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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Librem 13 coreboot report – February 3rd, 2017: It’s Alive!

    It’s been 3 weeks since I wrote my last blog post but this is going to be a short update, in big part because I’ve spent the first two weeks sick in bed and thus wasn’t able to do much at all. However, in the last week I did manage to make some big progress, and the result represents such a great milestone that it warrants a blog post of its own. And, well, I doubt many will complain about not having to read through a wall of text for today’s blog post

    So the good news is: coreboot is working on the Librem 13. The laptop boots into Linux and most things are working! The only issue I have found so far is that the M.2 SATA port doesn’t seem to work properly yet (see below for more info).

  • Obsidian-1 Icon Theme Based On Faenza And It Revives Desktop

    Obsidian-1 icons are based on Faenza icon theme which is around from some years but the development of Faenza is almost stopped, hope creator again give some time to his popular icons. Obisidian-1 icon theme offers icons for panels, toolbars and buttons and colourful squared icons for devices, applications, folder, files and menu items, there are two version included to fit with light or dark themes. It is in active development which means if you find any missing icon or problem with this icon set then you can report it via linked page and hopefully it will be fixed in the next update. Arc theme suite used in the following screenshots and you can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Enlightenment Wires In Wayland's Pointer Constraints & Relative Pointer Support

    It's been a while since we last had anything to report on Enlightenment's Wayland compositor work, but that changed as we begin February.

    Landing on Friday in Enlightenment Git is support for pointer constraints within their Wayland compositor. This protocol support is about adding constraints to the motion of pointer, such as limiting it to a given region or to its current position.

  • Take Your Writing To The Next Level With Writefull (Cross-Platform)

    Writefull is a tool that helps improve your writing by comparing your text against databases of correct language like Google Books, Web, Scholar and News.

    The application is free to use but not open source software, and is available for Linux, Windows, Mac, as well as a Chrome extension.

  • Plotinus and the quest for searchable menus

    For something that dramatically alters the UX, Plotinus is technically very clean. There is no fork of Gtk+ (the gui toolkit on GNU/Linux) or similarly hacky techniques. It uses the built-in GTK3_MODULES system to extend Gtk+.

    But this brings a downside - compatibility. Plotinus only supports Gtk+ 3 applications. While some in the GNU/Linux community would like to see all applications use Gtk+ 3, this is not the case. Some of the apps with the worst menus, like Inkscape or the GIMP, are written in the older Gtk 2 library.

  • [Video] Spring-loading functionality in Plasma 5.10's Folder View

    Folder View in Plasma 5.10 allows you to navigate folders by hovering above them during drag and drop.

  • [Video] Plasma 5.9
  • [Older] [Video] MX Linux 16 - Linux Distribution, First Impressions Review
  • Calculate Linux 17 Cinnamon released

    Calculate Linux Calculate Linux 17 was launched back at the very end of last year in KDE and MATE editions, You can check Calculate Linux 17 Released.Now it is time to taste the new flavour, Cinnamon.
    Calculate Linux Team has announced the release of Calculate Linux 17 Cinnamon.

    Well, Calculate Linux Desktop Cinnamon(CLDC) must be having key and basic features and packages just like other DE flavoured Calculate Linux variants.Apart from that CLDC is released with Cinnamon 3.2.7.Other than that Firefox, RythomBox, Gimp, Pidgin, Totem and many more packages are updated and pre-installed in CLDC.

  • [Slackware] Chromium 56, LibreOffice 5.2.5

    I had rebuilt the libreoffice-5.2.4 packages for Slackware -current last week, because library updates in Slackware had broken the spreadsheet application ‘localc‘. And voila… not long afterwards the Document Foundation blog announced 5.2.5: “all users are invited to update to LibreOffice 5.2.5 from LibreOffice 5.1.6 or previous versions“. Today on the first of february, we can even witness the 5.3 release.

