Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish


today's leftovers

Filed under
  • What Is Arch Linux 32? How To Migrate To This New Fork As Arch Linux 32-Bit Support Ends?

    About nine months ago, the Arch Linux developers announced the end of the support for 32-bit architecture. As a result, Arch Linux 2017.02.01 was the last release to ship a 32-bit ISO as well. It was followed by a depreciation period.

  • Trading Watch on Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Mellanox Announces First Major Production Deployment of Linux Kernel-Based Open Ethernet Switch
  • Cloud Foundry: Focusing on Flexibility and Choice for a Cloud-Native World

    For some organizations working outside of technology hubs such as Silicon Valley, there is a vast shortage of developer talent to choose from. As a result, many have taken a proactive learning approach to help bring their developers up-to-speed with the demands of today’s cloud-native software platforms.

    Cloud Foundry is evolving its technology to benefit these users’ goals, explained Cloud Foundry Executive Director Abby Kearns, in this live-streamed episode of The New Stack Makers podcast recorded at Cloud Foundry Summit Europe last month.

  • Kubernetes by the numbers: 10 compelling stats

    How quickly has Kubernetes’ popularity soared? By most accounts, very quickly. Earlier this year, Cloud Native Computing Foundation executive director Dan Kohn penned a blog post that dug into that claim. People regularly tout Kubernetes as one of the highest velocity projects ever in open source history: Does the data back it up?

    As Kohn found, there may not be a single definitive metric, but they all point in the same conclusion: “You can pick your preferred statistic, such as that Kubernetes is in the top 0.00006% of the projects on GitHub,” Kohn wrote. “I prefer to just think of it as one of the fastest moving projects in the history of open source.”

today's leftovers

Filed under

today's leftovers: Linux and Mesa

Filed under
  • Intel User-Mode Instruction Prevention Support Revised For The Linux Kernel

    An Intel engineer over the weekend sent out the latest patches for implementing the company's User-Mode Instruction Prevention (UMIP) support within the Linux kernel.

    User-Mode Instruction Prevention appears to be on track for upcoming Cannonlake processors and prevents certain instructions from being executed if the ring level is greater than zero. These instructions include the store task register, store machine status word, store global descriptor table, and store interrupt descriptor table. To fend off possible escalation attacks, Intel's UMIP security feature will prevent these instructions from being executed outside of the highest level privileges.

  • Mesa 17.3 Features - Vulkan Updates, Better Performance

    Mesa 17.3 is due out in the days ahead as the Q4'2017 installment of Mesa 3D for delivering the updated open-source OpenGL and Vulkan driver stacks for Linux and other platforms. As usual, this quarterly update to Mesa introduces a ton of new features, performance improvements, and other enhancements.

today's leftovers

Filed under

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • IT Security Woes and Linux – Unleaded Hangout

    IT Security Woes and Linux are the topic of the day with the hangout crew. We discuss recent events with Equifax and how they’re not the only cybersecurity incident worth note.

  • GNOME Asia 2017

    Finally, I got opportunity to write about my first and awesome GNOME Asia 2017. This year is a special year for GNOME as it’s the 20th anniversary of GNOME and 10th anniversary of GNOME Asia conference.

    GNOME Asia was hosted at Chongqing University, Chongqing this year which happens to be known as 3D city built on and around mountains. It was also my first experience in China as a visitor. I was excited.

  • Faking cleaner URLs in the Debian BTS
  • My Free Software Activities in October 2017

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • Skylake-based touch panels offer up to IP69 protection

    Wincomm’s Linux-ready “WTP-9E66” resistive touch-panel PCs come in IP66 protected 15-, 19-, and 22-inch models, with optional PCAP, IP67, and IP69.

  • Tizen 4.0 Milestone M2: What has been released?

    Samsung has published the second milestone, so-called M2, of Tizen 4.0. This is the second release for Tizen 4.0 after Samsung hit the first milestone back in June, also announcing that Tizen is the most successful Linux-based embedded OS in the whole world. As expected, Tizen 4.0 M2 comes with a bunch of new, welcome additions and some fine-tuning for the platform.

  • Apple Quarter and Few Other Items in Smartphone Wars

today's leftovers

Filed under

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • Akademy 2018 site visit

    Last week I was part of the expedition by KDE (together with Kenny and Petra) to visit the local team that is helping us organize Akademy 2018 in Vienna.

