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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The desktop belongs to Electron

    I’ve been using a Pixelbook over the past week, checking out the new Linux application functionality. It’s not ready for prime time, but it’s a billion times better than the last time I tried to run Linux apps on Chrome OS.

  • P-State Powersave Improvements May Help Boost I/O Performance

    Those running Intel Skylake servers may soon see better I/O performance if using the P-State powersave governor that is often the default on many Linux distributions.

  • Free Webinar on Community-Driven Governance for Open Source Projects

    Topics such as licensing and governance are complex but nonetheless critical considerations for open source projects. And, understanding and implementing the requirements in a strategic way are key to a project’s long-term health and success. In an upcoming webinar — “Governance Models of Community-Driven Open Source Projects” — The Linux Foundation’s Scott Nicholas will examine various approaches for structuring open source projects with these requirements in mind.

  • Google Summer of Code, Porting Keyboard KCM to Qt Quick!

    I am Gun Park, and I’m excited to finally join the wonderful KDE community through this amazing opportunity called Google Summer of Code 2018. Thanks for all the people that have supported and led me to this journey!

  • Google Summer of Code with KDE
  • Announcing Board of Directors Elections 2018

    From 2016 to 2017, I was a director on the GNOME Foundation Board of Directors. This is a great opportunity for anyone working on the GNOME project. And because Board elections are coming up, I wanted to share the news.

  • How to connect Ubuntu 18.04 to your Google account
  • Have a Release Party, Promote openSUSE’s Newest Version

    There are just 9 days left for the release of openSUSE Leap 15 and the community can help spread the word of the release by having a release party and promoting the newest version of Leap.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, April 2018

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Truth is More Important Than Harmony

    Today I did a very silly thing, because it was the right moment and the right audience…

    No, it probably wasn’t! But I figured it was probably as close as it would get to one. Of course it will brand me further as a troublemaker, but that’s not entirely fair– I really wasn’t the one who started the trouble.

    Devuan’s structure is clearly built on the bazaar– when they find something unofficial that can help Devuan more than hurt it, they just offer the opportunity to be official.

    This is based on observation and it may not be true as a solid rule, but it happened with Devuan-live (and it’s one the best moves Devuan made– it helped me to believe they can make timely, great decisions) and it appeared to be happening eventually with vdev (unfortunately abandoned by its author) and it appears to have happened with the now-official Devuan forum: https://devuan.org/

  • Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 32 released

    We've just released Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 32. It's available from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2045311.1, or via 'pkg update' from the support repository at https://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/support .

  • Solaris 11.3 SRU 32 Released With Package Updates

    While waiting for Solaris 11.4 to be released, Oracle has today rolled out its thirty-second stable release update to Solaris 11.3.

    With this latest SRU to the two-year-old Solaris 11.3 is now Apache 2.4.33, OpenSSL 1.0.2o, Wireshark 2.4.6, Perl 5.22, Python 2.7.14, and a wealth of other package updates. There are also some new system calls for yielding better network performance, netstat providing more UDP socket statistics, and various other minor enhancements.

  • Telenav Open Sources Its AI Map-Making Technology to Improve OpenStreetMap and Announces $10,000-Prize Contest
  • Open source HarperDB database solution studio launched

    “With the release of the HarperDB studio, we are providing tools that the industry expects while at the same time taking it a step further and including analytical capabilities to shorten the data value chain and provide accessible, real-time actionability on big data for IoT and HTAP use cases,” said HarperDB CEO Stephen Goldberg.

Audiocasts/Shows: Cooking with Linux and This Week in Linux

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  • Cooking with Linux (Without a Net)

    It's Tuesday, and it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net) where I do some live Linuxy and open source stuff, live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face. Today, we're going back to WSL and trying to run X Windows and we're going to take a Linux distribution most people have never heard of out for a spin.

