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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Kubuntu Podcast #15 – Yakkety and Kubuntu Ninjas
  • Pitivi 0.97 Released As The GNOME-Aligned Open-Source Video Editor

    Pitivi 0.97 was released today as the newest development release of this open-source non-linear video editing software followed quickly by a 0.97.1 point release just for a fix to show the correct version string.

  • The WineHQ Wine development release 1.9.16 is now available for Linux and Mac

    What's new in this release:

    Better 64-bit binary compatibility on macOS.
    Performance improvements in JavaScript.
    More progress towards the Direct3D command stream.
    More shader instructions in Direct3D.
    Performance improvements in GDI.
    Various bug fixes.

  • Apricity OS 07.2016 Screenshot Tour
  • openSUSE Asia Summit 2016 opens up event registration

    openSUSE.Asia Summit is a 2 day event hosted every year in different regions of Asia to promote openSUSE and open source. Hosting a variety of workshops, talks and a hackathon, openSUSE Asia summit is expecting over 400 participants. Attendees will learn how to use openSUSE and incorporate it in their personal as well as professional lives. They will also understand the dynamics of the openSUSE project and meet the openSUSE contributors and board.

    In addition, we have chance to learn free and open technologies, to share experiences with each other, and most of all, have fun at the Summit, and, in beautiful tropical scene of Yogyakarta region (a travel guide for you coming soon). In previous years openSUSE.Asia Summit has been held in Beijing, China in 2014 and National Taipei University of Education,Taipei / Taiwan, Republic Of China 2015.

  • Managers: Do you delegate or donate?
  • The Red Hat Paradox

    When one thinks of Red Hat, Linux emerges as the top of mind software application. The Red Hat Linux software solution paradigm represented, to many, a “crazy” business model in its early days. Prior to the emergence, the likes of Microsoft, IBM, HP, etc. had defined the software development, sales and support model narrative in a clear objectified manner. Organizations paid a monetized licencing fee, and monetized annual support. Modifications to core software were often reliant upon the vendor, based upon established pricing models. Also, core product upgrades were solely the responsibility of the provider.

  • Enea AB: Enea® Linux the first commercial Linux distribution with Yocto Project 2.1
  • Find This Secret Command In MS-DOS Code To Win $100,000 And “Embarrass” Microsoft

    If we start reading Microsoft’s history, the MS-DOS chapter comes very early. The operating system acts as a foundation of the Microsoft Empire. Bill Gates got his big break in 1980 when he licensed this OS to IBM.

    You might know that Microsoft didn’t develop this operating system in-house. Instead, it acquired another operating system named QDOS–Quick and Dirty Operating System. QDOS was developed by SCP’s Tim Paterson, who was later hired by Gates to modify QDOS into MS-DOS.

    If you turn more pages of the history, you’ll come across another technology pioneer named the late Gary Kildall. He was the founder of DRI (Digital Research Inc.) and creator of an early PC OS named CP/M.

  • Researchers crack open unusually advanced malware that hid for 5 years [Ed: Windows]

    Security experts have discovered a malware platform that's so advanced in its design and execution that it could probably have been developed only with the active support of a nation-state.

    The malware—known alternatively as "ProjectSauron" by researchers from Kaspersky Lab and "Remsec" by their counterparts from Symantec—has been active since at least 2011 and has been discovered on 30 or so targets. Its ability to operate undetected for five years is a testament to its creators, who clearly studied other state-sponsored hacking groups in an attempt to replicate their advances and avoid their mistakes. State-sponsored groups have been responsible for malware like the Stuxnet- or National Security Agency-linked Flame, Duqu, and Regin. Much of ProjectSauron resides solely in computer memory and was written in the form of Binary Large Objects, making it hard to detect using antivirus.

  • 5 Best Hacks From The Black Hat 2016

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • This Week in Solus – Install #33

    Our development and bug tracking oriented infrastructure moved from Bugzilla to Phabricator a few days ago. Bugzilla simply didn’t offer us the flexibility we needed and has long been a bit of a sore tooth for us.