  • Fedora 25 Using GLVND For Mesa Has Been Causing Headaches

    The decision to switch Mesa to enabling GLVND support in Fedora 25 as a post-release change has been causing headaches for some users.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • CoreOS Drives Container Management Forward with Tectonic 1.5

    CoreOS is updating its flagship Tectonic platform with the new Tectonic 1.5 release, officially announced on Jan. 31. The new platform benefits from improvements in Kubernetes as well as innovations purpose-built by CoreOS.

  • Mesa 13.0.4 Released with RadeonSI and Intel ANV Vulkan Driver Improvements

    Collabora's Emil Velikov is announcing today the immediate availability of the fourth maintenance update to the latest Mesa 13 stable series of the open-source graphics driver stack for Linux-based operating systems.

  • openSUSE Cloud Images are Ripe for Users

    Cloud images for openSUSE Leap 42.2 are now available for Amazon Web Services (AWS EC2), Azure, Google Compute Engine and more cloud providers.

    Last week, openSUSE Leap 42.2 cloud image became available in the AWS Marketplace and within the past few weeks cloud images for Azure, Google Compute Engine and OpenStack also became available.

  • My free software activities, January 2017

    The debmans package I had so lovingly worked on last month is now officially abandoned. It turns out that another developer, Michael Stapelberg wrote his own implementation from scratch, called debiman.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Vulkan Slides Now Available From Khronos' Vancouver Event

    Yesterday The Khronos Group hosted a one-day workshop in Vancouver, Canada with all things Vulkan.

  • Handling all those mail notifications from the bug tracker
  • OPNsense 17.1 Released, Based On FreeBSD 11

    OPNsense 17.1 is now available as the newest release of this network-focused FreeBSD-based operating system forked from pfSense.

    It's now been two years since the first official release of OPNsense and to celebrate they have out a big update. OPNsense 17.1 re-bases to using FreeBSD 11.0, there's now a SSH remote installer, new language support, more hardening features used from HardenedBSD, new plugins, integrated authentication via PAM, and many other improvements. Some of the new plug-ins include FTP Proxy, Tinc VPN, and Let's Encrypt support.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Finding an Alternative to Mac OS X — Part 2 - Adventures with Linux

    This is the second in my series on finding an alternative to Mac OS X. Part 1 was about evaluating 13 alternative operating systems and then choosing one to use full time. The selected OS was elementary OS. The motivation for this change is to get access to better hardware since Apple is neglecting the Mac lineup.

    If video is more your style I gave a short (10 min) talk at work on my adventures with Linux that covers the core content of this post.

  • New Office 365 subscriptions for consumers plunged 62% in 2016

    Four years after the introduction of Office 365 for consumers, Microsoft last week said subscriptions to the productivity software had reached nearly 25 million.

    Subscribers, however, were harder to find last year than in 2015, according to the numbers Microsoft reported: Additions to Office 365's rolls were down 62% in 2016 compared to the year before.

    During an earnings call with Wall Street analysts last week, CEO Satya Nadella touted revenue increases for the Office products aimed at consumers -- which include Office 365 -- and of the latter said that the company had, "continued to see an increase in ... subscriber base."

    That it did.

  • Oracle effectively doubles licence fees to run its stuff in AWS

    That's changed: Oracle's new cloud licensing policy [PDF] says an AWS vCPU is now treated as a full core if hyperthreading is not enabled. A user renting two AWS vCPUS therefore needs to pay full freight for both, effectively doubling the number of Oracle licences required to run Big Red inside AWS. And therefore doubling the cost as well.

  • SoftMaker's FlexiPDF
  • Calamares 3.0 Gets First Point Release to Improve SDDM Autologin Config Handling
  • Best Linux Distro: Final Round of Voting Has Begun

    Arch Linux wins the qualifying round for the second year, followed by Linux Mint. In addition, eight distros qualified by write-in votes to be included in our final round. Now it’s time to get out the vote in the all-important final round to determine the Best Linux Distro according to our readers.