  • Episode 28 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, check out some big distro release news from Fedora, CentOS, CoreOS, KaOS and more. There’s new versions of Firefox, Kdenlive, GNOME and Cinnamon available. Lubuntu announces their switch to LXQt by default. If you’re interested in learning Python, Humble Bundle has a great Python Development bundle available. Ubuntu 18.10’s codename was announced and some of the Ubuntu Flavours might be dropping support for 32bit ISOs in the 18.10 cycle. Google confirmed that Linux Apps are coming to ChromeOS. Then later in the show we’ll look at some gaming news from Atari and Valve, also some mobile news from Puri.sm and Android. All that and much more!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • New Technologies Lead to New Linux and Cloud Training Options
  • Everything You Need to Know about the Cloud and Cloud Computing, Part II: Using the Cloud [Ed: Latest cloudwashing by IBM/LJ; just call it what it is: servers being pushed back to a mainframe era -- companies controlling all the servers.]
  • Kakoune: A Better Code Editor Heavily Inspired by Vim

    It comes with numerous text editing/writing tools such as contextual help, syntax highlighting, auto-completion while typing, and supports many different programming languages. It also implements multiple selections as an essential procedure for interacting with your text.

    In addition, Kakoune’s client/server architecture allows for multiple clients to connect to the same editing session.

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  • New in Qt 5.11: improvements to the model/view APIs (part 1)

    The Qt model/view APIs are used throughout Qt — in Qt Widgets, in Qt Quick, as well as in other non-GUI code. As I tell my students when I deliver Qt trainings: mastering the usage of model/view classes and functions is mandatory knowledge, any non-trivial Qt application is going to be data-driven, with the data coming from a model class.

  • Akademy 2019 Call for Hosts

    The organization of this year's Akademy is in full swing: the official conference program is out, we have had an insightful interview with one of the keynote speakers, another is coming soon, and attendees are already booking flights and accommodation. The #akademy IRC channel on Freenode and the Telegram group are buzzing with messages, advice and recommendations.

  • GNOME Is Removing the Ability to Launch Binary Apps from Nautilus

    Last year Nautilus lost the ability to show desktop icons — now GNOME developers plan to drop another familiar feature.

    According to a code commit on Gitlab the famous file manager is set to lose the ability to run binaries and launch apps directly.

    Or, to put it another way, you won’t be able to double-click on programs, scripts or apps to launch them using Nautilus.

  • Mageia Blog (English) : Issues with the Grand Update?

    This should not be needed, as 32-bit libraries should be able to co-exist on a 64 bit install, as they may be needed for third party applications.

    Bug 23016 has been reopened to study this a bit more. For now, we’re watching for reports, and giving you the workaround of uninstalling the 32 bit library.

    It’s not that 32-bit isn’t able to mix with 64-bit in all cases, just in some, where there are files in the lib package that should be in a different (non-arch specific) package. In these two cases, it’s the /usr/share/locale/ files are in both the 32 and 64 bit packages, with identical names and paths.

    The rpm package manager allows a file to be owned by more than one package, provided the attributes are identical, but it blocks updating with a new version, since it’s trying to update one of the packages, but until the other version is updated too, there is a conflict. We’re keeping a watch-out for these packaging errors.

    It’s possible that if you’ve used DNF to do the update, rather than urpmi, you won’t have this problem; as we gather more information, we’ll add it to roundups in the coming weeks.

    While all this Grand stuff has been happening, we’ve also been doing plenty of the usual things, including over 300 packages into Cauldron.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Following Microsoft’s lead, Google makes it easy to run Linux apps on ChromeOS [Ed: A Microsoft propaganda site spreads lies. I guess that author never heard of Crouton (which a Google employee developed a long time ago). Never mind cygwin on Windows, which goes nearly 2 decades back and wasn't the work of Microsoft. This is what happens when one drinks Microsoft Kool-Aid.]
  • InvoicePrinter 1.2

    A new version of my Ruby gem for generating PDF invoices InvoicePrinter is out! This time bringing in a bundled server that can be handy for applications not running on Ruby.

