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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Allwinner A64 Support Being Worked On For Mainline Kernel

    Andre Przywara of ARM Holdings published basic Allwinner (A64) support under a "request for comments" flag on the kernel mailing list.

  • Why the Blockchain Initiative Coud Be Transformational for the Economy

    Recently, I covered the news that a group of top technology and finance companies including IBM, Wells Fargo and the London Stock Exchange Group, are partnering and working with The Linux Foundation to advance blockchain technology, which is central to how many businesses process transactions. The Linux Foundation announced that the project will develop an enterprise grade, open source distributed ledger framework and developers wil be invited to focus on building industry-specific applications, platforms and hardware systems to support business transactions.

  • 13 Open Source LightWeight Desktop Environments I Discovered in 2015

    The word ‘Open Source‘ can be attributed to Linux community which brought it into existence along with introduction of Linux (successor of then existing Unix Operating System). Although ‘Linux‘ in itself came into existence only a base Kernel, but its open source nature attracted huge society of developers worldwide to contribute to its development.

  • Qt 5.6 Will Be Long-Term Supported, Promises HiDPI and Full Windows 10 Support

    The Qt Company, through Tuukka Turunen, had the great pleasure of announcing this past weekend the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Beta build of the upcoming Qt 5.6.

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 now offers new hardware and Docker support

    SUSE announced the availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 1, giving customers new capabilities for maintaining application uptime, improving the efficiency of data center development and operations, and bringing solutions to market faster.

  • Privacy-focused Tails 2.0 beta 1 Linux distro is here -- Debian 8, GNOME shell classic, and more

    With clueless politicians, the media, and scared citizens calling for a ban on encryption, it can feel like the Internet is under attack. Such basic rights to privacy are the foundation of the net -- once we lose them, it can be impossible to get back.

    Unfortunately, even mundane aspects of computing, like operating systems -- which should fade into the background -- are threatening our privacy. Windows 10, for instance, sends much data to Microsoft, while Android is partly a means for Google to collect data. Traditional Linux distributions are not inherently privacy-focused, but generally speaking, many are. For the gold standard in privacy and security, Tails -- a distro recommended by Edward Snowden -- can be used. Today, the first beta of the 2.0 version operating system becomes available.

  • COM Express “server on module” taps Skylake Xeons

    Congatec announced a “Conga-TS170” COM Express Basic module series based on Intel’s 6th Gen (“Skylake”) Core and Xeon processors, and aimed at high performance “server class” apps.

  • DevOps On The Desktop: Containers Are Software As A Service

    It seems that everyone has a metaphor to explain what containers “are”. If you want to emphasize the self-contained nature of containers and the way in which they can package a whole operating system’s worth of dependencies, you might say that they are like virtual machines. If you want to emphasize the portability of containers and their role as a distribution mechanism, you might say that they are like a platform. If you want to emphasize the dangerous state of container security nowadays, you might say that they are equivalent to root access. Each of these metaphors emphasizes one aspect of what containers “are”, and each of these metaphors is correct.

  • Amazon's AWS IoT Cloud Service Enters General Availability
  • Alive And Well In Largo

    In the past, we had a server running GNOME and when a user clicked on Firefox, it handed that process off to another server and Firefox then remote displayed back to the workstation. This met our needs for many years. When using NX as the transport however, having Firefox running on its own server meant that there was an Xwindow hop in the middle. Because of the network hungry nature of Firefox, this application was moved and now runs directly on the same server as GNOME/NX. This gives Firefox direct access to the NX/Xserver with no hop in the middle. Firefox therefore is very much faster, scrolling and typing is far superior. This also meant that our scaling and loads have changed and required tuning and in the coming weeks some load balancing. The server version of Firefox is used for all aspects of user requirements, except for video playback which is now handled by launching the Firefox version found on the local workstation.

today's leftovers

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  • Looking for a Chromebook? You Can Now Run Top Applications on Them

    If you haven't looked into Chromebooks, or if you previously wrote them off due to the immaturity of Chrome OS, look again. Many holiday gift receivers would be happy to get a Chromebook, and they are much more flexible now than before. And, Google is even offering incentives with Chromebooks, including, in many cases, free storage in the cloud and other perks.

