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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • How to get Apple-like gestures on the Linux desktop

    I understand a big part of the problem is that Apple owns patents on trackpad gestures, something which hinders the open source community's ability to create a quality experience. But that hurdle shouldn't equate to a bad experience, which many people have. Not only does Linux install without any sort of multi-touch gestures, it is sometimes over sensitive or under sensitive. I've installed Linux on laptop hardware and found the trackpad configuration was a losing battle—until I discovered Fusuma.

  • How to fix missing Python for Ansible in Fedora Vagrant
  • Did your open source career begin with video games?

    Certainly you don't need to be a gamer as a child to grow up and become a developer, nor does being a gamer automatically set you up for a career in technology.

    But there's definitely a good bit of overlap between the two.

    After listening to the first episode of Command Line Heroes, and reading Ross Turk's story of how MUDs led him to a career in coding, I've thought a bit about how gaming has influenced my own journey into technology, and how it lead to a career in open source.

    For me, that first important game was WarCraft II. Sure, I played games before it, and after it. But shortly after my family replaced our faithful Apple IIc with a blazing fast (by comparison) 486 PC with amazing features like color, and a sound card, and even a 2400 baud modem (that would take about three months to download the equivalent of an hour of Netflix today).

  • openSUSE to Have Summit in Nashville

    The openSUSE community is headed to Nashville, Tennessee, next year and will have the openSUSE SUmmit Nashville April 5 through April 6, 2019, during the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

    Registration for the event is open and the Call for Papers is open until Jan. 15. Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encourage to register for the summit and submit a talk.

    The schedule for the openSUSE SUmmit Nashville will be released at the beginning of February.

  • How selfless is your open organization?

    "Community" is a defining characteristic of open organizations. A community could be many things—a "team," a "group," a "department," or a "task force," for example. What makes any of these groups a true community is two distinct factors: a well-defined purpose and clear investment in or value of that purpose.

    How does a person balance a community's values with his or her own, personal values? How does that person negotiate this relationship when setting goals? Answers to these questions will expose and speak to that person's character.

  • Andres Rodriguez: MAAS 2.5.0 beta 1 released

    I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.5.0 beta 1 has been released.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 545

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 545 for the week of September 9 – 15, 2018.

  • Arm delivers production-ready open source Bluetooth Low Energy software stack to unleash IoT innovation

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is quickly becoming the Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity protocol of choice for a variety of use cases, including smart lighting, smart cities and asset tracking, where low-cost, power consumption and small footprint are fundamental requirements. According to the 2018 Bluetooth Market Update, there will be more than 5 billion Bluetooth device shipments by 2022, with 97% of them containing Bluetooth Low Energy technology. The advances in Bluetooth 5 technology, along with the introduction of Bluetooth Mesh are driving new market opportunities across building automation, sensor networks, and other IoT solutions.

  • Digital Minimalism and Deep Work

    Through Newport's blog I learned that the title of his next book is Digital Minimalism. This intrigued me, because since I started thinking about minimalism myself, I've wondered about the difference of approach needed between minimalism in the "real world" and the digital domains. It turns out the topic of Newport's next book is about something different: from what I can tell, focussing on controlling how one spends one's time online for maximum productivity.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Zinc Launches UK’s First Open Source Blockchain-Based Hiring Software

    London: Zinc, a UK based start-up, today launches its blockchain based hiring software, which promises to eliminate many of the inefficiencies associated with recruitment within the technology sector.  Available to the public from today, Zinc has been successfully tested in beta with customers including GoCardless and Booking.com.

  • Lumina Networks Expands Engineering Management to Drive Product Innovation and Open Source Leadership

    Open source networking leader Lumina Networks today announced the addition of three industry leaders to their engineering team.  Avinash Parwaney joins Lumina’s executive team as VP of Engineering. Parwaney is formerly from Cisco where he was Senior Director of Engineering. Prem Sankar Gopannan has joined Lumina as Director of Engineering and Iyappa Swaminathan has joined as Director of Technical Product Management.

