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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Plain Text Productivity Redux

    On Ubuntu, I can use Meld for this process; on OS X, I can use Kaleidoscope. Yes, it will take a couple of passes to converge, but the process is super-quick and quite easy. I haven’t found a comparison/merge tool for iOS or Android yet, but I do have an iOS text editor (Editorial) that supports the TaskPaper format (as well as Markdown). Given that it’s very likely I’d only need to use a mobile device when my primary laptop would be offline, I think I can get away with just editing the primary laptop text file from my mobile device. I haven’t tested that part yet, so some additional fine-tuning may be necessary.

  • Pink Slips From Microsoft and Oracle

    In what appears to be little more than some light housekeeping, this week Microsoft will be saying goodbye to about 700 employees. This is a routine move, and about the only reason this is getting any attention is...well, Microsoft and jobs. A little more serious are layoffs at Oracle. In both cases, however, the number of jobs being lost amounts to little more than a drop in the bucket for these two tech giants. Of course, that's little consolation if you're one of the people getting sacked.

    The layoffs at Microsoft are part of a plan announced in June to cut 2,850 jobs by the end of this fiscal year. According to Business Insider, this isn't a cost cutting measure, but an attempt "to update skills in various units" -- a pruning, in other words. Most of the scheduled cuts have already taken place.

  • IBM Wants to be “Red Hat” of Deep Learning

    IBM today announced the addition of TensorFlow and Chainer deep learning frameworks to its PowerAI suite of deep learning tools, which already includes popular offerings such as Caffe, Theano, and Torch. It’s another step in IBM efforts to lay claim to leadership in the nascent deep learning market. Offering supported distributions of popular frameworks, said Sumit Gupta, IBM vice president, High Performance Computing and Analytics, is a natural next step in expanding and commercializing deep learning use.

  • Learn Kubernetes Container Management In New Linux Foundation Course
  • The Linux Foundation welcomes Hitachi as a platinum member
  • Mainline Explicit Fencing – part 3

    In the last two articles we talked about how Explicit Fencing can help the graphics pipeline in general and what happened on the effort to upstream the Android Sync Framework. Now on the third post of this series we will go through the Explicit Fencing implementation on DRM and other elements of the graphics stack.

  • AMDGPU-PRO 16.60 released for Linux, adds support for even more cards including GCN 1.0

    AMDGPU-PRO 16.60 is now officially available for AMD GPU owners and it adds support for even more cards including GCN 1.0.

    It might not cover the whole of GCN 1.0, as their generations and naming schemes are mixed in together. Some cards in the same series are from different generations, for example. Cards like the 7900 series still aren't listed.

  • GNOME's Mutter Rolls Out New Monitor Configuration System

    GNOME developer Jonas Ådahl has begun landing his work on a new monitor configuration system in Mutter for the GNOME 3.24 desktop release.

    Of this new monitor configuration system, Jonas explained in this tracker bug, "moving all low level monitor logic (i.e. CRTC/connector/... things into mutter, hiding it behind a higher level configuration API). While the current API simply provides a getter and a setter for all KMS like state, the new will be placed a layer above, with a set of 'monitors' that can be placed in 'logical monitors'. One will be able to rotate a logical monitor, set a scale, place multiple monitors inside one (i.e. mirroring)."

  • Linux Mint releases BETA versions of refreshed Debian-based LMDE 2 'Betsy' ISO images

    Linux Mint is widely known as an Ubuntu-based operating system, but that isn't entirely true. Yes, the main version is based on Canonical's distro, but one version, LMDE, is instead based on Debian. In fact, "LMDE" stands for Linux Mint Debian Edition. Of course, Ubuntu is based on Debian which makes the entire thing even more confusing for users, but I digress.

    Today, the Linux Mint Team releases refreshed BETA versions of the LMDE 2 "Betsy" ISO images. What does this mean? There have been many updates since the last version of the ISO was released in 2015, meaning that new installs were very outdated and needed many updates. The Linux Mint team is packaging all of those updates into the ISO so that it is more modern for those doing a fresh install.

  • OpenWRT Backfire on WRT54GL signal strength

    Because I wanted my home router to use at least decently supported software that provides complete out-of-the-box support for native IPv6, I recently got around upgrading my WRT54GL's firmware from White Russian to Backfire, which is the most recent OpenWRT release that fits the hardware's limited amount of flash memory.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mac sales declined nearly 10% last year as Lenovo, Dell and others gained ground

    It’s not surprising that Mac sales dropped for Apple in 2016 as they experienced their first year over year sales decline since 2001. What is interesting, however, is that as Mac sales dropped roughly 10% and personal computers overall dropped 5.7% for the year, the top four leaders in the market all saw growth as Apple was pushed to number five.