Linux Foundation Executive Director's Statement on Immigration Ban

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Misc

The Linux operating system underlies nearly every piece of technology in modern life, from phones to satellites to web searches to your car. For the Linux Foundation, openness is both a part of our core principles and also a matter of practicality. Linux, the largest cooperatively developed software project in history, is created by thousands of people from around the world and made available to anyone to use for free. The Linux Foundation also hosts dozens of other open source projects covering security, networking, cloud, automotive, blockchain and other areas. Last year, the Linux Foundation hosted over 20,000 people from 85 countries at more than 150 events. Open source is a fundamentally global activity but America has always served as the hub for innovation and collaboration. Linux’s creator, Linux Foundation Fellow Linus Torvalds, immigrated to America from Finland and became a citizen. The Administration's policy on immigration restrictions is antithetical to the values of openness and community that have enabled open source to succeed. I oppose the immigration ban.

Read more

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • BlackArch 2017.01.28 released with new tools

    In the end of last year, BlackArch team is tremendously working to bring new tool set and updates to their distro.Like recently the release of BlackArch Linux 2016.12.29 and 2016.12.20 brought hundreds of new tools, new installer and updated list of packages and features.

  • MyGica T230C hacking

    As DVB-T(1) is phased out in Germany soon, I got me a new DVB-T2 stick. The MyGica T230 is supported under Linux, and has a quite low price (~20€).

  • The Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Rating Lowered to Buy at Vetr Inc.
  • Almost a month with Fedora...

    I installed Fedora 25 Workstation (KDE spin) almost a month ago, as a desperate attempt to get my all-in-one Epson XP 231 printer working.

    The experiment ended with the printer/scanner working on OpenMandriva Lx 3.1, PCLinuxOS and, later, on Mageia 5.1. Oddly, although I could scan without any problems on Fedora, the printer was not operational.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • `Dash To Panel` Is A Cool Icon Taskbar For GNOME Shell

    Dash to Panel is a fairly new GNOME Shell extension that moves the dash into the top bar, to achieve a single panel (combined app launchers and system tray) design similar to that of KDE Plasma or Windows 7+.

  • Plasma 5_17.01 for Slackware

    My previous post concerned itself with the question: what do I spend my time on? Keeping Plasma 5 working on Slackware 14.2 and -current, and for 32bit as well as 64bit architectures, is simply too time-consuming for a monthly release. I asked for your opinion and I was glad for all the feedback I have received. Predominantly, people are using 64bit Slackware and I saw both the stable 14.2 and the -current development tree mentioned. It looks like a small minority of people is running Plasma 5 on 32bit Slackware – not my target of choice but everyone has his or her own reasons and I am not here to doubt those.

  • Germany and Italy to cooperate on standardisation

    The governments of Italy and Germany will intensify their cooperation on ICT standardisation, the two agreed on 18 January at a conference in Berlin. The countries want to advance the digital single market and set the pace for other European countries, announced the German government.

  • VK9 - Direct3D-Over-Vulkan - Reaches New Milestones
  • Oracle Switching Solaris To A Continuous Delivery Model

    Last week talk of Solaris heated up again with Solaris 12 being removed from the Oracle road-map, after rumors of Oracle canning Solaris occurred in early December, meanwhile there are also more layoffs happening at Oracle. Oracle finally issued a blog post this week with a bit more clarification on the matter.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Plain Text Productivity Redux

    On Ubuntu, I can use Meld for this process; on OS X, I can use Kaleidoscope. Yes, it will take a couple of passes to converge, but the process is super-quick and quite easy. I haven’t found a comparison/merge tool for iOS or Android yet, but I do have an iOS text editor (Editorial) that supports the TaskPaper format (as well as Markdown). Given that it’s very likely I’d only need to use a mobile device when my primary laptop would be offline, I think I can get away with just editing the primary laptop text file from my mobile device. I haven’t tested that part yet, so some additional fine-tuning may be necessary.

