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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hyperledger and the Linux Foundation Opens Doors to the Public Blockchain Space

    Hyperledger, a cross-industry collaborative effort started by the Linux Foundation and joined by many banks, giant tech companies, blockchain specific companies and others, with the aim of developing an open source protocol for private blockchain use, has extended its hand to the public blockchain community in what appears to be an offer of partnership and closer collaboration.

  • Display compositing? What is it and which one should you use?
  • GNOME Games 3.22: the Giant Leap

    I didn't blog about Games since quite some time and the app changed a lot since 3.18. 3.20 was quite a small update featurewise: it added support for MAME and Neo Geo Pocket games, added the About dialog, allowed l10n of the application, added a Preferences window listing the available plugins and fixed other small bugs, but this release mainly saw refactoring work with the introduction of the plugins system where plugins allow to list games: the Steam plugin lists Steam games and the SNES plugin lists SNES games.

  • Elementary OS 0.4 (Overview)
  • Has HPE bought SUSE? No. But here’s what did happen…

    There are a number of articles, blogs and social media posts out with headlines like ‘SUSE’s been bought by HPE.’ Clearly, this is a misunderstanding of what was announced last week but once a meme is out there, others often follow and echo without checking out the source information carefully.

    So, lets clear things up by calling out some of the facts:

  • Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices Progress and Events

    Now, if this was any other article I would be laughing and citing it as an example of how Wikipedia is seriously failing, but in this case it’s had an adverse and detrimental effect on you, the backers of this project. There exists now a public record - an accusation by a Senior Wikipedia Administrator - that you are “sock puppets” with a “vested conflict of interest” in making statements on Wikipedia. Worse than that I have had to invest considerable time in ensuring that the Wikipedia article does not bring the EOMA68 project into disrepute, by being comprised of false and misleading statements. That’s several days worth of potential delay to fulfilling the promises that I’ve made to you. So for that and many other reasons which I’ve documented on the page, I’m supporting the “Deletion” of the Wikipedia Page. The thing is: what people actually collaboratively developed (before the COI-inspired editing began) was actually really good, so that has been preserved on the “talk” page of the elinux.org EOMA68 Specification. But what’s up there now is just… utterly misleading.

  • Skylake box-PC targets transportation applications
  • Samsung Z2 (SM-Z200F) Certified in Indonesia, likely Launching soon

    A Samsung smartphone carrying the model number SM-Z200F and manufactured in Indonesia has been officially certified today (September 16, 2016) by the Directorate General of Resources and Equipment of Post and Information (DG SDPPI), the local authority under whose purview that falls.

    The Samsung Z2 which is known to have the model number SM-Z200F had earlier landed the Indonesian agency on August 22 for evaluation and testing. The status of the Z2 changed yesterday after completion of the testing and was indicated as awaiting approval. However, that approval did drop today.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Carla Schroder: On Farming and Linux

    Carla Schroder sometimes describes herself as an “Ace Linux guru,” which is as good a way to tell you who she is as any — at least in the Linux context. She’s written so much, in so many places, that it’s easier to give you a single Google link to her work than to list a whole stack of articles, plus three O’Reilly books. The single article I’ll point you to on its own is one Schroder wrote for Opensource.com in July, 2016, titled I’ve Been Linuxing Since Before You Were Born.

    But the main thing (the “takeaway,” marketing people would say) about this interview is that it shows you how a persistent person can teach herself Linux and build a pretty good career working with it and writing about it — and still have time to do a little farming on the side.

  • And another live upgrade – 13.2 -> Leap 42.1
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/37
  • Q4OS 1.6.2 ‘Orion’ Linux Distro Released, Based On Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 ‘Jessie’

    Q4OS is a Debian-based open source Linux distribution that comes with Trinity desktop environment, which is forked from KDE. The latest release, Q4OS 1.6.2 ‘Orion’, improves the previous version and fixes the bugs reported by users. The existing Q4OS 1.6 or 1.6.1 OS users are advised to update their systems to the latest version.

