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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Windows 10 Anniversary Update is borking boxen everywhere

    Users are reporting that upgrading to the Windows 10 Anniversary Update renders their PCs unusable.

    A lengthy Reddit thread explains the problem: the Anniversary Update installs just fine, but when users re-start their PCs after the upgrade … nothing happens.

    Users report that their PCs simply hang on restart, sometimes losing even the ability to accept input from mice and keyboards and sometimes frustrating users by allowing input but not responding.

    Some in the thread report that disabling Secure Boot removes the problem, others describe more elaborate workarounds.

    Microsoft, for its part, has advised those in the thread to do a clean install of Windows and pointed those afflicted to USB media creation tools in order to facilitate that action.

  • RFC #1: Karl Fogel – Open Source, Then and Now (Part 1)

    Karl served on the board of the Open Source Initiative, which coined the term “open source”, and helped write Subversion, a popular version control system that predates Git. Karl also wrote a popular book on managing open source projects called Producing Open Source Software. He’s currently a partner at Open Tech Strategies, a firm that helps major organizations use open source to achieve their goals.

  • Marek Continues Baking More Mesa Optimizations

    AMD developer Marek Olšák continues leading their recent charge on looking to boost the performance potential out of Mesa / Gallium3D.

    Aside from working on the remaining OGL4 extensions, longtime Mesa contributor Marek Olšák has been seeking to boost the performance of the open-source AMD OpenGL driver. He's published a number of optimizations with the most impressive improvements being for a 23%+ performance improvement for RadeonSI with the BioShock Infinite game.

  • littler 0.3.1

    The second release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in the summer of 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

    littler is the first command-line interface for R and predates Rscript. It is still faster, and in my very biased eyes better as it allows for piping as well shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It prefers to live on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on the OS X due yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems where a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet -- the build system could be extended -- see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers welcome!).

  • Choqok Lives — Qt Twitter App Sees First Update in Over a Year

    Feed me cereal and call me a-maized: there’s a brand new version of Qt Twitter app Choqok on the way.

    Choqok 1.6 Beta is the first update to the app in over a year and a half since the previous, and only the second, major update to the app in almost three years!

    “We want to make this release more stable than ever and then we are going to release a beta today and the final version next month,” Choqok’s developers write in a recent blog post update.

    Stability is going to be key for the app as the incumbent stable release is full of bugs caused, in part, by changes to the Twitter infrastructure that it hasn’t kept pace with.

    As such the bulk of this beta update is made up of bug fixes, polish and updates to work with new Twitter functionality, like sending unlimited direct messages and quoting tweets.

    Choqok 1.6 is also based on KDE Frameworks 5 and supports for the GNU Social network.

  • wtf is PAM?
  • GSoC Updates: Plugging in the grilo owncloud plugin

    My GSoC Project has materialized quite a bit since the last blog post. In the previous blog post I discussed implementing a cache for persisting the query results from the owncloud grilo plugin. However, after some discussions with Felipe, we decided it’s better to proceed without the cache for now.

  • Wifislax 4.12 Screenshot Tour
  • Next Weeks Broker Price Targets For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • How Analysts Feel About Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT)?
  • Flock to Fedora - Day #2 with focus on Modularity
  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160805-1

    TUG 2016 is over, and I have returned from a wonderful trip to Toronto and Maine. High time to release a new checkout of the TeX Live packages. After that I will probably need some time for another checkout, as there are a lot of plans on the table: upstream created a new collection, which means new package in Debian, which needs to go through NEW, and I am also planning to integrate tex4ht to give it an update. Help greatly appreciated here.

  • Sketching using MyPaint on the BQ M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet
  • Samsung Z2 Coming to India 11 August Priced at Rs 4,499 ?

    We are super excited (American term) for the launch of the Samsung Z2. This upcoming Tizen tech has had lots of information pointing to its release such as Wifi and Bluetooth certification as well as news that Samsung has already begun assembly of the device. The Z2 is also slated to be distributed in 8 countries that include: India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Nocturn Is a Cross Platform Twitter App With a Clean Design

    Nocturn is a simple desktop Twitter app for Mac and Linux built using React, Electron and JavaScript.

    I know what you’re thinking: “Not another electron app!?” but this one is at least a bit different to the usual web wrapping schtick.

