that were previously Open Source have either moved to an Open-Core Model and/or changed to Source Available licensing. There are various reasons behind this including refinement of business models and protecting investment in intellectual property. I won't debate the motivations or merits of such approaches in this article, there are already many other articles out there which do! Instead I will look briefly at one such Source Available license, the Business Source License, and whom has adopted it and how.

  •                    

  • Dutch share decentralised data exchange as open source

                         

                           

    Nuts, an open source, decentralised data exchange solution offering a large-scale trusted chain of custody, is inviting healthcare organisations to join. The project is being tested by hospitals, general practitioners and companies involved in healthcare, and hopes to launch the first version this summer.

  •                    

  • MERA, Mocana, and Osaka NDS Join Automotive Grade Linux

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, announces three new members: MERA, Mocana, and Osaka NDS.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Radeon OpenGL Driver Lands Experimental Option To Boost Performance For CAD Software

    Well known open-source AMD OpenGL driver developer Marek Olšák has introduced an off-by-default option to help with the performance for at least some CAD-type applications.

    Marek has been working on plumbing out-of-order drawing support into core Mesa and NIR while wiring it through for the RadeonSI driver. The aim is to provide faster glBegin/glEnd calls that in turn benefit older OpenGL code-bases or in particular a focus on CAD/workstation software.

  • Kismet, Frameworks Updates Land in openSUSE Tumbleweed

    Four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released so far this week.

    Kismet, KDE Frameworks, sudo, LibreOffice and ImageMagick were just a few of the packages that received updates in the snapshots.

    The most recent snapshot, 20200322 brougth the 1.3.6 version of the Bluetooth configuration tool, blueberry. Full featured Command Line Interface (CLI) system information tool inxi 3.0.38 fixed a Perl issue where perl treats 000 as a string and not 0. General purpose VPN package WireGuard removed dead code. The snapshot also updated several YaST packages. Fixes were made to help with text icons displayed during installations in yast2 4.2.74 package and some cosmetic changes were made in the yast2-ntp-client 4.2.10 package to not show check-boxes for saving configuration and starting the deamon. The snapshot is currently trending at a rating of 84, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

    Just three packages were updated in snapshot 20200320. Python 2 compatibility was removed in the urlscan 0.9.4 package. Both elementary-xfce-icon-theme and perl-Encode 3.05 were updated in the snapshot, which is trending at a rating of 99.

    The other two snapshots also recorded a stable rating of 99.

  • How Domotz streamlined provisioning of IoT devices

    As the number of IoT devices scale, the challenges of provisioning and keeping them up to date in the field increases. Domotz, who manufacture an all-in-one, network monitoring and management device for enterprise IoT networks, found themselves with this challenge that was further compounded by their rapid software release cadence.

  • Apache Software Foundation Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

    Today marks twenty-one years since the Apache Software Foundation was created out of the Apache Group and incorporated as a non-profit organization.

    While the Apache Software Foundation continues to be most well known for the Apache HTTPD web server, over the past two decades they have amassed close to over 300 other projects from various database implementations to various Java tools to Subversion and much more. The Apache Software Foundation values their code-base at close to $20 billion USD.

  • XenProject Developer and Design Summit: Update in light of COVID-19

    Because the University of Bucharest has been very flexible, there is no rush to make a decision. As a result, the Advisory Board has recommended that we spend time looking into the options in detail and make a final decision around mid-April which is 6 weeks before the originally scheduled event.

  •      

  • AMD Uses DMCA to Mitigate Massive GPU Source Code Leak (Updated)

           

             

    AMD has filed at least two DMCA notices against Github repos that carried "stolen" source code relating to AMD's Navi and Arden GPUs, the latter being the processor for the upcoming Xbox Series X. The person claiming responsibility for the leak informs TorrentFreak that if they doesn't get a buyer for the remainder of the code, they will dump the whole lot online.

  •       

  • Josh Bressers: Part 6: What do we do now?

