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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Rio

    I was really pleased to see Endless, the little company with big plans, initiate a GNOME Design hackfest in Rio.

    The ground team in Rio arranged a visit to two locations where we met with the users that Endless is targeting. While not strictly a user testing session, it helped to better understand the context of their product and get a glimpse of the lives in Rocinha, one of the Rio famous favelas or a more remote rural Magé. Probably wouldn’t have a chance to visit Brazil that way.

  • Windows Phone is dead

    With Lumia sales on the decline and Microsoft's plan to not produce a large amount of handsets, it's clear we're witnessing the end of Windows Phone. Rumors suggest Microsoft is developing a Surface Phone, but it has to make it to the market first. Windows Phone has long been in decline and its app situation is only getting worse. With a lack of hardware, lack of sales, and less than 2 percent market share, it's time to call it: Windows Phone is dead. Real Windows on phones might become a thing with Continuum eventually, but Windows Phone as we know it is done. It won't stop Microsoft producing a few handsets every year as a vanity project, but for everyone else it's the end of the line. Farewell, Windows Phone.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Free Pathways to Running Linux Right

    If you're new or relatively new to Linux, you may be looking around for good educational resources and perhaps some tutorials. Whether you're new to Linux or looking to become a more advanced user, there are a lot of free online books and tutorials that can give you guidance. In this post, you'll find our newly updated collection of many good Linux reference guides and tools online--all available at no cost.

  • Build a better web server – Part 1

    Up your computing power with an upgraded or brand new server that you can build yourself

    While big business and big data may be utilising mainframes more of late, the concept of servers is not going away any time soon. Servers are an integral part of any system, however large your IT infrastructure is. Whether it’s inside the data centre or tucked away in your (well-ventilated!) cupboard at home, there are still a lot of uses for servers in 2015.

    For the office you may want to save a bit of money and create something perfect for your needs that you know exactly how to maintain. For home you may just want to enhance your setup and make the entire network more efficient. For both it’s a great way to separate certain aspects of your network to control it in a more efficient way.

    There are many components of a server that you need to keep in mind, but it boils down to an appropriate hardware selection and a good distro for the task at hand. In this tutorial, we are going to concentrate on file and web servers, two base server systems that can be expanded and modified in multiple ways to best fit the situation you are in.

    As we’re teaching you how to build a better web server, we will first take a quick detour to tell you what you should know if you want to upgrade your current server so that it can compete with the new tech.

  • Podcast Season 4 Episode 02

    In this episode: Good news from Qt and bad news for 32 bit Google Chrome users. The Linux Foundation ditches individual membership and Microsoft MITs more code. Plus loads of Finds, Neurons, Voices, Competition Prizes and An Important Announcement.

  • How many IoT devices do you own?

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is rapidly changing the way we interact with the world around us. A whole host of devices are becoming smarter, more connected, and better able to anticipate our needs. Whether in the form of wearables, home automation, connected cars, or business asset tracking, every day we are seeing a greater level of engagement between the physical world and the digital.

    While this enormous growth in IoT may seem inevitable, like any emerging technology, there are issues which have not yet fully sorted themselves out yet. How can we be sure that all of the devices we own can speak to one another in a language which they all understand, regardless of who manufactured them? How can we be sure we always have access to our data even if we end our relationship with the product's vendor? And how can we know that our data, which by its nature is often quite personal, is always safe and secure?

  • App: Audio Trimmer for Samsung Z3 in the Tizen Store

    Audio Trimmer, an app for the Samsung Z3, is an entertainment app which allows you to trim your songs down to your favorite parts, just like the name suggests.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Voice of the Masses: Should the Linux Foundation have community representation?

    According to their own website: “The Linux Foundation protects and promotes the ideals of freedom and generous collaboration established through the development of Linux, and shares these ideals to power any endeavor aiming to make the future a better place in which to live.” This is indeed a noble goal, and to assist it in this endeavor, many of the world’s largest technology companies pay tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars. All this money is first stored in a Scrooge McDuck style silo before being used to pay the salaries of some kernel developers, passed on to projects improving security in open source, and used to promote Linux in a wide variety of ways.