    Although Mac sales were up in Q4 2016 compared to Q4 2015, an analyst note today from Bloomberg’s Anand Srinivasan and Wei Mok has revealed Apple has dropped to the fifth largest PC vendor, with ASUS (ASUSTeK) overtaking fourth place. The top four vendors are now Lenovo, HP, Dell, and ASUS.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 02
  • Platform9 Introduces Infrastructure-Agnostic Managed Kubernetes Service
  • 10-bit HEVC Decoding Support Being Worked On For RadeonSI Gallium3D

    AMD developer Christian König is working on 10-bit HEVC video decoding support for the open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D driver stack.

    HEVC/H.265's Main 10 profile allows 10-bits per sample. HEVC Main 10 support was added to Polaris graphics hardware. Last year there was HEVC Main 10 added to Radeon UVD code while now Christian is working on the user-space side.

  • Budgie Desktop Is Moving to Qt

    Tossing a startled cat amidst a proverbial flock pigeons, Budgie creator and Solus Project lead Ikey Doherty dropped word of the switch in a lengthy blog post that details the technical reasoning behind their plans for Budgie going forward.

  • GXml 0.13.90 Released

    With lot of work to do on XSD, but certainly happy to see GXml.Gom* classes taking shape, fixed lot of bugs since last 0.13.2 and starting to port some projects to this new version, I hope to soon release 0.14, just after most translation are in place.

    This new version, will provide a better supported XML GObject wrapped, using DOM4 API and initials of other technologies like XPath and XSD.

  • Poll: who needs 32bit packages for latest Plasma 5?

    During the past week I have been spending time on getting the latest KDE Frameworks, Plasma and Applications built. The new Applications 16.12 was quite a bit of work due to the splitting of tarballs in many smaller ones. Also, the Slackware 14.2 and -current versions have now diverged sufficiently that the packages I compile on 14.2 are no longer guaranteed to work on -current, so that introduces additional work.

  • Red Hat Breaks Above 200-Day Moving Average - Bullish for RHT

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GoboLinux 016

    GoboLinux is available for 64-bit x86 computers exclusively. The ISO I downloaded for GoboLinux 016 was 958MB in size. Booting from the installation media brings up a text-based menu system where we are asked to select our preferred language from a list of six European languages. We are then asked to select our keyboard's layout from another list. At this point, the system drops us to a command prompt where we are logged in as the root user. The default shell is zsh. A welcome message lets us know we can run the startx command to launch a desktop environment or run the Installer command to begin installing the distribution.

  • Solus Linux Working On A Flatpak-Based, Optimized Steam Runtime

    The Solus Linux developers have been working on their "Linux Steam Integration" for Steam and improvements around the Steam runtime, with this being one of the distributions interested in good Linux performance and making use of some Clear Linux optimizations, while their next step is looking at Flatpak-packaging up of libraries needed by the Steam runtime to fork a Flatpak-happy Linux gaming setup.

  • It’s ‘Best Linux Distro’ Time Again

    It’s time to start the process of choosing the FOSS Force Reader’s Choice Award winner for Best Desktop Linux Distro for 2016. This is the third outing for our annual poll, which began in a March, 2015 contest that was won by Ubuntu, which bested runner-up Linux Mint by only 11 votes. Last year we moved the voting up to January, in a contest which saw Arch Linux as the overall winner, with elementary OS in second place.

    Just like last year, this year’s polling will be a two round process. The first round, which began early Friday afternoon when the poll quietly went up on our front page, is a qualifying round. In this round, we’re offering a field of 19 of the top 20 distros on Distrowatch’s famous “Page Hit Ranking” list. Those whose favorite distro isn’t on the list shouldn’t worry — your distro’s not out of the game yet. Below the poll there’s a place to write-in any distro that’s not in the poll to be tallied for possible inclusion in the second and final round of polling to follow.

  • Tracktion NAMM 2017 Preview [Ed: Raspberry Pi with Ubuntu]
  • Snapdragon 410E SBC offers long lifecycle support at $85

    The Linux/Android-ready Inforce 6309L is a cheaper version of the DragonBoard 410c-like Inforce 6309. It sacrifices GbE and LVDS, but has 10-year support.

