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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Exploding the Linux Container Host

    Ben Corrie discusses Project Bonneville, how to create a shared Linux kernel for privileged containers, running containers without Linux, and VMware's dynamic resource constraints of a container host.

  • GNOME Content Apps Hackfest

    From December the 2nd to the 4th, a dozen of GNOME Hackers and LibreOffice Hackers joined forces in Medialab Prado, Madrid, to hack on our content apps.

    During these three days we had important discussions about the future of these apps. Topics such as: sharing resources between apps, planning how the Share of content is going to be done in the future, new designs and development plans for each app, and bugfixes.

  • Getting Qt 5 right in your application

    I’m sure many of you already read about Clazy. For those who didn’t, it’s a quite convenient tool for checking your code and making sure you’re getting Qt’s API right. There’s some non-trivial quirks here and there that aren’t very important but once polished can push your system considerably, especially on those cases that are ran repeatedly.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 Screenshot Tour
  • Debian Fun in November 2015
  • A few weekend security updates
  • D-Link DCS-2630L Full-HD 180-Degree WiFi Camera Review

    The D-Link DCS-2630L is an indoor security camera which features full high definition video, responsive recording, 2-way audio, night vision, 802.11ac WiFi connectivity and the company's first 180-degree Ultra-Wide view, delivering the widest angle lens available on a consumer surveillance camera.

today's leftovers

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  • Does Ubuntu stand Windows 10 and OSX?

    I have to say I use Ubuntu less these days, but I still love Linux and Ubuntu in particular and I would love to install the next version and see a light, modern UI, it would truly kick some asses!

  • The Oncoming Train of Enterprise Container Deployments

    As many of you know, adoption of containers has skyrocketed over the last year or two. Thus far, containers have been used mostly by early adopters, yet over the next several years we can expect widespread enterprise adoption. In fact, I expect the rate of adoption to exceed that of cloud (IaaS services), or virtualization before that. While it took enterprises perhaps a decade to fully plan and implement their virtualization initiatives, we can expect many enterprises to have production container deployments within three to five years. I fear that many of these implementations will have serious problems. Worse still, container technologies, when misused, inherently force us to own bad solutions for far longer.

  • Geek News Radio

    Geek News Radio will be a new show from Sixgun Productions, who, in the past, have brought you Linux Outlaws. Unlike that show, GNR won’t focus on a relatively narrow topic like Linux and open source software but will instead cover anything remotely geeky that the hosts want to talk about. Despite the name — yes, it’s an obvious Fallout reference — we expect this will be less of a news show and rather have the feel of a few friends shooting the shit over a beer in the pub. Think of it as going back to the very basics of LO, the early years before we started with all the interviews and segments and recurring topics.

  • man-pages-4.03 is released

    I've released man-pages-4.03. The release tarball is available on The browsable online pages can be found on The Git repository for man-pages is available on

  • ASoC Support Still Being Worked On For AMD APUs

    Alex Deucher on Friday sent out the latest patches for implementing ASoC support for AMD APUs. These patches provide i2s audio support via a new driver and integrates with the AMDGPU DRM.

  • [Solus Project] Daily ISO 0.201549.3.0 Released

    The Solus Project is happy to announce the release of a new Daily ISO, 0.201549.3.0.

  • Pentoo 2015.0 RC4.6 Has Been Released With A Brand New Installer

    Pentoo 2015.0 RC4.6 is a free and open-source Linux system based on the good old Gentoo Linux, ideal for network engineers and hackers.

    Among others, Pentoo 2015.0 RC4.6 has received a new installer, tested by the team in real-life scenarios, usability improvements have been implemented and a lot of bugs have been squashed as well.

    While this is only a pre-release system, the Pentoo team is prepping for a major release, which should get interesting new features and tools.