    “I am pleased to welcome Avinash to lead the Lumina engineering team. He brings a wealth of real-world experience in large scale service provider networking,” said Andrew Coward, CEO of Lumina Networks. “Avinash will help Lumina accelerate our open source-based networking platforms and applications from proof of concept trials into production deployment. The addition of Prem and Iyappa to the team will further strengthen our ability to help lead the open source networking community, driving innovation and productization.”

  • EU antitrust ruling on Microsoft buy of GitHub due by October 19
  • which spare laptop?

    I'm in a perpetual state of downsizing and ridding my life (and my family's life) of things we don't need: sometimes old computers. My main (nearly my sole) machine is my work-provided Thinkpad T470s: a fantastic laptop that works so well I haven't had anything to write about it. However, I decided that it was worth keeping just one spare, for emergencies or other odd situations. I have two candidate machines in my possession.

    [...]

    Surprising myself perhaps more than anyone else, I've ended up opting for the Toshiba. The weight was the clincher. The CPU performance difference was too close to matter, and 3G RAM is sufficient for my spare laptop needs. Once I'd installed a spare SSD as the main storage device, day-to-day performance is very good. The resolution difference didn't turn out to be that important: it's still low enough that side-by-side text editor and browser feels crowded, so I end up using the same window management techniques as I would on the X61s.

    What do I use it for? I've taken it on a couple of trips or holidays which I wouldn't want to risk my work machine for. I wrote nearly all of liquorice on it in downtime on a holiday to Turkey whilst my daughter was having her afternoon nap. I'm touching up this blog post on it now!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • An "obsessive," "anti-imperialist" Turing Complete computer language with only one command

    Daniel writes, "An obsessive programmer, frustrated with not only the inefficiencies of mainstream OSes like Windows, but what he sees as their 'imperialistic oppression,' built an entire operating system using a subleq architecture. Subleq is a OISC, a language with only a single command. It lacks the most basic features of programming languages, and yet is Turing Complete.

  • PHP 7.3-RC1 Released, Benchmarks Looking Good For This Next PHP7 Update

    Released this week was the first RC milestone for the PHP 7.3 feature update due out before year's end. This weekend I ran some fresh PHP benchmarks looking at its performance.

    The PHP 7.3 release candidate is made up of many fixes ranging from memory corruption and segmentation faults to undefined symbols and other problems. The list of changes can be found via the NEWS entry.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: GIMP 2.10

    GIMP 2.10 landed in Debian Testing a few weeks ago and I have to say I'm very happy about it. The last major version of GIMP (2.8) was released in 2012 and the new version fixes a lot of bugs and improved the user interface.

  • Political strategy game Democracy 4 announced with Linux support

    Positech Games have announced Democracy 4 [Official Site], the next evolution of their political strategy game and it's coming with Linux support. For those who think they can run a country or would like to have a go at it, this is probably the closest you will ever get.

    This is good to see, because we had Democracy 3 that supported Linux, but Democracy 3 Africa did not support Linux. A shame too, because I rather liked what I saw in Democracy 3 which is why I'm quite happy about this news.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Wine-Staging 3.16 Released With ~880 Patches Still Atop Wine

    Busy since Friday's release of Wine 3.16, the volunteers maintaining the Wine-Staging tree with the various experimental/testing patches atop upstream Wine are out with their adjoining update that continues with just under 900 patches being re-based.

  • Some thoughts on State of Mind from Daedelic Entertainment
  • Summer’s End Roundup 2018

    Although it looked from the outside as if Mageians were sleeping through August, it wasn’t so! And now that it’s Autumn – fall for you folks in the North Americas – we’ll be more communicative, we promise.

  • Overriding misreported screen dimensions with KMS-backed drivers

    With Qt5 gaining support for high-DPI displays, and applications starting to exercise that support, it’s easy for applications to suddenly become unusable with some screens. For example, my old Samsung TV reported itself as 7″ screen. While this used not to really matter with websites forcing you to force the resolution of 96 DPI, the high-DPI applications started scaling themselves to occupy most of my screen, with elements becoming really huge (and ugly, apparently due to some poor scaling).

