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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.2 is now available.

  • Containers: 3 big myths

    You’ll see the likes of Mesosphere, or Docker Swarm, say, ‘we can deploy ten thousand containers in like thirty seconds’ – and similar claims. Well, that’s a really synthetic test: these kinds of numbers are 100% hype. In the real world such a capacity is pretty much useless. No one cares about deploying ten thousands little apps that do literally nothing, that just go ‘hello world.’

    The tricky bit with containers is actually linking them together. When you start with static hosts, or even VMs, they don’t change very often, so you don’t realise how much interconnection there is between your different applications. When you destroy and recreate your applications in their entirety via containers, you discover that you actually have to recreate all that plumbing on the fly and automate that and make it more agile. That can catch you by surprise if you don’t know about it ahead of time.

  • GNOME 3.19.4 Released For A Fresh Look At The Work For GNOME 3.20
  • SUSE Survey Finds There Just Aren't Enough OpenStack Skills to Go Around

    There is brand new evidence that a lack of workers with OpenStack skills may be holding the cloud platform back, especially at enterprises. SUSE LLC’s survey on OpenStack adoption trends reports that over eighty percent of enterprises are either planning to, or have already, implemented OpenStack as a cloud computing solution within their organizations. That means the need and desire is there. However, more than half of all organizations that have tried to deploy OpenStack say they’ve failed to do so due to a lack of skills.

    Here is more on the findings, and our latest review of quick ways to pick up OpenStack skills.

  • Red Hat, Inc. Price Target Update

    The mean short term price target for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) has been established at $89.12 per share. The higher price target estimate is at $97 and the lower price target estimate is expected at $75 according to 17 Analyst. The stock price is expected to vary based on the estimate which is suggested by the standard deviation value of $6.46

  • Are you a Fedora Women? Then Let us Know!

    It’s no secret that female presence has always been there, but most of the times we don’t know due a lack of info. Several years ago a Wiki page started where the idea was to have a list of those Women who can provide advice and help to those new young contributors starting on our community.

  • Mini PC invasion: These radically tiny computers fit in the palm of your hand

    Computers have been shrinking for years, and the revolution has only accelerated in recent times. As chipmakers focus on creating processors that sip power without sacrificing performance, thermal concerns have largely been alleviated in modern CPUs. Because of that, today’s pint-sized PCs offer enough performance to play HD video and satisfy Office jockeys, the opposite of the janky, compromised experience of yesteryear’s microcomputers.

  • Linux malware: Second screen-grabbing Trojan surfaces in space of a week

    Researchers have found Linux malware that appears to target a particular brand of Bitcoin ATM but works "just fine" on Ubuntu.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Yelp Releases an Initialization System for Docker Containers

    Simple, clean, easy to install. Sounds elegant. Best of all, you can check it out for yourself. Yelp gave dumb-init its own page on GetHub. Dumb-init is one of a number of internally-build tools that the social recommendation service has released as open source.

  • KDEPIM KDE and opensource

    Once upon a time a program named Akregator.

    It was born in 2004.

    But it didn’t evolute during 6-7 years. It was a bad thing for an kdepim application.

  • GTK+ 3.19.7 Brings Kinetic Scrolling For Wayland & More

    GNOME developers have released the latest development version of the GTK+ tool-kit in the approach towards GNOME 3.20.

    Today's GTK+ 3.19.7 release makes use of the new Wayland DnD support that just landed today. In the Wayland scope GNOME 3.19.7 also adds support for kinetic scrolling. Details on the GTK+ kinetic scrolling can be found via this bug report.

  • openSUSE makes the Leap to the Public Cloud

    openSUSE Leap 42.1 is now available on Amazon EC2, Google Compute Engine, and Microsoft Azure. Leap has been available on EC2 & GCE since shortly after it release; the Azure release was delayed due to a qemu bug resulting in incorrectly formatted images. These images are maintained by SUSE’s Public Cloud Engineering Team. If you’d like to peek inside, they’re developed on Open Build Service (OBS), in the Cloud:Images project.

  • Independent Research Firm Names Red Hat a Leader Among Private Cloud Software Suites

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it has been named a leader in two Forrester research reports ranking private cloud software suites and hybrid cloud management solutions. “The Forrester Wave™: Private Cloud Software Suites, Q1 2016” and “The Forrester Wave™: Hybrid Cloud Management Solutions, Q1 2016” reports assessed vendors in terms of their current offerings, market presence, and strategy, and Red Hat was placed as a leader in both reports.

  • Key Stocks of the Day: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat Announces the Beta of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7

    The Red Hat JBoss Middleware Team at Red Hat, Inc. has proudly announced the release and general availability of the first Beta build of the upcoming Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 software suite.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2015.20160117-1 and biber 2.3-1

    About one month has passed and here is the usual updated of TeX Live packages for Debian, this time also with an update to biber to accompany the updated version of biblatex. Nothing spectacular here besides fixes for some broken links of fonts.