  • Apricity OS Gets First Stable Release — A Beautiful And Simple Arch Linux-based Distro
  • Linux Arc Theme Now Available for Windows 10 Anniversary Update [Ed: More Linuxwashing]
  • Debian Code Search: improving client-side latency (2016-08-08)
  • Here Are the 9 Open Source Projects Recently Funded by Mozilla
  • How to add freely licensed animated GIFs to Facebook and Twitter using Riffsy
  • 4 talks from leaders in higher ed on the future of open education

    Openness has become the new standard for content and software across a variety of initiatives in higher education. Open source software, open education, open educational resources, open access publishing, open analytics, open data, open science, and open humanities have matured to challenge, even dominate, the global educational landscape.

    Those of us working with open projects know how important it is to contribute experiences of best practice, develop common understanding, and share strategic direction, in order to better facilitate communication and synchronization across the emerging open landscape. To that end, the Apereo Foundation—an open source software community of over 100 institutions of higher education—along with the Open Source Initiative and Red Hat organized the first Open Summit.

    The Summit was held at New York University in late May and included speakers from across a variety of open initiatives and communities: faculty teaching open source principles and practices; researchers creating open data and techniques to promote collaboration; campus staff developing open source projects in support of teaching and learning; librarians curating open educational resources; university administrators cultivating open governance models.

  • Innuendo, From Me, Just Like Trump

    Come on, Delta. If what you’ve been doing doesn’t work, stop beating your head against the wall. Switch to GNU/Linux like the stock-exchanges. They wanted stock-trades to take flight smoothly and reliably. GNU/Linux helps them do that. I wanted PCs to run reliably in schools. GNU/Linux helped that happen. PCs in my home have been running pretty well since we went completely GNU/Linux several years ago. This year we plan to get rid of Intel too for complete independence from Wintel. Try it. Make Delta great again by migrating to GNU/Linux. You and your passengers will like it.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Windows 10 Anniversary Update is borking boxen everywhere

    Users are reporting that upgrading to the Windows 10 Anniversary Update renders their PCs unusable.

    A lengthy Reddit thread explains the problem: the Anniversary Update installs just fine, but when users re-start their PCs after the upgrade … nothing happens.

    Users report that their PCs simply hang on restart, sometimes losing even the ability to accept input from mice and keyboards and sometimes frustrating users by allowing input but not responding.

    Some in the thread report that disabling Secure Boot removes the problem, others describe more elaborate workarounds.

    Microsoft, for its part, has advised those in the thread to do a clean install of Windows and pointed those afflicted to USB media creation tools in order to facilitate that action.

  • RFC #1: Karl Fogel – Open Source, Then and Now (Part 1)

    Karl served on the board of the Open Source Initiative, which coined the term “open source”, and helped write Subversion, a popular version control system that predates Git. Karl also wrote a popular book on managing open source projects called Producing Open Source Software. He’s currently a partner at Open Tech Strategies, a firm that helps major organizations use open source to achieve their goals.

  • Marek Continues Baking More Mesa Optimizations

    AMD developer Marek Olšák continues leading their recent charge on looking to boost the performance potential out of Mesa / Gallium3D.

    Aside from working on the remaining OGL4 extensions, longtime Mesa contributor Marek Olšák has been seeking to boost the performance of the open-source AMD OpenGL driver. He's published a number of optimizations with the most impressive improvements being for a 23%+ performance improvement for RadeonSI with the BioShock Infinite game.

  • littler 0.3.1

    The second release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in the summer of 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

    littler is the first command-line interface for R and predates Rscript. It is still faster, and in my very biased eyes better as it allows for piping as well shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It prefers to live on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on the OS X due yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems where a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet -- the build system could be extended -- see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers welcome!).

  • Choqok Lives — Qt Twitter App Sees First Update in Over a Year

    Feed me cereal and call me a-maized: there’s a brand new version of Qt Twitter app Choqok on the way.

    Choqok 1.6 Beta is the first update to the app in over a year and a half since the previous, and only the second, major update to the app in almost three years!

    “We want to make this release more stable than ever and then we are going to release a beta today and the final version next month,” Choqok’s developers write in a recent blog post update.

    Stability is going to be key for the app as the incumbent stable release is full of bugs caused, in part, by changes to the Twitter infrastructure that it hasn’t kept pace with.

    As such the bulk of this beta update is made up of bug fixes, polish and updates to work with new Twitter functionality, like sending unlimited direct messages and quoting tweets.

    Choqok 1.6 is also based on KDE Frameworks 5 and supports for the GNU Social network.

