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today's leftovers

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  • Linux: Assembly Required

    Even for Linux, you have to consider the platform. In my case, I’m using a 64-bit Intel/AMD PC. But you might be using a 32-bit version or running on ARM (or any other CPU Linux supports). There is even a 32-bit interface for 64-bit Linux (x32), if you are interested in that. The second order of business, then, is to figure out what the CPU architecture looks like.

  • Git v2.9.0 released
  • Day of Infamy, the WWII mod for Insurgency is being turned into a full game

    Having a proper WWII shooter on Linux is going to be pretty awesome.

  • LaKademy 2016 ‒ strewing FLOSS culture

    KDE is a free software community full of diversity and, as such, we foster several meetings and welcome people from all over the world. The 4th Latin-America KDE Summit (LaKademy 2016) took place from 26-29 May at Federal University of State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Brazil. Since 2014, LaKademy has become a yearly meeting (it happened every two years since 2010) and that has proven to be a quite important step to create a "sprint culture", narrow the ties with the global community, and better support newcomers. In every new edition, old LaKademy participants are more experienced about how sprints work and, therefore, more skillful in the task of guiding newcomers through their way into the Free Software world.

  • GParted 0.26.1 Ensures Bootloaders Work on EXT4 Partitions Smaller Than 16 TB

    GParted developer Curtis Gedak has announced the availability of the first point release for the GParted 0.26 open-source partition editor utility announced back in April 2016.

    Launched on April 26, GParted 0.26.0 introduced some exciting new features and improvements, among which we can mention read-only support for encrypted filesystems with the LUKS method, as well as the implementation of a progress bar for file system copy methods supporting EXT2, EXT3, EXT4, XFS, and NTFS.

  • ExLight Linux 160612 Screenshot Tour
  • Analyst’s Recommendation on Red Hat (RHT)
  • Ubuntu Snappy-Based Package Format Aims to Bridge Linux Divide
  • Russia mulls bug bounty to harden govt software

    Local media report deputy Communications Minister Aleksei Sokolov is discussing a possible bug bounty with the Russian tech sector.

    The implications of such a bounty are being considered including staffing requirements for bug triage and validation, and the need to find a way to force developers to develop and apply patches for affected software.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Pivotal Cloud Foundry Is Not Just for New Apps Anymore

    Pivotal, the EMC-VMware spinoff that promises businesses a modern way to build and deploy software, has undergone a subtle but important messaging shift in the last few months.

  • Blockchain as a Service: The New Weapon in the Cloud Wars?

    The cloud wars rage on. The room is full of 800lb gorillas that have been battling over market share and supremacy for several years now. You know who the key players are—Amazon, Microsoft, Google, and IBM—all still standing. Three years ago, Gartner described the market as ‘still evolving and maturing’. However, last year, they described the market as ‘in a state of upheaval’ with many providers shifting their strategies as they struggle to obtain market share.

  • Dix changements apportés par HandyLinux 2.5. Le septième va vous étonner !

    En fait, pour tout vous dire, j'ai longtemps hésité avec un autre titre : « HandyLinux 2.5 - Bob le bricoleur ».

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/23

    Week 2016/23 will go into the history books as the week a Tumbleweed snapshot sneaked through all openQA tests, hiding a breakage most users experienced. I’d like to apologize for the troubles you had with the 20160605 snapshot. I will explain at the end of the post how this could happen and how we plan on preventing such issues in the future.

  • One week in

    I finished my first week on the Fedora Engineering team and it was wonderful. My first week happened to correspond with the FAD Cloud WG 2016 meeting in Raleigh, so I had a chance to meet a lot of Fedora people and spend late nights learning useful bash hacks.

  • Week 1 on Reproducible Builds

    In this post I’m reviewing what I’ve done the last 6 days of Outreachy-funded reproducible builds work, outline what I plan to do the next two weeks, and speculate on long term goals. For those of you involved in the Debian reproducible builds project, please provide feedback about future plans and work!

  • Embedded syslog-ng: BMW i3 all-electric car

    A few weeks ago I ran into a blog post, sharing the good news: BMW is complying with the GPL. The blog post recounts how BMW shared the sources of the applications they use with the author of the blog on a DVD disk. Luckily, the author uploaded the content of the DVD to GitHub. Browsing the directories, I have found that syslog-ng is also included among the open source applications. It is version 3.4, so it is quite old, but still almost a decade newer than the version included on the Kindle (version 1.6).