  • IBM Adds Hybrid Cloud Capabilities To LinuxOne Mainframe Offering
  • IBM Enhances LinuxONE for Hybrid Cloud Environments
  • IBM boots Linux ecosytem with hybrid cloud capability
  • Time-lapse Video: Edison Supercomputer Moves to Berkeley
  • Yosembiance A Smooth and Sleek Theme Based On Ambiance

    Do you like Ambiance theme but also like flat themes? Yosembiance is smoothed and slightly flattened version of Ubuntu default theme Ambiance and it is modified by Brain Sundman, he tried to make this theme more beautiful and he succeeded, the Ubuntu's default theme Ambiance is also beautiful there is no doubt about it. The initial release of this theme was in 2014 and with the passage of time Brain also made this theme available for newer Ubuntu versions. There is blue version too, if you don't want to stick with orange one then you can choose blue for your desktop. I added this theme to PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial/15.10 Wily/15.04 Vivid/14.04 Trusty, and this theme is not tested on Linux Mint but hopefully it will work just fine, you can give it a shot and let us know in the comment below. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool or Ubuntu-Tweak to change themes/icons.

  • Linux Top 3: Kali Rolls, Gparted partions and Android x86 Mobilizes Linux

    As always there is no shortage of activity in the Linux distribution space and this week is no exception as multiple types of Linux distributions are out with updates.

  • ExTiX 16.1 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Jwm On Arch Linux Smile
  • All About Folder Sharing on OpenSUSE 42.1

    This is not the Brazilian dance guys. Samba is a free software licensed under the GNU General Public License and a re-implementation of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol which was originally developed by Andrew Tridgell. Samba is used for sharing files & folders between UNIX & Linux like system towards a Windows OS driven PC. Samba allows a non-Windows server to communicate with the same networking protocol as the Windows products and that’s the interesting part of it. Samba was originally developed for UNIX but now a days it can run on Linux, FreeBSD and other UNIX variants.The name Samba comes from SMB (Server Message Block). Samba works on the majority of modern operating systems available today.

  • [Fedora] Marketing – Year in Review

    Fedora experienced a significant amount of growth and development over the last year. With the growth and recent changes, there were new challenges that Fedora and the Marketing team had to face. The Magazine went really well with significant growth concerning the overall traffic (many thanks to Paul, Ryan, Joe, Chris, Justin) and with more infrastructure stability (thanks to Chris again and Patrick). On the other hand, the institutional part of Marketing experienced difficulties in keeping current with the changes that 2015 brought.

  • BofA/Merrill downgrades Red Hat, cites international sales pressures
  • Warning: 37 new booby trapped onion sites

    In June I warned Tor users about the presence of hundreds of fake and booby trapped .onion websites [1].

  • Tails 2.0 Anonymous Live CD Officially Released, Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8

    The Tails development team proudly announced the immediate availability for download of the final Tails 2.0 build, the most promising release of the amnesic incognito live system.

  • Ubuntu Linux and open source play key role in Microsoft Azure Stack Technical Preview

    The current perceptions of Microsoft by some home users can be quite negative. This is likely due to privacy concerns with Windows 10, which is a legitimate issue.

  • The Pine A64 is about to become the cheapest ARM 64-bit platform to run Docker

    Last Saturday one of the more promising Kickstarter campaigns that piqued our curiosity ended after 44 days and was able to raise 1.7 million dollars. It was a campaign to fund the cheapest 64-bit ARM board that can currently be bought for money.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GNOME Settings To Get a Major Design Overhaul

    The GNOME settings app is to get a major design overhaul, GNOME designers and developers have revealed.

    The new design proposals will see the utility switch from a grid layout with fixed window size to one using a sidebar list and resizeable window frame.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #19

    Alongside our crunch and focus for 1.1, we’ve also been continuing our campaign of bug crushing. We’ve crushed 22 bugs over the last week, ranging from long sitting bugs that have been resolved since the Budgie rewrite to recent ones that are related to inclusion of git-based patches for new software in the repo.