    In security it’s sometimes easy to lose sight of what we’re really trying to do. Running a scanner isn’t a goal in itself, the goal is to improve security, or it should be if it isn’t. Make sure you never forget what’s really happening. Sometimes in the excitement of security, the real reason we’re doing what we do can be lost.

    I always hate digging out the old trope “what’s the problem we’re trying to solve” but in this instance I think it’s a good question to ask yourself. Defining problems is really hard. Staying on goal is even harder.

    If we think our purpose is to run the scanners, what becomes our goal? The goal will be to have a clean scan. We know a clean scan is impossible, so what really happens is our purpose starts to twist itself around a disfigured version of reality. I’ve said many times the problem is really insecure applications, or at least that’s the problem I tend to think about. You have to figure this out for yourself. If you have a scanner running make sure you know why.

  • Splashtop Expands Linux Remote Access Support To Additional Linux Distributions

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Need Viber on your Chromebook? For now, Linux is probably the answer

    Over the weekend, I received a message from a reader who was desperately trying to get Viber working on his Chromebook. What is Viber you ask? Yeah, I wasn’t exactly familiar with it either but over 1 billion people around the globe depend on Rakuten’s messaging platform for chat, calls and even video conferencing. The app itself looks really inviting and it appears to offer similar features to WhatsApp and many other chat apps.

  • Sparky named repos

    Developing and providing packages to Sparky based on Debian testing only was quite easy, it was just one branch, developed as a rolling release. No changes in repos required then.

    Everything changed after releasing Sparky on Debian stable and keeping the oldstable line as well.

    Every big upgrade, means from testing to a new stable, and stable to a new oldstable required manual changes in the repo lists.

  • Keeping Tech Skills Up to Date From Anywhere, Anytime

    The Linux Foundation has been a 100% remote workforce for many years, so we are lucky to be in the position where the COVID-19 pandemic has not impacted our ability to deliver training and certification solutions. As a non-profit organization, our mission has always been to provide high quality, affordable programs to those who want and need them.

  • Tricks for getting around your Linux file system
  • Configuring Red Hat Satellite and Capsule Server with a Custom SSL Certificate
  • Google Engineer Posts Latest Patches For MAC + Audit Policy Using eBPF

    One of the interesting innovations for the eBPF in-kernel virtual machine in recent times is the work by Google on supporting MAC and audit policy handling by it. This stems from currently custom real-time security data collection and analysis of Google servers internally for real-time threat protection and this patch-set is part of their work on allowing similar functionality in the upstream Linux kernel.

  • RADV Lands AMD GCN 1.0/1.1 Fix For DOOM Eternal On Linux Under Steam Play

    Doom Eternal was released this week by id Software as their first game atop the Vulkan-focused id Tech 7 engine. While it's another id Software game not seeing a native Linux port, with some tweaking the game can run under Steam Play / Proton. And now Mesa's RADV Vulkan driver has landed a fix for AMD GCN 1.0/1.1 era GPUs with a fix allowing those older graphics cards to handle this latest Doom title. 

  • NVIDIA Nsight Graphics 2020.2 Adds Vulkan GPU Trace Support

    NVIDIA has released a new feature update to their Nsight Graphics standalone developer tool for debugging and profiling applications/games built atop a variety of 3D APIs.

  • TTM Huge Page Table Entries Pending For Lowering Graphics Driver CPU Usage

    Longtime open-source Linux graphics developer Thomas Hellström of VMware has sent out a patch series aiming for Linux 5.7 or 5.8 to introduce support for huge and giant page-table entries for the TTM memory management code and TTM-enabled graphics drivers.

  • COVID-19 vs open source: How developers are fighting the virus [Ed: Just promoting the illusion that proprietary software monopolists from Microsoft now speak 'for' Open Source]

    Programmers are in a unique position where not only can they typically work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, but they can help lend a hand. Help fight COVID-19 and donate your computing power, help create a community app, and keep on social distancing!

  • Josh Bressers: Part 5: Which of these security problems do I need to care about?

    If you just showed up here, go back and start at the intro post, you’ll want the missing context before reading this article. Or not, I mean, whatever.