    Not every app out there is a Ruby application and I wanted for people on different stacks to be able to benefit from super simple PDF invoicing that InvoicePrinter enable. This is the reason why I implemented JSON support and a command line in version 1.1 and why am I adding the server in 1.2. You can run it as a standalone server or mount it in any Rack application and use its JSON API to generate the documents.

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  • How to Fix 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress
  • GSoC 2018 with KDE – Community bonding period

    The community bonding period ends today and the coding period begins.

    Community bonding period had been quite hectic for me with respect to learning new things and thinking of good ways to implement them. I didn’t know much about piano or other musical instruments (as I had never played them before) and was unaware of many notations and usages, but thanks to my mentor Emmanuel Charruau (allon on IRC) who suported me a lot and always cleared even my very silly doubts (as I myself was learning various elements of piano and its notations for the first time). He provided me all the resources step-by-step and helped me learn so much about the project in such less time.

    It was quite fun exploring new things and learn them which I would never had.

  • IWD: the new WPA-Supplicant Replacement

    IWD comes with a more secure approach. It doesn't use OpenSSL or GnuTLS. Instead it uses different Kernel functions for cryptographic operations.

  • Sky’s the limit as Cathay Pacific deploys Red Hat cloud

    Cathay Pacific has deployed Red Hat solutions and services to drive customer experience across the airline, transforming legacy infrastructure into a modern hybrid cloud architecture.

    Specifically, the carrier leveraged the vendor’s OpenStack Platform and OpenShift Container Platform offerings, in a bid to improve end-user experience through digital technologies.

    Based in Hong Kong, Cathay Pacific is an international airline offering passenger and cargo services to 200 destinations in 52 countries and territories worldwide.

  • Xilinx Virtex 7 FPGA bitstream reverse engineered

    While my article on HN is getting no traction I might as well post on here some fantastic news: The Xilinx Virtex 7 FPGA bitstream has been reverse engineered by Clifford Wolf.

    For some context this is a very popular and cheap series of FPGA devices. For example you can buy the Arty board which has one of these FPGAs for $99, or the slightly more advanced Nexys 4 DDR for $265.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Mark Text: FOSS Markdown Editor With Realtime Preview

    Mark Text is a fairly new free, open source Markdown editor for Linux, Windows and Mac. Aimed at improving your editing efficiency, the editor supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec.

    The application tries not to get in your way, by using a clean interface that tries to focus on your writing and nothing more, with a seamless live preview, while still allowing you to easily access its menu or see the current file name.

  • MySql DataTime/TimeStamp fields and Scala
  • Making Videos (that work in Firefox) from a Series of Images
  • Linux Fun – Play Old Classic Snake Game in Linux Terminal

    msnake is the Linux command line version of the most popular old classic snake game was written in C using ncurses library by Mogria and Timo Furrer. The game can be played at terminal with textual interface in almost all GNU/Linux distributions.

    The game is highly customizable and includes free/classic gameplay modes, keybindings, and even the GUI-like appearance of the application.

    To run msnake game on all modern Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Fedora and Arch Linux, simply install it from the snapd package management software as shown.

  • Linuxfx LTS 9.0

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Purism's Librem 15 v2 Laptop Now Supported By Mainline Coreboot

    While Purism had already been shipping Coreboot on their Librem 15 v2 laptop two years ago and has already succeeded by their third revision that does have mainline Coreboot support, the support was merged today to Coreboot proper for the Librem 15 v2.

    Mainline Coreboot has already supported the earlier iteration of the original Librem 15, the newer and current Librem 15 v3, as well as the Librem 13. As of today the second version of the Librem 15 is now officially supported in its Git code-base. The Librem 15 v2 was their updated Broadwell-based like the Librem 15 v1 while the current-generation Librem 15 v3 is utilizing an Intel Skylake processor.

  • Opera 53 Web Browser Hits Stable with Revamped Appearance of Tabs, Address Bar

    Opera released today a new stable version of its Chromium-based web browser for computers, Opera 53, which is a minor update revamping the look of the tabs and the address bar.
    Based on the latest Chromium 66.0.3359.139 open-source web browser, Opera 53 is now rolling out to Linux, Mac, and Windows users worldwide with optimizations to how tabs are displayed on the tab bar when you have numerous tabs opened, especially for Mac users, making it easier to find a certain tab in the multitude of opened tabs.