  • Zenwalk 8.0 Linux Distribution Now In Beta
  • Manjaro Deepin 15.12
  • Arch just works, Ubuntu is customizable

    Ever actually treid to make a package for Ubuntu? Understanding .deb takes a good couple of days of documentation until you get it down, every idiot can make a Pacman package because it's simpler, it "just works". The AUR's success is probably tied to that any idiot can make a Pacman package.

  • Red Hat, Inc. Analyst Rating Update

    As many as 16 brokerage firms have rated Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) at 1.5. Research Analysts at Zacks Investment Research have ranked the company at 3, suggesting the traders with a rating of hold for the short term. The stock garnered a place in the hold list of 3 stock Analysts. 2 analysts suggested buying the company. 11 analysts rated the company as a strong buy.

  • Brokerages Set Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) PT at $89.73

    Shares of Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) have been given a consensus rating of “Buy” by the thirty-four research firms that are covering the company, AnalystRatings.NET reports. Two equities research analysts have rated the stock with a sell recommendation, six have given a hold recommendation and twenty-five have given a buy recommendation to the company. The average twelve-month target price among brokers that have covered the stock in the last year is $89.73.

  • neovim-coming-to-debian

    Almost 9 months after I took ownership of the Neovim RFP, I finally tagged & uploaded Neovim to Debian. It still has to go through the NEW queue, but it will soon be in an experimental release near you.

  • Sailfish OS on Fairphone 2 - a community driven project

    European flagship phone with European operating system combines ethics and ideologies in the mobile industry

  • Samsung Gear Manager Updated to Version 2.2.16011842 for Tizen Smartwatches

    Today, Samsung have released an update to the Android Gear Manager app, taking it to version 2.2.16011842. We did once upon a time get quite regular updates to the Gear Manager App, but the last one was back in November, which took us to version 2.2.15111841.

  • The Dawn of Open Source Insulin

    Based on WHO (World Health Organization) reports on diabetes, in 2012, an estimated 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes and it is projected to be one of the leading causes of death in 2030. More than 80% of diabetes deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.

  • So you think offline systems need no updates?

    So, yes, security issues are harmful. They must be taken serious, and a solid and well designed security concept should be applied. Multiple layers, different zones, role based access, update often, etc.

  • Why the Sun 2 has the message “Love your country, but never trust its government”

    Alec figured that message was never supposed to be seen and suggested it was a kind of silent protest of someone in Sun against the US Government. I replied, saying I was pretty sure such a message anywhere in the Sun bootprom code must have originated by John Gilmore. So I asked John, and he did not disappoint. This is what I wrote me back...

  • Microsoft Surface blamed for NFL football playoffs meltdown

    "They're having some trouble with their Microsoft Surface tablets," announced CBS reporter Evan Washburn. "That last defensive possession the Patriots' coaches did not have access to those tablets to show pictures to their players. NFL officials have been working at it. Some of those tablets are back in use but not all of them. A lot of frustration that they didn't have them on that last possession."

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.2 is now available.

  • Containers: 3 big myths

    You’ll see the likes of Mesosphere, or Docker Swarm, say, ‘we can deploy ten thousand containers in like thirty seconds’ – and similar claims. Well, that’s a really synthetic test: these kinds of numbers are 100% hype. In the real world such a capacity is pretty much useless. No one cares about deploying ten thousands little apps that do literally nothing, that just go ‘hello world.’

    The tricky bit with containers is actually linking them together. When you start with static hosts, or even VMs, they don’t change very often, so you don’t realise how much interconnection there is between your different applications. When you destroy and recreate your applications in their entirety via containers, you discover that you actually have to recreate all that plumbing on the fly and automate that and make it more agile. That can catch you by surprise if you don’t know about it ahead of time.

  • GNOME 3.19.4 Released For A Fresh Look At The Work For GNOME 3.20
  • SUSE Survey Finds There Just Aren't Enough OpenStack Skills to Go Around

    There is brand new evidence that a lack of workers with OpenStack skills may be holding the cloud platform back, especially at enterprises. SUSE LLC’s survey on OpenStack adoption trends reports that over eighty percent of enterprises are either planning to, or have already, implemented OpenStack as a cloud computing solution within their organizations. That means the need and desire is there. However, more than half of all organizations that have tried to deploy OpenStack say they’ve failed to do so due to a lack of skills.