    It turns out that it is really hard to find a solution for this. Most of the guides and tips are focused either on proprietary drivers or on getting custom resolutions. The DisplaySize specification in xorg.conf apparently did not change anything either. Finally, I was able to resolve the issue by overriding the EDID data for my screen. This guide explains how I did it.

  • Technology streamlines computational science projects

    Researchers use ICE to study topics in fields including nuclear energy, astrophysics, additive manufacturing, advanced materials, neutron science and quantum computing, answering questions such as how batteries behave and how some 3-D-printed parts deform when exposed to heat.

    Several factors differentiate ICE from other workflow management systems. For example, because ICE exists on an open-source software framework called the Eclipse Rich Client Platform, anyone can access, download and use it. Users also can create custom combinations of reusable resources and deploy simulation environments tailored to tackle specific research challenges.

  • Google Chrome 69 gives worldwide web a stay of execution in URL box

    Google Chrome 70 arrived as a beta release on Thursday, bringing with it a handful of meaningful improvements and some more esoteric features of interest to developers.

    Available on the Chrome Beta channel for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows – the iOS beta requires participation in Apple's TestFlight program – Chrome 70 implements a Shape Detection API that allows web apps to do things like detect faces in images, read barcodes and parse text in images.

    The API is particularly promising for mobile web apps, which can now return the location of facial features within an image, turn barcodes and QR codes into strings and read Latin alphabet text found in pictures.

  • PostgreSQL 11 Won't Ship With Its Faster JIT Support Enabled By Default

    One of the coolest innovations landing this year in PostgreSQL was LLVM-based JIT support to speed up database queries. But it's not going to be enabled by default in the upcoming PostgreSQL 11 release.

    This functionality relies upon LLVM for JIT compiling SQL queries rather than passing those queries to the PostgreSQL interpreter. These LLVM JIT'ed queries have led to more efficient code being generated and particularly help with more complex queries.

  • n2k18 Hackathon report: Ken Westerback (krw@) on disklabel(8) work, dhclient(8) progress

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Ubuntu Podcast S11E27 – Twenty-Seven Bones

    This week we’ve been moonlighting on other podcasts and started using DuckDuckGo. Trend Micro get booted from the Apple Store, Intel adopts an AMD display standard, a cheesy history of Linux gaming is published, Amazon Echo now Looks at you and we round up the community news.

  • New Life to KDE – Edu

    Some seeds take a while to grow, and what a while. I’v met Karina Mochetti five years ago when I moved to Campinas, back then I had just started working at Intel and I had finished one of my most glorious software developer tasks, good subversive terrorist that I’m, I made Linus Torvalds program in C++ and talking with a friend that lives in Rio de Janeiro I heard “I have a programmer friend in Campinas, wanna meet?”, well, yes, always.

  • API Changes in Clang

    I’ve started contributing to Clang, in the hope that I can improve the API for tooling. This will eventually mean changes to the C++ API of Clang, the CMake buildsystem, and new features in the tooling. Hopefully I’ll remember to blog about changes I make.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Chromebooks gain faff-free access to Windows file shares via Samba

    Google’s Chrome OS tanks crept a little further onto Microsoft’s manicured enterprise lawns with hints that Windows file-share support will arrive out-of-the-box in an upcoming version of Chrome OS.

    Those brave enough to be on the Canary version of Chrome 70 already have the functionality, assuming the preview software stays upright long enough to connect. The code uses the Samba project's libsmbclient to access the file shares.

    Veteran Windows blogger Paul Thurrott spotted a posting on Google+ by "Chromium Evangelist" François Beaufort indicating that the functionality was inbound. In the post, Beaufort linked to a Chromium code commit with the text: "Set NativeSmb flag to enabled by default – Network File Shares for ChromeOS will be available by default starting in M70."

  • [Gentoo] We mostly protect against script kiddie attacks

    The recent efforts on improving the security of different areas of Gentoo have brought some arguments. Some time ago one of the developers has considered whether he would withstand physical violence if an attacker would use it in order to compromise Gentoo. A few days later another developer has suggested that an attacker could pay Gentoo developers to compromise the distribution. Is this a real threat to Gentoo? Are we all doomed?