    Inforce Computing has released a more affordable and slightly less feature rich version of its commercial-oriented, circa-2015 Inforce 6309 SBC. Like the Inforce 6309, the new Inforce 6309L has the same 85 x 54mm footprint and much the same feature set as Arrow’s Qualcomm-backed, community-backed DragonBoard 410c SBC. It also offers the same Linux and Android BSPs used by the DragonBoard 410c, one of the first SBCs to adopt Linaro’s 96Boards form-factor.

  • It’s time to spring-clean your IT contracts

    The start of a new year is a time for review and planning, in business, as well as in our personal lives. It’s likely that you will be focused on finalising your company’s objectives and strategy for the year ahead. But it’s also important to consider whether the tools and processes that you have in place remain fit for purpose – and that includes your contract templates and contractual risk and compliance processes.

    When it comes to the law, “the only thing that is constant is change”. Without fail, each year brings the introduction of new legislation, case law and regulatory guidance that may have an impact on your contracts – whether it’s the terms of use or privacy policy for your website or app, or the contract terms that you use when supplying or purchasing technology services. Therefore, it’s important to carry out a regular review of your contract terms (and any existing contracts) to make sure that they remain compliant with law and are future-proofed as much as possible in terms of new legal and regulatory developments that you know are around the corner.

  • Chinese investors buy owner of PCWorld, IDC

    International Data Group, the owner of PCWorld magazine, several other tech journals and the IDC market research organisation, has been bought by two Chinese investors.

    China Oceanwide Holdings Group and IDG Capital (no affiliate of IDG) have paid between US$500 million and US$1 billion for IDG sans its high-performance computing research businesses.

    The two Chinese entities had made separate bids but were told by investment banker Goldman Sachs to join hands. The sale of IDG has been cleared by the US Committee on Foreign Investment and should be completed by end of the first quarter this year.

    China Oceanwide Holdings Group, founded by chairman Zhiqiang Lu, is active in financial services, real estate, technology, and media among others.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux use on Pornhub surged 14% in 2016

    Pornhub is one of the preeminent porn sites on the web. Each year Pornhub releases a year in review post with anonymous details about the site’s users. More and more Linux users are visiting Pornhub, Linux saw an impressive 14% increase in traffic share in 2016.

  • Amdocs partners with Linux Foundation to accelerate OpenECOMP adoption in Open Source
  • Calamares 2.4.6 Distribution-Independent Linux Installer Delivers Improvements

    The Calamares team is proud to announce the availability of the sixth maintenance update to the 2.4 stable series of the open-source, distribution-independent system installer Calamares, for Linux-based operating systems.

    Calamares 2.4.6 comes approximately two months after the release of the previous version, namely Calamares 2.4.5, and, as expected, it's a bugfix release that only delivers various improvements and bug fixes for some of the issues reported by users during all this time.

  • Shotwell Photo Manager 0.25.3 Released

    Photography fans will be pleased to hear that a new bug-fix release of photo management app Shotwell is now available to download.

  • AntiX 16.1 is available for public

    AntiX is Debian based Linux distribution. It uses lightweight desktop environments like Fluxbox, Icewm, Xfce, etc. This distribution is originated in Greece and is typically ideal for old systems. Few hours ago AntiX team released new version named AntiX 16.1. It is based on Debian Jessie.

  • Tumbleweed Preps for PulseAudio 10, Gets Ruby, Python Updates

    Developers using openSUSE Tumbleweed are always getting the newest packages as well as updated languages and past week’s snapshots delivered update versions of Python and Ruby.

    The most recent snapshot, 20170112, brought Python 2.x users version 2.7.13, which updated cipher lists for openSSL wrapper and supports versions equal to or greater than OpenSSL 1.1.0. Python-unidecode 0.04.20 was also updated in the snapshot. Another update related to OpenSSL 1.1.0 was PulseAudio 9.99.1, which is a release in preparation for PulseAudio 10.0. PulseAudio 10.0 includes compatibility with OpenSSL 1.1.0, a fix for hotplugged USB surround sound cards and and automatic switching of Bluetooth profile when using VoIP applications.

  • Genode OS Framework Planning For Async I/O, App ABI, Qt5 Plans For 2017

    The Genode Operating System Framework has announced their planned roadmap for this year as the involved developers continue working on this original OS initiative.

