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today's leftovers

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  • What Drives Linux Guru Wim Coekaerts? Have Fun, Build Things People Will Use [Ed: I'm sorry, but Wim Coekaerts is not a "Linux" guru; he sold his soul to Microsoft, which does this]

    When Wim Coekaerts is solving problems and building things, he’s happy. When he’s not, he’s not.

    In his long career, he’s found joy working on early database appliances, and later guiding Oracle’s effort to make Linux, the open source operating system he’d played with since his school days in Belgium, its OS of record. Now, “Linux has become the operating system of the cloud,” Coekearts says, so he sees lots more fun on the horizon.

  • How an amateur opera singer uses MuseScore
  • From dotCloud to Docker
  • How to Easily Hide Files and Folders in Linux
  • Call Ansible or Ansible Playbooks without an inventory
  • Canonical Launches New Ubuntu Tutorials Website
  • openSUSE Developers Implement Rolling Development Phase of openSUSE Leap 42.3

    openSUSE Project's Ludwig Nussel is announcing today that the rolling development phase of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system is now up and running.

    What this means exactly is that the download server will also serve development builds of openSUSE Leap 42.3 if they are good enough for testing, besides the latest OBS builds. However, you should know that this doesn't mean that openSUSE Leap 42.3 will follow a rolling release model because that's what openSUSE Tumbleweed is designed for.

    "That means just like with Tumbleweed, the download server doesn't just serve the latest build OBS produces. A build only shows up there if the automated testing results of openQA are sufficiently green. So from now on until the gold master zypper dup will update step by step to the final 42.3," explains Ludwig Nussel in the announcement.

  • Equity Perception: Analyst’s Indicator Review for Unum Group (UNM), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Pico-ITX SBC runs Linux on quad Cortex-A53 Snapdragon

    F&S unveiled a Linux-ready “armStone A53SD” Pico-ITX SBC with a Snapdragon 410E, up to 8GB LPDDR3 and 32GB eMMC, plus Ethernet, WiFi, BT, and 4x USB ports.

    F&S Elektronik Systeme is expanding its line of armStone-branded Pico-ITX boards, including its i.MX6-based ArmStone A9-v2, with an armStone A53SD SBC that employs Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 410E. Other Snadragon 410E embedded boards include Inforce Computing’s Inforce 6309L SBC and Inforce 6301 COM.

  • Firefox 52 Brings WebAssembly and Security fixes

    Mozilla patches Firefox for 28 different vulnerabilities, with seven rated as having critical impact.

    Mozilla released Firefox 52 on March 7, providing users of the open-source web browser with new features as well well as patches for 28 security vulnerabilities. The Firefox 52 release is the second major milestone release of Firefox in 2017 so far, following the Firefox 51 milestone that debuted on Jan. 24.

  • Firefox 52 Released with WebAssembly Support, Enhanced Sync

    Mozilla Firefox 52 has been released and is now available to download. Among new features in Firefox 52 is support for WebAssembly. Mozilla describes this as “an emerging standard that brings near-native performance to Web-based games, apps, and software libraries without the use of plugins.”

  • Establishing a Clean Software Baseline for Open Source License Compliance

    One of a company’s first challenges when starting an open source compliance program is to find exactly which open source software is already in use and under which licenses it is available.

    This initial auditing process is often described as establishing a clean compliance baseline for your product or software portfolio. This is an intensive activity over a period of time that can extend for months, depending on how soon you started the compliance activities in parallel to the development activities.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Litebook Linux Laptop Launches From $249

    A new Linux laptop has been launched this week and is available to purchase from $249 in the form of the Litebook, which is equipped with a 14 inch display offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels.

    The Litebook is powered by an Intel Celeron N3150 quad-core Braswell processor supported by 4 GB of RAM and loaded with an Elementary OS Linux software. Although there are a few points that that need to be discussed before you part with your hard owned cash.

  • Kernel Podcast for March 6th, 2017

    In this week’s kernel podcast: Linus Torvalds announces Linux 4.11-rc1, rants about folks not correctly leveraging linux-next, the remainder of this cycle’s merge window pulls, and announcements concerning end of life for some features.

  • Solus' Linux Driver Management Tool Enables "Always-On" Nvidia Optimus Support

    Joshua Strobl from the Solus Project has managed to publish a new weekly newsletter to inform users of the independently-developed Solus operating system about the latest developments.

    It would appear that Solus' development team is still working hard these days to improve the upcoming Linux Driver Management (LDM) tool, which is now capable of detecting multiple system configurations, including hybrid Intel and AMD Radeon or Intel and Nvidia GPUs, but also computers with AMD APUs by automatically configuring the graphics stack.