  • Amazon adds Docker registry to fill in "core" gap in its cloud

    Amazon Web Services' (AWS) has launched a simpler way for developers to manage Docker containers on its cloud platform.

    The EC2 Container Registry (ECR) gives developers an AWS-hosted registry to manage, store and deploy Docker images.

  • Beautiful KDE Plasma 5.5.2 Desktop Arrives with a Few Fixes

    The KDE Community has revealed that the KDE Plasma desktop has been upgraded to version 5.5.2 , marking the release of another maintenance update.

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Price Target Raised to $86.00 at Cowen and Company

    Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) had its price target increased by Cowen and Company from $82.00 to $86.00 in a research note released on Friday, AnalystRatings.NET reports. The brokerage currently has a market perform rating on the open-source software company’s stock.

  • Linux ready mini-PCs step up to faster AMD and Intel chips

    Compulab launched its fastest Fitlet mini-PC yet with a quad-core, 2.4GHz AMD G-Series “Fitlet-T,” plus two Intense PC mini-PCs using Intel’s 5th Gen Cores.

  • Did Apple Just Give Up?

    For instance what about RIM; there was a time when no self-respecting businessman would be seen without at least one Blackberry handset on them. Now with falling profits and struggling sales, the company seems close to collapse. So what happened there? Well I would argue that RIM fell behind, with the introduction of the iPhone and Android handsets, RIM left their Blackberry line swimming in the dark. The devices stuck to the same form factor, hardly improved from a hardware perspective and just completely ignored the shift in the industry. Now I’m not sure why this happened but it seemed like the company lacked the drive it once had.

today's leftovers

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  • The Most Popular Email Clients On Fedora Linux
  • India 2015

    Theme of our trip is Debian Pure Blends. More specifically, we will meet with distribution developers and designers to try understand why they fork from (other forks of) Debian, and how Debian might improve to better serve them - ideally be able to fully contain such projects within Debian itself.

  • SparkyLinux 4.2 Is Based on Debian 9 "Stretch", Adds Enlightenment 0.20 and LXQt 0.10

    Earlier today, December 21, the developers of the Debian-based SparkyLinux computer operating system had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of SparkyLinux 4.2.

  • Top Open Source Android Apps: Chatting, Pics, Audio, and More

    Most people don't realize that they're not limited to the Android apps found in the Google Play store. There are also great open source apps available from F-Droid. The apps found in F-Droid are both open source and specifically designed for your Android device. In this article, I'll share some of my favorite open source Android apps and share my experiences with each application.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Need for Compromise in Free Software – With Richard Stallman

    I had the opportunity to host a (virtual) round-table discussion on the need (or lack of need) for compromise in Free Software with an absolutely stellar group of panelists.

    Including: Richard Stallman (founder of the GNU Project and President of the Free Software Foundation), Aaron Seigo (of Kolab and KDE fame), Stuart Langridge (co-host of Bad Voltage and LUG Radio) and Swapnil Bhartiya (journalist for ITworld, and more).

  • Opera 35 Web Browser Enters Beta, Brings a Cleaner, Unified Settings Page, More

    Earlier today, December 15, Opera Software, through Zhenis Beisekov, has had the great pleasure of announcing the promotion of the Opera 35 web browser to the Beta channel for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

  • Symbolic Algebra Everywhere

    Previously in this space, I have covered software packages like Maxima that can be used to solve symbolic mathematics problems. Several packages are available that can do those types of calculations. In this article, I discuss Xcas/Giac. Xcas is the GUI interface to the system. Giac is the command-line program that provides access to the core engine. Xcas has the functionality to handle symbolic algebra, two-dimensional and three-dimensional graphing, spreadsheets and statistics. It even has its own programming language that you can use to add extra functionality of your own. Although you can use the default interface that comes with Xcas, you also can link the CAS (Computer Algebra System) engine as a shared library to your own C++ code.