  • Oracle Linux 7.2 Screenshot Tour
  • Reproducible Builds World Summit

    This week, I was attending the first Reproducible Builds World Summit in Athens. A while ago, I have fixed some reproducibility bugs in the Haskell compiler GHC (parts of #4012), and that got me a ticket to this fully sponsored and nicely organised event.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 “Rosa” Cinnamon released!
  • Ubuntu 16.04 Has Received Kernel 4.3 On The Master-Next Branch, Kernel 4.4 RC3 Is Also Tracked On The Unstable Channel
  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-8.5 Confirmed, But The Developers Need Some Extra Time

    Łukasz Zemczak, one of the Ubuntu Touch developers has announced that they have to update a lot of packages and so, the development takes more time.

  • Yet Another Ubuntu Touch Port For LG Optimus G Has Been Created

today's leftovers

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  • The Other New Budget Laptop For Linux Testing
  • Podcast Season 3 Episode 21
  • December 2015 Issue of Linux Journal

    Anyone who's active in the Linux community knows that while we love open source and we swear by the kernel, the real power of Linux is the people making up the community. Whether it's folks using Linux in a server room, people contributing code or documentation to a project in their spare time, or even geeks putting Linux stickers on their laptops, Linux is about people. This month, Brian Conner has a great interview with Jeremy Garcia, the founder of If there's a better example of a healthy and interactive Linux community, you'll be hard pressed to find it. If you want to know the history of LinuxQuestions, find out more about the man behind it, or even what the future holds, you should check out the interview. Jeremy is as cool as you'd expect him to be!

  • Linux Foundation offers OpenStack admin course
  • Minutes of the Board Meeting of December, 1st, 2015
  • Q4OS 1.4.4 Screenshot Tour
  • Arch Linux on your Android phone

    In this tutorial I will show you one of methods how to install Arch linux together with your android system on your phone.
    This method WILL NOT REPLACE your current android system and is safe to use for everybody. It uses independent file which is mounted and you are chrooted to this system. After you can connect via SSH, VNC directly from your phone, PC …

Can We Save Wireless from Regulators?

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Linux was born and grew within an ecosystem of norms, not laws. Those norms were those of programming (C), operating systems (*NIX), command shells (bash, etc.), e-mail (SMTP, etc.) licenses (GPL, etc.) and Internet protocols (TCP/IP and the rest).

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Education in crisis

    Today it is no longer sufficient to cover Microsoft and Cisco certifications only. A well-prepared IT professional needs to know about Linux too. Linux is the power behind the cloud, open source and the Internet of things.

  • Windows 10 Accurate Linux Theme Released for Almost All Major Desktops

    It took the Linux community a while, but they finally managed to put together a very good Windows 10 theme that works on most of the famous desktop environment.

  • Gammu 1.36.7

    Yesterday, Gammu 1.36.7 has been released.

  • gtrends 1.3.0 now on CRAN: Google Trends in R

    Sometime earlier last year, I started to help Philippe Massicotte with his gtrendsR package---which was then still "hiding" in relatively obscurity on BitBucket. I was able to assist with a few things related to internal data handling as well as package setup and package builds--but the package is really largely Philippe's. But then we both got busy, and it wasn't until this summer at the excellent useR! 2015 conference that we met and concluded that we really should finish the package. And we both remained busy...

  • Gigabyte GA-H110M-A: A Sub-$60 Intel Skylake Motherboard
  • AMD A10-8700P "Carrizo" Linux Laptop Testing

    The first of two laptops ordered so far is the Toshiba Satellite L55D-C5269. For $449 USD, this laptop provides a 15.6-inch display, AMD A10-8700P APU, 8GB of DDR3L memory, and 1TB SATA HDD. The most interesting part of that for the forthcoming tests is the A10-8700P -- a Carrizo APU. The A10-8700P is a Carrizo APU with two Excavator CPU modules and Radeon R7 graphics with six compute cores.

