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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • 6 Material-Inspired Themes/Icons for Your Linux Desktop

    What is a Linux desktop if it ain’t filled with eye candy? Here we have a list of Material inspired/flat-feeling Themes and Icons to beautify the GUI of your system so you may customize it to your hearts’ content.

    While there are more than a few themes and icons that will effectively function with your Linux system, I’ve scoured the web to make this compilation particularly because I’ve grown a liking for all things flat in relation to the looks and feel of any operating system.

  • Microservices Require Robust API Management

    As the microservices approach is becoming more prevalent in application development, API operations, or API Ops, is increasingly being recognized as a requisite skill amongst enterprise and startups.

    Microservices architecture breaks down services and assets into discrete, composable units. And they use APIs to communicate and connect with each other. Which in turn means dev teams are needing to build up their API design and creation skills (which requires testing and other ops tasks), as well as outsource functionality like security.

  • Infrastructure 'Coming to Life in a New Way,' SDN Inventor Says

    There are those that believe the era of infrastructure is gone, but Martin Casado is not among them. Casado, now a venture capitalist at Andreessen Horowitz, discussed during a keynote address at the Interop conference here why we're now on the cusp of an evolutionary shift in the infrastructure market.

  • MachineWorks to Release Polygonica v1.3 for Linux, Mac

    MachineWorks Ltd., leading provider of CNC simulation and verification software and polygonal mesh processing software, announced that future versions of Polygonica will include support for Linux and Macintosh operating systems.

  • Two of the Best Password Manager GUI Apps for Linux

    If you either manage a number of systems (regardless of platform), or simply have a lot of passwords for computers, services, sites, and so forth, keeping track of those authentication credentials can be a serious strain to your memory. On top of that, these days passwords should not be such that you can easily memorize them. The more challenging they are, the harder they are to crack. Because of this, anyone with more than one password necessary to navigate through the daily grind (which would be just about everyone) should immediately make use of a password manager.

  • Enlightenment Brings Session Recovery Support To Wayland

    Enlightenment's Wayland support continues to become more feature complete with the latest feature work being for session recovery support.

    With the latest work brought yesterday to Enlightenment Git, there's now support throughout under Wayland for session recovery support. This makes it possible where if the compositor were to die, there's support for reconnecting Wayland applications.

  • Fedora 24 Beta status is GO, release on May 10, 2016
  • The PPA Problem

    One of the things I frequently get questions about is why we recommend against the use of PPAs with Bodhi Linux. For those who are unaware PPAs, which is short for Personal Package Archives, are software repositories that contain software compiled for compatibility with specific versions of Ubuntu.

  • Mark Shuttleworth Talks Ubuntu Watches, Unity 8 and The Future of Free Software

    The man, the myth, and the space-faring market-disrupting legend, but also a very busy man.

    Yet, in the weeks following each new release of Ubuntu, Mark Shuttleworth manages to find some time to talk to the community and answer any pressing questions it has for him.

    Everyone, from the novice to the developer to grammatically deficient blogger, gets the same opportunity to ask Ubuntu’s’Self-Appointed Benevolent Dictator for Life’ anything they like.

    A video of his latest hour-long Q&A can be viewed by clicking play on the video above. If you are short on time you can scroll on down to read a transcript of highlights from the session.

  • DragonBox Pyra: Crowdfunding an open source, modular handheld PC (LPX Show)

    Before their was Kickstarter, before there were iPads, and before the smartphone market has really even taken off, there was the Pandora. It was designed to be a Linux-powered handheld computer which could be used for gaming and other tasks… but the crowd-funded project was plagued with shipping delays, which left a bitter taste in some people’s mouths.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC offers ISA, PCI, and PCIe expansion

    Versalogic’s “BayCat” is a rugged PC/104-Plus SBC with an Atom E3800 SoC, numerous I/O ports, ISA, PCI, and miniPCIe expansion, and -40 to 85°C operation.

