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today's leftovers

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  • A Brief History of Blockchain

    Many of the technologies we now take for granted were quiet revolutions in their time. Just think about how much smartphones have changed the way we live and work. It used to be that when people were out of the office, they were gone, because a telephone was tied to a place, not to a person. Now we have global nomads building new businesses straight from their phones. And to think: Smartphones have been around for merely a decade.

  • A Flurry of Open Source Graphics Milestones

    The past few months have been busy ones on the open-source graphics front, bringing with them Wayland 1.13, Weston 2.0, Mesa 17.0, and Linux 4.10. These releases have been quite interesting in and of themselves, but the biggest news must be that with Mesa 17.0, recent Intel platforms are fully conformant with the most recent Khronos rendering APIs: OpenGL 4.5, OpenGL ES 3.2, and Vulkan 1.0. This is an enormous step forward for open-source graphics: huge congratulations to everyone involved!

    Mesa 17.0 also includes the Etnaviv driver, supporting the Vivante GPUs found in NXP/Freescale i.MX SoCs, amongst others. The Etnaviv driver brings with it a 'renderonly' framework for Mesa, explicitly providing support for systems with a separate display controller and 3D GPU. Etnaviv joins Mesa as the sixth hardware vendor to have a supported, fully open-source, driver.

  • TechRadar Pro readers have voted for their preferred Linux distro

    Linux is steadily building up steam as a viable platform on all sorts of fronts, including gaming as we’ve seen recently, but which is the most popular of all the many distros out there?

    The results of our survey from earlier this month (which had almost 900 participants) have now been totted up, in which we asked you to name the three distros you used the most. And the clear winner – king-of-the-hill, top-of-the-list, a-number-one – was Ubuntu which was cited by 24% of respondents.

    The popular OS had a clear lead over second-place Mint, which was used by 14.5% of those surveyed. And the bronze medal was just secured by Fedora which snared 10.1%, only a fraction ahead of Debian which finished on 10% bang-on.

  • ArchBang Spring Release

    Openbox, Tint2 and Conky are back.

  • Manjaro-Arm Linux for embedded devices shutting down due to lack of contributors

    Manjaro-Arm provided a simple out-of-the-box solution for Linux on embedded boards since 2015, but due to its lack of contributor involvement, the project’s sole maintainer announced that it is shutting down.

  • Hackweek 15 - the YaST Integration Tests

    I decided to spend the last SUSE Hackweek with YaST and find a way which would allow us to write and run YaST integration tests easily. See the details in the project Hackweek page.

    Some time ago I found the cucumber-cpp project. It is a cucumber support for the C++ programming language.

    The reason is that the YaST UI uses the libyui library which is written in C++. If we want to control and check the YaST UI we need to implement it on the libyui level.

  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Global Payments Inc. (GPN)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Mean Rating At $1.47
  • Free software activities in February 2017
  • Technologic Systems integrates Ubuntu Core with Computer on Module
  • Ubuntu Core ported to an i.MX6 COM, a Dell IoT gateway, and a LimeNET base station

    Ubuntu Core is available on Technologic’s i.MX6-based TS-4900 COM, will run on Dell’s Edge Gateway 3000, and will soon appear on a LimeNET base station.

    At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Canonical announced several more takers for its IoT-oriented Ubuntu Core distribution. When Dell unveiled its compact, $399-and-up Edge Gateway 3000 series of Intel Atom-driven IoT gateways, Canonical revealed that the devices will be available with Ubuntu Core when they ship in early summer.

  • Linux Journal March 2017

    Like most fancy tech terms, "Cloud Computing" has lost its newness, and it's now just a commodity we purchase. It's often so much easier to provision virtual machines than it is to buy and host your own servers. Yes, there are concerns over privacy and security when your data is in the cloud. When you host in your own data center, however, there's still the possibility of a rogue cleaning crew getting to your servers. (We've all seen the movies; it just takes a mop and a blue jumper to get you into the most secure data center.) Regardless of your stance on cloud computing, it's here to stay. This month, we talk a bit about how to live in this bold new world.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Manjaro ARM to shut down

    While the project is dying, the team has offered help to anyone who is willing to continue this project. The team will guide through all the process and even teach if needed. If anyone is interested in continuing this project, now is the time. Otherwise we all have to say goodbye to Manjaro-ARM.