    Before I answer this question, let me make an important presumption. Gentoo is a community-driven open source project. As such, it has certain inherent weaknesses and there is no way around them without changing what Gentoo fundamentally is. Those weaknesses are common to all projects of the same nature.

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, August 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 8 hours from July. I worked only 5 hours and therefore carried over 18 hours to September.

  • TeX Live contrib updates

    It is now more than a year that I took over tlcontrib from Taco and provide it at the TeX Live contrib repository. It does now serve old TeX Live 2017 as well as the current TeX Live 2018, and since last year the number of packages has increased from 52 to 70.

  • Core i5-7500-based signage player supports NVIDIA MXM graphics cards

    Ibase launched its “SI-614” signage player that runs Linux or Windows 10 on a Core i5-7500 processor with up to 16GB DDR4, a choice of NVIDIA MXM NV1050 graphics cards and a 128 GB 2.5-inch SSD storage device.

    Ibase Technology has announced the SI-614, its latest digital signage player based on 7th Gen Intel Core desktop processors and supporting NVIDIA MXM GeForce GTX 10 Series graphics. These cards provide 3X the performance of previous-generation graphics cards, according to the company. This is the sixth signage player Ibase has introduced this year, the most recent being its AMD Ryzen V1000 based system, the SI-324, released in late August.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Have You Ever Considered Replacing Windows with Linux? [Ed: Microsoft propagandist (for over a decade) Bogdan Popa continues to provoke GNU/Linux users]
  • Windows file sharing comes to Chromebooks

    You can run Android apps on Chromebooks. You can run Linux programs on Chromebooks. Heck, you can even run Windows programs on Chromebooks. But one thing you couldn't do natively on a Chromebook is read and write files on a Windows PCs or Windows and Samba servers. Things change. With the forthcoming release of Chrome OS 70, you can access network file shares from Chromebooks.

    To do this, once Chrome OS 70 is available to all users, open Settings, look for "Network File Shares", click the "Add File Share" button, and enter your user name and password. Then, click "Add" button and open the Files app to browse your newly mounted shared folder. That's all there is to it.

  • 5 examples of Prometheus monitoring success

    Prometheus is an open source monitoring and alerting toolkit for containers and microservices. The project is a hit with lots of different organizations regardless of their size or industrial sector. The toolkit is highly customizable and designed to deliver rich metrics without creating a drag on system performance. Based on the organizations that have adopted it, Prometheus has become the mainstream, open source monitoring tool of choice for those that lean heavily on containers and microservices.

    Conceived at SoundCloud in 2012, Prometheus became part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) in 2016 and in August 2018, CNCF announced Prometheus was the second "graduated" project in the organization's history.

    Prometheus provides a key component for a modern DevOps workflow: keeping watch over cloud-native applications and infrastructure, including another popular CNCF project, Kubernetes.

  • Unique RTS game 'Circle Empires' to get Linux support later this month

    Publisher Iceberg Interactive sent word today that the unique RTS game Circle Empires from developer Luminous is heading to Linux. They didn't give an exact date other than "Later this month Circle Empires will also receive full Linux support.".

    Since I'm a big fan of RTS games, I was instantly quite surprised with how Circle Empires works. The map is literally split into circles, with you battling for control of each one of them.

  • Timespinner, a metroidvania featuring time travel, is set to be released September 25th

    Fans of metroidvanias will be getting a new game to sink their teeth into soon enough. A new trailer shows off what you can expect from the story and gameplay.

  • TensorFlow on Debian/sid (including Keras via R)

    I have been struggling with getting TensorFlow running on Debian/sid for quite some time. The main problem is that the CUDA libraries installed by Debian are CUDA 9.1 based, and the precompiled pip installable TensorFlow packages require CUDA 9.0 which resulted in an unusable installation. But finally I got around and found all the pieces.

