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today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fifteen new devices from Technoethical now RYF-certified to respect your freedom

    "We are excited that Technoethical has brought out such an impressive collection of hardware whose associated software respects user freedom. RYF certification continues to gain speed and momentum, thanks to companies like them. Users now have more options than ever when it comes to hardware they can trust, and I'm looking forward to what Technoethical will do next, " said the FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

  • LinuxQuestions.org Turns Seventeen

    I'm proud to announce that over the weekend LQ turned 17! I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation and feedback. While there is always room for improvement, that LQ has remained a friendly and welcoming place for new Linux members despite its size is a testament to the community.

  • 2 New Linux Laptops Unveiled by Entroware

    Two powerful new Linux laptops have been announced by UK-based computer company Entroware.

    The Entroware Apollo is a 13.1-inch notebook made from aluminium, while the Entroware Hybris is a 17.3-inch desktop replacement goliath.

  • Vulkan 1.0.53 Released With New Extensions
  • Nvidia Releases Updated Linux Vulkan Driver with Support for New Extensions

    Nvidia released a new version of its Vulkan graphics driver for both GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows operating systems adding support for new Vulkan and OpenGL extensions, as well as various performance improvements and bug fixes.

    Nvidia 381.10.10 Linux and Nvidia 382.68 Windows Vulkan drivers are now available, and they come improved interoperability with the latest Vulkan API by adding support for the VK_EXT_blend_operation_advanced and VK_NV_framebuffer_mixed_samples extensions.

  • Progress report for period June 12th - June 25th

    During the coding period, I discovered that MetaDisplay, main GObject of Mutter had a lot of X11 specific fields, so I had to move them into something else, which we (mentors and myself) decided to call MetaX11Display. A lot of code had to be modified, and that had to be carefully approached, so nothing got broken in the process. The "coding" I had done was just moving stuff around, between files, adjusting for new structure fields, and so on. It was, I might say, a rather boring experience. But, someone had to do it, as it is a requisite for all of my future work. Note that even at the moment of writing, all of X11 specifics have not been ironed out. While trying to efficiently split MetaDisplay, I stumbled upon MetaScreen, a structure which previously used to contain reference to X Screen it was managing. The comments in the code pointed out that, while Mutter used to contain more than one X Screen, nowadays it manages only one. So, again, we realized that structure needs to be split somehow, since it contains (as expected) lot of X11 specifics, but also some code that can be used for Wayland environment. The decision was made to move the fields into MetaDisplay and MetaX11Display, depending in which environment it might be useful. Sadly, I did not get around to start disassembling the screen management code in this period. So, that's what my next adventure will be all about. All of the work that was done is available on my Github repository [1].

  • Distributions are becoming irrelevant: difference was our strength and our liability

    For someone that has spent the past thirteen years defining himself as a developer of a Linux distribution (whether I really am still a Gentoo Linux developer or not is up for debate I’m sure), having to write a title like this is obviously hard. But from the day I started working on open source software to now I have grown a lot, and I have realized I have been wrong about many things in the past.

    One thing that I realized recently is that nowadays, distributions lost the war. As the title of this post says, difference is our strength, but at the same time, it is also the seed of our ruin. Take distributions: Gentoo, Fedora, Debian, SuSE, Archlinux, Ubuntu. They all look and act differently, focusing on different target users, and because of this they differ significantly in which software they make available, which versions are made available, and how much effort is spent on testing, both the package itself and the system integration.

  • SUSE Expands Container Management and Deployment Capabilities

    Like most Linux vendors today, SUSE is keeping busy updating it portfolio to support the growing demand for container management and services. So far this month, SUSE has announced two different efforts to improve its container portfolio.

    On June 27, SUSE announced its SUSE Manager 3.1 update, which provides new capabilities for organizations to manage software across both container and cloud infrastructure. SUSE Manager has been part of the SUSE portfolio since 2011, when the company was still part of Novell.