  • wtf is PAM?
  • GSoC Updates: Plugging in the grilo owncloud plugin

    My GSoC Project has materialized quite a bit since the last blog post. In the previous blog post I discussed implementing a cache for persisting the query results from the owncloud grilo plugin. However, after some discussions with Felipe, we decided it’s better to proceed without the cache for now.

  • Wifislax 4.12 Screenshot Tour
  • Next Weeks Broker Price Targets For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • How Analysts Feel About Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT)?
  • Flock to Fedora - Day #2 with focus on Modularity
  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160805-1

    TUG 2016 is over, and I have returned from a wonderful trip to Toronto and Maine. High time to release a new checkout of the TeX Live packages. After that I will probably need some time for another checkout, as there are a lot of plans on the table: upstream created a new collection, which means new package in Debian, which needs to go through NEW, and I am also planning to integrate tex4ht to give it an update. Help greatly appreciated here.

  • Sketching using MyPaint on the BQ M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet
  • Samsung Z2 Coming to India 11 August Priced at Rs 4,499 ?

    We are super excited (American term) for the launch of the Samsung Z2. This upcoming Tizen tech has had lots of information pointing to its release such as Wifi and Bluetooth certification as well as news that Samsung has already begun assembly of the device. The Z2 is also slated to be distributed in 8 countries that include: India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Nocturn Is a Cross Platform Twitter App With a Clean Design

    Nocturn is a simple desktop Twitter app for Mac and Linux built using React, Electron and JavaScript.

    I know what you’re thinking: “Not another electron app!?” but this one is at least a bit different to the usual web wrapping schtick.

    For, unlike Anatine which we wrote about at the end of July, Nocturn is not a frame around the regular Twitter web interface.

    Instead, it uses web technologies to create a new, native interface.

    Albeit a rather simple one.

  • Brand New Skype `Alpha` Application for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • The Wine Development Release 1.9.16 Is Now Available
  • Tip of the iceberg !
  • Vice-President’s Report — The State of the GNOME Foundation

    Hi! Long time no see. My blog has been pretty quiet in recent months, in the big part due to my extended commitment on the GNOME Foundation‘s Board of Directors (for a second year without an executive director present to take some of the load) and the various business engagements I’ve had.

  • New packages for LibreOffice and Chromium

    There’s a new LibreOffice release with a lot of improvements: 5.2.0. The announcement on the Document Foundation blog shows quite a lot of extensive information this time because of the version number jump and the changes implied by it. I’ll mention just a couple of semi-random facts here:
    Document classification has been added as a major feature. Two-factor authentication for Google Docs storage finally works in Writer. Interoperability (with the MS Office file formats of course) has been improved and an import filter for Word for DOS was added. In Calc, new functions were added along with tooltips showing context information about functions. Source code quality has been measurably improved again.

  • Chase Claims Android Pay Support Planned for “This Year”

today's leftovers

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  • I'm Going to GUADEC
  • Mapbox steps in to help GNOME’s Maps application

    On July 11th, GNOME’s Maps application stopped working. Like all mapping applications, it relies on an online service to provide data. The service it had been using – MapQuest – discontinued free access to their data. When the service went dead, there were no longer any maps in Maps.

    Thankfully, it didn’t take long for a replacement to be found. Mapbox, a popular mapping service (they provide data for Pinterest, Github and Foursquare, among others) stepped up and has generously offered to provide mapping data. Better than that, Maps now has an agreement in place with its data provider, putting it on a much more solid footing. The new arrangement with Mapbox might also allow additional features in the future, such as downloading maps data for offline use.

  • ROSA Fresh R8 is out!

    Dear friends, we are happy to present our new ROSA Fresh R8 release.

  • Here Are Research Reports Worth Watching: Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT), Estee Lauder Companies Inc (NYSE:EL)
  • Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS released
  • Monthly News – August 2016