    Here is more on the findings, and our latest review of quick ways to pick up OpenStack skills.

  • Red Hat, Inc. Price Target Update

    The mean short term price target for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) has been established at $89.12 per share. The higher price target estimate is at $97 and the lower price target estimate is expected at $75 according to 17 Analyst. The stock price is expected to vary based on the estimate which is suggested by the standard deviation value of $6.46

  • Are you a Fedora Women? Then Let us Know!

    It’s no secret that female presence has always been there, but most of the times we don’t know due a lack of info. Several years ago a Wiki page started where the idea was to have a list of those Women who can provide advice and help to those new young contributors starting on our community.

  • Mini PC invasion: These radically tiny computers fit in the palm of your hand

    Computers have been shrinking for years, and the revolution has only accelerated in recent times. As chipmakers focus on creating processors that sip power without sacrificing performance, thermal concerns have largely been alleviated in modern CPUs. Because of that, today’s pint-sized PCs offer enough performance to play HD video and satisfy Office jockeys, the opposite of the janky, compromised experience of yesteryear’s microcomputers.

  • Linux malware: Second screen-grabbing Trojan surfaces in space of a week

    Researchers have found Linux malware that appears to target a particular brand of Bitcoin ATM but works "just fine" on Ubuntu.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Yelp Releases an Initialization System for Docker Containers

    Simple, clean, easy to install. Sounds elegant. Best of all, you can check it out for yourself. Yelp gave dumb-init its own page on GetHub. Dumb-init is one of a number of internally-build tools that the social recommendation service has released as open source.

  • KDEPIM KDE and opensource

    Once upon a time a program named Akregator.

    It was born in 2004.

    But it didn’t evolute during 6-7 years. It was a bad thing for an kdepim application.

  • GTK+ 3.19.7 Brings Kinetic Scrolling For Wayland & More

    GNOME developers have released the latest development version of the GTK+ tool-kit in the approach towards GNOME 3.20.

    Today's GTK+ 3.19.7 release makes use of the new Wayland DnD support that just landed today. In the Wayland scope GNOME 3.19.7 also adds support for kinetic scrolling. Details on the GTK+ kinetic scrolling can be found via this bug report.

  • openSUSE makes the Leap to the Public Cloud

    openSUSE Leap 42.1 is now available on Amazon EC2, Google Compute Engine, and Microsoft Azure. Leap has been available on EC2 & GCE since shortly after it release; the Azure release was delayed due to a qemu bug resulting in incorrectly formatted images. These images are maintained by SUSE’s Public Cloud Engineering Team. If you’d like to peek inside, they’re developed on Open Build Service (OBS), in the Cloud:Images project.

  • Independent Research Firm Names Red Hat a Leader Among Private Cloud Software Suites

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it has been named a leader in two Forrester research reports ranking private cloud software suites and hybrid cloud management solutions. “The Forrester Wave™: Private Cloud Software Suites, Q1 2016” and “The Forrester Wave™: Hybrid Cloud Management Solutions, Q1 2016” reports assessed vendors in terms of their current offerings, market presence, and strategy, and Red Hat was placed as a leader in both reports.

  • Key Stocks of the Day: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat Announces the Beta of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7

    The Red Hat JBoss Middleware Team at Red Hat, Inc. has proudly announced the release and general availability of the first Beta build of the upcoming Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 software suite.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2015.20160117-1 and biber 2.3-1

    About one month has passed and here is the usual updated of TeX Live packages for Debian, this time also with an update to biber to accompany the updated version of biblatex. Nothing spectacular here besides fixes for some broken links of fonts.

  • $65 hacker board runs 64-bit Linux on quad-core Atom

    The Linux- and Android-friendly “JaguarBoard” SBC, based on a 64-bit quad core Atom processor, has achieved 600 percent of its Kickstarter funding goal.

  • What you need to know about Tizen 2.4 OS upgrade for Samsung Z1

    Tizen 2.4 Operating System (OS) for the Samsung Z1 has been in beta testing since the end of September 2015. Since then there has been a huge user demand for the Operating system to mature and flourish into a final release.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Latest Manjaro Linux 15.12 Stable Update Adds New Configs for Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

    The Manjaro community, through project leader Philip Müller, proudly announced today, January 18, the general availability of the fourth stable update for the Manjaro Linux 15.12 (Capella) series of operating systems.