  • Qualcomm patches widespread vulnerability, but most phones will remain at risk

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Podcast Season 4 Episode 8

    In this episode: Bitcoin scandal. RMS wins an award. Savers and rich people can buy the DragonBox Prya (thanks Canseco!) and Devuan reaches beta. Plus loads of Finds, Neurons and a long-stewing Voice of the Masses.

  • Interop: SDN Growing to $12.5B, SD-WAN to $6B

    "Open source is not just at the bottom of the networking stack, it now goes from layer 2 all the way up to network and security services," Casemore said. "It's significant fact in the market landscape and vendors have to give it due consideration."

  • RcppArmadillo 0.6.700.6.0

    A second Armadillo release 6.700.6 came out in the 6.700 series, and we uploaded RcppArmadillo 0.6.700.6.0 to CRAN and Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now 220 packages using.

  • Vivaldi Browser's New Snapshot Adds Editable Mouse Gestures, Tab Improvements

    We've been informed by Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard about the availability of a new snapshot build of the proprietary Vivaldi web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

    Vivaldi Snapshot 1.2.470.11 is now live for those who want to get an early taste of what's coming in the next stable update of the cross-platform web browser, which it looks like it gets a lot of attention lately, especially from those who want to migrate from Chromium-based browsers like Google Chrome or Opera. And today's snapshot introduces editable mouse gestures.

  • GNOME's Nautilus File Manager: "Its Best Moment Since It Was Created"

    At various points in GNOME's history the Nautilus file manager has been less than maintained, but these days the situation is much brighter.

    GNOME developer Carlos Soriano has come out to write about how great the Nautilus situation is these days. Soriano wrote in a new blog post, "as far as I can see the development status of Nautilus it’s in its best moment since it was created, and part of that is thanks of the status of gtk+ development and the values and vision of GNOME as a project."

  • Neptune Linux 4.5.1 ISO Out Now with USB 3 Boot Support, KDE Plasma 5.6.2

    Neptune developer Leszek Lesner announced the release and general availability of a new Live ISO image for his Neptune Linux rolling operating system, version 4.5.1.

    The new Neptune Linux 4.5.1 ISO is now ready for download and includes all the updated packages and security patches released in the distribution's main software repositories since Neptune 4.5.

  • My free software activities, April 2016
  • m23 rock 16.2 brings support for Ubuntu 16.04 clients

    From this version on, m23 offers support for m23 clients using Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus. A set of desktop environments is, of course, included for the new Ubuntu. Friends of the Univention Corporate Servers will be happy to hear that the m23 app is now available in the Univention App Center. As always, several small improvements have also been made to various parts of the software.

  • Unity 8 and Snaps Are the Future of the Ubuntu Desktop, After Ubuntu 16.10

    Today, May 5, 2016, is the last day of the Ubuntu Online Summit 2016, and we've just attended a very exciting session where the Ubuntu developers have discussed the future of the Ubuntu Desktop after Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak).

    You can watch the entire session below if you don't want to read the next paragraphs, but as usual, we'll try to detail and explain a few things for you so that you know now what to expect from future versions of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, on the desktop, of course.

  • Router hackers reach for the fork: LEDE splits from OpenWRT

    A split seems to have emerged in the Linux-router-OS community, with a breakaway group splitting from OpenWRT.

    OpenWRT is the chief open router firmware implementation, but it has run into headwinds of late. For example, downtime for the group earlier this year was traced back to the small organisation running a single, small, server without redundancy.

  • Samsung’s 360 degree camera will cost just about $350, oh and it runs Tizen !