  • Deepin 15.3 OS Released — A Polished and Beautiful Linux Distro That You’ll Love
  • The Router rumble: Ars DIY build faces better tests, tougher competition

    Since the original Homebrew router is in service for my office now, I built a new one. (Actually, I've built quite a few new ones since then—they've proven pretty popular.) The Homebrew 2.0 looks a lot more serious than its spunky little disco-colored predecessor; it's got a smaller form factor, rugged heavy heat dissipation fins along the top, and four Intel gigabit LAN interfaces across the front. It also has a newer processor: a J1900 Bay Trail Celeron, as opposed to the original Homebrew's 1037u Ivy Bridge Celeron. The new CPU is a mixed bag. It's got twice the cores, but it's a bit slower per thread. For most routing jobs, this gives the older Ivy Bridge CPU a slight advantage, but overall it's a wash. Either version has proven to be more than enough muscle to do the job.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.21 LTS Is a Big Update with Over 200 Changes, Update Now

    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.4 as the latest stable and most advanced kernel version, Greg Kroah-Hartman published details about the twenty-first maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.4 Updates GPU Drivers, Adds OverlayFS and EXT4 Improvements

    Today, September 15, 2016, renowned kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the Linux community about the availability of the fourth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series.

    Linux kernel 4.7.4 is now the most advanced stable kernel that exists for GNU/Linux operating systems. However, looking at its appended shortlog and the diff from the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.3, we can't help but notice that the changes implemented in today's release are pretty small in number. Only 59 files were changed, with 614 insertions and 282 deletions.

  • Got the writing bug? An introduction to bibisco

    The writing bug bit me again recently, so I started seeking alternatives and came across bibisco. The application is a personal project of Andrea Feccomandi, who is its sole author. It's licensed under the GPLv2, and freely downloadable from the website, with builds for Windows and 32- or 64-bit Linux. The source code is available on GitHub.

  • [Older] The Top 10 Linux Distributions Of All Time

    Distrowatch started their much discussed ranking system in 2002.

    Whilst only a guide to the success of a distribution it provides an interesting historical view over how the Linuxsphere has changed in the past 14 years.

    Each distribution has a page counter which counts the hits it receives each day and these are counted up and used as a hits per day count for the Distrowatch rankings. To prevent abuse only 1 page count is registered from each IP address per day.

    Now the merits of the numbers and how accurate they are may be up for debate but hopefully the following list will be an interesting insite into the history of Linux.

    This list looks at the rankings since 2002 and highlights the distributions that have hit the top ten in any given year.

    There are some interesting facts to accompany this list. For instance there is only 1 distribution that has been in the top 10 throughout all 14 years although if you count Red Hat and Fedora as one distribution then you could say 2.

    Another interesting fact is that only 3 Linux distributions have ever held the top spot at the end of any given year. You can get one point for each distribution you name.

    28 distributions have appeared in the top 10 in the past 14 years proving that whilst it maybe easy to rise to success it is just as easy to fall out of favour.

    This list is in alphabetical order because it would be hard to do it on rankings as they fluctuate so much per distribution.

  • Rugged, fanless Skylake box-PC has triple GbE and dual HDMI

    Aaeon’s rugged, fanless “Boxer-6639” industrial box-PC features 6th Gen Intel (Skylake) processors plus triple GbE, dual HDMI, and six RS-232/422/485 ports.

  • Open Files Faster With Bookmarks Indicator for Ubuntu
  • Avoid ACCIDENTAL ALL CAPS With This Nifty Indicator Applet
  • [How To] Get Android Notifications on the Ubuntu Desktop

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • OpenStack API Benchmarking and Scaling — 3 Test Cases
  • Red Hat and Veritas Team to Support Applications on OpenStack

    Now that so many enterprises have moved from the evaluation stage to deployment of OpenStack, they are in need of ways to organize and protect the applications they run in the cloud. That calls for storage, application management and security solutions--a space where Veritas has traditionally been prominent.

    Now, Red Hat, which has been accelerating its OpenStack efforts, has announced a collaboration with Veritas aimed at supporting business critical enterprise applications on OpenStack. The two companies have already teamed on business continuity, storage management and data protection solutions for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Virtualization. Now they plan to work together "to offer predictable quality of service to OpenStack applications and workloads, regardless of scale."