    In July, we’ve received $12,753 thanks to the generous donations of 530 people. I’d like to thank you from the bottom of my heart for helping us fund Linux Mint. During the attacks we were able to purchase additional servers and pay for services (some of which are now free, credits to Sucuri for sponsoring us) without ever worrying about how much things cost. We’re also able to have a budget which allows us to pay our development team. Although Mint developers are passionate and benevolent people, we send them money so that they can purchase fancy equipment or so they can be more comfortable and have more spare time (which they usually spend on improving Linux Mint anyway). They’ve no idea how much they’ll get, when and why, but they’re one of the core reasons Linux Mint gets better, so the same way you donate to Linux Mint, we love donating to them. On occasions and when something benefits the distribution in a tangible way, we’re also able to donate upstream. In preparation for Linux Mint 18, we sent money to various artists and some upstream developers. In brief, we’re extremely comfortable and free in the way we develop Linux Mint. Whenever we need something, we’re able to buy it. Whenever money can improve a particular aspect of the distribution we’re able to spend it. This frees our hands, it empowers us greatly and it makes our job much easier. I usually just say thank you and emphasize the fact that your help does help us a lot. Behind the curtain there are a lot of people involved at various degrees and doing very different things. Since we started in 2006 we never had to worry about money. We were able to grow our quality and success thanks to your enjoyment and support and we never had to feel small or revise our ambitions. You can see the effects this had on development and the decisions to maintain a new desktop environment, or lately in the decision to switch to XApps. I’m very grateful for this. Many thanks to you.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Mesosphere’s ‘Container 2.0’ Unites Stateless and Stateful Workloads [Ed: Mesosphere is funded by Microsoft and tied up to it]

    The trick is to allow some distributed programs handle their own scheduling. Container orchestrators, such as Kubernetes and the Docker Engine, use a single “monolithic,” scheduler, noted Florian Leibert, Mesosphere’s CEO, in a blog post. “Because there is no single scheduler that can optimize for all workloads, users end up with non-optimal operating constraints, including being forced to create separate clusters for each service,” he wrote.

  • MS Uses GNU/Linux. Why Not You?

    The answer is simple. GNU/Linux works for people and gets the job done. I recommend Debian GNU/Linux.

  • boot 25 % faster
  • Analyst Ratings on: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY), Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Sony’s Hero Open Source Developer Title for May-June Awarded to XDA RD Bumble-Bee

    Of the many OEMs that we talk about here on XDA-Developers, only a very few actually work for and with the community. Most are all talk, but actions speak louder than words, and only a handful truly speak.

    Sony is one of those OEMs that continues to foster relationships with the developer community, with several initiatives in place that promote external developers to work on Sony devices. Heck, the Sony Xperia Z3 was the ONLY device outside of Nexus and Android One devices to have had the Android N Developer Preview released for it.

    One of Sony’s pro-Open Source initiatives is the Hero Open Source Developer Program. Under this program, Sony recognizes and rewards developers that contribute to the Open Device projects. The developer with the most accepted commits to the SonyXperiaDev github during the preceding two months stands to win a device from Sony as a reward. The winner for the period of May-June is none other than Shane Francis, aka XDA Recognized Developer Bumble-Bee. Shane has won a Sony Xperia X Performance for his efforts and contributions to the AOSP for Xperia Projects, including helping with the fingerprint scanner on the Z5 on AOSP. We congratulate Shane for his prize from Sony, and thank him for his contributions to open source.

  • Mozilla Awards $585,000 to Nine Open Source Projects in Q2 2016

    Last quarter’s Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS)-awarded projects are diverse, but they have one thing in common: they believe in innovation for public benefit. Projects like Tails, PeARS and Caddy are paving the way for the next wave of openness, which is why Mozilla has allocated over $3.5 million to the MOSS initiative in support of these and other open source projects. We’re excited to share the program’s progress this quarter, which includes $585,000 in awards, nine new projects supported and two new tracks launched.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • 10 reasons you shouldn't upgrade to Windows 10 [iophk: "Mentions Chrome/Linux and Android/Linux but could have used a mention of GNU/Linux too"]
  • August 2016 Issue of Linux Journal
  • Enough About The Free Windows Upgrades Already, These Alternate Operating Systems Are Always Free
  • Container adoption remains in its infancy – but businesses should get ready for the next wave of virtualisation

    There has been a surge of interest in containers in recent years, particularly in the wake of Docker’s popularity among developers. Many are now suggesting that the virtualisation technology could eventually replace the hypervisors which have become near-ubiquitous in enterprise data centres.

    Simply put, containers offer a lightweight alternative to virtual machines, offering even greater resource utilisation, simplified management and the ability to quickly move applications betwee servers.

  • Submit Your Top 5 Linux Distributions

    Last week I wrote a list of the 5 Linux distributions I recommend for the everyday linux user.

    As expected I am receiving comments asking why I didn't include this distribution or that distribution.