  • IoT Technology: Devices

    An IoT system will typically be made of many devices – from dozens to millions – talking to a scaleable Back-end system. This Back-end system often runs in the Cloud. In some cases the IoT devices will talk directly to the Back-end systems. In other cases an additional system called an IoT Gateway will be placed between the devices and the Back-end systems. The IoT Gateway will typically talk to multiple local IoT devices, perform communications protocol conversions, perform local processing, and connect to the Back-end systems over a Ethernet, WiFi, or cellular modem link.

  • PC sales are falling faster than expected and it's all Windows 10's fault

    PC SALES are declining faster than first thought and Microsoft's controversial Windows 10 free upgrade programme is to blame.

    That's according to forecasts by analyst outfit IDC, which claims that PC shipments will fall by 7.3 per cent year on year, around with growth in the market now forecast at two per cent below its earlier predictions for 2016.

  • {Older] Free Windows 10 upgrade hurt 2015 PC sales as shipments fall under 300 million

    PC sales fell by as much as 10 percent in 2015 compared with 2014 as vendors such as HP, Dell, Lenovo and Acer saw shipments decline, according to similar data from analyst houses IDC and Gartner.

    In particular, the launch of Windows 10 did not provide the boost to sales that had been hoped, in part because the free upgrade offered to Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 device owners meant that many did not need to buy a new machine.

    Gartner estimated that worldwide PC shipments in 2015 totalled 288 million, an eight percent decline on the 313 million shipped in 2014.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • “10”‘s Nagware Ruins Your Day

    If you want software that works for you rather than you being a slave to its supplier, use Free/Libre Open Source Software like Debian GNU/Linux. It saved me many times from re-re-reboots, malware and slowing down.

  • Even in remotest Africa, Windows 10 nagware ruins your day: Update burns satellite link cash

    When you're stuck in the middle of the Central African Republic (CAR) trying to protect the wildlife from armed poachers and the Lord's Resistance Army, then life's pretty tough. And now Microsoft has made it tougher with Windows 10 upgrades.

    The Chinko Project manages roughly 17,600 square kilometres (6,795 square miles) of rainforest and savannah in the east of the CAR, near the border with South Sudan. Money is tight, and so is internet bandwidth. So the staff was more than a little displeased when one of the donated laptops the team uses began upgrading to Windows 10 automatically, pulling in gigabytes of data over a radio link.

  • Linux on Power: Why Open Architecture Matters
  • Open source NFV for management and network orchestration

    On this week’s NFV/SDN Reality Check, we look at some top news items from the past week and speak with on the use of open-source NFV for management and network orchestration

  • EU Parliament Votes for Smart Regulation of Blockchain Technology

    European Parliament members (MEPs) voted to take a hands-off approach to regulating blockchain technology, Ars Technica reports. Following the vote, unnamed sources told Ars Technica that European Commission staffers are working hard to understand the distributed ledger technology behind virtual currencies ‒ seven years after the launch of Bitcoin, with venture capital investments now totalling more than €1 billion.

  • On Getting Patches Merged

    In some project there's an awesome process to handle newcomer's contributions - autobuilder picks up your pull and runs full CI on it, coding style checkers automatically do basic review, and the functional review load is also at least all assigned with tooling too.

    Then there's project where utter chaos and ad-hoc process reign, like the Linux kernel or the community, and it's much harder for new folks to get their foot into the door. Of course there's documentation trying to bridge that gap, tools like to figure out whom to ping, but that's kinda the details. In the end you need someone from the inside to care about what you're doing and guide you through the maze the first few times.

  • AMD Published AMD GPU-PRO Beta Driver (for Linux)

    On Windows, we really only have one graphics driver per GPU. On Linux, however, there is a choice between open drivers and closed, binary-only blobs. Open drivers allow users to perpetuate support, for either really old hardware or pre-release software, without needing the GPU vendor to step in. It can also be better for security, because open-source software can be audited, which is better (albeit how much better is up for debate) than just having a few eyes on it... if any at all.

