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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Kramden Institute bridges digital divide with refurbished computers

    Ken's love of programming eventually led to a job at Canonical, and then he learned about the Kramden Institute. "At first I was just excited about what they do for so many children," he says. "It's truly an amazing organization. After hearing about Kramden, I very quickly signed up to work a Wednesday work night, which was really a blast. Wednesday evening at Kramden is an event to remember. They are incredibly well organized and almost always have a full house. It's a community of folks that want to help these children; I just fit right in."

  • Why I use openSUSE over other distributions.

    The below is a response to a Facebook query on why we use openSUSE over Ubuntu. I was happy with how it turned out and thought it could prove helpful to a larger audience.

  • OMG, Ubuntu Tablet Could Be a Mobile Game Changer
  • Maru Is an Android OS on the Phone and Debian Linux When Connected to PC

    A new project named Maru promises to provide users with a full Android Lollipop experience on the phone and switch to a Debian Linux distro when connected to a monitor and peripherals.

    A phone that is powered by Android and magically transforms into a Linux desktop when connected to an external display has been tried before. It was called Ubuntu for Android, and it was one of Canonical's earliest attempts at some sort of convergence between the mobile and PC worlds.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Readers Say ‘No’ to Antivirus on Linux

    A few weeks back when Ken Starks wrote an anecdotal column on an experience with a false positive from Avast antivirus on GNU/Linux, we started thinking. We run antivirus on our LAMP servers with the intent of protecting poor suckers on Windows, but on our Linux desktops and laptops? Pretty much, no. Some of us had tried the open source ClamAV at one time or another, mainly out of curiosity, but none of us had stuck with it. To our knowledge, until Starks wrote his column none of us even knew anybody who had ever run proprietary AV on Linux boxes.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2016/4 & 5
  • Almost weekend again – what’s in store

    I updated my packages for calibre and chromium with new versions. I updated the set of “compat32” packages for a multilib setup on slackware64-current to match the Slackware packages contained in the new Slackware 14.2 Beta 2.

  • Slackware 14.2 Beta 2 Announced

    Good news for everyone. Slackware 14.2 is getting close to release as Pat now announced Slackware 14.2 Beta 2 on the latest changelog. This update also brings some security changes for all supported Slackware releases back to Slackware 13.0!!!

  • Make a $40 Linux or Android PC with this tiny new Raspberry Pi 2 rival

    If you want to build a powerful $40 Linux or Android PC with 4K video support, consider Hardkernel’s Odroid-C2 computer.

    The developer board is an uncased computer like the popular Raspberry Pi 2, which sells for $35. But South Korea-based Hardkernel claims Odroid-C2 has more horsepower than its popular rival and can be a desktop replacement.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenGL 4.5 Is Not The End Of The Road For OpenGL
  • Intel Starts Supporting The Quark X1000 SoC With Coreboot

    Well, this is interesting. The Intel Quark X1000 SoC now has very basic support within Coreboot.

    The Quark X1000 SoC has been available for more than two years already as a single-core 400MHz x86 processor designed for wearable devices and other tiny, low-power applications. The Intel Galileo developer board is one of the many public devices utilizing an X1000. Back in 2014 we shared some Quark X1000 Linux benchmarks and Intel Edison benchmarks for those interested.

  • Endless Is The Latest Company To Join GNOME's Advisory Board

    Endless Computer, the company designing Linux-powered computers -- and using a modified GNOME desktop -- for emerging markets, has joined the GNOME Advisory Board.

    Endless develops "computers designed for the entire world" with their Endless PC retailing for $189 USD and The Endless Mini for $79 USD. The Endless Mini is ARM-powered while the more expensive unit features an Intel Celeron CPU.

  • Incoming! Fleet Commander 0.7

    We’ve just released the 0.7 series which should be the first version that is somewhat stable to use (think of it as alpha) and as we speak is under review for inclusion with Fedora 24.

    For the last year I have been massaging the prototype we had at GUADEC in Strasbourg into a reliable product, and recently Oliver Gutierrez has joined the team to help with the web development affairs, I would like to summarize some of my work here so that you guys know what’s all about and what are the future plans.

  • Zorin OS 11 Core and Ultimate Editions Out Now for Windows Refugees - Screenshot Tour

    On February 3, the Zorin OS team was excited to announce the release and immediate availability for download of the Zorin OS 11 operating system, which is currently being distributed as Core and Ultimate editions.