  • Skylake mini-PC has dual M.2 slots and up to 32GB DDR4

    Aaeon has launched a Linux-ready “Nano-002N” mini-PC with a 6th Gen Core CPU, up to 32GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, and 4x USB 3.0 ports, plus dual M.2 slots.

    Aaeon’s Nano-002N upgrades its Intel 5th Gen Nano-001N from 2015 with a dual-core, 6th Gen “Skylake” U-series CPU and additional new features. These include a serial port and twice the maximum memory for up to 32GB DDR4, among other enhancements. The mini-PC is well suited for media player, digital signage and POS, as well as other “tough applications in the factory, office, and off-site locations.”

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Chromebooks Are Getting Local File Sharing Support

    An upcoming Chrome OS update will add support for SMB shares, meaning Chromebooks will have access to files shared from Windows, macOS, and Linux computers.

    The feature is part of Chrome OS Canary right now, and will come to most Chromebooks with Chrome OS 70 on October 23. A screenshot of the feature in action, seen above, was posted by Google Employee François Beaufort on Google+ yesterday.

  • 5 Ridiculous Windows 10 Headlines That Will Have You Running To Linux
  • An interview with the developer of DXVK, part of what makes Valve's Steam Play tick

    What started as a large article talking to developers about Steam Play required splitting off before it became too big. For now, I give you a chat with the developer of DXVK, Philip Rebohle.

    For those that aren't quite up to speed, DXVK is a project that provides a Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation for Wine. It's part of what makes Valve's Steam Play "Proton" work. In simple terms, games built to run on Windows via DirectX can be run with DXVK/Proton, so that they can be played on Linux.

  • Game store itch releases a brand new client, plus a small interview

    Game store itch.io are doing some fantastic things and so it's time to highlight it a bit. They just released a massive overhaul to their open source client!

    Here's how the new and improved client looks, pretty slick right? It's blazingly fast too, from clicking the itch application button to actually logging in took around 2-3 seconds. When you want to just play your game, that's the kind of speed you want to enable you to quickly get going.

  • Last week’s [Slackware] updates: Chromium and VLC

    Last week the Chrome (and Chromium) update to release 69 was in the news. The UI changed significantly, sporting more of Google’s material design elements. Also the password manager has been improved: it will suggest random passwords in cases where you have to create a Web account and will offer to remember the random password in its vault so you don’t have to write it down or remember it (you’ll have to be signed into your Google account to be able to use this feature though).
    The ‘omnibox‘ (the area where you type your URLS and search queries) is more powerful now, showing many more related results while you are typing.
    My package for Chromium supports direct playback of H.265/HEVC video by the way, and has done so for the past releases. Check it out for instance on https://www.h265files.com/embed-h265-video.php . Not many other browsers (even other distros’ Chromium browsers) will do that.

  • Cloudera Launches an End-to-End, Open, Modular IoT Architecture with Red Hat and Eurotech to Accelerate IoT Deployments

    Architecture enables end-to-end analytics pushing machine learning and intelligence to the ‘edge’ to support real-time decision-making

    Cloudera, Inc. (NYSE : CLDR ), the modern platform for machine learning and analytics optimized for the cloud, today announced the launch of an end-to-end, open source Internet of Things (IoT) architecture in collaboration with Red Hat and Eurotech. Enterprises now have a modern IoT architecture that is scalable, secure, and technologically advanced without vendor lock-in.

  • ‘Open Hybrid’ Initiative Targets Big Data Workloads

    ortonworks, IBM and Red Hat today announced they’re banding together to build a consistent hybrid computing architecture for big data workloads. Dubbed the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative, the program pledges simplicity of deployment and freedom of movement for data apps.

    The rapid ascent of cloud computing platforms like AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud has given enterprises abundant new options for storing data and deploying processing-intensive applications, such as deep learning and real-time stream processing. Throw in the progress being made at the edge, with sensors and speedy ARM chips collecting and processing massive amounts of data, and you have the makings of a computing revolution.