  • Manjaro ARM Linux Distro Is Shutting Down, Lack Of Contributors Is The Reason
  • That Was The Week That Was (TWTWTW): Edition 2

    This is the second edition of TWTWTW, a weekly blog proclaiming noteworthy news in the open source world. It provides a concise distilled commentary of notable open source related news from a different perspective. For the second edition, we present a succinct catchup covering software, hardware, book releases, ending with a real Barry Bargain!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya

    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.

  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]

    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.

  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download

    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download

    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter: Funded

    A few moments ago, we hit 100% funded for our AppCenter campaign on Indiegogo. Thank you, backers! More than 300 people backed us over just two weeks to help bring our pay-what-you-want indie app store to life.

  • Linux Lite To Have These New Features In The Next Release Linux Lite 3.4

    ...we contacted the creator of the Linux Lite “Jerry Bezencon” and enquired the upcoming new features in the latest version of the Linux Lite. We have also done a review of the latest available distro i.e. 3.2 (32 bit) so that the readers can understand easily where are the new features headed towards.

  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: CMS Energy Corporation (CMS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • What Does The Chart For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell Us Presently?
  • LEDE-17.01 is coming [Ed: it has actually just come out, just like LWN's paywall]

    For some years, OpenWrt has arguably been the most active router-oriented distribution. Things changed in May of last year, though, when a group of OpenWrt developers split off to form the competing LEDE project. While the LEDE developers have been busy, the project has yet to make its first release. That situation is about to change, though, as evidenced by the LEDE v17.01.0-rc1 release candidate, which came out on February 1.

    Many of the changes made in LEDE since the 2015 OpenWrt "Chaos Calmer" release will not be immediately visible to most users. The core software has been updated, of course, including a move to the 4.4.42 kernel. There are a number of security-oriented enhancements, including a switch to SHA256 for package verification, the disabling of support for several old and insecure protocols, compilation with stack-overwrite detection, and more. There is support for a number of new devices. Perhaps the most anticipated new feature, though, is the improved smart queue management and the WiFi fairness work that has been done as part of the bufferbloat project. It has been clear for some time that WiFi should work far better than it does; the work that has found its way into the LEDE release candidate should be a significant step in that direction.

    Your editor decided that it was time to give LEDE a try, but there was some shopping to be done first. Getting the full benefit from the bufferbloat and airtime fairness work requires the right chipset; most of this work has been done on the Atheros ath9k driver. So the first step was to go out and pick up a new router with ath9k wireless. That is where the things turned out to be harder than one might expect.

  • Microsoft Faces European Privacy Probes Over Windows 10

    Microsoft Corp. faces a coordinated investigation by European privacy regulators after it failed to do enough to address their concerns about the collection and processing of user data with a series of changes to Windows 10 last month.

    European Union data-protection officials sent a letter to Microsoft saying they remain “concerned about the level of protection of users’ personal data,” according to a copy of the document posted by the Dutch watchdog Tuesday. Regulators from seven countries are concerned that even after the announced changes, “Microsoft does not comply with fundamental privacy rules.”

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017

    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.

  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver

    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31

    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!

  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?

    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.

Proprietary Traps and Openwashing

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Misc
  • Integrate ONLYOFFICE Online Editors with ownCloud [Ed: Proprietary software latches onto FOSS]

    ONLYOFFICE editors and ownCloud is the match made in heaven, wrote once one of our users. Inspired by this idea, we developed an integration app for you to use our online editors in ownCloud web interface.

  • Microsoft India projects itself as open source champion, says AI is the next step [Ed: Microsoft bribes to sabotage FOSS and blackmails it with patents; calls itself "open source"]
  • Open Source WSO2 IoT Server Advances Integration and Analytic Capabilities

    WSO2 has announced a new, fully-open-source WSO2 Internet of Things Server edition that "lowers the barriers to delivering enterprise-grad IoT and mobile solutions."

  • SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says

    SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer.

    The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store.

    "If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background," warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.

  • “Active Hours” in Windows 10 emphasizes how you are not in control of your own devices

    No edition of Windows 10, except Professional and Enterprise, is expected to function for more than 12 hours of the day. Microsoft most generously lets you set a block of 12 hours where you’re in control of the system, and will reserve the remaining 12 hours for it’s own purposes. How come we’re all fine with this?

    Windows 10 introduced the concept of “Active Hours”, a period of up to 12 hours when you expect to use the device, meant to reflect your work hours. The settings for changing the device’s active hours is hidden away among Windows Update settings, and it poorly fits with today’s lifestyles.

    Say you use your PC in the afternoon and into the late evening during the work week, but use it from morning to early afternoon in the weekends. You can’t fit all those hours nor accommodate home office hours in a period of just 12 hours. We’re always connected, and expect our devices to always be there for us when we need them.

  • Chrome 57 Will Permanently Enable DRM

    The next stable version of Chrome (Chrome 57) will not allow users to disable the Widevine DRM plugin anymore, therefore making it an always-on, permanent feature of Chrome. The new version of Chrome will also eliminate the “chrome://plugins” internal URL, which means if you want to disable Flash, you’ll have to do it from the Settings page.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Docker's tops for devops, AWS is the cloud king

    Docker is the king of devops tools, hybrid cloud is beating public-only and private-only clouds, and Microsoft Azure is making sizable headway in public cloud.

  • How input works – touch input

    Touch input is the new kid in the block concerning input events. It’s a technology which was created after X11 got created and thus it is not part of the X11 core protocol. On X11 this makes touch a weird beast. E.g. there is always an emulation to a pointer event. Applications which do not support touch can still be used as the touch events generate pointer events. Now this is actually a huge sacrifice for the API and means that touch feels – at least to me – as a second class citizen in X11.

  • Boot to Qt on embedded HW using Android 7.0 and Qt 5.8

    One can have real pain trying to create a demo setup or proof-of-concept for an embedded device. To ease the pain Qt for Device Creation has a list of supported devices where you can flash a “Boot to Qt” image and get your software running on the target HW literally within minutes.

  • IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 109 released
  • [openSUSE] Review of the week 2017/07

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    This week we ‘only’ delivered 5 snapshots. But at least it was big ones, so that makes up for it. The review covers the snapshots {0211..0215}.

  • Buy or Sell? Average Brokerage Ratings on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), The Hershey Company (HSY)
  • Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS released -Find Out More

    Ubuntu 16.04.X segment line has gotten its' next maintenance and bug-fix update, Ubuntu 16.04.2, so basically it is the second point update after the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS final for Desktop, Server, Cloud-based ones as well as the different flavored versions of Ubuntu like Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Mythbuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu GNOME have also been availed with their updated images of 16.04.2 version.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • VC Investor Martin Casado on the Future of Software-Defined Networking

    Software-defined networking’s biggest accomplishment last year was achieving market traction and validation, says Martin Casado, a general partner at the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. But there are still many challenges ahead for the industry at large and the organizations that aim to drive SDN forward.

  • What is the best Linux distro for beginners?

    Abundance of choice is one of the biggest challenges faced by all Linux users, particularly those dipping their toe in the water for the first time. Choosing your first Linux distro can be incredibly daunting, especially when you don't even know what you're looking for.

    In Linux's early days, choosing a distro was simple: you went with the one you had heard about, or the one that someone you knew had experience with, or the one with some degree of documentation. Naturally, then, you were limited in choice to the likes of RedHat, Debian, or Slackware.

  • DEFT “Zero” Linux 2017.1 Lightweight Hacker Distro Available For Download
  • No, OpenSUSE and SUSE Downloads Haven’t Been Hacked

    Some inconsequential remnants of SUSE’s old relationship with Novell remain, however; both the domain names and the IP addresses used by SUSE/openSUSE are still listed as being owned by Novell. If I were SUSE, I think I’d take care of that and have both transferred to my name. There’s no need to remind people of a history that’s better left forgotten.