    I’ve spent the last few posts going over the challenges of security scanners. I think the most important takeaway is we need to temper our expectations. Even a broken clock is right twice a day. So assuming some of the security flaws reported are real, how can we figure out what we should be paying attention to?

  • The exFAT Filesystem Is Coming To Linux -- Paragon Software's Not Happy About It
  • The exFAT filesystem is coming to Linux—Paragon software’s not happy about it

    When software and operating system giant Microsoft announced its support for inclusion of the exFAT filesystem directly into the Linux kernel back in August, it didn't get a ton of press coverage. But filesystem vendor Paragon Software clearly noticed this month's merge of the Microsoft-approved, largely Samsung-authored version of exFAT into the VFS for-next repository, which will in turn merge into Linux 5.7—and Paragon doesn't seem happy about it.

    Yesterday, Paragon issued a press release about European gateway-modem vendor Sagemcom adopting its version of exFAT into an upcoming series of Linux-based routers. Unfortunately, it chose to preface the announcement with a stream of FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt) that wouldn't have looked out of place on Steve Ballmer's letterhead in the 1990s.

  • ESET releases business edition of endpoint antivirus for Linux

    ESET has launched the latest version of ESET Endpoint Antivirus for Linux joining ESET’s existing product range catering extensively to Windows and MacOS. The new version is designed to provide advanced protection from threats to organisations’ general desktops. Powered by the advanced ESET LiveGrid technology, the solution combines speed, accuracy and minimal system impact, leaving more system resources for the desktops’ vital tasks in order to maintain business continuity.

    The company said its latest version of ESET Endpoint Antivirus for Linux is designed to meet the high standard of protection necessary in a corporate network, and now offers the same cutting-edge protection that exists for other operating systems. Key features include real-time file protection, more efficient scanning and increased stability, as well as full compatibility with the ESET Security Management Center and ESET Cloud Administrator. The software is intuitive to manage and can be deployed immediately and seamlessly.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Habana Labs Preps More Linux Code For Their AI Accelerators With The 5.7 Kernel

    Habana Labs, the AI accelerator start-up being acquired by Intel, has more driver improvements on tap for Linux 5.7.

    Habana Labs has been a good open-source supporter with punctually working on their mainline Linux driver enablement for their products. Their upstream Linux driver work started off at the start of 2019 with their for their Goya inference accelerator and increasing work on their Gaudi AI training product. They have been aiming to land their Gaudi enablement in Linux 5.7~5.8 but now it's looking like that will be the latter kernel if not longer.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.6 Milestone 1 Further Enhances The Benchmark Result Viewer

    It has been just under one month since the release of Phoronix Test Suite 9.4 while available this morning is the first development snapshot/milestone on the road to next quarter's Phoronix Test Suite 9.6-Nittedal feature release.

    [...]

    Aside from the result viewer enhancements, Phoronix Test Suite 9.6 Milestone 1 also has continued BSD support improvements. Additionally, there is a new phoronix-test-suite analyze-run-times sub-command to provide more detailed information about how long a test within a result file took to run and other metrics for better analyzing test options within time constraints.

  • Ceph Octopus is now available

    Ceph upstream released the first stable version of ‘Octopus’ today, and you can test it easily on Ubuntu with automatic upgrades to the final GA release. This version adds significant multi-site replication capabilities, important for large-scale redundancy and disaster recovery. Ceph v15.2.0 Octopus packages are built for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, CentOS 7 and 8, Container image (based on CentOS 8) and Debian Buster.

  • How to launch IoT devices – Part 4: When to ask for help

    The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry. By following this series so far, you hopefully have an idea and a plan on getting that idea to market (part 1). Then you selected hardware that works with your software (part 2), as well as infrastructure that supports you along the way (part 3). Do you feel in a good position to launch your IoT product and get a piece of that trillion dollar pie?

    Even the most successful products go off-course during development. In addition, when roadmaps, plans and budgets start to go wrong, it is easy to lose stakeholder support. This blog will explain how using specialists to outsource and co-create parts of a product will benefit your product in the short and long term.