    "Today, we’re transitioning Opera 53 from the beta line to stable. This build revamps the appearance of tabs and the address bar," said Krystian Kolondra, EVP Desktop at Opera. "Mac users find it difficult to locate and manage a particular tab when many of them are open. We figured out a way to optimize this and made your plentiful tabs’ favicons more visible."

  • Adaptive GNOME Web

    I started working on making GNOME Web work well on the Librem 5; to be sure it fits a phone's screen I want the windows to fit in a 360 points width, which is definitely small. To do so I started with the advices from Tobias Bernard to make Web have two modes that I named normal and narrow. The normal mode is Web as you know it, while the narrow mode moves all buttons from the header bar but the hamburger menu to a new action bar at the bottom, letting the windows reach yet unreachable widths.

  • GNOME Terminal: separate menu items for opening tabs and windows

    Astute users might have noticed that the GNOME Terminal binary distributed by Fedora has separate menu items for opening new tabs and windows, while the vanilla version available from GNOME doesn’t.

  • The Grand Update – brace yourselves!

    In the remaining hours before the hdlists are regenerated, and we can all update our Mageia 6 systems with more than 400 packages, here’s some info – very important info – about the update process.

    It’s vitally important that the update completes without interruption! Here’s what you need to do:

  • CentOS 7 1804 Linux Distro Available For Download: Here’s How To Update

    While making a list of free operating systems that can be used both as a daily use system as well as a server, CentOS gets an early mention. Based on RHEL base, CentOS is known for being a stable and manageable platform. Just recently, the developers have shipped the sixth CentOS-7 release.

  • Red Hat Summit: An introduction to OpenShift.io

    Red Hat OpenShift.io is an innovative online service for development teams. Installing and configuring IDEs, libraries, and various tools is a major time sink. OpenShift.io is a cloud-native set of zero-install tools for editing and debugging code, agile planning, and managing CI/CD pipelines. It also features package analytics (an unbelievably cool feature we’ll discuss more in a minute), and has various quick starts for common frameworks. Because everyone on the team uses the exact same tools, “It works on my machine” becomes a thing of the past.

    [...]

    One more thing: package analytics is an amazing feature. In Todd’s example, he added a package (the name of which we shall not mention) and the tools flagged it as having a security vulnerability. This is done in an elegant, friendly UI as opposed to a text message you might not notice in a console. In addition, the product uses machine learning to analyze your project. If you’re using an unusual combination of packages, the tools let you know. That might not be a problem, but it’s a sign that you might want to re-examine your choices. To quote Todd, package analytics is “freaky, freaky cool.”

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  • [Slackware] Moving to OpenSSL 1.1.0 and Firefox 60
  • [Slackware] May ’18 security update for Adobe Flashplayer

    Here’s the latest security update for Adobe’s Flash Player plugins.

    The version 29.0.0.171 of the flashplayer-plugin (NPAPI plugin for Mozilla based browsers) and the chromium-pepperflash-plugin (PPAPI plugin for Chromium based browsers) was released yesterday and you can find Slackware packages for it in my repository.

  • [DNG] Devuan "ASCII" 2.0 Release Candidate
  • Systemd-free Devuan Linux looses version 2.0 release candidate

    Devuan Linux, the Debian fork that offers "init freedom" has announced the first release candidate for its second version.

    Dubbed "ASCII", Devuan 2.0 uses Debian Stretch as its base, doesn't use Systemd, and reached beta in February 2018.

    This week, the developers behind the distro announced ASCII's first release candidate, along with news that the installer "now offers a wider variety of Desktop Environments including XFCE, KDE, MATE, Cinnamon, LXQT (with others available post-install)."

    "In addition, there are options for 'Console productivity' with hundreds of CLI and TUI utils, as well asa minimal base system ideal for servers," the team stated.