    For, unlike Anatine which we wrote about at the end of July, Nocturn is not a frame around the regular Twitter web interface.

    Instead, it uses web technologies to create a new, native interface.

    Albeit a rather simple one.

  • Brand New Skype `Alpha` Application for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • The Wine Development Release 1.9.16 Is Now Available
  • Tip of the iceberg !
  • Vice-President’s Report — The State of the GNOME Foundation

    Hi! Long time no see. My blog has been pretty quiet in recent months, in the big part due to my extended commitment on the GNOME Foundation‘s Board of Directors (for a second year without an executive director present to take some of the load) and the various business engagements I’ve had.

  • New packages for LibreOffice and Chromium

    There’s a new LibreOffice release with a lot of improvements: 5.2.0. The announcement on the Document Foundation blog shows quite a lot of extensive information this time because of the version number jump and the changes implied by it. I’ll mention just a couple of semi-random facts here:
    Document classification has been added as a major feature. Two-factor authentication for Google Docs storage finally works in Writer. Interoperability (with the MS Office file formats of course) has been improved and an import filter for Word for DOS was added. In Calc, new functions were added along with tooltips showing context information about functions. Source code quality has been measurably improved again.

  • Chase Claims Android Pay Support Planned for “This Year”

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • I'm Going to GUADEC
  • Mapbox steps in to help GNOME’s Maps application

    On July 11th, GNOME’s Maps application stopped working. Like all mapping applications, it relies on an online service to provide data. The service it had been using – MapQuest – discontinued free access to their data. When the service went dead, there were no longer any maps in Maps.

    Thankfully, it didn’t take long for a replacement to be found. Mapbox, a popular mapping service (they provide data for Pinterest, Github and Foursquare, among others) stepped up and has generously offered to provide mapping data. Better than that, Maps now has an agreement in place with its data provider, putting it on a much more solid footing. The new arrangement with Mapbox might also allow additional features in the future, such as downloading maps data for offline use.

  • ROSA Fresh R8 is out!

    Dear friends, we are happy to present our new ROSA Fresh R8 release.

  • Here Are Research Reports Worth Watching: Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT), Estee Lauder Companies Inc (NYSE:EL)
  • Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS released
  • Monthly News – August 2016

    In July, we’ve received $12,753 thanks to the generous donations of 530 people. I’d like to thank you from the bottom of my heart for helping us fund Linux Mint. During the attacks we were able to purchase additional servers and pay for services (some of which are now free, credits to Sucuri for sponsoring us) without ever worrying about how much things cost. We’re also able to have a budget which allows us to pay our development team. Although Mint developers are passionate and benevolent people, we send them money so that they can purchase fancy equipment or so they can be more comfortable and have more spare time (which they usually spend on improving Linux Mint anyway). They’ve no idea how much they’ll get, when and why, but they’re one of the core reasons Linux Mint gets better, so the same way you donate to Linux Mint, we love donating to them. On occasions and when something benefits the distribution in a tangible way, we’re also able to donate upstream. In preparation for Linux Mint 18, we sent money to various artists and some upstream developers. In brief, we’re extremely comfortable and free in the way we develop Linux Mint. Whenever we need something, we’re able to buy it. Whenever money can improve a particular aspect of the distribution we’re able to spend it. This frees our hands, it empowers us greatly and it makes our job much easier. I usually just say thank you and emphasize the fact that your help does help us a lot. Behind the curtain there are a lot of people involved at various degrees and doing very different things. Since we started in 2006 we never had to worry about money. We were able to grow our quality and success thanks to your enjoyment and support and we never had to feel small or revise our ambitions. You can see the effects this had on development and the decisions to maintain a new desktop environment, or lately in the decision to switch to XApps. I’m very grateful for this. Many thanks to you.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Mesosphere’s ‘Container 2.0’ Unites Stateless and Stateful Workloads [Ed: Mesosphere is funded by Microsoft and tied up to it]

    The trick is to allow some distributed programs handle their own scheduling. Container orchestrators, such as Kubernetes and the Docker Engine, use a single “monolithic,” scheduler, noted Florian Leibert, Mesosphere’s CEO, in a blog post. “Because there is no single scheduler that can optimize for all workloads, users end up with non-optimal operating constraints, including being forced to create separate clusters for each service,” he wrote.