  • Mir Gains EGL_KHR_fence_sync Support To Fix Graphics Corruption
  • AMD Crimson Driver Downgrades Performance on Linux
  • New Release: 0 A.D. Alpha 19 Syllepsis

    Wildfire Games, an international group of volunteer game developers, proudly announces the release of “0 A.D. Alpha 19 Syllepsis”, the nineteenth alpha version of 0 A.D., a free, open-source game of ancient warfare. This alpha features building and siege engine capture, a new pathfinder, visual replay and more!

  • Hatred, A highly violent game, is coming soon to Linux

    Hatred is one of the most controversial games that has been published on Steam, is also coming to the Linux platforms sometime in the near future as developers have managed to run it on Ubuntu successfully.

  • Qt testing packages for Fedora and Epel on copr

    We’re ( kde-sig ) trying slowly improve the quality of Fedora KDE and Qt, and is a lot of work. Some of the members even got to new jobs reducing the time to deal as “life” happens, which makes the work harder. Rex Dieter, our fearless ( and reasonable ) leader do a fantastic 100 people work, but still, we have enough to 100+n persons. So anything that can reduce the test time and the burden on the process are a necessary solution.

    Some can arg that rawhide is a test place, and they are right, but is for a devel future, not for a soon to be stable set of packages. And we’re hardly see people using rawhide on production aside us in some very very very restricted cases and most of all, in virtual machines, not bare metal.

    Then we can go to the -testing repo, which leads to Fedora buildsystem, that not helps much as every new package submitted need rely of someone say’s ok to testing stage or worst, wait minimum 7 days until reach the servers.

    And is not testing per se, as if we wait for 7 days without anyone really tested the package and reach the stable with a bad version, so we’re be double screwed.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #12
  • Kwort 4.3 released

    New version of Kwort available, this one is 4.3. Get it while it's hot! Smile

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Receives Wireshark 2.0, Leap 42.1 Updates Machinery

    Just a few moments ago, November 27, the openSUSE Project, through Douglas DeMaio, announced the latest updates to the openSUSE Tumbleweed and openSUSE Leap 42.1 GNU/Linux operating systems.