  • Poland-based VentilAid project 3D prints open-source ventilator

    Engineers and designers from Poland-based Urbicum have banded together to launch the VentilAid project, an effort to design an open-source ventilator which can be reproduced using a 3D printer and an assembly of basic, easily accessible parts. The open-source ventilator is being designed to help medical professionals in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic in cases where more traditional hospital resources are limited or exhausted.

    “We are facing a serious threat due to COVID-19,” the VentilAid team writes on its website. “Most of the countries are suffering severe shortage of medical equipment, that cannot be produced and delivered in a short time. Ventilators are essential to keep breathing when faced with the complications of COVID-19.”

  • foss-north – or doing many things at once

    When placing this year’s foss-north event over a quarter break I knew that I would be busy both at work and at the conference. Little did I know what was beyond the horizon Wink

    As a consequence of the COVID-19 situation, the event has to be converted from a physical meeting to a virtual event. This means many things to an organizer: renegotiating all sponsorship contracts, renegotiating with the physical venue, setting up the infrastructure for a virtual event, rescheduling all speakers, and so on.

    We at foss-north are lucky. All sponsors continue to stay with us and the venue was very cooperative when it came to rescheduling the event.

    I have started to document our virtual conference setup so that other conferences in the same situation can learn. Pull requests are welcome!

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl ootw: –retry-max-time

    curl supports retrying of operations that failed due to “transient errors”, meaning that if the error code curl gets signals that the error is likely to be temporary and not the fault of curl or the user using curl, it can try again. You enable retrying with --retry [tries] where you tell curl how many times it should retry. If it reaches the maximum number of retries with a successful transfer, it will return error.

    A transient error can mean that the server is temporary overloaded or similar, so when curl retries it will by default wait a short while before doing the next “round”. By default, it waits one second on the first retry and then it doubles the time for every new attempt until the waiting time reaches 10 minutes which then is the max waiting time. A user can set a custom delay between retries with the --retry-delay option.

  • Try our latest Test Pilot, Firefox for a Better Web, offering privacy and faster access to great content

    Today we are launching a new Test Pilot initiative called Firefox Better Web with Scroll. The Firefox Better Web initiative is about bringing the ease back to browsing the web. We know that publishers are getting the short end of the stick in the current online ad ecosystem and advertising networks make it difficult for excellent journalism to thrive. To give users what they want most, which is great quality content without getting tracked by third parties, we know there needs to be a change. We’ve combined Firefox and Scroll’s growing network of ad-free sites to offer users a fast and private web experience that we believe can be our future.

    If we’re going to create a better internet for everyone, we need to figure out how to make it work for publishers. Last year, we launched Enhanced Tracking Protection by default and have blocked more than two trillion third-party trackers to date, but it didn’t directly address the problems that publishers face. That’s where our partner Scroll comes in. By engaging with a better funding model, sites in their growing network no longer have to show you ads to make money. They can focus on quality not clicks. Firefox Better Web with Scroll gives you the fast, private web you want and supports publishers at the same time.

    To try the Firefox Better Web online experience, Firefox users simply sign up for a Firefox account and install a web extension. As a Test Pilot, it will only be available in the US. The membership is 50% off for the first six months at $2.50 per month. This goes directly to fund publishers and writers, and in early tests we’ve found that sites make at least 40% more money than they would have made from showing you ads.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 2020-03-23 | Linux Headlines

    Folding@home’s processing power continues to surge in the fight against COVID-19, Audacious switches to QT5, UBports and Volla join forces, and MythTV rolls out modern decoding improvements.

  • F2FS File-System Adding Zstd Compression Support In Linux 5.7

    Being introduced by Linux 5.6 is optional F2FS transparent data compression support that was implemented with LZO and LZ4. Now for the Linux 5.7 kernel there is Zstd compression support on the way.

    Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) maintainer Jaegeuk Kim today merged a patch from a Huawei engineer for supporting the Zstandard compression algorithm with this file-system level compression support. On Linux 5.7 and later it means setting compress_algorithm=zstd when mounting an F2FS file-system can enable this Zstd compression capability.