    All indications are that the defacer of the openSUSE News site, which operates as a subdomain of openSUSE.org, leveraged a widely reported vulnerability in WordPress that has recently been responsible for more than 2 million WordPress sites being hacked. The vulnerability was fixed in late January with the WordPress 4.7.2 update.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, January 2017

    In January, about 159 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Eudora saved thanks to open sourcing
    It took the organisation some five years of wrangling with the Eudora's IP owner Qualcomm, but eventually the once much-loved Mac then more software got given the open source greenlight. Eudora was created in 1988 by Steve Dorner while he was working at the University of Illinois. As email started to get big in the world of computing so too did Eudora in the mid-1990s. Qualcomm licensed the software from the University of Illinois and hired Dorner.
  • Top 10 Weirdest Names for Open Source Projects
    In the early stages of developing a new open source project, most developers rarely take the time to think about their future branding strategy. After all, a great idea, top notch code, and a passionate following are the winning formula when you’re getting a project underway. However the name you choose for your project can play a role in picking up a loyal following and attracting the curious. Names have power. They indicate tone and the intent. They can, if chosen well, inspire and unify action. They’re an important part of a project’s brand and tone of voice.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Katran
    While engineers are likely to implement hardware-based solutions for handling network load balance, Facebook’s scale of operation far outweighed the practicality of hardware load balancing, instead requiring the development of a lightweight software solution. The current result of Facebook’s efforts is its latest open-source release, scalable network load balancer Katran.
  • How Far Is Far Enough?

    Now, a new project from the Memento team holds out the promise of similar optimizations for more generic Web sites. The concept for Memento Tracer is to crowd-source a database of webrecorder.io-like crawls of complex Web sites in a form that can be analyzed to generate abstract templates similar to the platform templates on which LOCKSS plugins are mostly based. [...]

Blockchain and Hyperledger/FOSS

  • American Express Integrates Blockchain To Its Membership Rewards Program
    Financial services corporation American Express (AmEx) has announced a blockchain application to its Membership Rewards program in partnership with online merchant Boxed, Associated Press reported May 23. AmEx announced that it is integrating blockchain technology developed by Hyperledger, an open source blockchain project under the Linux Foundation, to let merchants design customized offers for AmEx cardholders in order to increase customer engagement.
  • Interview: Riccardo Spagni co-founder of a new open source blockchain
    South African cryptocurrency expert and lead maintainer of the Monero project Riccardo “fluffypony” Spagni has co-founded a new open source blockchain protocol named Tari. Tari is being built as a blockchain protocol for managing, transferring, and using digital assets, and is stewarded by a team based in Johannesburg. The Johannesburg-based team will work on building a blockchain protocol as a second-layer solution on top of Monero, leveraging the existing cryptocurrency’s security while offering a scalable and dynamic platform for digital assets.
  • CheapAir Ditches BitPay For Open-Source Bitcoin Payments
    Travel and accommodation website CheapAir.com has appeared to choose self-hosted payment processor BTCPay for its Bitcoin payments, shunning industry stalwart BitPay. [...] Coinbase revealed it was retiring its merchant processing function in April, a move which the cryptocurrency industry condemned for its disruptive consequences. BitPay, a processor which along with Coinbase continues to be arguably the best-known option for Bitcoin payments, appeared to miss out on wooing CheapAir, meanwhile, which has offered Bitcoin since 2014 and was the first ever travel agency world-wide to accept bitcoin.
  • Ontology (ONT) Develops its Open-source Triones Consensus System economic model
    The Ontology (ONT) team uses the blockchain technology and the Internet to explore in-depth levels of the information industry. The team’s plans include developing an open-source distributed trust ecosystem called Triones Consensus System that’s based on the Ontology chain network.

Linux 4.16.12, 4.14.44, 4.9.103, 4.4.133, and 3.18.110

Wine 3.9 Released