    I am therefore opening the floor to you guys and girls.

  • Simplicity Linux 16.07 out now

    Simplicity Linux is well know for it's lightweight nature and support for netbooks. The team behind this wonderful distribution has annonced the release of Simplicity 16.07. This distribution is based on Puppy Linux but this time there is a little twist. This time Simplicity Linux is avaialble in Debian based version too. Simplicity 16.07 is released in dektop and mini editions which are based on Puppy Linux and it uses LXDE as default desktop environment. As we said earlier there is X version of Simplicity 16.07 which is based on Debian via AntiX distribution.

  • Flock 2016 – krakow – day -1 or -2 (sunday/monday)

    Sunday started my travels to flock 2016. First up, a flight from Denver to Munich. 10 hours in the air, but at least fewer hops. Things started out on a troubling note as the flight was already delayed ~20min before I even left for the airport, which would cut my time between flights in Munich to just ~45min.

  • Fedora Inactive/Disabled Accounts
  • AppRecommender: A package recommender system

    Hello, my name is Lucas Moura and this post will present AppRecommender. This project is a package recommender system for Debian systems. The intent of this application is to look for packages that users have already installed in their system and recommend new useful packages based on them. This approach is similar as the one seen on Netflix or Amazon, where the movies or goods that a user has already seen determine other items that will be recommended.

  • AppRecommender: My Google Summer of Code project

    AppRecommender is a package recommender system for Debian.

  • Skylake taken to EPIC proportions

    IEI’s “Nano-ULT3” is an EPIC SBC with 6th Gen Core “Skylake” U-Series CPUs, up to 32GB DDR4 RAM, and coastline ports for 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, and 4x USB 3.0.

    One of the nice things about backward compatibility is that you can take a legacy form-factor like EPIC and match it with one of the latest, fastest embedded-ready processors around, thereby injecting new life into aging equipment. We’ve seen some EPIC single board computers with Intel 5th Gen Core “Broadwell” CPUs, like Perfectron’s OXY5638A or Aaeon’s EPIC-BDU7, but IEI’s Nano-ULT3 is the first 6th Gen “Skylake” EPIC board we’ve encountered.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Microsoft to Cut Thousands of Jobs

    Microsoft is cutting more jobs.

    The business technology giant said in a regulatory filing on Thursday that it plans to lay off an additional 2,850 workers to the previously announced 1,850 jobs it said it would slash in May.

    In total, Microsoft will cut 4,700 jobs worldwide by the end of the company’s fiscal year 2017.

  • P-State Algorithm Change, Schedutil IOWait Boosting

    While still in early form and won't be merged for this next kernel cycle (v4.8), a series of patches were published on Sunday to improve CPU frequency selection under Linux, including an algorithm change for the Intel P-State scaling driver.

    Rafael Wysocki posted the [RFC][PATCH 0/7] cpufreq / sched: cpufreq_update_util() flags and iowait boosting patch series looking for feedback on some CPU frequency scaling related changes. Wysocki admits he hasn't even thoroughly tested the impact of the changes yet, but is looking to see if other developers agree it would be a step in the right direction.

  • Linux Top 3: Simplicity 16.07, LXLE Eclectica and Lubuntu 16.10

    While GNOME and KDE are perhaps the two best known and most widely deployed open source desktop environments used in Linux, LXDE is an increasingly popular choice. In this week's Linux Planet Linx Top 3 roundup we take a quick look at three LXDE distro released this past week.

  • Simplicity Linux 16.07 Has Arrived, Offers Flavors Based on LXPup and Debian

    Today, July 31, 2016, the Simplicity Linux developers proudly announced the general availability of the Simplicity Linux 16.07 GNU/Linux operating system for personal computers.

    Simplicity Linux 16.07 comes three months after the previous stable release, Simplicity Linux 16.04, to bring lots of updated components and the latest GNU/Linux technologies. As usual, the distribution ships with the Mini and Desktop editions based on the lightweight LXPup OS, a Puppy Linux derivative using the LXDE desktop environment.

  • Flatpak 0.6.8 Adds No-Desktop Mode

    Flatpak 0.6.8 was released this weekend as the newest feature release of this GNOME sandboxing tech formerly known as XDG-App.