  • Microsoft discloses new Windows vulnerability that’s being actively exploited

    The flaw involves the Adobe Type Manager Library, which helps Windows render fonts. “There are multiple ways an attacker could exploit the vulnerability, such as convincing a user to open a specially crafted document or viewing it in the Windows Preview pane,” according to Microsoft. The vulnerability has a severity level of “critical,” which is the company’s highest rating.

    There isn’t currently a patch available to fix the flaw, though Microsoft’s advisory notes that updates to address security vulnerabilities are usually released as part of Update Tuesday, typically scheduled for the second Tuesday of every month. That means, in theory, the next Update Tuesday is scheduled for April 14th.

  • macOS, Windows 10 and Ubuntu Hacked at Pwn2Own 2020

    macOS, Windows 10 and Ubuntu were some of the software that fell to exploits on day 1 of Pwn2Own 2020. A total of $180,000 was up for grabs for 9 bugs in 3 categories, and hackers were able to defeat the security mechanisms in three of the most popular desktop operating systems out there.

    Due to coronavirus, the annual Pwn2Own event was held virtually, instead of in Vancouver, Canada. The hackers had prepared exploits in advance and sent them to organizers to demonstrate in a live presentation to all participants.

  • HashiCorp Accelerates Multi-Cloud Transformation Efforts

    HashiCorp got its start primarily as a DevOps vendor with the popular Vagrant open-source tool for building and distributing development environments. In recent years, the company has expanded significantly, with a key focus on the cloud with multiple tools including Consul for service discovery, Nomad for orchestration and Terraform for enabling infrastructure as code.

    "The practical reality for most companies is that they will adopt multi-cloud in some capacity," Armon Dadgar, co-founder and CTO of HashiCorp, told ITPro Today. "So the day-to-day reality and the challenge for companies becomes how to operationalize that."

  • Best website builder software [Ed: Too much of this is proprietary exploiting Free software]

    Website builders are tools that allow the creation of web pages without programming knowledge. These are helped by a visual editor (WYSIWYG) to add content and adapt the design. Typically these are online tools such as Wix, Jimdo or Weebly, but there are also offline tools that can be used.

  • Chef’s COVID-19 Preparedness

    The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and its impact on individuals, families, and businesses is real and significant. We respect the unique and essential role that Chef plays in the day-to-day operations of many businesses. During these extraordinary times, we want to share how we are prepared to continue to provide service to you in the coming weeks and months.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • State of KPhotoAlbum

    So far, this goal is doing quite well. A visible indicator of this is the new website, which is not just good-looking, but visually in line with other KDE project websites.

    On a personal note, I went to FOSDEM this year. Unfortunately, my time with other KDE people was very limited (to put it mildly), as I was occupied with FSFE topics. I did, however, say hello at the KDE booth, and was very touched by the warm welcome there. Bhushan immediately recognised me and handed me a KDE nametag, and I had a nice chat with Nicolas about some Purpose issue I was having.

    [...]

    The KDE community has decided on three goals to focus on for the next couple of years.

    We already have some ideas on how to improve KPhotoAlbum regarding the Consistency goal. If you have further suggestions and ideas we would love to hear them!

  • Windows Store Monthly Statistics [Ed: Windows 'Store' is a failure. Just like WSL.]

    A nice stream of new users for our software on the Windows platform.

    If you want to help to bring more stuff KDE develops on Windows, we have some meta Phabricator task were you can show up and tell for which parts you want to do work on.

  • Who really coined the term 'Open Source'?

    Today, in 2020, “Open Source” is a well understood, widely used concept. Everyone who works within the software development world understands what it means. But… who coined the term? Who is the first person to actually use the phrase “open source” in reference to software? Let's dive into some of the (sometimes conflicting) statements from multiple people… and what the reality actually looks like. Was it Eric S Raymond or Bruce Perens?

  • Cloud Foundry Foundation Announces KubeCF is New Incubating Project

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Are cloud platforms breaking down organizational barriers in the digitalization of banking?