    While the computing possibilities in the cloud and on the edge may appear bountiful, the reality is that the underlying architectures for building apps that can span these three modes are just starting to come together. Enterprises today face a dearth of repeatable patterns to guide their developers, administrators, and architects, who are tasked with building, deploying and maintaining hybrid that span not just the cloud and the edge, but traditional on-prem data centers too.

  • How to overcome two major challenges with digital transformation

    Business leaders of all stripes, not only CIOs, are talking about Digital Transformation these days. Even the World Economic Forum is publishing White Papers on the Digital Transformation of Industries. Even still, whether it’s Netflix passing over the 120 Million Monthly Subscribers mark while still managing 25% Year-on-Year growth, or Peloton stealing gym memberships with over a 100% year-on-year growth rate, it’s clear that businesses need to deliver better and more holistic experiences to customers through digital channels in order to succeed.

    However, organizations often struggle on their digital transformation journey in two fundamental areas. First, in the ability to fund transformational projects. Second, defining and implementing a strategy that ensures their organizations have the skills necessary for the transformational projects.

  • Observe the Analyst’s Thoughts: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Fedora at FrOSCon 2018 – Event report
  • Bring back the headphone jack: Why USB-C audio still doesn't work

     

    Smartphone makers, it’s time to have that come-to-Apple moment, where we tell you that it’s time to put the 3.5mm analog headset jack back on the phone—at least until you get your USB-C audio act in order. After plugging in a fistful of USB-C dongles and USB-C headsets into a stack of USB-C phones, I’ve discovered that it’s a mess, especially for third-party headsets. Here's why.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux LDAP Server

    Since the development of this traditional IT realm, the world shifted to the cloud, bringing with it a variety of solutions such as AWS® and other SaaS tools (e.g. GitHub, Jira, Slack, and others). With the advent of DevOps tools, such as Docker, Kubernetes, OpenVPN, and more, LDAP remained a popular choice for authentication services. However, now the challenge was that IT admins had to manage the Linux LDAP server, rather than purchase the capability as a service, much like the rest of their cloud-based infrastructure.

    The good news is that a modern approach to directory services has emerged with an LDAP-as-a-Service offering. This cloud LDAP solution is available from JumpCloud® Directory-as-a-Service and enables IT organizations to simply point their IT resources to a multi-tenant cloud Linux LDAP server environment managed by a third party. In addition, IT admins get the benefit of pay as you go, with high availability, security, and scalability.

  • ZFS On Linux 0.7.10 Released With Linux 4.18 Support, Debian DKMS

    For those making use of ZFS On Linux to utilize ZFS file-system support on Linux systems, a new ZOL 0.7.10 release along with its SPL layer have been released.

    Most notable to ZFS/SPL 0.7.10 is the latest Linux 4.18 stable kernel series now being supported, but support is retained for going back to the Linux 2.6.32 kernel.

  • Linux Announces New Course and Certs for Hyperledger Fabric and Sawtooth

    On Thursday, the Linux Foundation announced yet another resource to help leaners grow more familiar with blockchain technology. The new LFD271 – Hyperledger Fabric Fundamentals is currently open for enrollment. The course is intended to onboard learners into the world of the blockchain and introduce people to current uses and practices.

    Later this year, successful students will be able to take the Certified Hyperledger Fabric Administrator and Certified Hyperledger Sawtooth Administrator exams to prove their merit.

  • First-person adventure game 'The Norwood Suite' should get a Linux build on Steam in future

    I spoke to the developer of the first-person adventure game The Norwood Suite about their plans for Linux.

    As it turns out, they already have a Linux build people can directly request but the developer doesn't currently have Linux setup so they've been gathering reports from the community. They said later that it's "only a matter of time" before the Linux build goes live on Steam.

  • Humble adds more games to their Summer Sale, only a few days left
  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.12 and GStreamer Plugin 0.3 release

    After almost 6 months, a new release of the GStreamer Rust bindings and the GStreamer plugin writing infrastructure for Rust is out. As usual this was coinciding with the release of all the gtk-rs crates to make use of all the new features they contain.