  • Parsix 8.10 Screenshot Tour

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The Upgradeable Allwinner Dev Board That's Laptop-Compatible Raises $50k So Far

    At the beginning of the month I wrote about That Open, Upgradeable ARM Dev Board Is Trying To Make A Comeback, the EOMA68-spec'ed project formerly known as the Improv Dev Board. It's still using the same (rather slow) Allwinner SoC but has since seen some improvements and there's also a laptop compatible route too. The project has now raised more than $50k USD, but their goal is still three times that at $150k they are trying to raise over the next month.

  • My Microsoft Office 365 woes: Constant crashes, malware macros – and settings from Hell

    Microsoft Office remains one of the most important software products available, despite some rather nasty flaws. For me, Microsoft Office and video games anchor me to Windows. While video games seem set to remain largely Windows-only for the foreseeable future, Office is losing its grip.

    For a long time, I used Office because it was faster. Perhaps more importantly, I knew most of it worked, and I could fairly quickly make a fresh installation do what I wanted. Office 365 has changed all of that.

    To be perfectly honest, I'm not entirely certain why I got Office 365. I was perfectly happy using Office 2010 that had been beaten about the ears enough to look and feel identical to Office 2003. It was quick, the context menus gave me access to all the commands I wanted, and I managed to get rid of both the spacing after the paragraphs and all those dumb "smart quotes."

    Perhaps someone sent me a file that wouldn't open in 2010. Perhaps it was yet another attempt to make Lync work. I will probably never remember. Regardless, the shift to Office 365's version of Office 2013 – and eventually 2016 – has been a descent into madness.

  • Deploy Kubernetes with ansible on Atomic
  • Install Zulip on Ubuntu
  • Parabola 2016.07.27 Screenshot Tour
  • Create two, three, many openSUSE Guides
  • Friday Session Wrap for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • On managing Ruby versions

    This is a little thought on packaged Ruby versions (mostly in Linux-based systems) and why I don’t get many people advising newcomers to start by installing RVM when in reality they just want to program Ruby.

  • Are You Satisfied With Your Ubuntu Phone? (Poll)

    Ubuntu OTA 12 will have completed its phased roll out by the time you read this, and feedback to the changes it brings will not doubt have begun to roll in. Now that we’re almost 18 months on from the launch of the very first Ubuntu Phone I’m curious as to you are getting on with your Ubuntu Phone?

  • Snappy Sprint Heidelberg

    I recently attended Snappy Sprint Heidelberg, the first Snappy sprint focused on upstream and cross-distribution collaboration.

    Snappy is a technology with an interesting history: initially started to provide App Store-like semantics (atomicity, declarative security) for the Ubuntu Phone project, it has since expanded to be a platform for desktop application deployment (e.g. VLC), as well as server applications and the IoT space.

  • ReactOS 0.4.2 Nears With Many Features

    The first release candidate to the upcoming ReactOS 0.4.2 release is now available, the project aiming to be an open-source re-implementation of Microsoft Windows.

  • Software Freedom Kosova Conference SFK’16 Call for Speakers

    SKF | Software Freedom Kosova is an annual international conference in Kosovo organized to promote free/libre open source software, free culture and open knowledge, now in its 7th edition. It is organized by FLOSSK, a non governmental, not for profit organization, dedicated to promote software freedom and related philosophies.