    What if all your cloud plans and transformation efforts are technically brilliant, but fail spectacularly because your organization couldn't adapt and excel at using them? Culture is an important part of the transformation of the bank, but it's the hardest to get right and often overlooked.

    For a number of banks, the question of whether cloud platforms are breaking down organizational barriers is a mixed bag. Advancements in build and deployment automation have made it easier to create and deliver software more quickly and with less organizational friction, and cloud platforms have changed the way software is built and delivered.

    However, breaking down outdated software delivery practices and processes, and improving overall productivity remains a nagging issue for banks, and creating a culture focused on automation is not an easy task. Too often banks enthusiastically depoy new technology platforms with the promise of increased efficiency and productivity, only to be disillusioned by the fact that many of the same old problems still remain.

  • Check Out Ubuntu France’s Fantastic Focal Fossa Tee

    The fabulously fervent folks in the Ubuntu France community have fashioned Ubuntu’s latest mascot animal into a first-rate new t-shirt design.

    Not that that particular activity is new; the Ubuntu France team has created custom artwork to ‘showcase’ the past few Ubuntu releases — as you may well know if you follow this site over on Twitter:

  • How Open-Source Projects Are Driving Innovation In Tech

    I got a chance to deeply understand the world of OSS (Open Source Software) while I was at Docker, which is one of the most popular and used open source projects. I have to confess that I fell in love with this method of writing and consuming software.

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More in Tux Machines

HACKERS and HOSPITALS: How you can help

Free software activists, as well as many scientists and medical professionals, have long since realized that proprietary medical software and devices are neither ethical nor adequate to our needs. The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated some of these shortcomings to a broader audience -- and also given our community a unique opportunity to offer real, material help at a difficult time. We're putting together a plan to pitch in, and we hope you'll join us: keep reading to find out what you can do! You may already be aware that software and hardware restrictions are actively hampering the ability of hospitals to repair desperately needed ventilators all over the world, and how some Italian volunteers ran into problems when they 3D printed ventilator valves. (As you can see from the link, the stories vary about exactly what their interaction with the manufacturer was, but it's clear that the company refused to release proprietary design files, forcing the volunteers to reverse-engineer the parts.) Read more In LWN: HACKERS and HOSPITALS<

OCRFeeder - Where images go to text

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LibreOffice Online Guide translated into Czech and Some LibreOffice 7.0 Previews

  • LibreOffice Online Guide translated into Czech

    LibreOffice Online Guide was created as part of the Google Season of Docs programme, and released in December 2019. Today we’re announcing that the Czech LibreOffice community has finished translating the guide, and it can be downloaded here. (See this page for English documentation.) It was a team effort, and participants were Petr Kuběj, Zuzana Pitříková, Zdeněk Crhonek, Roman Toman, Tereza Portešová, Petr Valach and Stanislav Horáček. Thanks to all volunteers! The Czech team continues with the translation of the Getting Started Guide, and is always open for new volunteers, translators and correctors. Give them a hand!

  • Fontwork update

    Jun Nogata help the LibreOffice community with new Fontwork. And now it’s ready to be in use.

  • Bullet images update

    LibreOffice 7.0 will get new bullet imges. Hope you like them. In general you can use whatever image you like, want or find from the internet, so in the Bullet image dialog there are the following examples...

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, Late Night Linux, Linux Headlines and More

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    We discover a few simple Raspberry Pi tricks that unlock incredible performance and make us re-think the capabilities of Arm systems. Plus we celebrate Wireguard finally landing in Linux, catch up on feedback, and check out the new Manjaro laptop.

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  • Late Night Linux – Episode 86

    The impacts of Coronovirus on Linux and open source, KDE Korner, and whether we are seeing the second big split in the FOSS world.

  • All Backup Solutions for the Home | Rsync, Synology, and FreeNAS
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    The MANRS initiative gains several new members, GitLab wants customers to help migrate premier features to its free tier, Eclipse Theia reaches 1.0, Lutris lands Humble Bundle game store integration, and Steam scales back automatic updates.

  • An Open Source Toolchain For Natural Language Processing From Explosion AI

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