  • $65 hacker board runs 64-bit Linux on quad-core Atom

    The Linux- and Android-friendly “JaguarBoard” SBC, based on a 64-bit quad core Atom processor, has achieved 600 percent of its Kickstarter funding goal.

  • What you need to know about Tizen 2.4 OS upgrade for Samsung Z1

    Tizen 2.4 Operating System (OS) for the Samsung Z1 has been in beta testing since the end of September 2015. Since then there has been a huge user demand for the Operating system to mature and flourish into a final release.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Latest Manjaro Linux 15.12 Stable Update Adds New Configs for Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

    The Manjaro community, through project leader Philip Müller, proudly announced today, January 18, the general availability of the fourth stable update for the Manjaro Linux 15.12 (Capella) series of operating systems.

  • DevOps tool Ansible gets a major overhaul

    If you’re going to really make use of a cloud to its full potential, you need DevOps tools. And one of the best of these tools has just gotten a serious makeover: Ansible 2.0.

    This is the first major release of Ansible since Red Hat bought the company in October 2015.

    Ansible brings to the Red Hat‘s OpenStack-based OpenShift cloud an agent-less cloud management approach. Ansible is not, however, OpenStack specific. It can work with, to name but a few, VMware, Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure.

    Like most DevOps programs, e.g., Chef, Juju and Puppet, Ansible doesn’t require your IT crew to be coding samurai. It’s designed to make it easy to automate cloud deployment and configuration to rolling upgrades.

  • Pocket-sized Linux server doubles as a smartphone power pack

    iCracked’s “Ocean” is a tiny battery powered microserver and power pack that comes with Debian but also supports Android, Raspbian, and other Linux builds.

    You might call iCracked the “Uber” of the iOS device repair market. Founded in 2010, the company has since grown into a network over 4,000 “certified iTechs” located in a dozen countries, and claimed to be “the world’s largest on-demand repair and trade-in network for iOS devices.”

  • How Kubernetes is helping Docker blossom

    Kubernetes and Docker are the latest buzz words in the IT sector. Businesses and IT enthusiasts alike are clamoring to learn more about containerization.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Mycroft: Linux’s Own AI

    The future is artificially intelligent. We are already surrounded by devices that are continuously listening to every word that we speak. There is Siri, Google Now, Amazon Alexa, and Microsoft’s Cortana. The biggest problem with these AI “virtual assistants” is that users have no real control over them. They use closed source technologies to send every bit of information they collect from users back to their masters.

  • Three "Open Source" Investing Strategies to Start Using Today

    More and more tech companies are building their success by going "open source."

    By that, I mean they're using open-source tech platforms like Linux and Hadoop – which are free and open to the public to use – to write code, create cloud storage, and develop Big Data applications. With these platforms, they're saving money, running their business more efficiently… and raking in the profits.

    I thought of open-source platforms recently – on New Year's Eve.

  • Security Updates For Linux 4.5 Brings Improvements For Smack, EVM & TPM

    Linus Torvalds pulled in the security subsystem updates this weekend for the Linux 4.5 kernel.

    Security updates for Linux 4.5 include TPM/TPM2 enhancements for the Trusted Platform Module, Smack now supports file-receive process-based permission checking for sockets, and EVM has support for loading an x509 certificate from the kernel into the EVM trusted kernel keyring. There are also bug-fixes and other minor improvements as part of these security updates for Linux 4.5.

  • NVIDIA Publishes Nouveau Patches For Secure Boot, Unified Firmware Loading

    NVIDIA has released new patches today for helping the open-source Nouveau driver step towards properly supporting the GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell" graphics cards as well as better supporting Tegra.

  • Intel NUC Skylake NUC6i3SYK Linux Benchmarks

    These open-source benchmark results complement other recent Intel NUC Skylake Benchmarks On Linux and thanks to the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org they are all easily-reproducible and support side-by-side comparisons.

  • KDE Made Much Progress In 2015 Thanks To Student Developers With GSoC

    While Google's annual Summer of Code has been done for several months now, the KDE project published this weekend their final overview of all the progress that was made this past summer by these promising student developers.

    Among the work that came to KDE over the summer of 2015 thanks to GSoC was porting more software to KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5, a checker framework for KDevelop, Kdenlive improvements, handling of OpenStreetMap files within Marble, PDF tags/layers within Okular, a new configuration module for pointing devices, a GnuPGP-plugin for Kopete, and other improvements.