    Samsung is one of those big guns from the consumer electronics market who has been betting huge on Virtual Reality. After partnering with Oculus for the Gear VR headset which has set its own benchmark for the best untethered VR solution one can buy, now that the headset has been in good shape, Samsung is working out ways to deliver content on it. Samsung have joined hands with multiple partners to provide VR experiences on its Milk VR platform and had also unveiled its own 360 degree camera at Unpacked 2016 event back in february- Gear 360 to let almost anyone to produce 360 degree content that can be viewed on the Gear VR.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • M$ Kicks Second Most Loyal Users In The Teeth [Ed: context below]
  • Windows 10 updates are now ruining pro-gaming streams

    Forcing a gaming PC to update mid-game during a livestream to up to 130,000 followers isn’t best advert for the software

  • Containers Used on over Half of New Apps in Production

    Shippable, the Seattle-based producer of a continuous delivery platform for software developers, recently quizzed 300 coders in the U.S. and found that more than half of them (52 percent) are using Docker or other container technologies to deploy their new applications in production. Fourteen percent are using containers for development and testing purposes.

    Indicating that 2016 is the year that containers cement their hold on the enterprise, a whopping 89 percent of respondents told the startup that they were very or somewhat likely to increase their use of the DevOps-enabling technology within the next 12 months.

    Developers are turning to containers when speed is of the essence. Containers have helped a majority of developers (74 percent) ship new software at least 10 percent faster. Eight percent are enjoying a 50-percent boost.

  • Divide et Impera

    But for those committed long term to an on premise model, new tactics are required. In a market that is struggling with fragmentation, solutions must become less fragmented. In some cases this will mean traditional formal partnerships, but these can be difficult to sustain as they require time and capital resource investments from companies that are certain to be short on one if not both. History suggests, however, that informal aggregations can be equally successful: the Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP combination, as one example, achieved massive success – success that continues to this day.

  • gNewSense 4.0 released

    I hereby announce the release of gNewSense 4, codenamed Ucclia. It's based on a solid Debian, modified to respect the Free Software Foundation's and is available for 3 architectures: i386, amd64 and mipsel (Lemote Yeeloong).

  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux Firewall OS Lands More OpenSSL Security Fixes

    Yesterday we reported news on the release of the IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution, which brought many security patches and improvements, along with updated components.

    Today, May 5, 2016, we're informing our readers about the immediate availability of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102, a small maintenance build to the stable IPFire 2.19 distribution that updates the OpenSSL package to version 1.0.2h, fixing a total of six vulnerabilities discovered upstream.

  • Samsung’s Artik 10, starts shipping in the US for $150

    Samsung’s Artik development boards are finally reaching hands of consumers in the US. The Artik development boards which were unveiled back in May 2015 at the IoT World 2015 have taken quite a lot of time to become consumer ready and take over the likes of the new Raspberry Pi 3, Pine 64,etc which have revolutionized the DIY Maker community with the “PC ona board” concept. And now, the Artik 10- the most powerful board from the Artik series is all set to intensify the ongoing competition. Priced at $150, which is more than what one would pay for 4 $35 priced Raspberry Pis, Samsung will sure have to do a lot to of work to impress the buyers and build a community around it.

  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • ​Why I Hate Security, Computers, and the Entire Modern Banking System

    I woke up yesterday to find that a string of mysterious credit card payments had wiped out my checking account.

    I spent the next few hours as a prisoner of the phone tree, being interrogated on the transactions that I wanted answers about. No, I did not have a Banana Republic credit card. I didn’t have a Capital One credit card either. And I had no idea who Michael was, or what he was doing with all my money.

    The woman on the other end of the phone flagged transaction after transaction. For each one, she read me a long, pre-written paragraph of instructions and disclaimers—verbatim, even if she had repeated the same words just before. “Okay, so,” I said, when she was finally done. “It looks like this person is paying off credit cards through the web. What… am I supposed to do about that? What information do they have that lets them do it?”

    “It looks like they have your routing number and account number,” she told me. “You should close this account and get a new one.”

    I thanked her and hung up. Then my head exploded.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Inline assembly
  • Learn file management commnad line required for RHCSA
  • Weekly phpMyAdmin contributions 2016-W17
  • Smarthistory: No grand strategies needed, just openness

    For many, open initiatives within higher education may have begun when The New York Times declared 2012 as "The Year of the MOOC." According to the article, "Traditional online courses charge tuition, carry credit and limit enrollment to a few dozen to ensure interaction with instructors. The MOOC, on the other hand, is usually free, credit-less and, well, massive." Today MOOCs may not be living up to the hopes (or hype) of many of their original proponents, but the concept of developing and delivering educational content online is now certainly common practice.