  • Revival Icon Set: An Icon Theme Reborn From Old Icon Theme

    There are plenty of icon themes available for Linux desktops but we always welcome new eyecandy study stuff which wants to make Linux desktop elegant and different. Revival icon set is a remastered version of an old icon theme which I don't know because it is not mentioned on source page. The icons in this set are kind of gradient variation and mimetypes taken from Emerald icon theme, it come with in three different folder colors: Blue, Orange, and Mint green folders. It is compatible with most of the desktops such as Unity, Gnome, Mate, Cinnamon, KDE and others. It is in active development, so if you want to contribute in any way you can do it via this page.

  • Budgie-Remix 16.04
  • Is it Time to Take Profits on Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Stock under Consideration: Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora TTY on my hotel TV?

today's leftovers

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  • Singularity 2.0 Software Makes Linux Applications More Portable

    Singularity containers are designed to be as portable as possible, spanning many flavors and vintages of Linux. The only known i86 limitation is the version of Linux running on the host. Singularity has been ported to distributions going as far back as RHEL 5 (and compatibles) and works on all flavors of Debian, Gentoo and Slackware. Within the container, there are almost no limitations aside from basic binary compatibility.

  • Microsoft's Deceptive Tactics Push Customers to Mac, Linux

    Over the past few months, Microsoft has maintained a course that continues to anger and alienate users. Having converted the Windows operating system into a suite of spyware tools designed to harvest users’ data through recommended updates that it has forced on users, the Redmond giant has given many of those users reason to abandon Windows for another operating system. As Windows continues to lose users, Microsoft — rather than adjust course —has instead ramped up the very tactics that angered users in the first place.

    Last summer, Microsoft announced that anyone currently running Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 would be able to upgrade to the new and “improved” Windows 10 for free. Many wondered why the company would give away licenses to use the new operating system, especially considering that in the past users have paid good money to purchase new iterations of Windows. Within days of the release of Windows 10, the reason was clear: greater data-mining opportunities. The entire operating system is designed to harvest users’ data for Microsoft’s financial gain.

  • Kenji Eno’s D Now Available on GOG for PC, Mac, and Linux
  • Ruling stocks in today’s market: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Canonical OTA-11 Ubuntu Smartphones Update Transforms Meizu Pro 5 Into A Pocket Desktop PC (video)

    If you are looking for a way to transform your Ubuntu smartphone into a pocket desktop PC you might be interested in a new update which is being rolled out by Canonical this week in the form of the Ubuntu Touch OTA-11 Update.

  • Monthly News – May 2016

    Thank you all for your donations and for your support. We’ve received a lot of help in preparation for the next release.

  • Hackers Find Bugs, Extort Ransom and Call it a Public Service

    Crooks breaking into enterprise networks are holding data they steal for ransom under the guise they are doing the company a favor by exposing a flaw. The criminal act is described as bug poaching by IBM researchers and is becoming a growing new threat to businesses vulnerable to attacks.

    According to IBM’s X-Force researchers, the new tactic it is a variation on ransomware. In the case of bug poaching, hackers are extorting companies for as much as $30,000 in exchange for details on how hackers broke into their network and stole data. More conventional ransomware attacks, also growing in number, simply encrypt data and demand payment for a decryption key.

today's leftovers

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  • How to fix any Linux problem

    Everyone has a problem with Linux at some point. The important thing is how quickly that problem gets solved. An amazing element of the open source and computing community is the vast network of help available online in the form of blogs, websites and forums.

    Without doubt this is of huge importance in getting issues known and fixed, and it's wonderful to see how willing the community is to help out complete strangers and beginners alike. That being said, there's nothing that beats a bit of prior knowledge.

    To help arm you with the knowledge you need to keep your Linux systems cheerfully ticking over, we've taken our years of experience answering all manner of reader questions and distilled this into a rich brew of condensed Linux knowledge, which will target the top issues that Linux users regularly run into.

  • Windows 10 nagware: You can't click X. Make a date OR ELSE

    Microsoft’s Windows 10 nagware campaign has entered a new phase, with all options to evade or escape an upgrade finally blocked.

    Recently, Microsoft’s policy had been to throw up a dialogue box asking you whether you wanted to install Windows 10.

    If you clicked the red “X” to close the box – the tried-and-tested way to make dialogue boxes vanish without agreeing to do anything – Microsoft began taking that as permission for the upgrade to go ahead.

  • Samsung: “Don’t Install Windows 10 Because We Suck At Making Drivers”
  • New CoreOS open source storage system Torus fails to impress

    CoreOS has released a prototype version of Torus, an open source distributed storage system primarily intended for providing storage to container clusters.