  • MS Uses GNU/Linux. Why Not You?

    The answer is simple. GNU/Linux works for people and gets the job done. I recommend Debian GNU/Linux.

  • boot 25 % faster
  • Analyst Ratings on: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY), Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Sony’s Hero Open Source Developer Title for May-June Awarded to XDA RD Bumble-Bee

    Of the many OEMs that we talk about here on XDA-Developers, only a very few actually work for and with the community. Most are all talk, but actions speak louder than words, and only a handful truly speak.

    Sony is one of those OEMs that continues to foster relationships with the developer community, with several initiatives in place that promote external developers to work on Sony devices. Heck, the Sony Xperia Z3 was the ONLY device outside of Nexus and Android One devices to have had the Android N Developer Preview released for it.

    One of Sony’s pro-Open Source initiatives is the Hero Open Source Developer Program. Under this program, Sony recognizes and rewards developers that contribute to the Open Device projects. The developer with the most accepted commits to the SonyXperiaDev github during the preceding two months stands to win a device from Sony as a reward. The winner for the period of May-June is none other than Shane Francis, aka XDA Recognized Developer Bumble-Bee. Shane has won a Sony Xperia X Performance for his efforts and contributions to the AOSP for Xperia Projects, including helping with the fingerprint scanner on the Z5 on AOSP. We congratulate Shane for his prize from Sony, and thank him for his contributions to open source.

  • Mozilla Awards $585,000 to Nine Open Source Projects in Q2 2016

    Last quarter’s Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS)-awarded projects are diverse, but they have one thing in common: they believe in innovation for public benefit. Projects like Tails, PeARS and Caddy are paving the way for the next wave of openness, which is why Mozilla has allocated over $3.5 million to the MOSS initiative in support of these and other open source projects. We’re excited to share the program’s progress this quarter, which includes $585,000 in awards, nine new projects supported and two new tracks launched.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 10 reasons you shouldn't upgrade to Windows 10 [iophk: "Mentions Chrome/Linux and Android/Linux but could have used a mention of GNU/Linux too"]
  • August 2016 Issue of Linux Journal
  • Enough About The Free Windows Upgrades Already, These Alternate Operating Systems Are Always Free
  • Container adoption remains in its infancy – but businesses should get ready for the next wave of virtualisation

    There has been a surge of interest in containers in recent years, particularly in the wake of Docker’s popularity among developers. Many are now suggesting that the virtualisation technology could eventually replace the hypervisors which have become near-ubiquitous in enterprise data centres.

    Simply put, containers offer a lightweight alternative to virtual machines, offering even greater resource utilisation, simplified management and the ability to quickly move applications betwee servers.

  • Submit Your Top 5 Linux Distributions

    Last week I wrote a list of the 5 Linux distributions I recommend for the everyday linux user.

    As expected I am receiving comments asking why I didn't include this distribution or that distribution.

    I am therefore opening the floor to you guys and girls.

  • Simplicity Linux 16.07 out now

    Simplicity Linux is well know for it's lightweight nature and support for netbooks. The team behind this wonderful distribution has annonced the release of Simplicity 16.07. This distribution is based on Puppy Linux but this time there is a little twist. This time Simplicity Linux is avaialble in Debian based version too. Simplicity 16.07 is released in dektop and mini editions which are based on Puppy Linux and it uses LXDE as default desktop environment. As we said earlier there is X version of Simplicity 16.07 which is based on Debian via AntiX distribution.

  • Flock 2016 – krakow – day -1 or -2 (sunday/monday)

    Sunday started my travels to flock 2016. First up, a flight from Denver to Munich. 10 hours in the air, but at least fewer hops. Things started out on a troubling note as the flight was already delayed ~20min before I even left for the airport, which would cut my time between flights in Munich to just ~45min.

  • Fedora Inactive/Disabled Accounts
  • AppRecommender: A package recommender system

    Hello, my name is Lucas Moura and this post will present AppRecommender. This project is a package recommender system for Debian systems. The intent of this application is to look for packages that users have already installed in their system and recommend new useful packages based on them. This approach is similar as the one seen on Netflix or Amazon, where the movies or goods that a user has already seen determine other items that will be recommended.

