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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Zorin OS 12.3 Linux Distro Released: Download The Perfect Windows Replacement

    While listing out the best distros for a Linux beginner, the ease of use and installation are the most critical factors. Such qualities make distros like Linux Mint, Ubuntu, and Zorin OS the most recommended options. In case you’re also concerned about your privacy and security, a shift to the world of Linux becomes a more obvious option.

    Calling itself a replacement for Windows and macOS, Zorin OS has been established as a beginner-friendly option that offers a smooth ride while making the transition. The latest Zorin OS 12.3 release works to strengthen the basics of the operating system and polishes the whole experience.

  • Ramblings about long ago and far away

    I had originally run MCC (Manchester Computer Center Interim Linux) in college but when I moved it was easier to find a box of floppies with SLS so I had installed that on the 486. I would then download software source code from the internet and rebuild it for my own use using all the extra flags I could find in GCC to make my 20Mhz system seem faster. I instead learned that most of the options didn't do anything on i386 Linux at the time and most of my reports about it were probably met by eye-rolls with the people at Cygnus. My supposed goal was to try and set up a MUD so I could code up a text based virtual reality. Or to get a war game called Conquer working on Linux. Or maybe get xTrek working on my system. [I think I mostly was trying to become a game developer by just building stuff versus actually coding stuff. I cave-man debugged a lot of things using stuff I had learned in FORTRAN but it wasn't actually making new things.]

  • EzeeLinux Show 18.13 | Running Linux On Junk

    A talk about the advantages of running Linux on junk hardware.

  • Best 50 HD Wallpapers for Ubuntu

    Wallpapers are useful in many ways depending on the visual it contains for example if there is a motivational quote on it, it helps to motivate you. The images are the best type of wallpaper because they have an impact on the mind of a human being. So if you are a working professional and have to work continuously on a computer then your desktop cab be a source of inspiration and happiness.

    So today we are going to share 50 best HD Wallpapers for your Ubuntu which will keep your desktop fresh.

  • Ubuntu Tried Adding Synaptics Support Back To GNOME's Mutter

    GNOME developers previously dropped support for Synaptics and other input drivers from Mutter in favor of the universal libinput stack that is also Wayland-friendly. Canonical developers tried to get Synaptics support on X11 added back into Mutter but it looks clear now that was rejected.

    Canonical's Will Cooke reported in this week's Ubuntu happenings that they were trying to add upstream support for Synaptics to Mutter, complementing the libinput support. While it's great Canonical trying to contribute upstream to GNOME, Synaptics support was previously dropped as being a maintenance burden and with libinput support getting into rather good shape.

  • Long live Release Engineering

    y involvement in Fedora goes back to late 2003 early 2004 somewhere as a packager for I started by getting a few packages in to scratch some of my itches and I saw it as a way to give back to the greater open source community. Around FC3 somewhere I stepped up to help in infrastructure to rebuild the builders in plague, the build system we used before koji and that we used for EPEL(Something that I helped form) for awhile until we got external repo support in koji.

    I was involved in the implementation of koji in Fedora, I joined OLPC as a build and release engineer, where I oversaw a move of the OS they shipped from FC6 to F8, and laid a foundation for the move to F9. I left OLPC when Red Hat opensourced RHN Satellite as “spacewalk project” I joined Red Hat as the release engineer for both, after a brief period there was some reorganisation in engineering that resulted in me handing off the release engineering tasks to someone closer the the engineers working on the code. As a result I worked on Fedora full time helping Jesse Keating. When he decided to work on the internal migration from CVS to git I took over as the lead.


    Recently I have accepted a Job offer to become the manager of a different team inside of Red Hat.

today's leftovers

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  • Linus Bashes CTS Labs, GNOME 3.28 Released, Project ACRN and More

    GNOME 3.28 "Chongqing" is here, with many new features and fixes. According to the release notes, "the release incorporates 25832 changes, made by approximately 838 contributors." The new version includes personal organization improvements, new Boxes features, such as automatic downloading of operating systems, and much more.

  • pkg-config and paths

    This is something of a frequently asked question, as it comes up every once in a while. The pkg-config documentation is fairly terse, and even pkgconf hasn’t improved on that.

  • OSMC's March update is here with Pi 3 B+ support

    OSMC's March update is ready with a wide range of improvements and fixes to keep your OSMC device running in tip-top shape. We've released this update slightly earlier in the month than usual to add support for the new Raspberry Pi 3 B+.