  • Pink Slips From Microsoft and Oracle

    In what appears to be little more than some light housekeeping, this week Microsoft will be saying goodbye to about 700 employees. This is a routine move, and about the only reason this is getting any attention is...well, Microsoft and jobs. A little more serious are layoffs at Oracle. In both cases, however, the number of jobs being lost amounts to little more than a drop in the bucket for these two tech giants. Of course, that's little consolation if you're one of the people getting sacked.

    The layoffs at Microsoft are part of a plan announced in June to cut 2,850 jobs by the end of this fiscal year. According to Business Insider, this isn't a cost cutting measure, but an attempt "to update skills in various units" -- a pruning, in other words. Most of the scheduled cuts have already taken place.

  • IBM Wants to be “Red Hat” of Deep Learning

    IBM today announced the addition of TensorFlow and Chainer deep learning frameworks to its PowerAI suite of deep learning tools, which already includes popular offerings such as Caffe, Theano, and Torch. It’s another step in IBM efforts to lay claim to leadership in the nascent deep learning market. Offering supported distributions of popular frameworks, said Sumit Gupta, IBM vice president, High Performance Computing and Analytics, is a natural next step in expanding and commercializing deep learning use.

  • Learn Kubernetes Container Management In New Linux Foundation Course
  • The Linux Foundation welcomes Hitachi as a platinum member
  • Mainline Explicit Fencing – part 3

    In the last two articles we talked about how Explicit Fencing can help the graphics pipeline in general and what happened on the effort to upstream the Android Sync Framework. Now on the third post of this series we will go through the Explicit Fencing implementation on DRM and other elements of the graphics stack.

  • AMDGPU-PRO 16.60 released for Linux, adds support for even more cards including GCN 1.0

    AMDGPU-PRO 16.60 is now officially available for AMD GPU owners and it adds support for even more cards including GCN 1.0.

    It might not cover the whole of GCN 1.0, as their generations and naming schemes are mixed in together. Some cards in the same series are from different generations, for example. Cards like the 7900 series still aren't listed.

  • GNOME's Mutter Rolls Out New Monitor Configuration System

    GNOME developer Jonas Ådahl has begun landing his work on a new monitor configuration system in Mutter for the GNOME 3.24 desktop release.

    Of this new monitor configuration system, Jonas explained in this tracker bug, "moving all low level monitor logic (i.e. CRTC/connector/... things into mutter, hiding it behind a higher level configuration API). While the current API simply provides a getter and a setter for all KMS like state, the new will be placed a layer above, with a set of 'monitors' that can be placed in 'logical monitors'. One will be able to rotate a logical monitor, set a scale, place multiple monitors inside one (i.e. mirroring)."

  • Linux Mint releases BETA versions of refreshed Debian-based LMDE 2 'Betsy' ISO images

    Linux Mint is widely known as an Ubuntu-based operating system, but that isn't entirely true. Yes, the main version is based on Canonical's distro, but one version, LMDE, is instead based on Debian. In fact, "LMDE" stands for Linux Mint Debian Edition. Of course, Ubuntu is based on Debian which makes the entire thing even more confusing for users, but I digress.

    Today, the Linux Mint Team releases refreshed BETA versions of the LMDE 2 "Betsy" ISO images. What does this mean? There have been many updates since the last version of the ISO was released in 2015, meaning that new installs were very outdated and needed many updates. The Linux Mint team is packaging all of those updates into the ISO so that it is more modern for those doing a fresh install.

  • OpenWRT Backfire on WRT54GL signal strength

    Because I wanted my home router to use at least decently supported software that provides complete out-of-the-box support for native IPv6, I recently got around upgrading my WRT54GL's firmware from White Russian to Backfire, which is the most recent OpenWRT release that fits the hardware's limited amount of flash memory.

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