    "SUSE Manager's new container management and compliance capabilities will enable customers to automate orchestration and provisioning of their container-based services while ensuring container compliance from the same tool they are already using to manage their Linux infrastructure," Mary Johnston Turner, research vice president for Enterprise System Management Software at IDC, said in a statement.

  • OECD: ‘Create incentives for reuse of open data’

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is urging Europe’s governments to create incentives for public sector organisations and others to use open data. A good way for governments to promote sharing and reuse of data, and to improve public administration, is the creation of data-driven eGovernment services, says Barbara Ubaldi, Head of Unit, Digital Government and Open Data at the OECD.

  • d2k17 Hackathon Report: Alexander Bluhm on Network Stack Improvements and more
  • Rust, C, and Binding

    Rust is designed to be interoperable with C interfaces. Currently it is not able to call C++ libraries directly.

  • Windows 10 Insiders can now get SUSE Linux distributions from the Store
  • What are the leading software platforms for NFV infrastructure?

    As service providers report a number of successful production deployments of network functions virtualization, it is important to consider the infrastructure beneath it all -- and the available options. The leading software platforms for NFV infrastructure are OpenStack and VMware's vCloud NFV. But service providers can choose from a number of OpenStack options, including sourcing from a supplier or open source internal development.

  • Stuck Stacks, the 7 year itch and the DevOps dilemma

    It is 7 years since OpenStack came into being...

  • Your Container Orchestration Needs: Kubernetes vs. Mesos vs. Docker Swarm

    If you’re going to use Mesos or Docker Swarm, it’s very easy to decide which version you can use, either the community supported version or the enterprise grade supported offering.

    For Kubernetes you have to decide which option or options is most likely the right one for your business, this could be somehow challenging, especially in some cases if you’re going to build a hybrid and federated environment, e.g. with OpenStack, AWS and OTC (Open Telekom Cloud).

  • Site Reliability Engineering for Cloud-Native Operations
  • Launched Just A Year Ago, Open-Source Scality S3 Server Gains Extraordinary Momentum As It Simplifies The Life Of Developers

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Manjaro Linux 17.0.2 Arch-based operating system is here with GNOME, KDE, and Xfce

    Many Linux snobs push the Arch operating system as the greatest thing since sliced bread. In fact, some members of the Arch community (not all of them) can be downright mean and unpleasant to non-users. Not using Arch? Ugh. Peasant! In reality, while Arch is a fine OS (stable and fast), it can be very hard to install and set up, and quite frankly, often not worth the hassle. People have lives to live, and sometimes it is easy to forget that an operating system and associated computer are tools -- not a religion.

  • [Older] Friends, syslog-ng, Package Hub, ARM: openSUSE conference 2017

    Being a long-time openSUSE user, I visit the openSUSE conference not only to present on one of its components – syslog-ng – but also to meet friends and learn about new technologies and the plans for the upcoming year. Some talks, like those about Package Hub, were very interesting and important also from a syslog-ng perspective. Of course, I also joined a few talks for my personal interest, like the one on the new ARM devices supported by openSUSE.

  • UK Army to Use Red Hat OS, Automation Platform for Private Cloud Needs
  • Linux-ready PC/104 board runs on 6 to 7 Watts

    Win Enterprises announced a “MB-83310” PC/104 SBC with a Vortex DX3 SoC, GbE, Fast Ethernet, SATA, M.2, and a -20 to 70°C operating range.

  • [Older] The Turtlebot 3 has launched

    If you’re familiar with ROS (Robot Operating System), chances are you’re also familiar with the Turtlebot. The first version of the Turtlebot was created back in 2010 to serve as an inexpensive platform for learning ROS. This was followed in 2012 by the Turtlebot 2, which has since become the reference platform for learning ROS. We have a number of them here at Canonical, and we love them, although we have one issue with them: they’re just a tad too big. Taking them on a plane requires one to decide what one loves more, one’s belongings, or the Turtlebot, and to check the other.