  • AppRecommender: My Google Summer of Code project

    AppRecommender is a package recommender system for Debian.

  • Skylake taken to EPIC proportions

    IEI’s “Nano-ULT3” is an EPIC SBC with 6th Gen Core “Skylake” U-Series CPUs, up to 32GB DDR4 RAM, and coastline ports for 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, and 4x USB 3.0.

    One of the nice things about backward compatibility is that you can take a legacy form-factor like EPIC and match it with one of the latest, fastest embedded-ready processors around, thereby injecting new life into aging equipment. We’ve seen some EPIC single board computers with Intel 5th Gen Core “Broadwell” CPUs, like Perfectron’s OXY5638A or Aaeon’s EPIC-BDU7, but IEI’s Nano-ULT3 is the first 6th Gen “Skylake” EPIC board we’ve encountered.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft to Cut Thousands of Jobs

    Microsoft is cutting more jobs.

    The business technology giant said in a regulatory filing on Thursday that it plans to lay off an additional 2,850 workers to the previously announced 1,850 jobs it said it would slash in May.

    In total, Microsoft will cut 4,700 jobs worldwide by the end of the company’s fiscal year 2017.

  • P-State Algorithm Change, Schedutil IOWait Boosting

    While still in early form and won't be merged for this next kernel cycle (v4.8), a series of patches were published on Sunday to improve CPU frequency selection under Linux, including an algorithm change for the Intel P-State scaling driver.

    Rafael Wysocki posted the [RFC][PATCH 0/7] cpufreq / sched: cpufreq_update_util() flags and iowait boosting patch series looking for feedback on some CPU frequency scaling related changes. Wysocki admits he hasn't even thoroughly tested the impact of the changes yet, but is looking to see if other developers agree it would be a step in the right direction.

  • Linux Top 3: Simplicity 16.07, LXLE Eclectica and Lubuntu 16.10

    While GNOME and KDE are perhaps the two best known and most widely deployed open source desktop environments used in Linux, LXDE is an increasingly popular choice. In this week's Linux Planet Linx Top 3 roundup we take a quick look at three LXDE distro released this past week.

  • Simplicity Linux 16.07 Has Arrived, Offers Flavors Based on LXPup and Debian

    Today, July 31, 2016, the Simplicity Linux developers proudly announced the general availability of the Simplicity Linux 16.07 GNU/Linux operating system for personal computers.

    Simplicity Linux 16.07 comes three months after the previous stable release, Simplicity Linux 16.04, to bring lots of updated components and the latest GNU/Linux technologies. As usual, the distribution ships with the Mini and Desktop editions based on the lightweight LXPup OS, a Puppy Linux derivative using the LXDE desktop environment.

  • Flatpak 0.6.8 Adds No-Desktop Mode

    Flatpak 0.6.8 was released this weekend as the newest feature release of this GNOME sandboxing tech formerly known as XDG-App.

  • Parsix 8.10 Screenshot Tour

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The Upgradeable Allwinner Dev Board That's Laptop-Compatible Raises $50k So Far

    At the beginning of the month I wrote about That Open, Upgradeable ARM Dev Board Is Trying To Make A Comeback, the EOMA68-spec'ed project formerly known as the Improv Dev Board. It's still using the same (rather slow) Allwinner SoC but has since seen some improvements and there's also a laptop compatible route too. The project has now raised more than $50k USD, but their goal is still three times that at $150k they are trying to raise over the next month.

  • My Microsoft Office 365 woes: Constant crashes, malware macros – and settings from Hell

    Microsoft Office remains one of the most important software products available, despite some rather nasty flaws. For me, Microsoft Office and video games anchor me to Windows. While video games seem set to remain largely Windows-only for the foreseeable future, Office is losing its grip.

    For a long time, I used Office because it was faster. Perhaps more importantly, I knew most of it worked, and I could fairly quickly make a fresh installation do what I wanted. Office 365 has changed all of that.

    To be perfectly honest, I'm not entirely certain why I got Office 365. I was perfectly happy using Office 2010 that had been beaten about the ears enough to look and feel identical to Office 2003. It was quick, the context menus gave me access to all the commands I wanted, and I managed to get rid of both the spacing after the paragraphs and all those dumb "smart quotes."

