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today's leftovers

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  • My Experience With Linux of the 90s, or why I have Linux Desktop PTSD

    I have Linux on my phone right now (I’ve finally switched from Apple -> Android). My terror of malware aside, it’s a delightful experience. I see people using Linux on their desktops/laptops, and it JUST WORKS.

    This continues to amaze me. In the 90s, back when I started using Linux, one did not simply ‘install’ Linux.

  • This Russian all-in-one desktop is just quirky enough to attract attention
  • MIPS CPUs and Debian 8 power T-Platforms' Tavolga Terminal
  • MIPS-Based CPU, Debian 8 Underpin Russian T-Platforms' All-In-One PC
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.4 Officially Released

    The latest version of the stable Linux kernel, 4.4.4, has been revealed today by Greg Kroah-Hartman, which makes it the most advanced stable version available.

  • How the Linux Foundation is increasing the woman force in open source

    I have been attending LinuxCon since 2009 and since last year they have started a ‘childcare’ at the event so moms and dads can drop their kids there and attend the events. The Linux Foundation is now partnering with Women Who Code to increase participation of women in the foundation’s events.

    “Increasing diversity in technology takes more than one approach. From our partnership with Goodwill to support people from disadvantaged backgrounds to our work with Women Who Code and a variety of other organizations, we hope to have at least a small impact on this important issue,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. “We’re looking forward to meeting and working with women from the program and helping them to advance their careers and contributions in the open source community.”

  • 4 no-bull takeaways about Docker Cloud

    Late last year, Docker snapped up cross-cloud container management service Tutum, but it wasn't clear how the acquired company's handiwork would manifest under the Docker brand.

    Earlier this week, we found out: Tutum reemerged as Docker Cloud amid little fanfare, but with more than only the badges swapped on the product. Cloud now cross-integrates with all of Docker's other services, and Docker promises to unveil more features for shortly.

  • curl vs Wget

    The main differences as I (Daniel Stenberg) see them. Please consider my bias towards curl since after all, curl is my baby - but I contribute to Wget as well.

    Please let me know if you have other thoughts or comments on this document.

  • UI Design is Hard, Let's Go Shopping

    I could add a menu with sorting/grouping options, which would allow novice and intermediate users to find the function, but that still does not hint at the shortcut, and the functions to set the sorting would have to be disabled on Linux because wxGTK cannot set the sort column from a program.

  • GNOME's Mutter Gets New Nested Wayland CLI Switch

    Just ahead of this month's GNOME 3.20 release is now the Mutter 3.19.91 development release.

    Notable to this new Mutter release is that it adds a --nested switch when running Mutter. Using this argument will allow running a nested Wayland session.

  • Are you using this highly effective interview technique?

    A similar technique I learned from former member of the GNOME Foundation board of directors Jonathan Blandford goes one step further. The principle of targeted selection is that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. So, if you are hiring someone to manage a team, ask about a time that they were a manager in the past. If you need someone who can learn quickly in a new and fast moving domain, ask them about a time that they were in a similar situation. Then, dig deep for the details. What did they do? How did they interact with others? How effective was the outcome of the situation?

  • Chakra 2016.02 "Ian" Released and Named in Memory of Ian Murdock, Debian Founder
  • SUSE Delivers New OpenStack Platform, Plus Training Offerings

    SUSE has announced the availability of SUSE OpenStack Cloud 6, which it is positioning as an enterprise-ready distribution for building Infrastructure-as-a-Service private clouds with less stress on IT staff and resources. Like many other new distributions, this one embraces container technology.

    Based on the OpenStack release Liberty, SUSE OpenStack Cloud 6 delivers availability enhancements along with Docker and IBM z Systems mainframe support that the company claims can make it easier to move business-critical applications and data to the cloud.

  • Bits from the Release Team: A Slightly Moveable Feast

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • If You Use An ASUS Motherboard & Hit A Linux Issue, Hopefully It's On This List
  • Dell is bringing Thunderbolt 3 support to Linux systems

    The Dell XPS 13 is one of our favorite laptops, but that’s only if Windows is your operating system of choice. Mac users have a whole brand just for their computers, but Linux aficionados are typically left out in the cold. There’s good news today though, as the XPS Developer Edition, which runs a custom Ubuntu image, will bring support for Thunderbolt 3 to the platform with the Skylake update, according to chatter on the Dell forums, as pointed out by PCWorld.

  • Solus 1.1 Linux Released With Updates To Its Budgie Desktop

    Solus, one of the most talked about newcomer Linux distributions, is out with their 1.1 Shannon update.

    Solus 1.0 was released at the end of 2015 while out today is the project's first point release.