  • [Stable Update] 2017-03-06 – Mesa, Xorg-Server, Deepin, Tesseract, Plasma5 [Ed: #Manjaro 17.0 released]

    Some more updated Deepin, Bluez and Haskell packages round-up this update for today. Please test and give us feedback as usual

  • Latest Weekly Build of Black Lab Linux Improves Microsoft Surface Studio Support

    Black Lab Software's CEO Robert J. Dohnert is informing Softpedia today about the availability of a new weekly snapshot of the Ubuntu-based Black Lab Linux operating system.

    At the end of February, we informed you that Black Lab Software decided to release weekly builds of Black Lab Linux, keeping users up-to-date with the latest GNU/Linux technologies, but also patching security flaws and fixing some of the most annoying bugs.

  • 3.5-inch Skylake SBC offers 4x SATA, 4x PCIe, and 5x USB 3.0

    ADL’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ADLQ170HDS” SBC offers Intel’s 6th Gen Core CPUs with extended temp support and plenty of of SATA 3, PCIe, and USB 3.0.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to Install Debian, Ubuntu, or Kali Linux on Your Chromebook

    At the same time, you can also access all the Linux utilities, whether it’s sshing into your server or using applications like GIMP and LibreOffice. To be honest, I do most of my consumer side work in Chrome OS; it has almost all commercial and popular apps and services. Whether I want to watch Netflix, HBO Now, Hulu, or Amazon Prime, I can do this on the same machine where I can also use core Linux utilities and manage my servers easily.

  • Adapt or Die: The New Pattern of Software Delivery

    In recent years, however, we’ve seen an explosion of new developments in software; each intended to achieve the above-stated goal. The current nexus of software development, also referred to as ‘Cloud Native Computing’ does just that and lies at the intersection of containers, microservices, Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery/Deployment and the modern cloud.

  • BlackArch Linux 2017-03-01 Hacking Distro Released With 50 New Tools And Kernel 4.9.11

    Whenever we talk about Linux Kali alternatives, we often end up talking about Parrot OS. But, there’s another great option that’s based on Arch Linux. Yes, I’m talking about BlackArch Linux. I keep tracking its releases regularly, and today I’ll tell you about the freshly baked BlackArch Linux 2017-03-01.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • A Brief History of Blockchain

    Many of the technologies we now take for granted were quiet revolutions in their time. Just think about how much smartphones have changed the way we live and work. It used to be that when people were out of the office, they were gone, because a telephone was tied to a place, not to a person. Now we have global nomads building new businesses straight from their phones. And to think: Smartphones have been around for merely a decade.

  • A Flurry of Open Source Graphics Milestones

    The past few months have been busy ones on the open-source graphics front, bringing with them Wayland 1.13, Weston 2.0, Mesa 17.0, and Linux 4.10. These releases have been quite interesting in and of themselves, but the biggest news must be that with Mesa 17.0, recent Intel platforms are fully conformant with the most recent Khronos rendering APIs: OpenGL 4.5, OpenGL ES 3.2, and Vulkan 1.0. This is an enormous step forward for open-source graphics: huge congratulations to everyone involved!

    Mesa 17.0 also includes the Etnaviv driver, supporting the Vivante GPUs found in NXP/Freescale i.MX SoCs, amongst others. The Etnaviv driver brings with it a 'renderonly' framework for Mesa, explicitly providing support for systems with a separate display controller and 3D GPU. Etnaviv joins Mesa as the sixth hardware vendor to have a supported, fully open-source, driver.

  • TechRadar Pro readers have voted for their preferred Linux distro

    Linux is steadily building up steam as a viable platform on all sorts of fronts, including gaming as we’ve seen recently, but which is the most popular of all the many distros out there?

    The results of our survey from earlier this month (which had almost 900 participants) have now been totted up, in which we asked you to name the three distros you used the most. And the clear winner – king-of-the-hill, top-of-the-list, a-number-one – was Ubuntu which was cited by 24% of respondents.

    The popular OS had a clear lead over second-place Mint, which was used by 14.5% of those surveyed. And the bronze medal was just secured by Fedora which snared 10.1%, only a fraction ahead of Debian which finished on 10% bang-on.

  • ArchBang Spring Release

    Openbox, Tint2 and Conky are back.

  • Manjaro-Arm Linux for embedded devices shutting down due to lack of contributors

    Manjaro-Arm provided a simple out-of-the-box solution for Linux on embedded boards since 2015, but due to its lack of contributor involvement, the project’s sole maintainer announced that it is shutting down.

  • Hackweek 15 - the YaST Integration Tests

    I decided to spend the last SUSE Hackweek with YaST and find a way which would allow us to write and run YaST integration tests easily. See the details in the project Hackweek page.

    Some time ago I found the cucumber-cpp project. It is a cucumber support for the C++ programming language.

    The reason is that the YaST UI uses the libyui library which is written in C++. If we want to control and check the YaST UI we need to implement it on the libyui level.