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today's leftovers

  • Acer updates Chromebook 15 with 12-hour battery life -- $199 exclusively at Walmart
    Chromebooks are not for everyone, but for many home users, it is absolute perfection. If you live in the web browser -- as many people do nowadays -- laptops running Google's Linux-based Chrome OS are a godsend because they are maintenance free. No need for confusing OS upgrades or anti-virus software. It just works, and it works well. Since they can now run Android apps too, they could become a serious threat to Microsoft and Windows 10. One of the most attractive aspects of Chromebooks is price -- they are often quite affordable. Today, Acer refreshes its 15.6 inch Chromebook 15 with a mind-boggling 12 hours of battery life. Best of all? It starts at $199. Yes, this model will get Android app support in a future update too.
  • Of Life, Linux and Karma Angels
    Angel filed appeal after appeal only to be denied on every attempt. Texas is an "at will" employment state so being terminated for cause can mean anything. Over the next few weeks, Angel became more and more fearful of losing her house, as she had just purchased it a year before. On top of that, her HP desktop had taken a nose dive into severe brokeness and that made it extra difficult for her to look for work. I put together a decent desktop for her and installed it that day, and was a Linux computer. Angel didn't have even the slightest problem with the new machine, and she wasn't particularly good at using one. So, let's put another slash in the falsehood that Linux is too hard for the everyday user. Most of them anyway. YMMV. To her glee, the OS picked up and configured her Epson all in one without her lifting a finger to do so. She almost clapped for happiness, stating that in Windows, installing that printer had been a nightmare, even with the included driver CD. And just to pinpoint the time frame for you, it was the summer of 2006.
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided to launch on Linux in November, Mac version delayed
    Feral Entertainment has announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will be launching on Linux in November. Feral Interactive is currently working on the Linux port of the game. In September the game development studio announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided would make its way to two additional platforms: Linux and Mac. The Linux version of the game will most likely make use of OpenGL or Vulkan to power its graphics engine.
  • Mad Max: It Came From The Desert to Linux
    First of all, let me get one thing straight out of the way, so you know where I come from. I did not like the recent Mad Max movie. Like, not at all. Not that I mind the post apocalyptic theme. I used to like the older Mad Max’s just fine (probably the first one the best). The new one…meh. The Max character had virtually no back story (as thin as a sheet of paper) and he was just acting like a crazy person from beginning to end. The story’s premise was boring and just an excuse for endless and not so impressive action scenes. So there was nothing redeeming it. I know this is not the mainstream opinion of the movie (everyone apparently thought it was the best thing ever since sliced bread) so I can only attribute this phenomenon to either mass hysteria or simply a clear decrease in movie expectations. The Force Awakens‘ success, despite being a mediocre movie and certainly underwhelming compared to the original trilogy, certainly echoes the same trend. I guess you cannot beat nostalgia. Just tag a Millennium Falcon on and you get a free ride no matter how incoherent the story or the characters are.
  • Budgie Remix 16.10 Overview
  • I Switched To OpenSuse Tumbleweed :)
  • 50-day Moving Average Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At $76.67
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) – Is this large market cap stock undervalued?
  • Fedora 25 new features, Perl removed from Build Root
    Fedora is the fast-paced bleeding-edge distribution of Red Hat. Fedora 25 is the second release of 2016 the other being Fedora 24. Let’s discover what lies in the future of this popular Linux distribution especially among developers.
  • "dnf update" considered harmful
    Updating a Linux distribution has historically been done from the command line (using tools like Debian's apt-get, openSUSE's zypper, or Fedora's yum—or its successor dnf). A series of crashes during system updates on Fedora 24 led Adam Williamson to post a note to fedora-devel and other mailing lists warning people away from running "dnf update" within desktop environments. It turns out that doing so has never truly been supported—though it works the vast majority of the time. The discussion around Williamson's note, however, makes it clear that the command is commonly run that way and that at least some users are quite surprised (and unhappy) that it isn't a supported option.
  • Supporting UEFI secure boot in Debian
    The Debian project can be accused of many things, but jumping too quickly on leading-edge technology is not one of them. That can be seen in, among other things, the fact that there is still not a version of the distribution that supports the UEFI secure boot mechanism. But, as Ben Hutchings explained during his 2016 Kernel Recipes talk, such support is in the works, and it will be implemented in a uniquely Debian-like manner.
  • The Lenovo Yoga Book Is the Future of Laptops, But It's Missing an Operating System
    For this review I spent a week with the Android version of Lenovo’s slick new backflipping laptop. Guts-wise it’s identical to the Windows 10 variant. They both feature Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processors, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of on-device storage, and 1920 x 1200 resolution displays. The Android version starts at $500 and the Windows version starts at $550.
  • Another Broken Nexus 5
    In late 2013 I bought a Nexus 5 for my wife [1]. It’s a good phone and I generally have no complaints about the way it works. In the middle of 2016 I had to make a warranty claim when the original Nexus 5 stopped working [2]. Google’s warranty support was ok, the call-back was good but unfortunately there was some confusion which delayed replacement. Once the confusion about the IMEI was resolved the warranty replacement method was to bill my credit card for a replacement phone and reverse the charge if/when they got the original phone back and found it to have a defect covered by warranty. This policy meant that I got a new phone sooner as they didn’t need to get the old phone first. This is a huge benefit for defects that don’t make the phone unusable as you will never be without a phone. Also if the user determines that the breakage was their fault they can just refrain from sending in the old phone.