  • Ubuntu ranked as 2nd most used IoT OS by Eclipse Foundation survey
  • Conjure-up dev summary: Week 25

    We recently switched over to using a bundled LXD and with that change came a few hiccups in deployments. We've been monitoring the error reports coming in and have made several fixes to improve that journey. If you are one of the ones unable to deploy spells please give this release another go and get in touch with us if you still run into problems.

  • We're looking for Ubuntu 17.10 wallpapers right now!

    Submissions will be handled via Flickr at the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase - Wallpapers group, and the submission window begins now and ends on July 3rd.

  • Atollic TrueSTUDIO, the leading commercial GNU/Eclipse IDE for ARM devices is now available for use on Linux workstations

    Atollic TrueSTUDIO IDE has rapidly become the preferred Eclipse™/GDB/GCC-based software development environment for developers working with ARM-based devices. The Linux hosting announcement is expected to widely increase the popularity of this tool.

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  • Security-Focused Purism Librem 13 & 15 Linux Laptops Go Mainstream with Qubes OS

    Purism, the social purpose corporation focused on designing and manufacturing privacy-conscious hardware and software products, announced the general availability of their security-focused Purism Librem 13 and 15 laptops.

    Until recently, both Purism Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops were available only as made-to-order, which means that those who wanted to purchase either model would have to order it first and then wait a few months until the device arrived. And now, the company finally managed to scale the production to hold inventory of the laptops.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • EV3DEV Lego Linux Updated

    The ev3dev Linux distribution got an update this month. The distribution targets the Lego EV3 which is a CPU Lego provides to drive their Mindstorm robots. The new release includes the most recent kernel and updates from Debian 8.8. It also contains tools needed for some Wi-Fi dongles and other updates.

  • Purism Librem 13 / 15 Laptops Hit GA Status

    Purism has announced their privacy-minded Coreboot-friendly Librem laptops have reached a general availability state.

    Purism will now be holding an inventory of their Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops for quicker shipping rather than everything being made-to-order.

    While this means users will no longer need to wait "months" when ordering a Librem 13/15 laptop, it still doesn't sound like it will be a very quick turnaround time. Their press release announcing the GA state says, "will now arrive in user’s hands a few weeks after purchase."

  • Linux is Running on Almost All of the Top 500 Supercomputers

    Linux is still running on more than 99% of the top 500 fastest supercomputers in the world. Same as last year, 498 out of top 500 supercomputers run Linux while remaining 2 run Unix.

  • Alioth moving toward pagure

    Since 2003, the Debian project has been running a server called Alioth to host source code version control systems. The server will hit the end of life of the Debian LTS release (Wheezy) next year; that deadline raised some questions regarding the plans for the server over the coming years. Naturally, that led to a discussion regarding possible replacements.

    In response, the current Alioth maintainer, Alexander Wirt, announced a sprint to migrate to pagure, a free-software "Git-centered forge" written in Python for the Fedora project, which LWN covered last year. Alioth currently runs FusionForge, previously known as GForge, which is the free-software fork of the SourceForge code base when that service closed its source in 2001. Alioth hosts source code repositories, mainly Git and Subversion (SVN) and, like other "forge" sites, also offers forums, issue trackers, and mailing list services. While other alternatives are still being evaluated, a consensus has emerged on a migration plan from FusionForage to a more modern and minimal platform based on pagure.

  • elementary + GitHub

    We’re excited to finally say that elementary has completed our move and now lives on GitHub! We’ve migrated over 70 repositories from Launchpad and bzr. So what does that really mean?

  • Ultimate Edition 5.4

    For those who like a visually enhanced form of Linux then Ultimate Edition 5.4 is for you. The graphics are extremely nice compared to other versions of Linux I have seen.

    With animated cursors and having a desktop called ‘Budgie’ the Operating System (OS) is visually pleasing.

  • Google Summer of Code day 16
  • Google Summer of Code day 17
  • Running virt-controller locally
  • How to install and use Monit on Ubuntu/Debian Linux server as process supervision tool
  • AMDGPU VRAM Improvements Could Help DiRT Rally, Dying Light

    A patch series posted on Friday could help games suffering from visible video memory pressure when using the AMDGPU DRM driver.