  • KDE at FISL 2016

    The 17th edition of the International Free Software Forum (FISL) took place, as usual, at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul's Convention Center, city of Porto Alegre, from 13th to 16th July. FISL is the largest FOSS conference in Latin America and a quite traditional venue to get a comprehensive panorama of all sorts of FOSS-related new topics: technical advances, adoption cases, FOSS and education, hacker culture, just to mention a few.

    This year, FISL started an effort which aims at strengthening the respect for diversity in FOSS communities. Many activities were led by and/or had the participation of minority groups, emphasizing the need for respect and diversity regarding gender identity, special needs, sexual orientation, physical appearance, race, ethnicity, religion and socioeconomic status.

  • To EGLStream or not

    The announcement of KDE Neon dev/unstable switching to Wayland by default raised quite a few worried comments as NVIDIA’s proprietary driver is not supported. One thing should be clear: we won’t break any setups. We will make sure that X11 is selected by default if the given hardware setup does not support Wayland. Nevertheless I think that the amount of questions show that I should discuss this in more detail.

  • LVFS and ODRS are down
  • Updates Enhance Audio, Graphics, Telepathy

    Snapshots this week added new sensations for Tumbleweed users, but there were plenty of other updates in the repositories to get people excited.

    While snapshot 20160907 added some subpackages to enhance PulseAudio and updated telepathy-qt5 to version 0.9.7, GStreamer fixed quite a few bugs in its update to version 1.8.3 to improve media processing. Wine’s 32-bit subpackage update in the snapshot, bringing it to version 1.9.18, added support for multiple kernel drivers in a single process.

  • Samsung’s Gear 360 Now Works with other smartphones, See how

    Samsung’s Gear 360 camera works with just a few high-end Samsung smartphones like the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge, the same way the Gear VR headset only supports select Samsung smartphones. Seems Samsung placed some sort of restriction of all other smartphone brands, allowing the app to support only some mostly high-end Samsung smartphones. The Korean giant also disabled 4K video filming in the Gear 360 on all devices except the Galaxy S7. But all these are now past, as a new modified version of the Samsung Gear 360 Manager has emerged which opens up the Gear 360 to work with other smartphones.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rocket League for Linux: The Definitive Video Review

    Rocket League blasted on to Linux at the end of last week and we were ridiculously about it — but perhaps you're not caught up in the excitement.

  • Last Minute Wayland Fixes For GNOME 3.22

    It looks like running the GNOME desktop environment natively on Wayland should be in pretty good shape after a round of last-minute improvements.

    GNOME 3.22 package updates this week provided a number of important Wayland fixes:

    Mutter 3.21.92 fixes for Wayland: absolute pointer motion events, animated cursors, various crashes, XWayland pointer warp emulation, and other non-Wayland improvements.

  • elementary OS 0.4 Loki Screencast and Screenshots
  • Who Needs the Internet of Things?

    This week, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced it has sold more than 10 million Raspberry Pi boards and celebrated the milestone by releasing a new Raspberry Pi Starter Kit. While many of these Linux-driven hacker boards were used for the foundation’s original purpose -- creating a low-cost computer for computer education -- a large percentage have been sold to hobbyists and commercial developers working on Internet of Things (IoT) projects ranging from home automation to industrial sensor networks.

    Linux-driven open source and commercial single board computers and modules sit at the heart of the IoT phenomenon. They are usually found in the form of gateways or hubs that aggregate sensor data from typically wirelessly enabled, sensor-equipped endpoints. Sometimes these endpoints run Linux as well, but these are more often simpler, lower-power MCU-driven devices such as Arduino-based devices. Linux and Windows run the show in the newly IoT-savvy cloud platforms that are emerging to monitor systems and analyze data fed from the gateways in so-called fog ecosystems.

    Over the next few weeks, I’ll be analyzing the IoT universe, with a special focus on Linux and other open source technologies used in home and industrial automation. I’ll look at major open source products and projects, IoT-oriented hacker boards, security and privacy issues, and future trends.