  • Sabayon 16.3 Monthly Release Available To Download

    Sabayon is a free, open source and Gentoo based Linux distribution. It aims to provide the easy to use, simple and yet powerful Linux operating system. Sabayon team has made the monthly release Sabayon 16.3 available to download with bug fixes and applications updates.
    Sabayon is a Gentoo based Linux distribution. It is available in all popular flavors, KDE, GNOME, Xfce and MATE. So if you are wanting to try this distribution then you can install Sabayon in your favorite flavor.

  • dgplug summer training student Trishna Guha

    This training has changed my life entirely. I started the training as a newbie. I took part in the training attentively and tried to learn and implement what all have been taught in the summer training. After few months I really could feel the change. I jotted down the skills those I didn’t used to have before the training and it felt so awesome. Finally this training has turned me into an Open Source Contributor Smile. I am learning a lot contributing to opensource.

  • Last week 'flu by

    My first chore was to set up VPN access to the development resources (source control, wiki, etc.). I sandboxed the proprietary VPN client in a VM with a systemd unit to run it at boot, so I can control it by starting and stopping that VM. I then set to work on unpacking and exploring the SoC vendor's evaluation module (EVM), starting by looking at serial output - of which there was none. Nothing on the LCD panel or network port either. A frustrating day.

  • FAQ: What the heck happened to Linux Mint?

    Apparently, a hacker going by the handle “Peace.” Peace gave an interview to ZDNet reporter Zach Whittaker, in which he or she explained that the idea was mainly just to get access to as many computers as possible, possibly for a botnet. Peace first gained access to the site in January, via a security vulnerability in a WordPress plugin.

today's leftovers

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  • The Do It Yourself age by Richard Hillesley

    Such is the spirit of Linux and free software.

  • March 2016 Issue of Linux Journal

    If you've booted Linux in the past decade, you've used an initrd in order to load the system. Using an init ramdisk (or initram filesystem) is a great way to load a temporary, stripped-down root filesystem during bootup. Eduardo Arcusa Les explains the nuances of initrd and shows how to take advantage of the brilliant concept that makes booting Linux so easy. Using a real-world example, he describes how initrd has been incredibly useful for him and can be for others as well.

  • openSUSE becomes mentoring organization

    University students can spend their summer break writing code and learning about open source development with openSUSE while earning money through Google’s 12-year old, annual international program.

  • My Debian Activities in February 2016
  • Monthly News – February 2016

    I’d like to thank the phpBB team and Automattic (the company behind WordPress.com) for reaching out to us to see if and how they could help.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Review: System 76 Wild Dog Pro

    I got an order confirmation almost immediately with an estimate of 2 to 6 days to ship. Soon after that I got a note stating that the Wild Dog was running toward the latter end of that range. I figured I could just use my laptop until the new machine arrived if necessary, and I waited.

    While I was waiting, I still continued to use my old desktop. I noticed the rebooting issue happened toward the end of the day. It finally dawned on me (I’m a little thick) that it might be heat related. I crawled under the desk to find that the power supply fan wasn’t working. I ordered a new one of those to see if it would help.

  • [Bodhi] Forums Temporarily Offline

    Due to circumstances outside of our control the Bodhi Forums are temporarily offline. We are working to bring them back to working order as soon as possible.

  • New workers get Tumbleweed rolling

    openQA workers that keep Tumbleweed tested and rolling have almost been replenished.

    The new hardware can run more workers and is newer, bigger and faster, which increases the speed of openQA testing. One of two Intel E5-2630 v3 is partially running while the other has yet to be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure. Each machine has 8 cores with 16 threads for a total of 16 cores of 32 threads when both machines become fully functional. The new hardware has each have 256GB of RAM and 400GB Intel NVMe SSDs.

  • Calamares 2.0 Distribution Independent Installer Released for GNU/Linux

    After being in development for the last five months or so, the Calamares 2.0 graphical installer for Linux kernel-based operating system has finally reached maturity and is now available for all OS vendors.

    Calamares 2.0 is a major release, and it introduces a significant amount of new features and improvements, among which we can mention revamped partitioning functionality, which has been rebased on the library used by KDE Partition Manager.

  • Tails official mysterious during interview

    Tails – a Debian-based Linux distribution focused on privacy and online anonymity – recently released its “2.0” update. I reached out to the Tails press team to ask them a few questions, the full answers to which I am including below.

    Interestingly, I'm not entirely certain exactly who I was talking with. I know I was communicating with the official Tails Press mailing list but to whom… I haven't the foggiest. Here's what happened when I asked the question directly:

    Lunduke: “Any names that you'd like to be associated with the press list in the article? Or are your names top-secret? :)”

    Tails: “Many of our names can be seen on our development mailing list, but we don't think that any name in particular is relevant for this interview.”