    Independent developer John Brooks has posted a set of nine patches for improving the driver's performance when limited CPU-visible video memory is under pressure.

  • Understanding Xwayland - Part 1 of 2

    In this week’s article for my ongoing Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project I planned on writing about the basic idea behind the project, but I reconsidered and decided to first give an overview on how Xwayland functions on a high-level and in the next week take a look at its inner workings in detail. The reason for that is, that there is not much Xwayland documentation available right now. So these two articles are meant to fill this void in order to give interested beginners a helping hand. And in two weeks I’ll catch up on explaining the project’s idea.

    [...]

    In the second part next week we’ll have a close look at the Xwayland code to see how Xwayland fills its role as an Xserver in regards to its X based clients and at the same time acts as a Wayland client when facing the Wayland compositor.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Effective Microservices Architecture with Event-Driven Design

    There’s no doubt, in the IT world, microservices are sexy. But just because you find something cool and attractive doesn’t mean it’s good for you. And it doesn’t mean you know how to use it properly.

  • Cloud Foundry Makes its Mark on the Enterprise

    "Proprietary will have to either get on board or be left in the dust."

  • Tumbleweed Review of the week 2017/25

    With the pace of Tumbleweed having resumed to ‘almost daily snapshots’ I will to the review again weekly instead of bi-weekly. It’s just easier to remember what big updates came in like this. This week I will cover the 6 snapshots 0616,0617,0618,0619,0620 and 0622 (again, 0622 just passed openQA and you will get it shortly on the mirror). There was also a 0621 tested, but discarded by openQA.

  • S10E16 – Enthusiastic Woozy Route

    It’s Season Ten Episode Sixteen of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Joey Sneddon are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • My Meetup Slides: Deploy and Manage Kubernetes Clusters on Ubuntu in the Oracle Cloud
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  • MinnowBoard 3 will offer Apollo Lake, triple M.2s, and Raspberry Pi expansion

    Minnowboard.org is prepping an open spec “MinnowBoard 3” SBC with a quad-core Apollo Lake, 4GB LPDDR4, 8GB eMMC, 3x M.2 sockets, and an RPi connector.

    The Intel-backed Minnowboard.org project has posted preliminary specs for an open-spec MinnowBoard 3 model to follow the recently shipped MinnowBoard Turbo Quad. Due to ship in the fall, the community-backed MinnowBoard 3 stands out with a 14nm Apollo Lake Atom, three M.2 sockets, and an “RPI” adapter. The only RPI we know of is Raspberry Pi, or more specifically, its much copied 40-pin expansion connector.

  • Open source social robot kit runs on Raspberry Pi and Arduino

    Thecorpora’s Scratch-ready “Q.bo One” robot is based on the RPi 3 and Arduino, and offers stereo cams, mics, a speaker, and visual and language recognition.

    In 2010, robotics developer Francisco Paz and his Barcelona-based Thecorpora startup introduced the first Qbo “Cue-be-oh” robot as an open source proof-of-concept and research project for exploring AI capabilities in multi-sensory, interactive robots. Now, after a preview in February at Mobile World Congress, Thecorpora has gone to Indiegogo to launch the first mass produced version of the social robot in partnership with Arrow.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Thinking of Buying the Chuwi Lapbook 12.3? Watch This Video First

    Are you looking for a Chuwi Lapbook 12.3 review to help you decide whether this cheap n’ cheerful Chinese laptop is for you? Well, look no further. A reader recently shared the following Chuwi 12.3 video review in the comments section.

  • China Is Driving To 5G And IoT Through Global Collaboration

    OPNFV is an initiative from the Linux Foundation that is working on the interoperability and integration of these virtual components, referred to as virtual network functions (VNFs), into a platform called network function virtualization (NFV).