  • Yet Another Message Bug Crashes iPhones, iOS 11.3 and iOS 11.4 Affected

    The message bug crashing WhatsApp on Android is now hitting iPhones as well, only that in Apple’s ecosystem it breaks down Messages to a point where it’s fairly difficult to bring it back.
    Specifically, a specially crafted message that includes invisible Unicode characters causes the Messages app on an iPhone to crash completely. The app no longer launches, despite the typical workarounds like forced closes or phone reboots.

    At this point, the message bug appears to spread online with the following string of emoji, though it’s worth noting that the body can be easily modified by anyone, as long as the invisible Unicode characters are still there:

today's leftovers

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  • CNCF’s CloudEvents Spec Could Facilitate Interoperability across Serverless Platforms

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) wants to foster greater interoperability between serverless platforms, through its release of the CloudEvents specification. The project is at version 0.1 iteration, and hopes that it will be approved as a CNCF sandbox project in June.

    The CloudEvents specification provides (formerly called OpenEvents) a path that would allow any two components to transfer an event, regardless of whether they are functions, apps, containers or services, said Doug Davis, an IBM senior technical staff member at IBM and a member of the CNCF serverless working group.

    “Much in the same way HTTP — in its most basic form — helped interoperability between any two components by standardizing how to represent well-defined metadata about the message being transferred, CloudEvents is doing the same thing,” said Davis. “Defining the common metadata will aid in the transferring of an event from any producer to any consumer.”

  • GNOME Announces New Internship Program For Complex Projects

    Complementing GNOME's involvement in Google Summer of Code and Outreachy, the GNOME Foundation has announced a new internship program aimed for more complex projects.

    This new internship program is higher-paying due to greater complexity: the foundation will pay interns $8,000 USD for three months of work.

    The first round of internship projects are open for USB protection via USBGuard for fending off USB-based attacks, improved credentials management via a new program, a new PipeWire portal system, private session support for the desktop, crypto hardware enablement like making TPMs easier to use, and location aware policies/security handling.

  • Microsoft Brings Ubuntu Linux To Windows 10 On ARM; More Distros To Follow
  • CodeWeavers has Released CrossOver 17.5.0 for Linux and MacOS

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 17.5.0 for both macOS and Linux. CrossOver 17.5.0 has many improvements to the core Windows compatibility layer and also specific enhancements for several popular applications.

today's leftovers

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  • Bcachefs File-System Is Working On Going Upstream In The Linux Kernel

    Kent Overstreet who has been spending the past few years working on the Bcachefs file-system born out of the BCache block cache technology is now starting work on upstreaming the code to the mainline kernel.

    For facilitating an easier review process, he begun by sending out the patches for the on-disk data structures and ioctl interface exposed to user-space. This is just over one thousand lines of code while the entire file-system implementation is more than fifty thousand lines of new code.

  • ROCm 1.8 Beta Packages Available For Radeon GPU Compute/OpenCL Testing

    While ROCm 1.7.2 is the latest stable release for this Radeon GPU compute stack, there are 1.8.0 beta packages available for testing.

    A few days ago AMD developers quietly made available ROCm 1.8 beta packages for Ubuntu 16.04 and RHEL/CentOS 7.4.

  • Docker for Desktop is Certified Kubernetes

    “You are now Certified Kubernetes.” With this comment, Docker for Windows and Docker for Mac passed the Kubernetes conformance tests. Kubernetes has been available in Docker for Mac and Docker for Windows since January, having first being announced at DockerCon EU last year. But why is this important to the many of you who are using Docker for Windows and Docker for Mac?

    Kubernetes is designed to be a platform that others can build upon. As with any similar project, the risk is that different distributions vary enough that applications aren’t really portable. The Kubernetes project has always been aware of that risk – and this led directly to forming the Conformance Working Group. The group owns a test suite that anyone distributing Kubernetes can run, and submit the results for to attain official certification. This test suite checks that Kubernetes behaves like, well, Kubernetes; that the various APIs are exposed correctly and that applications built using the core APIs will run successfully. In fact, our enterprise container platform, Docker Enterprise Edition, achieved certification using the same test suite You can find more about the test suite at https://github.com/cncf/k8s-conformance.

