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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • MPV 0.25.0 Open-Source Video Player Supports DVB-T2, MacBook Pro's Touch Bar

    It's been more than two months since the MPlayer-based MPV open-source video player received an update, and the development team is proud to announce the immediate availability for download of MPV 0.25.0.

    MPV 0.25.0 is a major milestone and comes with significant changes, such as the fact that starting with this release, all future versions of the player will be tagged on the master branch. Also, this is the first release of MPV to drop support for Mac OS X 10.7 and earlier builds.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.5 Is the Last in the Series, KDE Plasma 5.10 Is Coming End of May

    As expected, today KDE announced the availability of the fifth maintenance update to the current stable, yet short-lived KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems, versioned 5.9.5.

    KDE Plasma 5.9.5 is here more than a month after the release of the KDE Plasma 5.9.4 update, which most probably many of you use on your favorite GNU/Linux distributions. But the time has come to update your installations to KDE Plasma 5.9.5, the last point release in the series, adding more than 60 improvements across various components.

  • What was Linux like ten years ago?

    Linux has improved by leaps and bounds over the last decade, and more and more people have come to appreciate its power and flexibility. But a redditor recently wondered what it was like to run Linux ten years ago, and he got some very interesting responses from Linux veterans.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 33

    It has been a long time since our last status update! The reason is the end of the previous sprint caught quite some of the YaST Team members on vacations and, when the vacation period was over, we were so anxious to jump into development to make YaST another little bit better that the blog post somehow fell behind.

    But it’s time to pay our (reporting) debts. So these are some of the highlights of the 33th development sprint that finished on April 11th.

  • StackIQ announces support for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, Raspberry Pi and NetApp Storage Arrays in major new release, Stacki 4.0
  • Red Hat repackages its application management tech into software containers

    A year after buying application connectivity startup 3scale Inc., Red Hat Inc. is making the technology that it obtained through the deal available in a new form geared toward tech-savvy firms.

    Unveiled on Thursday, Red Hat 3scale API Management – On Premise runs on the company’s OpenShift Container Platform and is designed to be deployed inside Docker instances. It’s an alternative to the original cloud version of 3scale for organizations that wish to keep their operations behind the firewall. The software should be particularly appealing to government agencies and firms in regulated industries, which often can’t move certain workloads off-premises due to security obligations.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Daily Build Downloads Now Available

    Ubuntu 17.10 daily build images are available to download.

  • This Script Can Make GNOME Shell Look like Windows, Mac, or Unity

    GNOME Shell’s stock experience is fairly vanilla, but with the right ingredients you can give it an entirely different flavour. GNOME Layout Manager is a new script in development that takes advantage of this malleability.

  • 96Boards Officially Launches The HiKey 960 ARM Board

    The 96Boards organization has announced the official launch and shipping of the HiKey 960.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenRA C&C Reimplementation Gets New Stable Release, Here Is What's New

    Oliver Brakmann from the OpenRA project, an open-source and cross-platform initiative to offer a reimplementation of the popular Command & Conquer games, announced the availability of a new stable release.

  • Pisi-Linux-2.0-Beta-KDE5
  • Arch-Based arkOS Linux Being Discontinued

    arkOS, the Arch-based Linux distribution focused on "securely self-hosting your online life" with aims to make it easy to deploy servers for web-based services, is being discontinued.

    ArkOS since 2012 had been working to make it trivial to deploy your own Linux web server, your own personal cloud (ownCloud), and making it easy for other services to be deployed while being done so securely and easily. You probably haven't heard of arkOS making the news in a while and sadly now it's making news again, but only because it's being discontinued by its lead developer.

  • SUSE Hack Week 15

    Back in February the fifteenth SUSE Hack Week took place. As always this was a week of free hacking, to learn, to innovate, to collaborate, and to have a lot of fun. I didn't have the full time, so I worked on a couple of small things and a few projects I maintain. I did want to summarize that, so here you go.

  • How To Use SD Card As Internal Storage On Android | Adoptable Storage On Android
  • Anbox - Android in a Box
  • Your CEO’s Obliviousness about Open Source is Endangering Your Business [Ed: Jeff Luszcz says nothing about the risk of proprietary components with back doors etc. and instead 'pulls a Black Duck']

    But what caused these issues? Itis what happens when an open source component is integrated into a commercial software product and violates its open source license, or when it contains a vulnerability that was previously unknown. As technology evolves, open source security and compliance risk are reaching a critical apex that if not addressed, will threaten the entire software supply chain.