  • OpenCL-Over-Vulkan Could Be Here Soon

    Khronos members have been working on code that could allow OpenCL code to be converted for execution by Vulkan drivers.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 3.02 Released with Updated Wayland and X.Org Infrastructures

    OpenMandriva announced today the release and immediate availability of the second point release to the stable OpenMandriva Lx 3 series of the open-source computer operating system.

    After more than six months in development, OpenMandriva Lx 3.02 is finally here to update users to the most recent GNU/Linux and Open Source technologies. The release comes with the latest KDE software, including KDE Plasma 5.9.5 desktop environment, KDE Applications 17.04 software suite, and KDE Frameworks 5.35.0.

  • QCT Collaborates with Red Hat to Deliver OpenStack Reference Architecture for Private and Hybrid Clouds

    QxStack with Red Hat OpenStack Platform combines Red Hat’s production-ready OpenStack offering, QxStack Auto-Deployment Tool, and QCT hardware to give enterprises and service providers a highly available OpenStack cloud that’s easy to deploy, manage and scale.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • My Kid Will Never Hack Linux

    And we need to adapt our thinking accordingly: we don't need free and open source software and copyleft so that the next generation can hack the Linux kernel; we need it so they can hack a flying car.

  • Linux Is Everywhere (The Shirt)
  • I made a T-Shirt called "Linux Is Everywhere", Thoughts?

    This shirt is to celebrate the proliferation of Linux throughout the computing world. Linux is so widely spread that it is very likely everyone uses it everyday, whether they know it or not. Linux powers about 80% of the Internet, 100% of Android devices (phones and tablets), 100% of Chromebooks, Chromecasts, Roku, and so much more.

  • [Older] Best Linux Distros for Developers

    One of the common questions I get asked is "which Linux distro is best for developers?" The short answer is that it depends. The long answer takes the form of this article. This piece will dive into the different Linux distros favored by developers. It'll also provide some insight as to why there is no automatic (simple) answer for why one developer chooses one distro over another.

    To provide a more accurate look at this entire situation, I’ll provide a break down of each consideration a developer might use to make their Linux distro selection. As you read please note: one must first start off with the right development applications, without these selecting a distro is meaningless.

  • MakuluLinux Flash Teaser & Release Date !

    You've been waiting, and We've been busy, Now see whats coming to you Real Soon ...

  • Security-Oriented Alpine Linux 3.6.2 OS Adds Linux Kernel 4.9.32 and Tor 0.3.0.8

    Alpine Linux, the security-oriented, independently-developed, and lightweight GNU/Linux distribution based on musl libc and BusyBox, was updated today to version 3.6.2.

    Alpine Linux 3.6.2 comes only two weeks after the release of the first maintenance update in the 3.6 stable series of the operating system, and it looks like it upgrades the kernel packages to the upstream Linux 4.9.32 LTS kernel. It also includes Tor 0.3.0.8 and Mozilla Firefox 52.2.0 ESR.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Position Raised by State of Wisconsin Investment Board
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Sold by Asset Management One Co. Ltd.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ditching Linux For Windows After WannaCry Is Too Risky For Munich, Green Party Warns

    In a statement, the Green Party has said it would be very strange to make a switch from a stable and secure operating system to a platform which is a favorite choice of hackers.

  • Advantages and disadvantages of choosing Linux over Windows [Ed: laughable article if it can be called an article]
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 36

    We are still digesting all the great content and conversations from openSUSE Conference 2017, but the development machine never stops, so here we are with the report of our post-conference sprint.

  • [Tumbleweed] Review of the weeks 2017/23 & 24

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    It’s said that time flies when one is busy – so what does that mean in the context of Tumbleweed? We must be skipping entire periods. The last two weeks have seen 10 snapshots being published, which is a clear indication that our community IS busy bringing you all the nice updates you wish for. I will cover the snapshots 0602, 0604, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0609, 0610, 0612, 0613 and 0615. 0615 passed openQA and is currently in progress of syncing out, mirrors should deliver it shortly.

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GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday
    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.
  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today
    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer! Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!
  • Happy birthday, GNOME!
    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!
  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday
    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.