    Perhaps your history with open educational resources is a bit longer? Before MOOCs, increasing awareness of the costs associated with college texts spawned the open textbook movement. Founded in 1999 at Rice University, OpenStax (then Connexions) began its mission to create open textbooks as freely available educational resources with nonrestrictive licenses, where faculty, researchers, and even students could share and freely adapt educational materials such as courses, books, and reports. While the open textbook movement never really enjoyed the flare of popularity of MOOCs, they too have found advocates and an audience within higher education.

  • 3D printer helps create aBioBot, an open source pipetting robot designed to speed up science

    A team of artists, scientists and engineers has developed a robotic lab assistant based on a modified 3D printer that can intelligently automate and adapt laboratory processes. By eliminating repetition and errors, aBioBot’s mission is to free up scientists’ energy and resources, potentially shortening the time between major scientific breakthroughs.

  • Three Cheers for Monotasking!

    Anyone who has coded—or worked with coders—knows all about this. They complain constantly about interruptions, and with good reason. When they're deep into a problem, switching their attention is costly. They've lost their train of thought, and it can take several minutes to get it back. That's not much of a problem if it happens a few times a day, but it's a real killer if it happens a few times an hour.

  • Pirate Bay visitors infected with crypto-ransomware via bad ads [Ed: Windows]

    Although malvertising attackers have hit a number of torrent sites over the past month, as noted by TorrentFreak, this weekend's premier of the sixth season of Games of Thrones triggered a huge spike in BitTorrent activity. The attackers may have been trying to cash in on a surge in traffic to The Pirate Bay.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How Linux Frustrated Me Into Loving It

    I have been very interested in Linux since my entry into the Wonderful World of Unix in 2006. I found Ubuntu and installed it on a crappy Dell desktop computer I was given when I was doing online schooling. The computer originally came with Windows, and one day while I was browsing, I decided to search for “alternative to Windows.” Linux popped up right away. I had never heard of Linux before, but after voraciously reading article after article, I decided Linux was the path for my future.

  • HP Chromebook 13 is a business-focused Chrome OS laptop with USB-C

    In the grand scheme of things, Chrome OS is hardly a major player from a desktop market share perspective -- for now. With that said, the Linux-based operating system has captured the hearts and minds of many consumers. It has matured quite a bit too, becoming a viable Windows alternative for home users. Actually, it is a great choice for some businesses too -- depending on needs, of course.

  • Summary: Linux Scheduler: A decade of wasted cores - Part 1 - What is NUMA ?

    Last month, a research paper with title 'The Linux Scheduler: a Decade of Wasted Cores' was trending on the front page of HN. As an individual who is interested in Systems, I thought it would be good idea to read this 16 page research paper. I spent a good amount of time learning about different topics which were involved in it. This is the first post in the series in which I will try to summarize the paper.

  • Vulkan 1.0.12 Specification Update Adds VK_AMD_rasterization_order
  • GTK+ 3.22 Is Working On An OpenGL Renderer & Scene Graph

    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat has written an update about changes to GNOME's GTK+ tool-kit for the 3.20 cycle but he also mentions some of the exciting work that's brewing for GNOME/GTK+ 3.22.

    Clasen's latest blog post covers some of the recent internal changes to GTK+ CSS, theme changes, various changes facing application developers, and more. Those interested about the GTK+ tooling changes can read the blog post.

  • Bunsenlabs Rc2
  • April is almost gone

    The second one was the release of pre-release isos of Mageia 6 and OpenMandriva Lx 3. I must say that both distros are doing a great job; the systems performed so well that they did not seem beta versions to me.

    I did not like Plasma 5, though... I am sure the KDE team is doing a great work, but I truly do not see what the point of this tablet-ready interface is. After all, KDE missed the tablet train (the Vivaldi tablet never saw the light of the day) and tablets are already in decline...