    The overall theme of the Genode OS work in 2017 is to focus on stability and scalability, but there is also much more on their road-map for this calendar year.

  • PrestaShop

    Helping people overcome the challenges of building and growing an online business is what the PrestaShop open-source ecommerce platform is all about. The significant PrestaShop 1.7 release provides innovations focused on three themes: sell faster, create easier and code better.

  • This Week in Spring: Reactor 3.0, Open Source CD, and All Kinds of Cloud

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD

    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.

  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image

    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?

  • This week in GTK+ – 31

    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.

  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews

    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.

  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?

    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding.

    [...]

    The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.

  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition

    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.

  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Some improbable 2017 predictions [Older, no longer behind paywall]

    Another important single point of failure is Android. It has brought a lot of freedom to the mobile device world, but it is still a company-controlled project that is not entirely free and, by some measures at least, is becoming less free over time. A shift of emphasis at Google could easily push Android more in the proprietary direction. Meanwhile, the end of CyanogenMod has, temporarily, brought about the loss of our most successful community-oriented Android derivative.

    The good news is that the efforts to bring vendor kernels closer to the mainline will bear some fruit this year, making it easier to run systems that, if not fully free, are more free than before. Lineage OS, rising from the ashes of CyanogenMod, should help to ensure the availability of alternative Android builds. But it seems likely that efforts to provide free software at the higher levels of the stack (microG, for example) will languish.

  • A Web Service Written in Pure Bash.

    The service itself is currently running on a Ubuntu 16.10 droplet on DigitalOcean. To expose my service I needed to open a connection with the outside world and initially played with netcat as it’s preinstalled on most *nix machines. This task wasn’t familiar to me at all, but I couldn’t read the incoming request and I couldn’t handle two users connecting at the same time. I explored inetd which lacked of documentation beyond the man page. Continuing with my research I found xinetd which is a more secure version of inetd. I also found a lot more sufficient documentation and user guides on creating a service. After installing xinetd I began building a primitive version of my pure bash service called beeroclock.

  • Deloitte Blockchain Lab Opens in NYC

    Here's another sign that blockchain is becoming big business.

    Deloitte today announced the formation of a blockchain lab in the heart of New York City's financial district in what the global audit and consultancy firm expects will be a "make or break" year the technology. The lab is home to more than 20 developers and designers and will work with Deloitte teams abroad as well as over a dozen of the company's technology partners.

    Open now and dubbed the Americas Blockchain Lab at Deloitte, the new practice will help drive the development of blockchains solutions for financial services firms, from proofs of concepts to ready-to-integrate solutions, stated the company.

    "Financial institutions have the power and ability to move blockchain to the next level," said Eric Piscini, a principal with Deloitte Consulting, in a statement. "To get there, companies will need to move away from churning out proofs of concept and begin producing and implementing solutions."

  • $0.39 EPS Expected For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) In Quarter
  • Asking for help with koji builds
  • Debian 8.7 released

    This update adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with adjustments for serious problems.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 Released

    The Debian Project has released the seventh update of Debian 8 Jessie. This release ships with tons of security updates, bug fixes, and updated packages. The existing users of Debian 8 need to point the apt package tool to one of the updated Debian mirrors and get the update. The new installation media and ISO images are yet to be published.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 Released With New Features and 85 Security Updates

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • A first Look at the Samsung Chromebook Plus

    Based on this video, it appears as if this Chromebook from Samsung would be a great machine with GNU/Linux installed on it.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.41 LTS Update Comes With Improved Radeon, Nouveau And Power PC

    Greg Kroah-Hartman, the Linux kernel maintainer for the stable branch gives us the impression that he doesn’t need any sleeps whatsoever as he is delivering update after updates at a timely interval. The latest update is the Linux 4.4.41 kernel and has brought Linux OS users a wide array of interesting features.

  • Kaby Lake HD Graphics 630 Appear To Be Coming Up Short On Linux

    One would think the graphics of a Core i5 7600K "Kaby Lake" processor would be faster than the Core i5 6600K "Skylake" or even a Core i5 6500, but that's not always the case with the current state of the Linux driver support for the newest-generation Intel hardware.

  • New Benchmark Test Profiles This Weekend: GIMP, Memcached, JPEG Turbo, More OpenCL
  • Discord chat and VOIP on Linux, game streaming on any device, and more

    In this open gaming roundup, we take a look at Discord, a popular chat and VOIP client among gamers which is now supported on Linux; a new Gaming as a Service platform LiquidSky; and more gaming news.