  • Mentor tips Azure IoT support and Linux-driven self-driving tech [Ed: Azure is a patent trap with back doors]

    Mentor announced Azure Certified for IoT compliance for Mentor Embedded Linux, and unveiled a Linux-based “DRS360” self-driving car platform.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The Linux Migration: April 2017 Progress Report

    In December 2016, I kicked off a migration to Linux (from OS X) as my primary laptop OS. In the nearly 4 months since the initial progress report, I’ve published a series of articles providing updates on things like which Linux distribution I selected, how I’m handling running VMs on my Linux laptop, and integration with corporate collaboration systems (here, here, and here). I thought that these “along the way” posts would be sufficient to keep readers informed, but I’ve had a couple of requests in the last week about how the migration is going. This post will help answer that question by summarizing what’s happened so far.

    Let me start by saying that I am actively using a Linux-powered laptop as my primary laptop right now, and I have been doing so since early February. All the posts I’ve published so far have been updates of how things are going “in production,” so to speak. The following sections describe my current, active environment.

  • Galago Pro: Look Inside

    Look inside the Galago Pro and see how easy it is to upgrade!

  • Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan Continues Progressing
  • Nouveau 1.0.15 X.Org Driver Released With Pascal Support
  • Arch Linux running natively on Pixel C
  • openSUSE Conference 2017 Schedule Posted

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux PC builder System76 plans to design, manufacture its own hardware

    System76 is one of only a handful of PC vendors that exclusively sells computers with Linux-based software. Up until now, that’s meant the company has chosen hardware that it could guarantee would work well with custom firmware and the Ubuntu Linux operating system.

  • Opto 22 Fortifies Commitment to Open-source Technology by Joining The Linux Foundation

    Industrial automation manufacturer Opto 22 announces it has joined The Linux Foundation as a Silver Level member. As a Linux Foundation member, Opto 22 will help support the greatest shared technology resources in history, while also accelerating the company’s technology and innovation through open-source leadership and participation. In joining The Linux Foundation, Opto 22 hopes to spearhead the adoption of open-source technology in the industrial automation and process control industries, and accelerate the rollout of Industrial Internet of Things applications.

  • Indicator Bulletin – A Clipboard Manager for Searching and Formatting Text

    Yes, yes – there are already many clipboard managers in the Linux community but how many of them are posses a slick UI and are searchable? Today we bring you one such app to add to the number in your head.

    Indicator Bulletin is a clipboard manager applet through which you can intelligently search for (using regular expressions) and edit text you have saved to its clipboard.

    It was built for Ubuntu by Serg, who already has a handful of clipboard manager apps under his belt.

  • Copr <3 Modularity
  • Jonathan Blow's next game looks like it might support Linux

    Take this with a pinch of salt, since it's early days for his next game, but Jonathan Blow (Braid, The Witness) actually showed off his next game 'Jai Sokoban' running on Linux.

  • KDE Fans Launch Petition to Make Plasma Ubuntu’s Next Desktop

    A new petition is calling for Canonical to make KDE Plasma Ubuntu's next desktop, following news that the distro is to drop Unity in favour of GNOME.

  • Samba, Ceph, LightDM Update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

    Snapshots released the past two weeks of openSUSE Tumbleweed have slowed down a bit, but new software continues to be updated in the five snapshots that have been release since April 6.

  • Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F26 Alpha

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Kernel 4.11 Could Land on April 23 as Linus Torvalds Announces Seventh RC

    The Easter Bunny brought us another Release Candidate (RC) version of the upcoming Linux 4.11 kernel, as announced by Linus Torvalds on Sunday evening.

    Linux kernel 4.11 RC7 is here, as expected, one week after the previous Release Candidate build, and, according to Linus Torvalds' announcement, it could also be the last in the series, marking the end of the development cycle for Linux kernel 4.11, which could land as soon as next week if nothing surprising, unexpected happens.

  • Mesa 17.0.4 Launches with Better RadeonSI, r600 Drivers, Mesa 17.1 Gets First RC

    Collabora's Emil Velikov is proud to announce today, April 17, 2017, the release and general availability of the fourth maintenance update to the stable Mesa 17.0 3D Graphics Library for Linux-based operating systems.

    Coming a little over two weeks after the release of Mesa 17.0.3, which brought various improvements to both the Intel OpenGL and ANV Vulkan drivers, RadeonSI, Nouveau, Galleon, Freedreno, as well as Radeon RADV Vulkan drivers, the Mesa 17.0.4 update is here to implement a total of 29 changes, mostly for Intel i965.

  • Mesa Lands GLVND Support For EGL

    GLVND is the NVIDIA-led effort for the new "Linux OpenGL ABI" or basically the OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library to allow multiple OpenGL drivers to happily co-exist on the same system. Mesa's existing GLVND support has been limited to GLX while now there is EGL support.