  • Linux Lite 2.8 - Screencast and Screenshots
  • Linux Lite 2.8 Released With Linux Kernel 3.19, BTRFS Support And More

    Linux Lite known is a simple, sleek and stable Linux distribution based on Ubuntu's Long Term Support (LTS) releases. Linux Lite is especially for Windows users. It aims to fulfill everyday computing needs by providing the complete set of applications. Jerry Bezencon and the team recently announced Linux Lite 2.8, the final release of 2.0 series. Let's see what is new in this release.

  • Opensuse 13.1 has gone evergreen
  • First X-Apps, openSUSE Board, Faces of FOSS

    Today in Linux news "openSUSE 13.1 has gone Evergreen" and Bryan Lunduke was elected to its board. Clement Lefebvre reported on the first two Mint X-Apps and Dedoimedo found a distribution he likes. Rory Dear argued today against migrating to Linux and FOSS Force is back with their most difficult quiz yet.

  • Ubuntu Community Calls All Artists to Contribute Wallpapers to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    Today, Ubuntu project member Nathan Haines has informed the Ubuntu community that the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase contest is open to submissions from artists who want to contribute their awesome artwork to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

  • PSA: Support for Ubuntu 15.04 Ends Today

    After nine months swinging in the wild, the sun finally sets on official support for the Vivid Vervet.

    Ubuntu 15.04 desktop users will receive no more security notices, critical fixes, or updated packages from the main Ubuntu archives as of February 4th, 2016.

  • ODROID-C2 64-bit dev board coming soon for $40

    Hardkernel’s next single-board computer features a quad-core ARM Coretx-A53 64-bit processor, 2GB of RAM, and Gigabit Ethernet.

  • Developer: Video – Tizen Native Geocode API

    The Geocode API can be used as an add-on to your apps, that allows developers to create Tizen 2.3 or 2.4 native applications that can send your location and also receive co-ordinates from a server. You need to add permissions in your Tizen project for the app to use your phone’s map service, Internet and network.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition Sold with $100 Discount to Make Way for New Model

    The Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition is a very successful laptop that tends to sell really well. Only a limited number of units are made each year, and they also ship with Ubuntu.

  • Dell will ship XPS 13 Developer Edition "Project Sputnik" Linux laptops with Skylake chips
  • Giving Silos Their Due

    One was Linux on the Desktop (LOTD). Around the turn of the Millennium, I predicted big successes for LOTD and Linux on the Laptop (LOTL)—and continued to do the same, annually, until I gave up.

  • This Wrong Command Could Brick Your Linux Laptop [Ed: avoid UEFI]
  • Little warning: Deleting the wrong files may brick your Linux PC

    Here's a friendly warning from El Reg: don't wipe the wrong directory from your Linux system, or you may end up bricking the computer. This has happened to people, we're told.

    The directory in question is /sys/firmware/efi/efivars which is a special filesystem that presents the configuration settings for the computer's underlying UEFI firmware to the user. These configuration variables are used to control the way the motherboard firmware starts up the system and boots your operating system. Changing the files in this directory therefore changes these respective variables in the firmware.

  • Kids can refurbish computers for others at Kramden

    I’ve learned a lot from my time at Kramden, but what I love most is that the computers we refurbish go to underprivileged kids who would not otherwise be able to afford a computer of their own. I've realized that not all children have the resources they need to learn about technology, which will limit their future potential, but with Kramden’s refurbished computers, more kids will get access to computers in their homes.

  • Most Reliable Hosting Company Sites in January 2016

    As it did through the entirety of 2015, Linux has once again dominated as the most commonly used operating system amongst the top ten hosting company websites. The only two companies in January’s table not using Linux to host their websites are Swishmail (FreeBSD) and EveryCity (SmartOS).

  • deepin 15.1 - Screencast and Screenshots
  • Manjaro Devs Patch Zero-Day Linux Kernel Vulnerability with the Latest Update

    Today, Manjaro project leader Philip Müller has announced the general availability of the sixth update for the stable Manjaro Linux 15.12 (Capella) series of operating systems.

    The February 2 update for Manjaro Linux 15.12 is here to mainly patch a zero-day vulnerability in the Linux kernel packages that the distro currently supports. Among them are Linux 3.10.96, Linux 3.12.53 LTS, Linux 3.13.11.33, Linux 3.14.60 LTS, Linux 3.16.7.23, Linux 3.18.26 LTS, Linux 3.19.8.13, Linux 4.1.16 LTS, Linux 4.2.8.2, Linux 4.3.4, Linux 4.4.0, and Linux 4.5 RC1.