  • New BlackArch Linux version released, now provides 1400 pentesting tools

    BlackArch Linux version 2016.04.28 released for ethical hackers and security researchers with 1400 pentesting tools

  • Manjaro 16.06 - third preview released

    It took us almost another month to prepare this third preview of our upcoming stable release we call Daniella.

    The Xfce edition remains our flagship offering and has received the attention it deserves. Few can claim to offer such a polished, integrated and leading-edge Xfce experience. We ship Xfce 4.12 with this release of Manjaro. We mainly focused on polishing the user experience on the desktop and window manager, and on updating some components to take advantage of newly available technologies such as switching to a new theme called Maia, we already using for our KDE edition.

  • IoT Past and Present: The History of IoT, and Where It's Headed Today [Ed: just devices with a network stack. Nothing new.]
  • 1btn – an Open Source Dash

    The availability of cheap radios, omni-present WiFi and powerful web services means the IoT wave is here to stay. Amazon got into the act with its “do only one thing” Dash button. But a more interesting solution would be an IoT “do it all” button.

  • No Time to Panic as One Quarter Shows Minor Dip in Smartphone Sales - Total Smartphone Market Will Grow This Year (and here's why)

    We now have the Q1 numbers from Strategy Analytics and IDC, the two last remaining of the classic four big smartphone industry analyst houses we used on this blog to calculate the industry average of the total market size, back when the 'smartphone bloodbath' started six years ago. And both SA and IDC are in exceptional, near-perfect agreement on the exact size of the market, we get a total smartphone market for Q1 at 334.8 Million units. That is down 18% from the Christmas sales Quarter (normal that Q1 is down) but for the first time ever in this industry, the YEAR-ON-YEAR comparison of Q1, so the January-March quarter last year 2015 vs now, is down. This has not happened in the smartphone industry in any YoY period. And some are now talking about 'peak smartphone'. That number COULD be a signal that smartphone industry growth has stalled and now peaked and smartphone sales will either plateau flat, or decline into the next year(s).

  • GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha Released With ZFS File-System Support, MATE 1.12

    The first alpha release was made available this weekend of GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha 1, a desktop focused operating system built atop FreeBSD 10.3.

  • 3D Printer Crowdfunding projects

    Like every Kickstarter project, there is a risk. But I think that Trinus appears to be a good project, we need to wait to the launch and review a real machine to know if it worth it. Also, the Youtube Channel Maker’s Muse, made a review of the project and the company Konama, creators of Trinus, sent him a the 3d printer and he currently makes the review of this printer that pledged more then 1 million dollars on KickStarter.

  • Refactoring the open-source photography community

    Generally speaking, most free-software communities tend to form around specific projects: a distribution, an application, a tightly linked suite of applications, and so on. Those are the functional units in which developers work, so it is a natural extension from there to focused mailing lists, web sites, IRC channels, and other forms of interaction with each other and users. But there are alternatives. At Libre Graphics Meeting 2016 in London, Pat David spoke about his recent experience bringing together a new online community centered around photographers who use open-source software. That community crosses over between several applications and libraries, and it has been successful enough that multiple photography-related projects have shut down their independent user forums and migrated to the new site, PIXLS.US.

  • DIY recycling, UCONN's open source chemistry book, and more news

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fresh Mesa 11.3-devel RadeonSI Tests On Ubuntu 16.04 vs. NVIDIA's 364.19 Driver

    For some end-of-month benchmarks and while having a number of graphics cards out prior to being let down by Tomb Raider's Linux benchmark, here is a fresh round of OpenGL tests while using the newest Mesa 11.3-devel code on RadeonSI with AMDGPU/Radeon DRM from Ubuntu 16.04 and then compared to various Kepler/Maxwell graphics cards with the newest NVIDIA Linux driver.