  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Ruling the commandline
  • Fedora 27 release party: Managua, Nicaragua

    On February 27th, the Fedora Community in Nicaragua ran a Release Party for the F27 Release. The activity took place in a salon of Hotel Mansión Teodolinda in Managua. This is our first activity of the year. This event was late in the Fedora Development Schedule because the Fedora 28 release is coming soon this year, but we need to keep the community active and keep promoting the Fedora Four Foundations in Nicaragua. The event schedule was…

  • Stop streaming music from YouTube with this one weird trick

    Having grown up on the internet long before the average connection speed made music streaming services viable, streaming has always struck me as wasteful. And I know that doesn't make much sense—it's not like there's a limited amount of bandwidth to go around! But if I'm going to listen to the same audio file five times, why not just download it once and listen to it forever? Particularly if I want to listen to it while airborne and avoid the horrors of plane wifi. Or if I want to remove NSFW graphics that seem to frequently accompany mixes I enjoy.

  • dput usability changes

    With these changes, after building a package, you just need to type dput (in the correct directory of course) to sign and upload it.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, February 2018
  • Mentorship within software development teams

    In my journey to find an internship opportunity through Google Summer of Code, I wanted to give input about the relationship between a mentor and an intern/apprentice. My time as a service manager in the automotive repair industry gave me insight into the design of these relationships.

  • Faster Window/Application Launching Is Coming For Cinnamon

    Linux Mint's GNOME/GTK-derived Cinnamon Desktop Environment will soon be able to launch applications faster.

    Developers of Linux Mint were recently investigating why application launching on Cinnamon felt slower than with desktops / window managers on MATE and Xfce. With a basic test they were able to confirm their feelings and went to work on figuring out the slowdowns.

  • Rugged, Kaby Lake based NVR system offers up to eight PoE ports

    Aaeon’s automotive-focused “VPC-5600S” networked video recorder PC runs Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Core chips and offers dual hot-swappable SATA trays and 6x to 10x GbE ports, with 4x to 8x of those supporting PoE.

    Aaeon has launched a rugged VPC-5600S network video recorder (NVR) embedded computer with up to 10x Gigabit Ethernet ports, of which up to 8x support Power-over-Ethernet (PoE). Together with the Linux and Windows supported Intel 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” CPUs, the capability enables users to “receive the highest quality images from multiple sources without any danger of data loss,” says Aaeon. With the additional four USB 3.0 ports, the VPC-5600S can support up to 14x high-grade surveillance cameras, says the Asus-owned company.

  • Fanless system has four PoE and two standard GbE ports

    FCO’s Linux-ready “SmartMod” box PC offers a 7th Gen Intel Core CPU, SATA and mSATA, 5x USB, 6x serial, 3x mini-PCIe, dual display support, and 6x GbE ports, four of which have PoE.

  • Top 20 Best Tizen Apps in the Tizen Store for February 2018

    Whats happening in the world of Tizen Smartphones? Well, not really that much of late, but that’s probably another post for another time.

    For the last year we have kept a close eye on the Tizen App ecosystem and today we bring you the Top 20 Apps downloaded from the Tizen Store during February 2018 for the Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3, and Z4 mobiles. New entries in the Top 20 are 99 Apps, Hill Driver, Balloon shoot, Music Press MX Music Player, and Jio TV. The rest are the usual suspects. Anyone that has been following this list knows not much really changes from month to month at the moment on the store.

  • 10 Best Android Download Manager Apps For 2018

    Download managers are designed to give users great control over their downloads. Some manager apps can accelerate download speeds by downloading from multiple sources at a time. A stock Android download manager usually comes pre-installed on devices by default. But, these default download managers might provide slow downloading speeds and, generally, do not have advanced features like queuing or resuming paused downloads.


  • Intel Says Its Next Chips Will Be Fully Protected Against Spectre Vulnerability
  • Hybrid cloud security: 5 key strategies
  • Triada Malware Preinstalled on Low-Cost Android Phones – Here’s How to Beat It

today's leftovers

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  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E02 – A Tale of Two Cities - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we interview Will Cooke, Manager of the Ubuntu Desktop team, about the changes we can expect to see in Ubuntu 18.04.

  • The Latest Winevulkan Patches Make It Usable For Doom, Wolfenstein & DXVK

    Roderick Colenbrander and those working with him on "Winevulkan" to provide a clean Vulkan implementation for Wine supporting the Vulkan ICD concept, etc, rather than the old hacked together code in Wine-Staging have done a great job. With Roderick's latest Winevulkan patches, this new implementation is considered usable.