  • Devil-Linux 1.8.0 Major Update Implements Google-Authenticator for PAM, HAProxy

    Devil-Linux developer Heiko Zuerker proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of a new major update of his GNU/Linux distribution targeted at routers and firewalls, Devil-Linux 1.8.0.

    Coming five years after the Devil-Linux 1.6.0 stable release, Devil-Linux 1.8.0 appears to be a major overhaul of the independently developed operating system, implementing the Google-Authenticator for PAM Pluggable Authentication Module) and the HAProxy high-performance TCP/HTTP load balancer.

  • Red Hat steps up its Kubernetes game with OpenShift Container 3.5

    Kubernetes, the open-source system for managing Docker and Rkt containers across private, public, and hybrid cloud environments, grows every more popular. So, it's no surprise that Red Hat, with its intention to become a cloud power, is embracing OpenShift Container Platform 3.5.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Technical Analysis: Support and Resistance on Stock Charts
  • Platform for Chris Lamb

    It has become a cliché to ask rhetorical questions about Debian's role in today's free software ecosystem. Is the project still relevant? Is it lacking focus? What does it stand for?

    Debian will face increasing challenges in the years ahead. We could easily see ourselves relegated to the "glue" underlying the next generation of containerised systems or IoT devices — whilst a success of sorts, we would find it increasingly harder to attract and retain developers. This will compound our perennial problems of manpower but also fail to increase the philosophical, technical and social diversity within our existing membership.

  • Freedom Penguin’s Unleaded – Ubuntu Unity Feedback
  • [Video] No Ubuntu Unity, No Linux Phones? #Geekoutdoors.com EP368

    Now that Ubuntu has officially stopped working on Unity as it's primary desktop environment, does that mean it's an end to Linux Phones?

  • Cyber crime: British Chambers of Commerce urges firms to ramp up defences after spate of hacks [iophk: "banning Windows finally?"]

    “Firms that don’t adopt the appropriate protections leave themselves open to tough penalties,” he said.

  • HTTPS Certificate Issuance Becomes More Secure Thanks to New CAA Standard

    Last week, the CA/Browser Forum voted to implement CAA mandatory checks before the issuance of new SSL/TLS certificates, as a measure to prevent the misissuance of HTTPS certificates.

    According to CA/Browser Forum ballot 187, 100% of all browser makers and 94% of all certificate authorities voted to implement CAA mandatory checks starting September 8, 2017.

Today is Hardware Freedom Day (and today's leftovers)

Filed under
Hardware
Misc
  • Happy Hardware Freedom Day 2017!

    And today is the day where we celebrate Free Hardware and the possibilities to build and design upon other people’s work or simply start something with the community in mind by ensuring projects can be shared and improved at will. In case you’ve missed our announcement the registration for Hardware Freedom Day will remain open for the month to come allowing you to celebrate at a later date, just make sure you specify the new date on your wiki page.

  • Apple’s MacBook Trouble is a Cautionary Tale

    The MacBook no longer holds the top spot in Laptop Mag’s annual ranking. In the magazine’s new ranking, MacBooks fall all the way to fifth place.

  • Leaked NSA Malware Threatens Windows Users Around the World

    The ShadowBrokers, an entity previously confirmed by The Intercept to have leaked authentic malware used by the NSA to attack computers around the world, today released another cache of what appears to be extremely potent (and previously unknown) software capable of breaking into systems running Windows. The software could give nearly anyone with sufficient technical knowledge the ability to wreak havoc on millions of Microsoft users.

  • EFF Director: WikiLeaks Move to Share CIA Hacking Tools with Tech Giants Could "Make Us All Safer"

    DN! talks with Electronic Frontier Foundation Executive Director Cindy Cohn about thousands of documents WikiLeaks published this week, dubbed "Vault 7," that describe CIA programs to hack into both Apple and Android cellphones, smart TVs and even cars. Some of the released documents describe tools to take over entire phones, allowing the CIA to then bypass encrypted messenger programs such as Signal, Telegram and WhatsApp. Other documents outline a CIA and British intelligence program called "Weeping Angel," through which the spy agency can hack into a Samsung smart television and turn it into a surveillance device that records audio conversations, even when it appears to be off. Other documents outline how the CIA has used the U.S. Consulate in Frankfurt, Germany, as a covert base to spy on Europe, the Middle East and Africa. "It’s extremely troubling that the CIA was keeping all of this information rather than giving it to the tech companies so that they could fix these problems and make us all safer," Cohn notes.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.