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Misc

OpenOffice, IBM, and Redmond buses

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Misc

On the streets of Redmond, Wash. -- aka the center of all evil in the known universe -- you can now find buses bedecked with OpenOffice and Sun ads.

French court rules in favor of private P2P use

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Misc

On the eve of France's Parliament returning to discuss the possibility of legalizing P2P via a compulsory or global license, the French judiciary has sent a message to deputies a day early, clearly siding with non-commercial users of P2P applications.

Richard Stallman on P2P

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Richard Stallman is the creator of the Free Software movement, the founder of the GNU project and the Free Software Foundation. He has written several programs used in almost all GNU/Linux distributions, such as the GNU C Compiler, the GNU Emacs editor and the GNU Debugger, amongst others. He wrote the GNU GPL, and is also currently co-authoring version 3 of the GPL. He also gave POSIX it's name, the term used to mean most UNIX-like operating systems today. We asked him for his opinions on File Sharing, DRM and some other subjects.

Torvalds says DRM isn't necessarily bad

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Misc

Provisions against digital rights management in a draft update to the General Public License could undermine computer security, Linus Torvalds said this week in e-mails reflecting the Linux leader's pragmatic philosophy.

The Producer Electronics Revolution, Part I

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Misc

For the last few years, the biggest show in town has been CES, the Consumer Electronics Show. It fills the whole Convention Center--the biggest one on Earth--plus the Sands and the Hilton and the Alexis Park. Several million square feet host more than 2,500 exhibits and 150,000 visitors. Doc's first report on CES. Several thumbs-down and one big thumbs-up on the keynotes.

Debian founder takes over LSB leadership

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The Free Standards Group (FSG), the non-profit group behind the Linux Standard Base (LSB), has announced that Debian Linux founder Ian Murdock will be its new CTO (chief technology officer) and will chair the LSB workgroup.

Getting your caffeine buzz started in the shower

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Misc
Humor

Ah, sweet, sweet caffeine. Whether your chosen delivery device is a Triple Red Eye from Starbucks or a liter of Mountain Dew, nothing beats the gentle jolt into full wakefulness provided by the humble C8H10N4O2 molecule. In a cruel twist of fate, some people are unable to brew a pot of coffee, a latte, or figure out how to open a can of Mountain Dew right after waking up, due to that very same lack of caffeine. What's a caffeine-loving geek to do?

Trusted Computing comes under attack

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Misc

Alan Cox, a lead Linux kernel developer and security architect, said that trusting computing has often been used to lock customers into buying a particular software and to prevent rival software makers from competing on that platform.

What's up with Novell's new licensing?

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Misc

You might have missed it, if you want to buy products from Novell's serious SUSE Linux line -- SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), Novell Linux Small Business Suite 9, and Open Enterprise Server -- you'll be paying less after March 1st.

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Android One: Let us fill you in on Google’s big game

India is now the world’s third largest Internet market and “on a bullet train to become the second”. But even when we become the second with around 300 million Internet users, India would still have over 75 per cent of the population that has no access to this so-called information superhighway. It is this chunk of population that will form the “next billion” which companies like Nokia, and now Google, has been talking about. And it is this next billion that Google thinks will line up to buy and good smartphone that is also affordable. Read more

Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support

A significant patch-set was published on Saturday night that implements the driver-independent bits of OpenGL 4's ARB_tessellation_shader extension inside Mesa. The tessellation support has been one of the big pieces missing from Mesa's OpenGL 4 implementation and fortunately it's getting close to mainline. Chris Forbes of Intel published fifty-six patches this weekend that implement the driver-independent portions of the extension inside Mesa. Of course, the driver portions still need to follow for it to be useful. Read more

Small Console Menu Utilities

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own. This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill. Read more