    It was just at the start of March that the initial Winevulkan support merged and since then more patch series have landed for this implementation that allows Windows programs on Wine to tap Vulkan support, permitting the host system has working Vulkan API support.

  • Samsung/Enlightenment Developers Are Busy At Work On EFL 2.0

    Cedric Bail of Samsung's Open-Source Group presented today at the Embedded Linux Conference on EFL 2.0 as part of the Enlightenment project's long-standing goal to provide a new and unified API.

    While the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries 1.x (EFL1) continues to be maintained, the developers at Samsung OSG that are part of the Enlightenment team have been busy construction EFL 2.0 and hope to show off the first of their new wares in 2018.

  • Present your images from the couch with Gwenview, MPRIS & KDE Connect

    KDE Applications 18.04 Feature Freeze is setting in. Or: reminder to do finally that feature you always wanted to implement.

  • Reflections on the GNOME 3.28 Release Video

    I just flipped the switch for the 3.28 Release Video. I’m really excited for all the new awesome features the community has landed, but I am a bit sad that I don’t have time to put more effort into the video this time around. A busy time schedule collided with technical difficulties in recording some of the apps. When I was staring at my weekly schedule Monday there didn’t seem much chance for a release video to be published at all..

  • Slackware: What all happened in March so far

    I realize I have been a wee bit silent on the blog (not counting my replies in the comments section). This was due to private issues that drained the desire for social interactions. Nevertheless there was quite a bit of activity on the Slackware packaging front.

  • Development Versions of Oracle Linux UEK now available on GitHub

    The source for UEK has always been available at, as a git repository with full git history. Starting now, we'll also be posting the UEK source on By doing so, we intend to increase the visibility for our work and to make it even easier for people to access the source for UEK. We will also use this repository for working with developers at partner companies and in the Linux community. The repository contains the source for the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel including a small number of Oracle additions which have not yet been accepted into the mainline Linux kernel source tree.

    The Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) is a Linux kernel built by Oracle and supported via Oracle Linux support. Its focus is performance, stability, and minimal backports by tracking the mainline source code as closely as is practical. UEK is well-tested and used to run Oracle's Engineered Systems, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, and large enterprise deployments for Oracle customers.

  • Defining the Spectrum of Cloud Deployment Technologies

    “Cloud computing” has been a catch-all phrase over the past decade to describe anything that’s a shift away from hardware servers. However, the term has become nebulous in recent times with the growing diversity in how many different ways you can leverage the cloud.

    We’ve come far from a simplistic separation between on-premises and cloud. Today, it’s about on-premises versus a range of different cloud options. Indeed, the cloud can be a confusing place for newcomers and veterans alike, with new options cropping up every few months, and the landscape always shifting towards the newer and better.

    But how do you choose between good, better and best? Let’s compare the various cloud deployment technologies available today and find the common ground and what separates them from each other.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Chromebooks Getting All-New Wallpaper Picker and Support for Exporting Passwords

    We have some good news for you if you're a Chromebook user, as Google has added a bunch of goodies to Chrome OS, which you can try right now from the Canary experimental channel.

    Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort recently shared details about several new features that have been added to the Chrome Canary experimental channel for Google's Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, including a brand-new wallpaper picker, support for exporting passwords, and a revamped keyboard shortcut viewer.

  • Mesosphere Extends DC/OS to the EDGE, Adds Multi-Cloud, Kubernetes Support
  • SOGo v4.0.0 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of SOGo v4.0.0. This is a major release of SOGo which focuses on new features, various enhancements and improved stability over previous versions.

  • An argument against proxies

    Proxies? In companies getting started with an upstream first concept this is what people are called who act as the only interface between their employer and an open source project: All information from any project used internally flows through them. All bug reports and patches intended as upstream contribution also flows through them - hiding entire teams producing the actual contributions.

    At Apache projects I learnt to dislike this setup of having proxies act in place of the real contributors. Why so?

    Apache is built on the premise of individuals working together in the best interest of their projects. Over time, people who prove to commit themselves to a project get added to that project. Work contributed to a project gets rewarded - in a merit doesn't go away kind-of sense working on an Apache project is a role independent of other work committments - in the "merit doesn't go away" sense this merit is attached to the individual making contributions, not to the entity sponsoring that individual in one way or another.

  • HDCP 2.2 Content Protection Being Worked On For The i915 DRM Driver [Ed: DRM in Linux]

    With the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle there will be initial support for HDCP with the i915 DRM driver. That High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) support in its initial form is limited to v1.4 on HDMI/DP connectors, but HDCP 2.2 is now being tackled.