  • OpenWRT router SBC mixes Cortex-A5 and FPGA

    DAB-Embedded’s wireless enabled “DAB-OWRT-SAMA5” router SBC runs OpenWrt Linux on an Atmel SAMA5D36 SoC linked to an Altera MAX 10 FPGA.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Piracy helping Windows gain market share over Linux
  • Docker Datacenter Suite Advances Production Container Technology

    Docker isn't just for hobbyist developers and early adopters anymore. Docker Inc. takes the wraps off a new commercial platform that enables containers as a service (CaaS).
    Docker Inc., the lead commercial sponsor behind the open-source Docker container technology, is expanding its commercially supported product lineup Feb. 23 with the official launch of the Docker Datacenter platform. DDC builds on Docker Inc.'s existing services, including the Docker Universal Control Plane, which was first publicly announced as a beta last November.

  • ​Docker improves container security and management

    We love Docker. This container technology makes it possible to run four-to-six times the number of server applications as you can with Virtual Machines (VM) on the same hardware. There are only two little problems: Security and management.

  • Interesting Linux Disk Benchmarks Of Up To 14 SSDs With Btrfs RAID
  • Manjaro Linux 16.02 Cinnamon Edition Out with Cinnamon 2.8.6, LibreOffice 5.1
  • openSUSE T-Shirts for Leap Day

    To celebrate Leap Day, openSUSE will ship you a Leap 42 T-Shirt when you submit a proposal for this year’s openSUSE Conference by Leap Day (Feb. 29, 2016).

  • Spin your own Debian

    Today, we’re going to look at creating a custom Debian ISO using the Debian Live Systems project. With the project and website, you can create your own custom version of the distro to deploy as you wish around an office or in your own home. The benefit of creating your own spin is the ability to include specific packages that are relevant to your needs, have it work on specific architectures, and generally make it much more suited to your needs.

  • Tails 2.0.1 is out
  • Bite-size i.MX7 module sips power, ships with Linux

    Toradex launched a pair of Colibri COMs built around NXP’s low-power, Cortex-A7- and -M4-based i.MX 7 Solo and Dual SoCs, featuring -20 to 85°C operation.

    As promised last September, Toradex has shipped one of the first computer-on-modules based on NXP’s i.MX7 system-on-chips. It does not appear to be the first, as CompuLab promised to ship its CL-SOM-iMX7 COM in Jan. 2016. Toradex can, however, claim to have the smallest i.MX7 module to date — its 67.6 x 36.7mm dimensions beat out the 68 x 42mm CompuLab module.

  • Backgrounds / Wallpapers for Tizen Smartphones Samsung Z1 / Z3 / TM1 – Vol 2

    Over the last year we have created some stunning wallpapers / backgrounds for Tizen devices Samsung Gear S / S2 / Neo / Galaxy / Z1 / Z3 and TM1. Now we have some more specially for the Samsung Z1, Z3, and TM1 Tizen Smartphones.

    This month there are more of an abstract style, but if you would like anything different then please let us know in the comments section. Instructions on how you can actually set them as your background are at the bottom of the page.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
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Linux 4.11 RC4

  • Linux 4.11-rc4
    So last week, I said that I was hoping that rc3 was the point where we'd start to shrink the rc's, and yes, rc4 is smaller than rc3. By a tiny tiny smidgen. It does touch a few more files, but it has a couple fewer commits, and fewer lines changed overall. But on the whole the two are almost identical in size. Which isn't actually all that bad, considering that rc4 has both a networking merge and the usual driver suspects from Greg, _and_ some drm fixes - and those tend to be the big areas. So on the whole things look fine. There's changes all over, and in mostly the usual proportions. Some core kernel code shows up in the diffstat slightly more than it usually does - we had an audit fix and a bpf hashmap fix, but on the whole it all looks very regular: mostly drivers, networking, arch fixes and some filesystem noise. Shortlog appended as usual for people who want to skim the details. Go out and test, Linus
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Fourth Release Candidate of the Linux 4.11 Kernel
    As expected, Linus Torvalds made his regular Sunday announcement to inform us about the availability of the fourth Release Candidate (RC) development release of the upcoming Linux 4.11 kernel. Coming one week after the third Release Candidate, Linux 4.11 RC4 appears to be just a bit smaller than the previous build, updating the networking stack and many of the supported drivers to be on par with what was changed earlier this week in the stable Linux kernel branches.
  • Linux 4.11-rc4 Kernel Released
    Linus Torvalds has announced the Linux 4.11-rc4 kernel this evening.