Key financial blockchain technology is open sourced

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Linux 4.9's Efficient BPF-based Profiler
    Linux 4.9 skips needing the file entirely, and its associated overheads. I wrote about this as a missing BPF feature in March. It is now done.
  • UBIFS Working On File Encryption Support
    Following EXT4 file-system encryption and F2FS per-file encryption support, the UBIFS file-system is also bringing in encryption support built off this fscrypto framework used by EXT4/F2FS. In making use of fscrypto, the UBIFS file-system encryption support is similar to the EXT4/F2FS implementations and supports not only encrypting the file contents but also the file name. In making use of this framework, it only took around one thousand lines of new code to make it happen from the kernel-side while the user-space changes for supporting UBIFS encryption are still baking. UBIFS for those out of the look is the Unsorted Block Image File-System that's built atop UBI and designed for raw flash memory media.
  • An important set of stable kernel updates
  • Linux Kernels 3.16.38, 3.12.66, 3.10.104, and 3.2.83 Patched Against "Dirty COW"
    We reported the other day that an ancient bug, which existed in the Linux kernel since 2005, was patched in several recent updates, namely Linux kernel 4.8.3, Linux kernel 4.7.9, and Linux kernel 4.4.26 LTS. One day later, the maintainers of other supported Linux kernel branches patched the bug, which is dubbed by researchers as "Dirty COW" and documented as CVE-2016-5195. As such, today we'd like to inform those of running GNU/Linux distributions powered by kernels from the Linux 3.16, 3.12, 3.10, and 3.2 series that new updates are available for their systems.
  • Linux users warned over serious vulnerability affecting many versions
  • MuQSS - The Multiple Queue Skiplist Scheduler v0.112
    It's getting close now to the point where it can replace BFS in -ck releases. Thanks to the many people testing and reporting back, some other misbehaviours were discovered and their associated fixes have been committed.
  • Linux Raid mdadm md0
    Linux Raid is the de-facto way for decades in the linux-world on how to create and use a software raid. RAID stands for: Redundant Array of Independent Disks. Some people use the I for inexpensive disks, I guess that works too!
  • On Linux kernel maintainer scalability
    LWN's traditional development statistics article for the 4.6 development cycle ended with a statement that the process was running smoothly and that there were no process scalability issues in sight. Wolfram Sang started his 2016 LinuxCon Europe talk by taking issue with that claim. He thinks that there are indeed scalability problems in the kernel's development process. A look at his argument is of interest, especially when contrasted with another recent talk on maintainer scalability.
  • First comparison of Vulkan API vs OpenGL ES API on ARM
  • Prime Indicator Plus Makes It Easy To Switch Between Nvidia And Intel Graphics (Nvidia Optimus)
    The original Prime Indicator hasn't been updated since February, 2015. André Brait forked the indicator (while also using code from the Linux Mint version), improving it with both new functionality and bug fixes, and the new app is called Prime Indicator Plus. Using the nvidia-prime package, Ubuntu users can switch between Intel and Nvidia graphics by using Nvidia Settings (under PRIME Profiles), which then requires restarting the session (logout/login) to apply the changes. Prime Indicator makes this easier, by allowing you to switch graphics from the indicator menu, including triggering the logout.
  • Features You Will Not Find In The Mesa 13.0 Release
    While Mesa 13.0 is coming along for release next month with exciting features like OpenGL 4.5 for Intel, unofficial GL 4.4/4.5 for RadeonSI/NVC0, and the addition of the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver, there is some functionality that sadly won't be found in this release. Below are some features/functionality not currently found in Mesa 13.0. Some of the mentioned items have patches floating on the mailing list that weren't merged in time while other items are more along the lines of pipe-dreams that would have been fun to see in Mesa for 2016.
  • Crucial MX300: Good Linux Performance, 525GB SSD For Only $120 USD