    Building off that HDCP v1.4 support done by Google's Chrome OS developers for the i915 DRM Linux driver, Intel developers are now working on extending that to HDCP v2.2 capabilities. HDCP2 is an entirely different link protection design from HDCP1. HDCP 2.x support for newer devices supports more encryption standards, supports WirelessHD and Miracast wireless display standards, a new authentication protocol, and other changes effectively making it a clean sheet design but with some commonalities between the versions.

  • How to create a cron job with Kubernetes on a Raspberry Pi
  • herbstluftwm – A Manual Tiling Window Manager for X11

    herbstluftwm is an open-source tiling window manager with which you can manually organize your screens into mutually non-overlapping frames. i.e app windows will be stacked above each other instead of the typical overlapping window settings.

    herbstluftwm offers a swift operation and since its configuration file is a script that runs at startup, it is configured at runtime via ipc calls from herbstclient same as wmii/musca. It makes use of tags (read workspaces) which can be added or removed at runtime.

  • Device Integration

    I’ve been working on some groundwork features to sneak into Builder 3.28 so that we can build upon them for 3.30. In particular, I’ve started to land device abstractions. The goal around this is to make it easier to do cross-architecture development as well as support devices like phones, tablets, and IoT.

  • 20 questions DevOps job candidates should be prepared to answer [Ed: more of that inane "DevOps" hype in Red Hat sites]
  • Infrastructure 2.0: Whatever We’re Calling it Now, It’s Here [Ed: "DevOps" again, Now with 2.0.]
  • Another motive To buy these stock: DiamondRock Hospitality Company (DRH), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • An intro to ONLYOFFICE – now available as a snap

    Two years ago ONLYOFFICE developers released a desktop office suite that combined viewers and editors for text documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

    Last week ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors was released as a snap – the universal Linux packaging format. This blog explains with closer insight how the editors were created, the technological aspects, and why we decided to build the snap.

  • Kotlin programming language now available as a snap for Ubuntu
  • Purism Partners with Cryptography Pioneer Werner Koch to Create a New Encrypted Communication Standard for Security-Focused Devices

    Purism, maker of security-focused laptops has announced today that they have joined forces with leading cryptography pioneer, Werner Koch, to integrate hardware encryption into the company’s Librem laptops and forthcoming Librem 5 phone. By manufacturing hardware with its own software and services, Purism will include cryptography by default pushing the industry forward with unprecedented protection for end-user devices.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Chromebooks Will Soon Get a Docked Magnifier Accessibility Tool, Try It Out Now

    Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort shares today with us a new experimental feature that's coming to a Chromebook near you later this year and it's now available for public testing.

    The new feature we're talking about here is a docked magnifier tool that will be available from the accessibility settings of the Chrome OS operating system and promises to let you magnify the top section of your screen. Users will be able to choose between a 2x and 20x zoom level value.

  • OpenMAX Tizonia H.264 Encoder/Decoder Land In Mesa 18.1 Git

    It was last summer that a GSoC student developer worked on an OpenMAX Tizonia state tracker for Gallium3D to replace the existing and out-of-date "Bellagio" code. Finally today that new Tizonia code has landed in Mesa 18.1-devel Git.

  • Termshot - Take Image Screenshot of Command Line Output

    In this article, I'll show you how to turn a command line output in Linux into an image using Termshot. Termshot is Linux tool which turns a cli command's output into a screenshot including colors and interactive text. This is of the essence if working on something that you need to screenshot for sharing, reference or documentation purposes. Sometimes you would copy terminal output in a text format but when you paste it on a different platform like CMS, it will lose original formatting and its colors giving it an atrocious look.


  • Back to Basics Part 4 – using grep in GNU/Linux

    One of the really confusing things for users who are new to messing with the command line, can be trying to search with specifics. A useful little tool for aiding in this process, is called grep, or “global regular expression print,” which will search for regular statements in anything you pipe it through, and show you matches for what you looked for (if any exist.)

  • Way of the Passive Fist is out and it’s finger-aching fun

    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam] is not the type of brawler I expected it to be, but it’s still a very fun experience.

  • The Linux beta of Arma 3 has been updated to 1.80, compatible with Windows again for a time

    The Linux beta of Arma 3 [Steam] is once again up to date with the Windows client at version 1.80 (meaning for now multiplayer with Windows gamers is possible), this also brings compatibility with the Tac-Ops Mission Pack.

  • MX-17.1-RC1 Release Candidate 1 available for testing

    We are pleased to offer MX-17.1-RC1 for testing.

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