  • New Qt 5.8 rc snapshot for testing

    All known blockers should be fixed in these packages and we are targeting to release Qt 5.8.0 Tue 17th January if nothing really serious found during testing. So please inform me immediately if there is some new blocker in the packages.

  • Qt 5.8 Hoping To Release Next Week, Last Minute Test Builds

    Qt 5.8.0 will hopefully be released in the days ahead.

    The Qt Company has issued new Qt 5.8.0 release candidate snapshots this week for testing. The developers believe all official blocker bugs should be fixed with this release but are encouraging last minute testing. If nothing major is discovered, Qt 5.8.0 will be released next week on 17 January.

    Those wanting to test what could be the final builds of Qt 5.8 can find them via this Qt mailing list post. Since then some bugs have been pointed out, but it's not clear yet if they'll be promoted to being blocker bugs and thereby potentially delaying next week's release.

  • AryaLinux 2017 - Release Notes

    AryaLinux 2017 comes with package updates, the latest Linux kernel and updated build scripts to build system from scratch. Here are the features of this release...

  • AryaLinux 2017 is now available for public

    AryaLinux is an Indian Linux distribution which is made using Linux From Scratch guide. This distribution uses alps as package management. Few hours ago Arya team released AryaLinux 2017 in Xfce and MATE editions. There are various changes made in this release and lots of new updates are included too.

    According to official announcement, AryaLinux will be released in 64-bit only from now on. So guys if you want to test this distro then you better have newer hardware. Linux kernel is updated to 4.9. Mate is now updated to 1.17. LibroOffice is updates to 5.2.3. Simple screen recorder is returned with Qt5. Parole and Exaile are made default media and audio player respectively.

  • What Are the Numbers Saying About: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Upgraded at Vetr Inc.
  • Debian 8 kernel security update

    There are a fair number of outstanding security issues in the Linux kernel for Debian 8 "jessie", but none of them were considered serious enough to issue a security update and DSA. Instead, most of them are being fixed through the point release (8.7) which will be released this weekend. Don't forget that you need to reboot to complete a kernel upgrade.

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Linux and FOSS Events

  • Debian SunCamp 2017 Is Taking Place May 18-21 in the Province of Girona, Spain
    It looks like last year's Debian SunCamp event for Debian developers was a total success and Martín Ferrari is back with a new proposal that should take place later this spring during four days full of hacking, socializing, and fun. That's right, we're talking about Debian SunCamp 2017, an event any Debian developer, contributor, or user can attend to meet his or hers Debian buddies, hack together on new projects or improve existing ones by sharing their knowledge, plan upcoming features and discuss ideas for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.
  • Pieter Hintjens In Memoriam
    Pieter Hintjens was a writer, programmer and thinker who has spent decades building large software systems and on-line communities, which he describes as "Living Systems". He was an expert in distributed computing, having written over 30 protocols and distributed software systems. He designed AMQP in 2004, and founded the ZeroMQ free software project in 2007. He was the author of the O'Reilly ZeroMQ book, "Culture and Empire", "The Psychopath Code", "Social Architecture", and "Confessions of a Necromancer". He was the president of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII), and fought the software patent directive and the standardisation of the Microsoft OOXML Office format. He also organized the Internet of Things (IOT) Devroom here at FOSDEM for the last 3 years. In April 2016 he was diagnosed with terminal metastasis of a previous cancer.
  • foss-gbg on Wednesday
    The topics are Yocto Linux on FPGA-based hardware, risk and license management in open source projects and a product release by the local start-up Zifra (an encryptable SD-card). More information and free tickets are available at the foss-gbg site.