Leftovers: Software

  • i2pd 2.10 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses. I2P client is a software used for building and using anonymous I2P networks. Such networks are commonly used for anonymous peer-to-peer applications (filesharing, cryptocurrencies) and anonymous client-server applications (websites, instant messengers, chat-servers). I2P allows people from all around the world to communicate and share information without restrictions.
  • Pixeluvo Review | Photo Editor for Linux & Windows
    A review of Pixeluvo, a great photo editor available on Linux and Windows. Pixeluvo is not free or open source.
  • Blit, A Retrospective On My Largest Project Ever
    I’ve always been someone who’s liked art and programming. Especially combining the two. One of my favorite genres is pixel art, or sprites as they are also known. I’ve dabbled in making a few other art programs before, but nothing like this. Originally Blit supposed to be only a sprite animation tool that had a modern look and feel, but my ideas for it grew greater (*sigh* feature creep). There are many other sprinting tools out there like GrafX2, Aseprite, (and other 2D animation programs like TVPaint). I’m not saying that it’s wrong that they make their own GUI toolkit, but it feels kind of odd. I really wanted to bring these types of programs out of the days of the Amiga. After doing some initial research, I settled on using Qt.
  • An alert on the upcoming 7.51.0 release
    In two weeks time, on Wednesday November 2nd, we will release curl and libcurl 7.51.0 unless something earth shattering happens.
  • Desktop Gmail Client `WMail` 2.0.0 Stable Released
    WMail is a free, open source desktop client for Gmail and Google Inbox, available for Linux, Windows, and Mac.
  • SpaceView: Ubuntu File System Usage Indicator
  • FunYahoo++: New Yahoo Messenger Plugin For Pidgin / libpurple [PPA]
    Yahoo retired its old Messenger protocol in favor of a new one, breaking compatibility with third-party applications, such as Pidgin, Empathy, and so on. Eion Robb, the SkypeWeb and Hangouts developer, has created a replacement Yahoo prpl plugin, called FunYahoo++, that works with the new Yahoo Messenger protocol. Note that I tested the plugin with Pidgin, but it should work with other instant messaging applications that support libpurple, like BitlBee or Empathy.
  • GCC Lands Loop Splitting Optimization
    The latest GCC 7 development code has an optimization pass now for loop splitting.
  • GCC 7 To End Feature Development Next Month
    Friday's GCC 7 status report indicates the feature freeze is coming up in just a few weeks. Red Hat developer Jakub Jelinek wrote in the latest status report, "Trunk which will eventually become GCC 7 is still in Stage 1 but its end is near and we are planning to transition into Stage 3 starting Nov 13th end of day time zone of your choice. This means it is time to get things you want to have in GCC 7 finalized and reviewed. As usual there may be exceptions to late reviewed features but don't count on that. Likewise target specific features can sneak in during Stage 3 if maintainers ok them."
  • GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') released [stable]
    GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release.
  • GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset released
    GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset has been released !
  • guile-ncurses 2.0 released
    I am pleased to announce the release of guile-ncurses 2.0 guile-ncurses is a library for the creation of text user interfaces in the GNU Guile dialect of the Scheme programming language. It is a wrapper to the ncurses TUI library. It contains some basic text display and keyboard and mouse input functionality, as well as a menu widget and a form widget. It also has lower level terminfo and termios functionality.
  • Unifont 9.0.03 Released
    Unifont 9.0.03 is released. The main changes are the addition of the Pikto and Tonal ConScript Unicode Registry scripts.
  • PATHspider 1.0.0 released!
    In today’s Internet we see an increasing deployment of middleboxes. While middleboxes provide in-network functionality that is necessary to keep networks manageable and economically viable, any packet mangling — whether essential for the needed functionality or accidental as an unwanted side effect — makes it more and more difficult to deploy new protocols or extensions of existing protocols. For the evolution of the protocol stack, it is important to know which network impairments exist and potentially need to be worked around. While classical network measurement tools are often focused on absolute performance values, PATHspider performs A/B testing between two different protocols or different protocol extensions to perform controlled experiments of protocol-dependent connectivity problems as well as differential treatment.
  • The Domain Name System