  • 12 emerging IT job titles with a bright future [Ed: They interject pure buzzwords into job titles (not new jobs). Typical Red Hat spin.]
  • At This Price, Is It Too Late To Buy Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?
  • My suggestion for QEMU

    I have been involved in open source software since 1993. And in 1994, I believed so strongly in the ability for people to come together to write code that I created the FreeDOS Project, to replicate the functionality of MS-DOS. And twenty-three years later, I'm still using and developing FreeDOS.

    My desktop system is Linux, and I run FreeDOS using QEMU (Quick EMUlator). QEMU is very easy to use, and provides great flexbility to define your virtual machine. I run FreeDOS in QEMU when I want to play an old DOS game, or when I want to test some legacy software, or when I want to write code to update a FreeDOS program.

    But one problem pops up occasionally when using QEMU. A lot of old DOS software uses the function keys to do various things. The most extreme example is WordPerfect, which was arguably the most popular commercial word processor of the day. WordPerfect is notorious for using all of the function keys, in every combination, including use of Ctrl and Alt to access all the common features. I think WordPerfect probably used all of the expanded keys too, like Home and End.

  • syspatch(8) Binary Updates Now for the Latest Release Only


    We intend to only build syspatches for one release in the future.  Errata patches will continue to be generated for 2 releases.

today's leftovers

Filed under

today's leftovers

Filed under

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • Clear Linux Reaches The Amazon EC2 Cloud
  • Freedreno MSM DRM Driver Updates Submitted For Linux 4.15

    New features and improvements in this DRM driver for Qualcomm display hardware includes preemption support for Adreno A5xx hardware, display fixes for the Snapdragon 820, async cursor plane updates, refactoring of some code, improvements to the firmware loading, and a number of GPU debugging enhancements. For the preemption support it is already available in patch form for libdrm and the Freedreno Gallium3D driver for exposing context priority support.

  • GTK+ Twitter App Corebird Has Pushed Out a New Release

    A new version of Linux Twitter app Corebird has been released with improved user autocomplete, image-only tweets, links in profile bios, and more.

  • Introducing Narabu, part 4: Decoding

    So we're at the stage where the structure is in place. How do we decode? Once we have the structure, it's actually fairly straightforward:

    First of all, we need to figure out where each slice starts and ends. This is done on the CPU, but it's mostly just setting up pointers, so it's super-cheap. It doesn't see any pixels at all, just lengths and some probability distributions (those are decoded on the CPU, but they're only a few hundred values and no FP math is involved).


  • KBibTeX 0.7-rc1 (0.6.95)
  • LibreELEC 8.2.0 Kodi-focused Linux distro is here, but Raspberry Pi versions are pulled

    While many folks prefer to leverage legal streaming services like Netflix on hardware such as Apple TV and Roku nowadays, other people still prefer accessing locally stored media files. Is that concept dying? Yeah, but it will be a while before it is dead completely. Not to mention, music and movie pirates will keep locally stored downloaded media content alive for quite some time.

    Don't get me wrong, not everyone that watches locally stored media files are pirates, but some certainly are. Whether you are accessing downloaded media or streaming content using an addon, the Kodi media center is a great way to experience it. Taking it a step further, a Linux-based operating system that exists just to serve Kodi is even better. Today, one of the best such distros, LibreELEC, gets a major update to version 8.2.0.

  • Ultimate Edition 5.7
  • Ethereum & OpenCL: ROCm vs. AMDGPU-PRO 17.40

    Following this week's Ethereum and OpenCL benchmarks with Radeon vs. NVIDIA using the latest Linux drivers, some premium supporters requested a fresh AMDGPU-PRO vs. ROCm comparison. So here are a couple of those OpenCL benchmarks of AMDGPU-PRO vs. ROCm on different Polaris / Fiji and Vega GPUs.

  • Why open source is increasingly key to government innovation

    Open source is at the heart of much of the innovation transforming the global economy and society today. OpenGov spoke to Mr. Dirk-Peter van Leeuwen (above), Senior vice president and General Manager, Asia Pacific at Red Hat Inc., the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, to learn about how governments are leveraging open source to deliver services at the high standards expected by citizens.