  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.0.20 with Fixes for Linux Kernel 4.5, Small Changes

    Today, April 28, 2016, Oracle has announced the release of VirtualBox 5.0.20, yet another maintenance version of its acclaimed open-source and cross-platform virtualization software.

  • pcp+grafana scripted dashboards

    Our previous work gluing Performance Co-Pilot and Grafana together has made it possible to look at a networkful of systems' performance stats and histories with just a few clicks on a web browser, and no auxiliary software (databases, web servers, etc.) other than PCP itself.

    Many people probably stopped at the most basic use of the technology: with the grafana dashboards provided.

  • How to build your own IRC Server with InspIRCd and Anope
  • How To Install Linux Mint Alongside Windows 10 (UEFI)
  • Tails 2.3 Screenshot Tour
  • openSUSE announces Community Release Team

    The openSUSE Board announced today a call to action for a Community Release Team to assist with tasks associated to the development of the next Leap version 42.2.

  • Mele introduces a $70 Ubuntu stick PC

    The Meizu Pro 5U smartphone puts Ubuntu in your pocket, but you can’t use it as a desktop computer. Fortunately you’ve got other pockets, and you can stuff the Mele PCG02U into one them.

    The PCG02U is an HDMI stick PC, and if you hadn’t guessed from the U at the end of its name or that unmistakable orange color (or, more obviously, the title of this post) it is indeed powered by Ubuntu — Ubuntu 14.04 to be precise. It’s on sale now, and you can pick one up for just $70.

  • Samsung Unveils New Artik Module Tools for IoT Developers

    A new Artik IDE development environment and the Artik Cloud give developers new capabilities with Artik modules.
    Samsung has given Internet of things developers several new tools to create and grow their ideas for new devices and concepts, including the Samsung Artik IDE (integrated development environment) and an IoT-focused Samsung Artik Cloud where developers can collect, store and access their data from any device or other cloud.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Where did we all go wrong? And why doesn't anyone remember?

    But we didn't pursue them. We replaced them with something cheaper -- with Unix machines, an OS only a nerd could love. And then we replaced the Unix machines with something cheaper still -- the IBM PC, a machine so poor that the £125 ZX Spectrum had better graphics and sound.

    And now, we all use descendants of that. Generally acknowledged as one of the poorest, most-compromised machines, based on descendants of one of the poorest, most-compromised CPUs.

    Yes, over the 40 years since then, most of rough edges have been polished out. The machines are now small, fast, power-frugal with tons of memory and storage, with great graphics and sound. But it's taken decades to get here.

    And the OSes have developed. Now they're feature-rich, fairly friendly, really very robust considering the stone-age stuff they're built from.

    But if we hadn't spent 3 or 4 decades making a pig's ear into silk purse -- if we'd started with a silk purse instead -- where might we have got to by now?

  • Your Beard Doesn’t Intimidate Me Anymore!
  • Understanding Your HPC Application Needs

    Many HPC applications began as single processor (single core) programs. If these applications take too long on a single core or need more memory than is available, they need to be modified so they can run on scalable systems. Fortunately, many of the important (and most used) HPC applications are already available for scalable systems. Not all applications require large numbers of cores for effective performance, while others are highly scalable.

  • 5 Container as a Service Tools You Should Know About

    In a previous article on next-generation cloud technologies, I mentioned Containers as a Service (CaaS), which provides a framework to manage container and application deployment.

  • Don't Worry About IBM's Mainframe Sales Collapse

    For those who know little about International Business Machines , the company's hulking System Z mainframe computers may seem like little more than a relic. The 42% year-over-year decline in System Z sales during IBM's first quarter would appear to offer proof that the mainframe business is struggling.

    But investors shouldn't worry about this mainframe sales collapse. It's happened before, and it will happen again. IBM's System Z product cycle, which sees new models introduced every few years, induces an extreme amount of sales volatility as clients rush to upgrade. While IBM doesn't report System Z sales numbers directly, the company does report year-over-year performance, and that allows us to see that the big drop in sales during the first quarter is nothing out of the ordinary.

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