  • Taunton’s open source success: a new era for electronic patient records

    Almost one year ago our organisation, Taunton and Somerset NHS FT, achieved an important milestone in delivering transformational change in our digital programme: we became the first NHS trust to go live with an open source electronic patient record (EPR).

    Some may have perceived this as a risky choice. An open source EPR was untested within the NHS, and NHS organisations can tend to do what everyone else has already tried. Yet we saw that, by having a flexible system that had no licence fees, we would be able to tailor the system as we went along, to suit the needs of our clinicians, patients and our healthcare partners in Somerset.

  • Navigating the challenges of international teamwork

    OpenEMR, OpenMRS, and VisTA are three of the most well-known open source applications in the health IT genre. OpenEMR has worldwide acceptance as a complete and flexible electronic healthcare records (EHR) system that can be tweaked with relative ease to work anywhere. That is evident in its adoption by the International Planned Parenthood Foundation, the Peace Corps, and most recently by the Health Services Dept of Israel. OpenMRS is a respected tool set and API that has been predominantly used in Africa, and has been adopted for targeted healthcare needs all over the world. Despite being a US-based project, its adoption in the US is minimal. VisTA is the US Veteran's Administration EHR and it is now, due mainly to the formation of OSEHRA.org, beginning to get traction in other countries as a solution to the high cost of proprietary EHR systems for hospitals. New on the horizon are projects like FHIR, started in Australia, and adopted by hl7.org.

  • Infostretch Adds New Open Source Test Automation Framework to QMetry Suite
  • Udacity plans to build its own open-source self-driving car

    Sebastian Thrun’s online education startup Udacity recently created a self-driving car engineering nanodegree, and on stage at Disrupt today Thrun revealed that the company intends to build its own self-driving car as part of the program, and that it also intends to open source the technology that results, so that “anyone” can try to build their own self-driving vehicle, according to Thrun.

    The crowdsourced vehicle plans will ultimately be created in service of the school, rather than a product in and of itself. The open-sourcing of the data should help other projects ramp up, and will include driving data and more to contribute to other people’s projects.

  • Q&A: SFU alumna launching new "open source" food co-op

    SFU alumna Jennifer Zickerman is making it easier to access locally grown, high quality herbs through her venture, the Lower Mainland Herb Growers Co-op.

    The co-operative offers economy of scale to local small growers growing culinary herbs. It will buy fresh herbs from local growers, then dry and package them as culinary herb blends and distribute them to retail stores.

    Zickerman first developed this business idea as a student in SFU's Community Economic Development (CED) program. She pitched it as part of the program's annual Social Innovation Challenge, winning $12,000 to implement her idea.

    The co-op's high quality products aim to replace the poor quality dried herbs found in most retail stores that are imported from countries with poor environmental and labour standards.

    Local farmers will also have a new market for a crop that grows well in this climate and requires few artificial supports such as fertilizer, pesticides and greenhouses.

  • Chile's green energy future is powered by open data analysis

    Open source software and open data play key roles in implementing Chile's long-term energy planning, identifying ways to get the maximum value from development, minimizing its impact, and requiring less development overall.

    Over the past two years, our company—in partnership with the Centro UC Cambio Global of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile—has been designing, building, and testing a framework to support Chile's Ministry of Energy in policy evaluation and regional hydroelectric power planning activities. Open source software and open data play a key role in this framework, but before I explain how, I need to summarize the context.

  • DYNAcity project starts mobility pilot in Flemish City of Ghent

    The mobility service is based on information published on the open data portal of the City of Ghent. It also incorporates data from innovative sources like thermal cameras and a carpool system. Participants in the pilot will receive travel advice each morning through a pop-up on their mobile phones.

  • Just Because It Says ‘Open Source Hardware’ Doesn’t Mean It Really Is

    David L. Jones, an electronics design engineer based in Sydney Australia, explains his pragmatic solution to the use of the open source hardware logo — inspired by the varying gradations of the Creative Commons licenses.