  • How to Block SSH and FTP Access to Specific IP and Network Range in Linux
  • Enlightenment 0.20 Desktop Environment Gets Its First Point Release to Fix 30 Bugs

    The first maintenance release of the Enlightenment 0.20 open-source desktop environment has been published earlier for all GNU/Linux operating systems, fixing over 30 issues reported by users since the previous version.

  • GTK+ For GNOME 3.20 Gets "Gadgets"

    Gadgets as explained by GNOME developer Ben Otte is, "A gadget is halfway between a widget and a CSS node. It's supposed to provide the minimum convenicence around CSS nodes until we've figured out how to integrate them with widgets."

  • CentOS 7-1511 Screenshot Tour
  • Tails 1.8 Screenshot Tour

today's leftovers

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  • Chromebookify Your Laptop Now!

    A few years ago there was a project designed to boot generic laptops so they functioned as Chromebooks. It was a cool project, but unfortunately, the compatibility wasn't great, and it wasn't reliable to use on a daily basis. Although Chromebooks are old news these days, it still would be quite useful to transform aging laptop computers into Chromebooks. Because they have such low system requirements, older laptops running the ChromeOS can become quite useful again.

  • AppStream 0.9 Brings Many Changes, Breaks API/ABI

    Version 0.9 of AppStream is now available. As a refresher, AppStream is a specification backed by multiple major Linux distributions as a cross-distribution effort of standardizing Linux component metadata.

  • Mesa 11.1 Will Likely Support The Raspberry Pi 3D Support In Linux 4.5

    In Linux 4.4 there wasn't 3D support, but that's changing with Linux 4.5. However, besides needing the Linux 4.5+ kernel, you also need a supported VC4 Gallium3D driver. While there's been the VC4 Gallium3D driver developed in mainline Mesa over the past many months, the branched code currently present for the imminent Mesa 11.1 release doesn't support the DRM driver as set to be shipped in Linux 4.5.

  • Intel Broxton OpenCL Support Added To Beignet
  • Snapshot 1.0.344.34 - move tabs between windows
  • Latest Vivaldi Web Browser Snapshot Lets Users Move Tabs Between Windows

    Earlier today, December 14, 2015, the developers behind the cross-platform and free Vivaldi web browser announced the release of a new snapshot build towards the second Beta version of the software.

  • Install NetXMS with Ubuntu 15.10
  • How to install Composer on Debian / Ubuntu Linux
  • How To Make Python Run As Fast As Julia
  • The Funding Crowd 54, the latest in Linux crowdfunding news

    Read the latest in crowdfunding news for Linux in the last issue of The Funding Crowd this year. We have an even mix of hidden gems and biggies this time, as well as a few bonus picks that might be worth checking out.

  • Best distro of 2015 poll

    Let's do it again. Last year, in a first-of-its-kind Dedoimedo best distro vote poll, I asked you about your favorite operating system, and you responded in kind. With exactly 1,900 votes, you opined on the state of the Linux. It's that time of the year once more.

    I am going to post an article reflecting my own view on how this year of distro testing went, but I would also very much like to hear from you. Like in 2014, I used the THP on Distrowatch and selected the top ten entries for the poll. But there's also a free field for you to add any other distro you like, as well as comments. It ought to be interesting, and hopefully not too quiet. After me.

  • Mageia: Some news of what’s boiling in the Cauldron

    For those of you who are most familiar with Mageia and its development, you are starting to know the drill: Cauldron is the place where we break stuff by upgrading everything that we tried to keep stable during the previous release cycle, and then we work on making it stable again. We are now in this stabilization phase and we were aiming internally for a first development snapshot of Mageia 6 as a set of ISO images, but there are still a number of factors that make it difficult right now.

  • Dropping Plasma 4

    Since the KDE 4 desktop has been unmaintained for several months and it's becoming increasingly difficult to support two versions of Plasma, we are removing it from our repositories. Plasma 5.5 has just been released and should be stable enough to replace it.

  • Enlightenment 0.20.1 Released With Fixes
  • And the date winners are: Kdenlive Café #1 and #2
  • Video Series

    I’m nearly a month down on a branch for Builder 3.20. It’s goal is to radically simplify the process of creating plugins, and prepare for external plugins. We really wanted to create a solid plugin story before doing that and things are progressing nicely.