  • Redesigning the lock screen

    Last November we had a small hackfest in London, focused on GNOME Shell design. We explored various themes during the hackfest and came up with a bunch of initial designs, which we’ve subsequently been developing. The main area of recent work has been the login and unlock experience. The rest of this post gives an overview of the design that we’ve come up with.

  • Trello Alternative Project Management Tool Zenkit is Now Available as Snap Package

    Brief: Project management app Zenkit is now available as a Snap application for Linux desktop.

    Zenkit – in case you did not know – is a collaboration tool for managing projects and tasks for work just like Trello. And, recently, Zenkit released a “snap” on Snapcraft which enables you to use Zenkit on any Linux distribution without having to worry about updates and stability.

  • Starting Up With Xubuntu

    Xubuntu is a variant of Ubuntu without GNOME as its default desktop environment. It comes with XFCE desktop environment, and X-F-C-E just pronounced as it is, is not an abbreviated word at all.

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  • Qualcomm announces support for 'fast commercial availability' of Android P

    Qualcomm announced today that it's working with Google to get Android P to more devices, sooner. The chipmaker had early access to the new OS version, allowing it to optimize its Snapdragon 845, 660, and 636 processors "to ensure readiness for OEMs to upgrade to Android P at the time of launch."

today's leftovers

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  • Windows 10 update bug locks machines running Chrome, Cortana and others

    Microsoft working on fix for machines and suggests temporary solutions to bug caused by installation of April 2018 update

  • How Kubernetes Aligns with Cisco's Intent Based Networking

    Cisco first announced its Intent Based Networking strategy in June 2017 and has expanded it with assurance and IoT capabilities in the months since.

    "Intent Based Networking is really a big step from traditional networking where you log in and configure individual switches and configuration is supposed to match some goal," Tucker said. "When you reverse that, you become explicit, and say here is what i want to achieve. and let automation make it so."

    "Kubernetes is starting right from that premise," Tucker added. "It has always been about, here is the model i want to see in the world and then the Kuberentes engine makes that so."

    In Tucker's view, the Kubernetes model is going to fit very well with Cisco's intent based networking model as well.

  • The Last Of The X.Org Server 1.20 Patches Posted

    Release manager Adam Jackson has sent out the last planned patches for integrating into xorg-server 1.20 prior to its long-awaited release.

    On Monday were four more patches with the final cleanups and polish for this X.Org Server update that's been in the making for more than the past year and a half.

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2018

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

today's leftovers

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Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Debian XU4 images updated
    I've updated my Debian images for the ODROID XU4; the newest build was done before stretch release, and a lot of minor adjustments have happened since then.
  • Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Released
  • FBI says Russians hacked [sic] hundreds of thousands of home and office routers

    The warning followed a court order Wednesday that allowed the FBI to seize a website that the hackers [sic] planned to use to give instructions to the routers. Though that cut off malicious communications, it still left the routers infected, and Friday’s warning was aimed at cleaning up those machines.

  • FBI tells router users to reboot now to kill malware infecting 500k devices

    Researchers from Cisco’s Talos security team first disclosed the existence of the malware on Wednesday. The detailed report said the malware infected more than 500,000 devices made by Linksys, Mikrotik, Netgear, QNAP, and TP-Link. Known as VPNFilter, the malware allowed attackers to collect communications, launch attacks on others, and permanently destroy the devices with a single command. The report said the malware was developed by hackers [sic] working for an advanced nation, possibly Russia, and advised users of affected router models to perform a factory reset, or at a minimum to reboot.