    Thanks to all the contributors of both gtk-rs and the GStreamer bindings for all the nice changes that happened over the last 6 months!

    And as usual, if you find any bugs please report them and if you have any questions let me know.

  • liveslak-1.3.0 with speed improvements

    There was no August release of a Plasma5 Live ISO as you will probably have noticed. The reason was that around the time when I released the August update of Plasma5 for Slackware, I was working on new liveslak functionality and wanted to finish that before releasing new ISOs. The testing took some more time than I anticipated due to increased work load in my day job. But I finished what I wanted to have in a new liveslak release, and today I want to write a post about the new stuff.

    To accompany the new liveslak-1.3.0 I have uploaded fresh ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. They are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Fri Sep 7 23:00:06 UTC 2018″.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (July and August 2018)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

        William Blough (bblough)
        Shengjing Zhu (zhsj)
        Boyuan Yang (byang)
        Thomas Koch (thk)
        Xavier Guimard (yadd)
        Valentin Vidic (vvidic)
        Mo Zhou (lumin)
        Ruben Undheim (rubund)
        Damiel Baumann (daniel)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

        Phil Morrell
        Raúl Benencia
        Brian T. Smith
        Iñaki Martin Malerba
        Hayashi Kentaro
        Arnaud Rebillout

    Congratulations!

  • Elementary OS First Impressions: A Great Linux Doorway For MacOS Users
  • Haiku, the open source BeOS clone, to release in beta after 17 years of development

    The Haiku OS project initially launched in August 2001, then named as “OpenBeOS”, is nearing a beta release expected later this month. It’s been over 17 years since the project launched, and more than 18 years since the last release of the operating system- BeOS that inspired it.

    BeOs launched in 1995 by Be Inc, almost became the operating system for Apple’s hardware. However, the negotiations between Be Inc and Apple turned into nothing and the iPhone giant decided in favour of NeXT. Used primarily in the area of multimedia by software developers and users, BeOS had an impressive user interface, pre-emptive multitasking, symmetric multiprocessing and a 64-bit journaling file system. Cloning BeOS, Haiku’s boot performance is very good. The Haiku user interface is modeled entirely after BeOS, acquiring its signature variable-width title bars and spatial file management.

  • Google Chrome Kills Off WWW In URLs — Here’s Why People Think It’s A Dumb Move

    While Google thinks www. or m. were “trivial subdomain,” people have strongly criticized Google over the Chromium blog thread. Some calling it a “dumb move,” others stating it another case of “stating opinion as a fact.”

    Apart from that, people have also pointed out several instances where two sites with similar URL scheme can cause confusion as well as open door to phishing attacks

  • BYD launches open-source platform, ‘developer version’ of AV model

    BYD has launched an open-source platform it calls ‘D++’ and a ‘developer version’ of its Qin Pro, claimed to be the world’s first autonomous car open to third-party developers. It announced these at its worldwide developer conference in Shenzhen, China, attended by representatives from companies including Baidu, Horizon and Roadstar.ai.

    Wang Chuanfu, BYD president and chairman, said at the conference: “Like the development of smartphones, which shifted from closed to open systems, this is also the only way for the car to become ‘smarter’. As we are embracing this new wave of intelligence, I’m proud to announce BYD’s strategy is now ‘open’.

    “In the future, travel will only comprise 1pc of smart cars, and the remaining 99pc is open to the human imagination,” Wang added. “BYD will fully open 341 sensors and 66 controls on the car for developers, providing a much broader creative platform, which is bound to produce an immeasurable application ecology. We are doing for the car what Android did for the mobile phone.”

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  • The Revel framework with golang.
  • Boston supporters! Join us against DRM

    International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is coming up on Tuesday, September 18th. This is our twelfth year gathering together to say in one voice that we oppose Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). If you live in the Boston area, we hope you'll join us for some in-person events! We're excited to spread the word about the injustice of DRM face-to-face, and we hope to see you there.

  • The Sci-Hub Effect? Prominent Research Councils Push Open Access

     

    This week several prestigious European research councils announced a major push for Open Access publishing. This will limit the influence of major copyright holders and could eventually help to 'tear down academia's paywalls.' The latter is exactly what Sci-Hub, the "Pirate Bay of Science," has been advocating for years.  