  • Containers 101: Docker fundamentals

    Docker started out in 2012 as an open source project, originally named dotcloud, to build single-application Linux containers. Since then, Docker has become an immensely popular development tool, increasingly used as a runtime environment. Few -- if any -- technologies have caught on with developers as quickly as Docker.

    One reason Docker is so popular is that it delivers the promise of “develop once, run anywhere.” Docker offers a simple way to package an application and its runtime dependencies into a single container; it also provides a runtime abstraction that enables the container to run across different versions of the Linux kernel.

  • Infographic: Companies want flexibility and faster production time from software defined networking. And they get it.

    Results from the latest Tech Pro Research survey reveal why companies are choosing to implement SDN, why they're choosing not to, and what happens after the implementation is done.

  • The rise of SDDC and the future of enterprise IT

    If you've worked in enterprise IT over the last few years, you'll undoubtedly have heard the phrase 'software defined' being bandied around. Whereas software once merely played a support role to the hardware on which it was running, cloud and virtualization technologies have now moved software into the spotlight, with hardware now playing second fiddle.

  • deepin 15.2 Screenshot Tour
  • Arch Linux 2016.06.01 Released, Download The Most Customizable Linux Distro Here

    Arch Linux, one of the most customizable Linux distros around, is here with the latest Arch Linux 2016.06.01 release. This monthly ISO respin is powered by Linux kernel 4.5.4 and includes all the changes made since May 1, 2016. The existing Arch users need to simply execute “sudo pacman -Syu” to update their Arch Linux installation.

  • How is that 10 Dollar iPhone (clone) Prediction Coming, for 2020? Lets do an update

    So I applied Moore's Law. Moore's Law is a computer science law that says, that every 18 months the amount of microprocessors that can be squeezed onto the same space of a silicon chip will double. So in effect, computing power doubles every 18 months. The corollary to the law says, to get the SAME computing power, every 18 months, the COST of producing the same computing power will be cut in half. And if we start from 600 dollars in the summer of 2010, then cut it in half in 18 months, by Christmas of 2011, there should be an equivalent smartphone costing 300 dollars, and 18 months later, by the summer of 2013, one should exist for 150 dollars etc. You see how this goes. I am looking for specs of 5mp camera, 3.5 inch touch screen, smartphone, on 3G, WiFi, with GPS (and an LED flash for the camera). If you've seen me speak in the past 6 years, you've seen this slide and my latest update of where we are:

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.

OSS in the Back End

  • AtScale Delivers Findings on BI-Plus-Hadoop
    Business intelligence is the dominant use-case for IT organizations implementing Hadoop, according to a report from the folks at AtScale. The benchmark study also shows which tools in the Haddop ecosystem are best for particular types of BI queries. As we've reported before, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. AtScale, billed as “the first company to allow business users to do business intelligence on Hadoop,” focused its study on the strengths and weaknesses of the industry’s most popular analytical engines for Hadoop – Impala, SparkSQL, Hive and Presto.
  • Study Says OpenStack at Scale Can Produce Surprising Savings
    Revenues from OpenStack-based businesses are poised to grow by 35 percent a year to more than $5 billion by 2020, according to analysts at 451 Research. In its latest Cloud Price Index, 451 Research analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services. The idea is to createa complex pricing model that takes into consideration the major factors impacting total cost of ownership (TCO), including salaries and workload requirements.The 451 study found that because of the prevalence of suitably qualified administrators, commercial private cloud offerings such as VMware and Microsoft currently offer a lower TCO when labor efficiency is below 400 virtual machines managed per engineer. But where labor efficiency is greater than this, OpenStack becomes more financially attractive. In fact, past this tipping point, all private cloud options are cheaper than both public cloud and managed private cloud options.
  • How OpenStack mentoring breaks down cultural barriers
    Victoria Martinez de la Cruz is no stranger to OpenStack's mentorship opportunities. It's how she got her own start in OpenStack, and now a few years later is helping to coordinate many of these opportunities herself. She is speaking on a panel on mentoring and internships later this week at OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Spain. In this interview, we catch up with Victoria to learn more about the details of what it's like to be a part of an open source internship, as well as some helpful advice for people on both sides of the mentoring process.