  • DevOps tool Ansible gets a major overhaul

    If you’re going to really make use of a cloud to its full potential, you need DevOps tools. And one of the best of these tools has just gotten a serious makeover: Ansible 2.0.

    This is the first major release of Ansible since Red Hat bought the company in October 2015.

    Ansible brings to the Red Hat‘s OpenStack-based OpenShift cloud an agent-less cloud management approach. Ansible is not, however, OpenStack specific. It can work with, to name but a few, VMware, Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure.

    Like most DevOps programs, e.g., Chef, Juju and Puppet, Ansible doesn’t require your IT crew to be coding samurai. It’s designed to make it easy to automate cloud deployment and configuration to rolling upgrades.

  • Pocket-sized Linux server doubles as a smartphone power pack

    iCracked’s “Ocean” is a tiny battery powered microserver and power pack that comes with Debian but also supports Android, Raspbian, and other Linux builds.

    You might call iCracked the “Uber” of the iOS device repair market. Founded in 2010, the company has since grown into a network over 4,000 “certified iTechs” located in a dozen countries, and claimed to be “the world’s largest on-demand repair and trade-in network for iOS devices.”

  • How Kubernetes is helping Docker blossom

    Kubernetes and Docker are the latest buzz words in the IT sector. Businesses and IT enthusiasts alike are clamoring to learn more about containerization.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mycroft: Linux’s Own AI

    The future is artificially intelligent. We are already surrounded by devices that are continuously listening to every word that we speak. There is Siri, Google Now, Amazon Alexa, and Microsoft’s Cortana. The biggest problem with these AI “virtual assistants” is that users have no real control over them. They use closed source technologies to send every bit of information they collect from users back to their masters.

  • Three "Open Source" Investing Strategies to Start Using Today

    More and more tech companies are building their success by going "open source."

    By that, I mean they're using open-source tech platforms like Linux and Hadoop – which are free and open to the public to use – to write code, create cloud storage, and develop Big Data applications. With these platforms, they're saving money, running their business more efficiently… and raking in the profits.

    I thought of open-source platforms recently – on New Year's Eve.

  • Security Updates For Linux 4.5 Brings Improvements For Smack, EVM & TPM

    Linus Torvalds pulled in the security subsystem updates this weekend for the Linux 4.5 kernel.

    Security updates for Linux 4.5 include TPM/TPM2 enhancements for the Trusted Platform Module, Smack now supports file-receive process-based permission checking for sockets, and EVM has support for loading an x509 certificate from the kernel into the EVM trusted kernel keyring. There are also bug-fixes and other minor improvements as part of these security updates for Linux 4.5.

  • NVIDIA Publishes Nouveau Patches For Secure Boot, Unified Firmware Loading

    NVIDIA has released new patches today for helping the open-source Nouveau driver step towards properly supporting the GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell" graphics cards as well as better supporting Tegra.

  • Intel NUC Skylake NUC6i3SYK Linux Benchmarks

    These open-source benchmark results complement other recent Intel NUC Skylake Benchmarks On Linux and thanks to the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org they are all easily-reproducible and support side-by-side comparisons.

  • KDE Made Much Progress In 2015 Thanks To Student Developers With GSoC

    While Google's annual Summer of Code has been done for several months now, the KDE project published this weekend their final overview of all the progress that was made this past summer by these promising student developers.

    Among the work that came to KDE over the summer of 2015 thanks to GSoC was porting more software to KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5, a checker framework for KDevelop, Kdenlive improvements, handling of OpenStreetMap files within Marble, PDF tags/layers within Okular, a new configuration module for pointing devices, a GnuPGP-plugin for Kopete, and other improvements.

  • A brief 360° overview of my first board turn

    You’ve certainly noticed that I didn’t run for a second turn, after my first 2 years. This doesn’t mean the election time and the actual campaign are boring Smile

    If you are an openSUSE Member, we really want to have your vote, so go to Board Election Wiki and make your own opinion.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.