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Autobeat – One App for SoundCloud, YouTube, and Local Music

    Autobeat is an Electron-based music player that combines YouTube, SoundCloud, and tracks from your local music library into a simple user Interface.

    Like many apps that combine multiple services into a single app e.g. Rambox and Manageyum, Autobeat eliminates the need to chase (in this case,) music across multiple services because it houses the most popular ones in a single User Interface.

    It features a clutter-free and intuitive app window. Its channels, favorites, and library functions are located in the left panel while the player controls are positioned at the bottom of the page.

  • Equality Constraints for Cubic B-Splines
  • How to Powerwash Your Chromebook if You Get Locked Out
  • How to change the default sudo timeout
  • Quest For The Perfect Linux Distro – Unleaded Hangouts

    Quest For The Perfect Linux Distro. Today the gang and I discuss what we’d like to see in the perfect Linux distro or any OS for that matter. Additionally, we also discuss what we really would love to see improved and can’t believe in 2018 remains a problem even to this day.

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  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Holdings Lowered by IBM Retirement Fund
  • Xiaomi Poco F1 and Mi 8 Receive Unofficial TWRP Builds
  • The Long-Awaited Haiku Operating System Beta Should Be Days Away

    The Haiku operating system has been in development since 2002 as an open-source BeOS-inspired platform and nearly a decade since they reached the alpha stage for their first release, they are nearly ready to deliver the beta.

    While they have delivered a few Haiku R1 alpha releases since 2009, the beta release has remained elusive but over the next week that should finally materialize. Last month we were elated to hear the beta should come in September with their release schedule putting that R1 Beta 1 milestone between 10 and 18 September. That appears to remain on track for likely seeing the official beta release over roughly the next week.

  • libcurl gets a URL API

    libcurl has done internet transfers specified as URLs for a long time, but the URLs you'd tell libcurl to use would always just get parsed and used internally.

    Applications that pass in URLs to libcurl would of course still very often need to parse URLs, create URLs or otherwise handle them, but libcurl has not been helping with that.

    At the same time, the under-specification of URLs has led to a situation where there's really no stable document anywhere describing how URLs are supposed to work and basically every implementer is left to handle the WHATWG URL spec, RFC 3986 and the world in between all by themselves. Understanding how their URL parsing libraries, libcurl, other tools and their favorite browsers differ is complicated.

  • Firefox Extensions and Other Tragedies

    Several months ago a Google employee told me not to panic about the removal of XUL because Firefox had probably mainlined the functionality I need from my ossified xul-ext packages. This appears to have been wildly inaccurate.

    [...]

    It appears that Waterfox is not in Debian so I cannot try that out.

  • Who are/were the FSFE Fellowship? Starting Fellowship 2.0?

    Since the FSFE Fellowship elected me as representative in April 2017, I've received a lot of questions from fellows and the wider community about what the Fellowship actually is. As representative, it is part of my role to help ensure that fellows are adequately informed and I hope to work towards that with this blog.

    The FSFE Fellowship was started in 2005 and has grown over the years.

  • N. Korean alleged to be behind WannaCry, no mention of NSA exploit

    The US Department of Justice has filed a criminal complaint against a North Korean cracker named Park Jin Hyok for allegedly being behind a 2104 hack of Sony Pictures and the May 2017 WannaCry ransomware attack.

    An affidavit filed by FBI special agent Nathan Shields also alleged that Park was behind the theft of $81 million from Bangladesh Bank, the central bank of that country, in February 2016. One glaring omission was the fact that an NSA exploit used to craft WannaCry had been leaked on the Web by a group known as the Shadow Brokers in April 2017.

    He was also accused of being behind numerous other unspecified break-ins at various private and government institutions.

    Park was alleged to have worked for a North Korean front company known as Chosun Expo; some of the employees in branches of the firm abroad also did private work for clients. Park was said to have worked with a group in Dalian, China.

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