  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Global Payments Inc. (GPN)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Mean Rating At $1.47
  • Free software activities in February 2017
  • Technologic Systems integrates Ubuntu Core with Computer on Module
  • Ubuntu Core ported to an i.MX6 COM, a Dell IoT gateway, and a LimeNET base station

    Ubuntu Core is available on Technologic’s i.MX6-based TS-4900 COM, will run on Dell’s Edge Gateway 3000, and will soon appear on a LimeNET base station.

    At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Canonical announced several more takers for its IoT-oriented Ubuntu Core distribution. When Dell unveiled its compact, $399-and-up Edge Gateway 3000 series of Intel Atom-driven IoT gateways, Canonical revealed that the devices will be available with Ubuntu Core when they ship in early summer.

  • Linux Journal March 2017

    Like most fancy tech terms, "Cloud Computing" has lost its newness, and it's now just a commodity we purchase. It's often so much easier to provision virtual machines than it is to buy and host your own servers. Yes, there are concerns over privacy and security when your data is in the cloud. When you host in your own data center, however, there's still the possibility of a rogue cleaning crew getting to your servers. (We've all seen the movies; it just takes a mop and a blue jumper to get you into the most secure data center.) Regardless of your stance on cloud computing, it's here to stay. This month, we talk a bit about how to live in this bold new world.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Manjaro ARM to shut down

    While the project is dying, the team has offered help to anyone who is willing to continue this project. The team will guide through all the process and even teach if needed. If anyone is interested in continuing this project, now is the time. Otherwise we all have to say goodbye to Manjaro-ARM.

  • Manjaro ARM Linux Distro Is Shutting Down, Lack Of Contributors Is The Reason
  • That Was The Week That Was (TWTWTW): Edition 2

    This is the second edition of TWTWTW, a weekly blog proclaiming noteworthy news in the open source world. It provides a concise distilled commentary of notable open source related news from a different perspective. For the second edition, we present a succinct catchup covering software, hardware, book releases, ending with a real Barry Bargain!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya

    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.

  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]

    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.

  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download

    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download

    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter: Funded

    A few moments ago, we hit 100% funded for our AppCenter campaign on Indiegogo. Thank you, backers! More than 300 people backed us over just two weeks to help bring our pay-what-you-want indie app store to life.

  • Linux Lite To Have These New Features In The Next Release Linux Lite 3.4

    ...we contacted the creator of the Linux Lite “Jerry Bezencon” and enquired the upcoming new features in the latest version of the Linux Lite. We have also done a review of the latest available distro i.e. 3.2 (32 bit) so that the readers can understand easily where are the new features headed towards.

  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: CMS Energy Corporation (CMS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • What Does The Chart For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell Us Presently?
  • LEDE-17.01 is coming [Ed: it has actually just come out, just like LWN's paywall]

    For some years, OpenWrt has arguably been the most active router-oriented distribution. Things changed in May of last year, though, when a group of OpenWrt developers split off to form the competing LEDE project. While the LEDE developers have been busy, the project has yet to make its first release. That situation is about to change, though, as evidenced by the LEDE v17.01.0-rc1 release candidate, which came out on February 1.

    Many of the changes made in LEDE since the 2015 OpenWrt "Chaos Calmer" release will not be immediately visible to most users. The core software has been updated, of course, including a move to the 4.4.42 kernel. There are a number of security-oriented enhancements, including a switch to SHA256 for package verification, the disabling of support for several old and insecure protocols, compilation with stack-overwrite detection, and more. There is support for a number of new devices. Perhaps the most anticipated new feature, though, is the improved smart queue management and the WiFi fairness work that has been done as part of the bufferbloat project. It has been clear for some time that WiFi should work far better than it does; the work that has found its way into the LEDE release candidate should be a significant step in that direction.

    Your editor decided that it was time to give LEDE a try, but there was some shopping to be done first. Getting the full benefit from the bufferbloat and airtime fairness work requires the right chipset; most of this work has been done on the Atheros ath9k driver. So the first step was to go out and pick up a new router with ath9k wireless. That is where the things turned out to be harder than one might expect.

  • Microsoft Faces European Privacy Probes Over Windows 10

    Microsoft Corp. faces a coordinated investigation by European privacy regulators after it failed to do enough to address their concerns about the collection and processing of user data with a series of changes to Windows 10 last month.

    European Union data-protection officials sent a letter to Microsoft saying they remain “concerned about the level of protection of users’ personal data,” according to a copy of the document posted by the Dutch watchdog Tuesday. Regulators from seven countries are concerned that even after the announced changes, “Microsoft does not comply with fundamental privacy rules.”

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017

    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.

  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver

    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31

    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!

  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?

    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.

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Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

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