  • A brief 360° overview of my first board turn

    You’ve certainly noticed that I didn’t run for a second turn, after my first 2 years. This doesn’t mean the election time and the actual campaign are boring Smile

    If you are an openSUSE Member, we really want to have your vote, so go to Board Election Wiki and make your own opinion.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Karen Sandler: I’m Running for the Linux Foundation Board of Directors

    As we begin a new year, I’m super excited that Conservancy has almost reached our initial target of 750 Supporters (we’re just 4 Supporters away from this goal! If you haven’t signed up, you can push us past this first milestone!). We launched our Supporter program over a year ago and more recently, in November, we asked you all to become Supporters now so that Conservancy can survive. Conservancy is moving toward a funding model primarily from individuals rather than larger corporate sponsors. While we are about to reach our minimal target, we still have a long way to go to our final goal of 2,500 Supporters — which will allow us to continue all of Conservancy’s critical programs, including copyleft enforcement. Many individuals have come forward to donate, and we hope that many more of you do so too! I was really excited about the statement of support published last week by the GNOME Foundation, and in particular their point that enforcement is necessary and benefits GNOME and free software as a whole.

  • Get new users…
  • GNOME Devs Are Defining a Clear Set of Core Apps for the Desktop Environment

    We always bring our readers the latest news from the GNOME Project, and today we have some interesting story to share with you all, especially GNU/Linux operating system vendors.

  • Reproducible builds: week 38 in Stretch cycle
  • The Penguicon Lucas Tech Track

    So if you’re in Detroit on the weekend of 29 April-1 May, come by and see me bloviate about:

    PAM: You’re Doing It Wrong
    the ZFS File System
    Networking for Systems Administrators
    Encrypted Backups with Tarsnap
    BSD Operating Systems in 2016
    Senior Sysadmin Panel

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • What is the best mouse for Linux (and everything else)?
  • 2016 Has Been Off To A Great Start For Open-Source & Linux

    We are only half-way through January yet there's been so much exciting news already for open-source and Linux enthusiasts as well as when it comes to interesting computer hardware.

    Given the amount of news already in the first two weeks of the year, here's a look at some of the most popular content on Phoronix already for 2016. Thanks to the Consumer Electronics Show, more Vulkan news, AMDGPU details, the start of the Linux 4.5 kernel cycle, and more, it's been very busy so far.

  • A letter from Gabon to the GNU Health community

    Mr. Armand Mpassy-Nzoumbato has written this letter to the GNU Health community, that I proudly want share with all of you. It shows the importance of Free Software in real-life scenarios, delivering our motto : Freedom and Equity in Healthcare.

  • Fedora Meetup Pune - January 2016

    On 15th January 2016, we had our first Fedora meetup at Pune. The venue was earlier decided to be Red Hat office, Pune but due to unavailability of space the meetup was moved to my apartment.

today's leftovers (GNU/Linux)

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Misc
  • Ocean is a Smartphone-Sized Powerful Linux Server thats Runs on Battery

    Usually servers are large machines that take up huge amounts of space on the floor or lots of space in a rack. But no more, a new Node.js Linux server has launched by iCracked for developers who want to be able to write software for Internet of Things applications and other tasks that is very small. The server is called Ocean and it is about the size of a smartphone. The small size means that you can slip the server in your pocket and carry your work with you wherever you go.

  • Finding the Perfect Linux Laptop

    It looks like a fairly capable device - but, as with lots of products from Shenzen, it's hard to get a direct price quote for the exact Ubuntu model. It appears to be reasonably compatible with the latest version of Ubuntu - but there are a few tales of woe spread around the web.

  • [GIT PULL] f2fs updates for v4.5
  • Linux For Everyone! Goodwill Partnership Yields Exciting Scholarship To Teach You New Skills

    Adult students from underserved communities now have the unique opportunity to enroll in a new program launched by The Linux Foundation in partnership with Goodwill.

  • Brainstorming Further Cooling Improvements To The Linux Benchmarking Room
  • Cruising Altitudes...

    Breaking up in pieces, First I divided the data into parts. Each part is associated with corresponding page which is to be printed. From that I get number of pages which will be required and then actual printing took place in draw-page call. The understanding of GTK Print API helped me. Begin-print signal is the one which is emitted when user is done with page setup ,but before rendering starts. All the calculations done to divide the data and get a count of pages are ensured in this one. In draw-page, actual rendering takes place using Cairo.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #17
  • openSUSE Leap: LibVirt And NetworkManager

    I recently switched to Leap from 13.2. First time i have seen the next generation of kde and plasma. So far i like the experience. But i miss some stuff Sad. If some dev out there needs an idea for his next little plasma widget project please consider porting service monitor. That widget alone could bring me back to kde4 Smile.

  • The Fifth Alpha Version Of The Debian 9.0 Stretch Installer Has Been Released

    Cyril Brulebois, one of the Debian Installer developers has announced yesterday that Debian 9.0 Stretch Alpha 5 installer has been released, permitting the users to test Debian’s Testing system easily.

today's leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)