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Misc

Linux Journal: Nick Gets His Wish

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Misc

Here it is, many years later, and I finally got my wish to join the marvelous Linux Journal team. I can't sum up where I want to take Linux Journal in 25 words or less. So suffice it to say I want to keep all the good stuff, make some things more fun, add more articles of practical value and tune others to have more practical value. Stay tuned.

Linux Today: The Top 10 Stories for 2005

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Being the publication we are, it is inevitable that we will choose to reflect on what happened with Linux in 2005. Specifically, what stories were the most read by you, the reader? What grabbed your attention? On what issues did you hold the strongest opinions?

Time Stops - Literally - On New Year's Eve

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Just before the stroke of midnight scientists will delay the start of 2006 by adding a "leap second" to accommodate for changes in the Earth's rotation.

Running Linux and Windows on the PSP

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So the PSP can do games, movies, video, music, photos, and Internet. Well, that's not enough—it should be able to run software we enjoy on our home PCs! Utilizing an open source x86 emulator called Bochs, which emulates the hardware usually found in PCs, and creating a few hard disk images with the software we want on them, you can run Linux and even Windows on your PSP!

Novell's New CTO/EVP Mulls 2006 Linux Strategy

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During his first month on the job at Novell, Dr. Jeffrey ("Jeff") Jaffe has roved the globe, culling ideas from his new colleagues about company strategy around Linux and open source in 2006 and future years to come.

Ten Failed Tech Trends for 2005

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We're guilty of hype.

But so is everyone else who writes about technology. Most of us gravitate to writing about tech because we think it's cool. We're dreamers, but we gravitate from one shiny bauble of a dream to the next one, rarely looking back to see which baubles become treasures and what morphs into dross.

Massachusetts CIO Resigns Over OpenDocument

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Peter Quinn, the man responsible for bringing OpenDocument to the state of Massachusetts as CIO, will resign on Jan. 9, citing the controversy around the decision as well as personal attacks aimed at him as reasons for his departure.

The Year Ahead: Vista, Linux And M&As, Oh My!

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After a relatively strong second half of 2005, the outlook for the new year is mixed: CIO confidence is modestly declining, demand for IT is expected to fluctuate, yet strong, long-term growth, with no visible prospects for any measurable downturn, is part of the forecast.

Provisioning for the Next Year

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As the year's end draws near, it is customary for journalists to list Top Stories from the year past and to make predictions for the year to come. But those are passive activities. They're what professional bystanders do: play-by-play, color commentary, op-edification. Journalists don't have to stand by any more. Their choices no longer are limited to writing or talking about What's Going On. They can be involved now. They can have effects.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: Eyeing the Horizon

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Where, oh where, did the past year go? It was a year that had us on the edge of our seats in enterprise Unix-land. It was a good year to be a pundit, and it was an even better year to be an open source or Linux vendor, as the latest wave of zeitgeist rolled in. Here's a brief overview of what developments of 2005 will have the most impact on enterprise Unix in 2006.

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Teaching open source changed my life

Teaching open source has been a breath of fresh air for myself and for many of our students because with the open source way, there are no official tests. There is no official certification for the majority of open source projects. And, there are no prescribed textbooks. In open source, no employer worth working for will ask for official proof of your abilities. A good employer will look at what you’ve done and ask you to showcase what you can do. Yes, it still helps to have a Computer Science degree, but the lack of one is often no drawback. Read more