Leftovers: OSS

  • When Open Source Meets the Enterprise
    Open source solutions have long been an option for the enterprise, but lately it seems they are becoming more of a necessity for advanced data operations than merely a luxury for IT techs who like to play with code. While it’s true that open platforms tend to provide a broader feature set compared to their proprietary brethren, due to their larger and more diverse development communities, this often comes at the cost of increased operational complexity. At a time when most enterprises are looking to shed their responsibilities for infrastructure and architecture to focus instead on core money-making services, open source requires a fairly high level of in-house technical skill. But as data environments become more distributed and reliant upon increasingly complex compilations of third-party systems, open source can provide at least a base layer of commonality for resources that support a given distribution.
  • EngineerBetter CTO: the logical truth about software 'packaging'
    Technologies such as Docker have blended these responsibilities, causing developers to need to care about what operating system and native libraries are available to their applications – after years of the industry striving for more abstraction and increased decoupling!
  • What will we do when everything is automated?
    Just translate the term "productivity of American factories" into the word "automation" and you get the picture. Other workers are not taking jobs away from the gainfully employed, machines are. This is not a new trend. It's been going on since before Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Industry creates machines that do the work of humans faster, cheaper, with more accuracy and with less failure. That's the nature of industry—nothing new here. However, what is new is the rate by which the displacement of human beings from the workforce in happening.
  • Want OpenStack benefits? Put your private cloud plan in place first
    The open source software promises hard-to-come-by cloud standards and no vendor lock-in, says Forrester's Lauren Nelson. But there's more to consider -- including containers.
  • Set the Agenda at OpenStack Summit Boston
    The next OpenStack Summit is just three months away now, and as is their custom, the organizers have once again invited you–the OpenStack Community–to vote on which presentations will and will not be featured at the event.
  • What’s new in the world of OpenStack Ambassadors
    Ambassadors act as liaisons between multiple User Groups, the Foundation and the community in their regions. Launched in 2013, the OpenStack Ambassador program aims to create a framework of community leaders to sustainably expand the reach of OpenStack around the world.
  • Boston summit preview, Ambassador program updates, and more OpenStack news

Proprietary Traps and Openwashing

  • Integrate ONLYOFFICE Online Editors with ownCloud [Ed: Proprietary software latches onto FOSS]
    ONLYOFFICE editors and ownCloud is the match made in heaven, wrote once one of our users. Inspired by this idea, we developed an integration app for you to use our online editors in ownCloud web interface.
  • Microsoft India projects itself as open source champion, says AI is the next step [Ed: Microsoft bribes to sabotage FOSS and blackmails it with patents; calls itself "open source"]
  • Open Source WSO2 IoT Server Advances Integration and Analytic Capabilities
    WSO2 has announced a new, fully-open-source WSO2 Internet of Things Server edition that "lowers the barriers to delivering enterprise-grad IoT and mobile solutions."
  • SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says
    SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer. The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store. "If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background," warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.
  • “Active Hours” in Windows 10 emphasizes how you are not in control of your own devices
    No edition of Windows 10, except Professional and Enterprise, is expected to function for more than 12 hours of the day. Microsoft most generously lets you set a block of 12 hours where you’re in control of the system, and will reserve the remaining 12 hours for it’s own purposes. How come we’re all fine with this? Windows 10 introduced the concept of “Active Hours”, a period of up to 12 hours when you expect to use the device, meant to reflect your work hours. The settings for changing the device’s active hours is hidden away among Windows Update settings, and it poorly fits with today’s lifestyles. Say you use your PC in the afternoon and into the late evening during the work week, but use it from morning to early afternoon in the weekends. You can’t fit all those hours nor accommodate home office hours in a period of just 12 hours. We’re always connected, and expect our devices to always be there for us when we need them.
  • Chrome 57 Will Permanently Enable DRM
    The next stable version of Chrome (Chrome 57) will not allow users to disable the Widevine DRM plugin anymore, therefore making it an always-on, permanent feature of Chrome. The new version of Chrome will also eliminate the “chrome://plugins” internal URL, which means if you want to disable Flash, you’ll have to do it from the Settings page.

Linux Mint 18.1 Serena - The glass is half full

Linux Mint 18.1 Serena is an okay distro. It has more merit than Sarah, but then, it's also had almost a year to work on polishing some of the issues, and while a few have been ironed out, big quality issues that were never the domain of Mint before still persist. The live session experience is underwhelming, the default theme is not vibrant enough and can lead to ocular exhaustion quickly, there were problems with stability, multimedia playback, and the promise of Spotify never came to be. On the other hand, most of the stuff works out of the box, the repos are rich, the distro can be tamed relatively easily, and at the end of the day, you have a supported, popular system full of goodies and shiny colors with only a slight aftertaste of betrayal in your proverbial mouth. Good, but only if you've just started playing around with Linux. This distro has no flair. It doesn't have the magic and fire of yore. No fire, no nothing. It's not super green. And it must pop pop pop. So I guess, grade wise, 6.5/10 or some such. All in all, 'tis Linux Mint all right, but not the best offering by a long shot. Read more Also: Linux Mint 18.2 Features – What’s Ahead In the Next Release