  • Arch Linux 2016.02.01 Available for Download, Still Powered by Linux Kernel 4.3

    It's the first day of February, so guess what? A new ISO image for the powerful and highly customizable Arch Linux operating system is now available for download via the official channels.

    Arch Linux 2016.02.01 was released just a couple of hours ago for those of you who would like to deploy the independent Linux kernel-based operating system on new machines.

  • I hate benchmarking

    Among development tasks, one of my least favorite is benchmarking and I tend to procrastinate on it (by writing blog posts, for example). Allow me to enumerate some reasons why I hate doing benchmarking.

  • Canonical Is Looking for Participants in "Ubuntu Apps in Unity 8" Research Study

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, the world's most popular free operating system, announced just a few minutes ago on their Twitter, Google+ and Facebook accounts that they're running a new user research study.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Flip Your Desktop Over to Boot Linux

    The Linux sleeve could only slide on if the computer was flipped upside down. So he needed to detect when it was in this state. To do this he wired a switch into one of the com ports of his computer, and attached it to the top of the case mod. He modified the assembly code in the MBR to read the state of the switch. When the Linux sleeve is on (and therefore the computer is flipped over) it boots Linux. When the sleeve is off, Windows. Neat. It would be cool to put a small computer in a cube and have it boot different operating systems with this trick. Or maybe a computer that boots into guest mode in one orientation, and the full system in another.

  • February 2016 Issue of Linux Journal

    I love my job. I teach Linux by day and write about Linux at night. It's easy to fall in love with your work when the things you do align with your passions.

  • Compatibility and a Linux Community Server

    I recently added support for IPv6 to the Linux Users of Victoria server. I think that adding IPv6 support is a good thing due to the lack of IPv4 addresses even though there are hardly any systems that are unable to access IPv4. One of the benefits of this for club members is that it’s a platform they can use for testing IPv6 connectivity with a friendly sysadmin to help them diagnose problems. I recently notified a member by email that the callback that their mail server used as an anti-spam measure didn’t work with IPv6 and was causing mail to be incorrectly rejected. It’s obviously a benefit for that user to have the problem with a small local server than with something like Gmail.

  • Reproducible builds: week 40 in Stretch cycle

    54 reviews have been removed, 36 added and 17 updated in the previous week.

  • My Free Software Activities in January 2016

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • CoreOS Overview, Part One

    CoreOS is an important part of many container stacks. In this series of posts, we’re going to take a look at CoreOS, why it’s important, and how it works. If you don’t know anything about CoreOS already, don’t worry. We start at the beginning.

  • First Point Release of OpenELEC 6.0 Solves Issues for Raspberry Pi 2 Users

    The developers of the OpenELEC (Open Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source and cross-platform media center operating system announced today, January 30, the release of OpenELEC 6.0.1.

  • Arch Linux Releases Pacman 5.0

    The Arch Linux crew has announced the release of their Pacman 5.0 package manager.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 Alpha 2 Released, Available to Download

    Today sees the second alpha release of the Ubuntu 16.04 development cycle made available to download.

    Alpha 2 arrives a day later than originally planned, and sees just three flavors release builds as part of the milestone.

    Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Kubuntu sit this alpha out. Why? To paraphrase a recent comment from a Kubuntu dev: “There’s simply nothing to test yet.”

  • Skype for Linux - A Good Microsoft App for Linux [Ed: very bad, very dangerous]

    Skype for Linux is a video chat and voice call application made by Microsoft that happens to have a Linux build as well. Let's take a closer look at what Microsoft is doing for Linux users.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rio

    I was really pleased to see Endless, the little company with big plans, initiate a GNOME Design hackfest in Rio.

    The ground team in Rio arranged a visit to two locations where we met with the users that Endless is targeting. While not strictly a user testing session, it helped to better understand the context of their product and get a glimpse of the lives in Rocinha, one of the Rio famous favelas or a more remote rural Magé. Probably wouldn’t have a chance to visit Brazil that way.

  • Windows Phone is dead

    With Lumia sales on the decline and Microsoft's plan to not produce a large amount of handsets, it's clear we're witnessing the end of Windows Phone. Rumors suggest Microsoft is developing a Surface Phone, but it has to make it to the market first. Windows Phone has long been in decline and its app situation is only getting worse. With a lack of hardware, lack of sales, and less than 2 percent market share, it's time to call it: Windows Phone is dead. Real Windows on phones might become a thing with Continuum eventually, but Windows Phone as we know it is done. It won't stop Microsoft producing a few handsets every year as a vanity project, but for everyone else it's the end of the line. Farewell, Windows Phone.

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Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).