Software and Games: KStars, Opera, OpenStack, MariaDB and More

  • KStars 2.9.6 is Released!
    I'm glad to announce the release of KStars 2.9.6 for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. This is a minor bugfix release.
  • Opera 54 Browser Enters Beta with News on the Speed Dial, Update & Recovery Menu
    Opera has promoted its upcoming Opera 54 web browser to the beta channel, giving us a glimpse of what to expect from the final version, due for release sometime next month. Based on the open-source Chromium 67.0.3396.18 web browser, Opera 54 recently entered beta stages of development with a plethora of new features and improvements, among which we can mention a new Update & Recovery Opera menu page that makes it easier for users to update the web browser and reset it to its default state, including the ability to clear temporary data, such as cookies.
  • OpenStack at a Crossroads
    The OpenStack of a few years ago is dead, however. What has emerged from the hype cycle is a materially different foundation, mission and software stack, with a great deal of change still ahead of it.
  • The OpenStack Foundation grows beyond OpenStack
    The OpenStack Foundation has made a considerable change to its development process and governance structure by introducing two open source projects that are not part of the OpenStack cloud platform. This week, the organization launched version 1.0 of Kata Containers - a runtime system with an emphasis on speed and security, enabling users to boot a VM in as little as five seconds - and introduced a brand new project called Zuul, spinning out the software development and integration platform that has been used by the OpenStack community internally since 2012.
  • Oracle nemesis MariaDB tries to lure enterprise folk with TX 3.0
    Open-source database biz MariaDB has upped the ante in its war against Oracle, promising enterprise customers better compatibility with – and easier migration from – Big Red. The Finnish firm's latest offering, MariaDB TX 3.0, released for GA today, extends the number of use cases to include temporal processing and advanced data protection for sensitive and personally identifiable information, as well as Oracle compatibility. The broad aim is to tap into customers' grumbles over legacy vendor lock-in, while convincing the bigger customers that they can move to an open-source database without compromising performance.
  • The Humble Monthly Bundle just added two great Linux games
    For those that are interested, you can secure a copy of two great Linux games in the current Humble Monthly Bundle. Just added today are: Get Cook, Serve, Delicious! 2!! Ken Follett's The Pillars of the Earth
  • SC-Controller 0.4.3 Released, Support Steam Controller & Sony DS4 Over Bluetooth
    For those looking to manage your Steam Controller and other supported Linux gaming peripheral input devices outside of Steam, there is a new release of the independently-developed SC-Controller Linux user-space software. While Linux 4.18 is bringing the Steam Controller kernel driver, for those looking for a Steam Controller solution right now to enjoy this excellent gaming controller for now outside of Steam, SC-Controller fills that void.

Huawei, Fuchsia and More

  • Huawei will no longer allow bootloader unlocking (Update: Explanation from Huawei)

    "In order to deliver the best user experience and prevent users from experiencing possible issues that could arise from ROM flashing, including system failure, stuttering, worsened battery performance, and risk of data being compromised, Huawei will cease providing bootloader unlock codes for devices launched after May 25, 2018. [...]"

  • Fuchsia Friday: How ad targeting might be a hidden cost of Fuchsia’s structure
     

    Fuchsia, by its nature, comes with the potential for a handful of new opportunities for ad targeting. Let’s peer into the dark side of Fuchsia’s innovative features.

  • iPhone Quarter, ZTE Troubles, Facebook Troubles, Nokia Come-back
     

    So the past month or two? The Quarterly results cycle came in. The item often of great interest is the Apple iPhone performance. 52.2 million iPhones shipped and that gives roughly a flat market share compared to the year before, so about 14%-15%. I'll come and do the full math later of the quarterly data. That race is no longer in any way interesting.

    But two Top 10 smartphone brands ARE in the news. One who is facing imminent death and the other who is making a miraculous return-from-dead. So imminent death and current Top 10 brand first. ZTE. The Trump administration has put a massive squeeze on ZTE and the company is in serious trouble of imminent collapse. Then bizarrely, Trump reversed course and felt he needed to protect CHINESE employment (???) and after yet another typical Trump-mess, we now are at a Never-Neverland where Trump's own party Republicans are revolting against their President and well, ZTE may end up a casualty of this mess. We'll keep an eye on it.

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