  • CentOS 7 1511 Updates To GNOME 3.14, KDE 4.14
  • Linux Top 3: Rockstor, Koozali SME and Chapeau

    In the world of Linux distributions, there are many that are based on Debian and Ubuntu, but those are the only two distro that have fueled a following of derivative distros, Fedora and CentOS have too.

  • Monthly News – November 2015

    Our apologies for posting these news so late. Since the website and forums went down, we’ve been hit by two new server issues. Two of our repository servers lost their hard drives. That’s a total of 3 servers going down in just a few weeks. This time around we had full backups though and we were able to minimize downtime (no downtime at all on the Mint and LMDE2 repositories, a few hours yesterday on the LMDE 1 repositories). We’re eager to resume work on Linux Mint but at the moment most of our focus is still on server administration, on recovery, on configuration but also on making sure we’re stronger and issues like these have less of an impact on us going forward.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 OEM images available

    Reminder: OEM images are for computer vendors and manufacturers. They allow Linux Mint to be “pre-installed” on a machine which is then used by another person than the one who performed the installation. After an OEM installation, the computer is set in such a way that the next reboot features a small setup screen where the new user/customer has the ability to choose his/her username, password, keyboard layout and locale.

  • Cybersecurity Researchers Are Hunted from All Sides

    ybersecurity researcher Peter Kruse, founder of CSIS Security Group in Denmark, thought his mother was calling. Her number appeared on his phone, but when he answered, it wasn’t her. Instead, a male voice told him to stop what he was doing as a computer expert.

    “They checked my family members,” he said, referring to his anonymous tormenters. “They did their homework.”

    Security researcher Costin Raiu at Kaspersky Lab in Romania has a similar story. While he was analyzing Stuxnet, a worm written by the US and Israel and considered to be the first cyber weapon, someone broke into his house.

  • Torrent websites infect 12 million users a month with malware [Ed: propaganda for blanket silencing/censoring sharing sites]

    Institutions such as the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) are fighting a losing battle in relation to preventing this type of piracy, simply because of the sheer number of people across the world tapping into the technology to download their favourite television show or album.

  • Raspberry Pi Zero: What you need to know

    Everything you need to know about the tiny $5 computer that is the newest member of the Raspberry Pi family.

  • Want Windows 10 on the Raspberry Pi? It's virtually possible

    Work to turn the $35 Raspberry Pi board into a thin client for Windows and Linux virtual desktops appears to be paying off.

  • The Gear S2 Is the Gear Live 2: Samsung Sidelines Android Wear

    Have you been anticipating a Gear Live 2 from Samsung running Android Wear? Well, we’re way past Google’s 2015 I/O Conference, so I think it’s safe to say that the Android Wear-powered Gear Live 2 is a no-show. With that said, however, I don’t think the Gear Live 2 was ever meant to be. I don’t think the Gear Live 2 was ever in the cards for Samsung, ever on the Korean giant’s “to make” list. To find out why, though, the key lies in Samsung’s latest smartwatch, the Tizen-powered Gear S2.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Rblpapi 0.3.5
    A new release of Rblpapi is now on CRAN. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg Labs (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required).
  • Flatpak 0.6.13
    These used to take an application id and an optional branch name as two arguments. This meant you could not specify multiple apps to install in a single command. So, instead of having the branch as a separate argument we now support partial references. If you only specify an id we try to match the rest as best we can depending on what is installed/available, but if this matches multiple things you have to specify more details.
  • New features on Hosted Weblate
    Today, new version has been deployed on Hosted Weblate. It brings many long requested features and enhancements.
  • A Wild Desktop Reddit App for Linux Appears
    Reddit is …Well it’s Reddit: there’s little else like it on the internet. Thos of us who use Reddit probably do so a tab, in a browser, because that’s how the site works best. Many desktop Reddit apps exist, but few translate the unique experience of using the service to the desktop in a way that really works.
  • Opera 41 Browser Brings Performance Improvements
    For those still using the Opera web-browser, Opera 41 is now available as the latest stable release and seems primarily focused on performance improvements.
  • Faster and better browsing – Welcome Opera 41
    We all know the feeling. You want to check out your favorite website, but when you open your laptop or turn on your computer, you realize the browser is closed. You click on the browser icon and then have to wait while the browser opens all your previously opened sites… We have a solution for you that makes your browsing faster: Opera 41 includes a new, smarter startup sequence that cuts away almost all the wait time, no matter how many tabs you open on startup.