  • Do Analysts See Any Upside to Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?
  • Mender to Provide Over-the-air Software Updates for Embedded Linux

    Internet of Things and connected devices are everywhere. And though they solve a number of specific problems, these Internet of Things devices can easily be converted into the Internet of Threats if they are not patched for security vulnerabilities.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games Leftovers

  • Atari reboots Ataribox as Atari VCS, teases April pre-order date
    Legendary game company Atari set retro hearts aflutter last year when it launched an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign for something called the Ataribox, a living room device running Linux and supposedly combining the features of a PC with a video game console -- complete with some Atari classic games. But the December 14 pre-order date Atari set was abruptly canceled after an unspecified technical issue, and it looked like the Ataribox would never reach any actual customers. This week, however, the company has emerged at the Game Developers Conference with some very similar hardware, albeit with a new name.
  • The Rocket League 'Spring Fever' event is live promising lots of flower power
    Ready to earn some more cosmetic items? The Spring Fever event in Rocket League [Steam] is now live and you can earn yourself some new items using Flowers you earn while playing like this:
  • Epic Games releases the assets from Paragon, for Unreal Engine developers
    In a move that's both surprising and rather welcome, Epic Games has decided to release the assets from their FPS MOBA Paragon for Unreal Engine developers, since they're shutting it down. This will include 20 AAA-quality characters, with their respective skins, animations, VFX and dialogue, along with over 1,500 environment components from Paragon. Here's where it's a bit insane, this all cost Epic Games around $12 million! It's pretty insane how much it costs to make AAA-like games now—eye watering.
  • Game engine Construct 3 adds a remote preview, new runtime is coming to improve game performance
    I'm a huge fan of drag and drop creation tools like Construct 3 [Official Site], that allow you to create games by building simple events sheets and it seems they've continued making Construct 3 more awesome to use.
  • Open-source re-implementation of RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 'OpenRCT2' has a fresh update
    Miss the days of playing RollerCoaster Tycoon 2? Miss them no more, as OpenRCT2 [GitHub, Official Site] is alive and well with a fresh update. Like many open source game engines, it allows you to play RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 on systems not designed for it—like Linux. Naturally, it comes with tons of improvements like user interface theming, fast-forwarding gameplay, multiplayer and so on.
  • Zombasite - Orc Schism, the expansion to the action RPG is out adding more content
    Here's one I sadly missed, released back in December (oh my!), Zombasite - Orc Schism [Steam, GOG] is an expansion to the dynamic zombie apocalypse action RPG.

GNOME: GitLab Migration and More

  • IMPORTANT: GitLab mass migration plan
    I know some fellows doesn’t read desktop-devel-list, so let me share here an email that it’s important for all to read: We have put in place the plan for the mass migration to GitLab and the steps maintainers needs to do.
  • ED Update – week 11
  • Reflections on Distractions in Work, Productivity and Time Usage
    For the past year or so I have mostly worked at home or remote in my daily life. Currently I’m engaged in my master thesis and need to manage my daily time and energy to work on it. It is no surprise to many of us that working using your internet-connected personal computer at home can make you prone to many distractions. However, managing your own time is not just about whipping and self-discipline. It is about setting yourself up in a structure which rewards you for hard work and gives your mind the breaks it needs. Based on reflections and experimentation with many scheduling systems and tools I finally felt I have achieved a set of principles I really like and that’s what I’ll be sharing with you today. [...] Minimizing shell notifications: While I don’t have the same big hammer to “block access to my e-mail” here, I decided to change the order of my e-mail inboxes in Geary so my more relevant (and far less activity prone) student e-mail inbox appears first. I also turned off the background e-mail daemon and turned off notification banners in GNOME Shell. [...] Lastly, I want to give two additional tips. If you like listening to music while working, consider whether it might affect your productivity. For example, I found music with vocals to be distracting me if I try to immerse myself in reading difficult litterature. I can really recommend Doctor Turtle’s acoustic instrumental music while working though (all free). Secondly, I find that different types of tasks requires different postures. For abstract, high-level or vaguely formulated tasks (fx formulating goals, reviewing something or reflecting), I find interacting with the computer whilst standing up and walking around to really help gather my thoughts. On the other hand with practical tasks or tasks which require immersion (fx programming tasks), I find sitting down to be much more comfortable.

OSS, Openwashing and FUD

Open Data (OD) for Research of Shootings