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Red Hat News

  • Improving Storage Performance with Ceph and Flash
    Ceph is a storage system designed to be used at scale, with clusters of Ceph in deployment in excess of 40 petabytes today. At LinuxCon Europe, Allen Samuels, Engineering Fellow at Western Digital, says that Ceph has been proven to scale out reasonably well. Samuels says, “the most important thing that a storage management system does in the clustered world is to give you availability and durability,” and much of the technology in Ceph focuses on controlling the availability and the durability of your data. In his presentation, Samuels talks not just about some of the performance advantages to deploying Ceph on Flash, but he also goes into detail about what they are doing to optimize Ceph in future releases.
  • Ceph and Flash by Allen Samuels, Western Digital
  • Red Hat Opens Up OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    When businesses and enterprises begin adopting data center platforms that utilize containerization, then and only then can we finally say that the container trend is sweeping the planet. Red Hat’s starter option for containerization platforms is OpenShift Dedicated — a public cloud-based, mostly preconfigured solution, which launched at this time last year on Amazon AWS.
  • Volatility Numbers in View for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Rhizome is working on an open-source tool to help archive digital content
    "The stability of this kind of easy archiving for document storage, review and revision is a great possibility, but the workflow for journalists is very specific, so the grant will allow us to figure out how it could function." Another feature of Webrecorder that journalists might find appealing, and one of the software's core purposes, is to preserve material that might be deleted or become unavailable in time. However, the tool is currently operated under a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Takedown policy. This means any individual can ask for a record of their web presence or materials to be removed, so Rhizome will be working to "answer the more complicated questions and figure out policies" around privacy and copyright with the latest round of funding.
  • An ode to releasing software
    There is one particular moment in every Free and Open Source Software project: it’s the time when the software is about to get released. The software has been totally frozen of course, QA tests have been made, all the lights are green; the website still needs to be updated with the release notes, perhaps some new content and of course the stable builds have to be uploaded. The release time is always a special one. The very day of the release, there is some excitement and often a bit of stress. The release manager(s), as well as everyone working on the project’s infrastructure are busy making sure everything is ready when the upload of the stable version of the software, binaries and source, has been completed. In many cases, some attention is paid to the main project’s mirror servers so that the downloads are fluid and work (mostly) flawlessly as soon as the release has been pushed and published.
  • Diversity Scholarship Series: My Time at CloudNativeCon 2016
    CloudNativeCon 2016 was a wonderful first conference for me and although the whirlwind of a conference is tiring, I left feeling motivated and inspired. The conference made me feel like I was a part of the community and technology I have been working with daily.
  • WordPress 4.7 Content Management System Provides New Design Options
    WordPress is among the most widely used open-source technologies in the world, powering more than 70 million websites. WordPress 4.7 was released Dec. 6, providing a new milestone update including new features for both users and developers. As is typically the case with new WordPress releases, there is also a new default theme in the 4.7 update. The 2017 theme provides users with a number of interesting attributes including the large feature image as well as the ability to have a video as part of the header image. The Theme Customizer feature enables users to more intuitively adjust various elements of a theme, to fit the needs of websites that use will upgrade to WordPress 4.7. In addition, the new custom CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) feature within a theme preview lets users quickly see how style changes will change the look of a site. As an open-source project, WordPress benefits from participation of independent contributors and for the 4.7 release there were 482 contributors. In this slideshow eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the WordPress 4.7 release.
  • Psychology Professor Releases Free, Open-Source, Preprint Software
    The Center for Open Science, directed by University of Virginia psychology professor Brian Nosek, has launched three new services to more quickly share research data as the center continues its mission to press for openness, integrity and reproducibility of scientific research. Typically, researchers send preprint manuscripts detailing their research findings to peer-reviewed academic journals, such as Nature and Science. The review process can take months or even years before publication – if the research is published at all. By contrast, “preprinting,” or sharing non-peer-reviewed research results online, enables crucial data to get out to the community the moment it is completed. That, said Nosek, is critical.
  • Integral Ad Science Launches Open Source SDK to Drive Mobile Innovation for the Advertising Industry
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  • Tullett Prebon Information And Quaternion Risk Management Partner To Enhance Transparency And Standardisation In Risk Modelling – Partnership Fuels Columbia University Research To Improve Understanding Of Systemic Risk
  • Integral Ad Science Partners with Google, Others for Open Source Viewability
  • DoomRL creator makes free roguelike open-source to try and counter Zenimax legal threat
  • DoomRL Goes Open-Source in Face of Copyright Claims
    Earlier this week, ZeniMax Medi hit DoomRL, a popular roguelike version of the original first-person shooter, with a cease-and-desist order. This order instructed producer ChaosForge to remove the free downloadable game to prevent further legal action. Instead of taking it down, co-creator Kornel Kisielewicz turned the game open-source.
  • This Indian software company just partnered with the world’s biggest open source community
    In what can be called a major motivation for Indian tech firms, Amrut Software, an end-to-end Software, BPO services and solutions provider has become a GitHub distributor for India region. GitHub hosts world’s biggest open source community along with the most popular version control systems, configuration management and collaboration tools for software developers. It has some of the largest installations of repositories in the world.
  • Python 3.6 released with many new improvements and features
    Python,the high-level interpreted programming language is now one of the most preferred programming language by beginners and professional-level developers.So,here Python 3.6 is now available with many changes,improvements and of course the ease of Python was not left in the work list.

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