today's howtos

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • We Got Phished
    She logged into her account but couldn’t find the document and, with other more urgent emails to deal with, she quickly moved on and put this brief event out of mind. This staff member will henceforth be known as PZ, or “patient zero.” The login page wasn’t really a login page. It was a decoy webpage, designed to look legitimate in order to trick unsuspecting recipients into typing in their private login credentials. Having fallen for the ruse, PZ had effectively handed over her email username and password to an unknown party outside the Exploratorium. This type of attack is known as “phishing.” Much like putting a lure into a lake and waiting to see what bites, a phishing attack puts out phony prompts, such as a fake login page, hoping that unwitting recipients can be manipulated into giving up personal information.
  • DDoS attacks against Dyn the work of 'script kiddies'
    Last week's distributed denial of service attack in the US against domain name services provider Dynamic Network Services are more likely to have been the work of "script kiddies", and not state actors. Security researchers at threat intelligence firm Flashpoint dismissed reports that linked the attack to WikiLeaks, the Russian government or the New World Hackers group. Instead, Flashpoint said, it was "moderately confident" that the Hackforums community was behind the attack which led to well-known sites like Twitter, Spotify, Netflix and Paypal being inaccessible on 21 October (US time).
  • How one rent-a-botnet army of cameras, DVRs caused Internet chaos
    Welcome to the Internet of Evil Things. The attack that disrupted much of the Internet on October 21 is still being teased apart by investigators, but evidence thus far points to multiple "botnets" of Internet-connected gadgets being responsible for blocking access to the Domain Name Service (DNS) infrastructure at DNS provider Dyn. Most of these botnets—coordinated armies of compromised devices that sent malicious network traffic to their targets—were controlled by Mirai, a self-spreading malware for Internet of Things (IoT) devices. in a blog post on the attack, Dyn reported "tens of millions" of devices were involved in the attack But other systems not matching the signature of Mirai were also involved in the coordinated attack on Dyn. "We believe that there might be one or more additional botnets involved in these attacks," Dale Drew, CSO of Level 3 Communications, told Ars. "This could mean that they are 'renting' several different botnets to launch an attack against a specific victim, in which multiple other sites have been impacted." The motive may have been blackmail, since the attacker sought a payout by Dyn to stop. But Drew warned that the huge disruption caused by the attack "could result in large copycat attacks, and [a] higher [number of] victim payouts [so] as to not be impacted in the same way. It could also be a signal that the bad guy is using multiple botnets in order to better avoid detection since they are not orchestrating the attack from a single botnet source."
  • ARM builds up security in the tiniest Internet of Things chips
    IoT is making devices smaller, smarter, and – we hope – safer. It’s not easy to make all those things happen at once, but chips that can help are starting to emerge. On Tuesday at ARM TechCon in Silicon Valley, ARM will introduce processors that are just a fraction of a millimeter across and incorporate the company’s TrustZone technology. TrustZone is hardware-based security built into SoC (system on chip) processors to establish a root of trust. It’s designed to prevent devices from being hacked and taken over by intruders, a danger that’s been in the news since the discovery of the Mirai botnet, which recently took over thousands of IP cameras to mount denial-of-service attacks.
  • Antique Kernel Flaw Opens Door to New Dirty Cow Exploit

Red Hat Open Tech to Run UKCloud’s Enterprise Platform; Radhesh Balakrishnan Comments

Red Hat and public cloud provider UKCloud have forged a partnership to develop an infrastructure-as-a-service cloud platform for the U.K. government’s work to deliver digital services to the public. UKCloud has standardized on Red Hat OpenStack Platform with Red Hat Ceph Storage to handle citizen web applications and government systems in behalf of public sector organizations across industries such as healthcare, defense and police and justice, Red Hat said Monday. Read more