  • How to help developers help themselves

    Developers need help. It comes with the territory for software companies employing thousands of developers, many who live and work in remote locations all over the world. At Red Hat, Rafael Benevides doles out lots of help. He teaches developers about tools and practices so they can be more productive, and he'll be taking the show on the road for the tech conference All Things Open this year where he'll share his specfic thoughts on cloud development.

  • Adblock Plus finds the end-game of its business model: Selling ads

    Eyeo GmbH, the company that makes the popular Adblock Plus software, will today start selling the very thing many of its users hate—advertisements. Today, the company is launching a self-service platform to sell "pre-whitelisted" ads that meet its "acceptable ads" criteria. The new system will let online publishers drag and drop advertisements that meet Eyeo's expectations for size and labeling.

    "The Acceptable Ads Platform helps publishers who want to show an alternative, nonintrusive ad experience to users with ad blockers by providing them with a tool that lets them implement Acceptable Ads themselves,” said Till Faida, co-founder of Adblock Plus.

    Publishers who place the ads will do so knowing that they won't be blocked by most of the 100 million Adblock Plus users. The software extension's default setting allows for "acceptable ads" to be shown, and more than 90 percent of its users don't change that default setting.

    Eyeo started its "acceptable ads" program in 2011. With the new platform, it hopes to automate and scale up a process that until now has been a cumbersome negotiation. What once could take weeks, the company boasts in today's statement, now "takes only seconds."

  • 5 Ways The Modern World Is Shockingly Ready To Collapse

    As technology embraces the digital, abandoning the crude and primitive notion of "physical existence" entirely, the idea that you actually own the media you buy is vanishing faster than that goddamn Walkman you swore was in the closet. And it's more than inconvenient for consumers; it may be apocalyptic for our society.

    [...]

    If you tried to purchase an Adobe product recently, you're already aware of this trend. As of 2013, you can no longer buy programs such as Photoshop, Flash, or Dreamweaver. You can only "subscribe" to them for a monthly fee. Yes, now you have the privilege of paying for your software forever. Isn't the future wonderful?

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Canonical Shaky On Sharing

    Remember Canonical, the company that produces the distribution Ubuntu GNU/Linux? They have a hard time even mentioning “Linux” on their website yet they manage to customize the Linux kernel for their distro without actively contributing the modifications to kernel.org.

  • AMD's GPUOpen HIP Project Made Progress Over The Summer

    The HIP project has made good progress over the summer. HIP from AMD's GPUOpen project is part of the puzzle for converting CUDA to portable C++ code. That source code can then run on AMD GPUs while having little to no performance impact, at least according to AMD.

  • A Unity developer is teasing the Vulkan API in the Unity engine [Ed: but it brings in Microsoft Mono]
  • 4 Weeks Left to Gentoo Miniconf

    4 weeks are left until LinuxDays and Gentoo Miniconf 2016 in Prague.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2016
  • New Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk Drone Development Kit Makes Use of Ubuntu Snappy and ROS

    Dubbed Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk, the new development kit is here to help developers create obstacle avoidance and autonomous robots and drones that use the slimmed-down version of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution designed for embedded and IoT (Internet of Things) devices, Ubuntu Snappy Core, as well as ROS (Robot Operating System).

    "Parrot developed S.L.A.M.dunk to be as easy and user-friendly as possible for developers, researchers, integrators, and academics," reads the press release. "All Ubuntu functionalities and benefits from ROS (Robot Operating System) framework are embedded in the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk making it user-friendly. The HDMI port makes it possible to develop directly on the product."

  • Enabling Geocode API for Tizen apps with Tizen studio and Here Maps

    If you’re a deveoper working on the Tizen platform with apps that require location access, then the new Tizen Studio’s Native Geocode API is just what you should be looking for. The API provides coordinates data to your app which can be achieved by following a fairly simple process.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more

GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux

For those curious about the impact of GCC compiler optimization levels, a variety of benchmarks were carried out using GCC 6.3 on Intel's Clear Linux platform. Read more Also: LLVM 4.0.1 Planning, Aiming For Better Stable Releases