    Perhaps someone sent me a file that wouldn't open in 2010. Perhaps it was yet another attempt to make Lync work. I will probably never remember. Regardless, the shift to Office 365's version of Office 2013 – and eventually 2016 – has been a descent into madness.

  • Deploy Kubernetes with ansible on Atomic
  • Install Zulip on Ubuntu
  • Parabola 2016.07.27 Screenshot Tour
  • Create two, three, many openSUSE Guides
  • Friday Session Wrap for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • On managing Ruby versions

    This is a little thought on packaged Ruby versions (mostly in Linux-based systems) and why I don’t get many people advising newcomers to start by installing RVM when in reality they just want to program Ruby.

  • Are You Satisfied With Your Ubuntu Phone? (Poll)

    Ubuntu OTA 12 will have completed its phased roll out by the time you read this, and feedback to the changes it brings will not doubt have begun to roll in. Now that we’re almost 18 months on from the launch of the very first Ubuntu Phone I’m curious as to you are getting on with your Ubuntu Phone?

  • Snappy Sprint Heidelberg

    I recently attended Snappy Sprint Heidelberg, the first Snappy sprint focused on upstream and cross-distribution collaboration.

    Snappy is a technology with an interesting history: initially started to provide App Store-like semantics (atomicity, declarative security) for the Ubuntu Phone project, it has since expanded to be a platform for desktop application deployment (e.g. VLC), as well as server applications and the IoT space.

  • ReactOS 0.4.2 Nears With Many Features

    The first release candidate to the upcoming ReactOS 0.4.2 release is now available, the project aiming to be an open-source re-implementation of Microsoft Windows.

  • Software Freedom Kosova Conference SFK’16 Call for Speakers

    SKF | Software Freedom Kosova is an annual international conference in Kosovo organized to promote free/libre open source software, free culture and open knowledge, now in its 7th edition. It is organized by FLOSSK, a non governmental, not for profit organization, dedicated to promote software freedom and related philosophies.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • iTWire - Microsoft to reduce global workforce
  • Microsoft Faces Two Lawsuits For Aggressive Windows 10 Upgrade Campaign

    The series of lawsuits against Microsoft doesn’t seem to terminate sooner.

  • Controlling access to the memory cache

    Access to main memory from the processor is mediated (and accelerated) by the L2 and L3 memory caches; developers working on performance-critical code quickly learn that cache utilization can have a huge effect on how quickly an application (or a kernel) runs. But, as Fenghua Yu noted in his LinuxCon Japan 2016 talk, the caches are a shared resource, so even a cache-optimal application can be slowed by an unrelated task, possibly running on a different CPU. Intel has been working on a mechanism that allows a system administrator to set cache-sharing policies; the talk described the need for this mechanism and how access to it is implemented in the current patch set.

  • Why Blockchain Matters

    If your familiarity with Bitcoin and Blockchain is limited to having heard about the trial of Silk Road’s Ross Ulbricht, you can be forgiven -- but your knowledge is out of date. Today, Bitcoin and especially Blockchain are moving into the mainstream, with governments and financial institutions launching experiments and prototypes to understand how they can take advantage of the unique characteristics of the technology.

  • Our Third Podcast, with Cybik, is Out Now

    Cybik comes back on how he came to know and use Linux in the first place, his gaming habits, how he got involved into the Skullgirls port, and shares with us his outlook on the Linux gaming landscape. The podcast is just an hour long and you can either download it below, and use our RSS feed (that has the additional benefit of making it easy for you to get new episodes from now on):

  • GSoC: final race and multi-disc implementation

    It’s been a while since I wrote a post here. A lot has happened since then. Now Gnome-games fully supports PlayStation games, with snapshoting capabilities. The next thing I’m working on is multi-disc support, specially for PlayStation titles. So far, there’s a working propotity although a lot needs to be re-engineered and polished. This last part of the project has involved working both in UI, persistance and logic layers.

  • This Week in GTK+ – 11

    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 22 commits, with 6199 lines added and 1763 lines removed.

  • [Solus] Replacement of Release Schedule

    In the not so distant past, Solus followed a static point release model. Our most current release at this time is 1.2, with a 1.2.1 planned to drop in the near future. However, we also recently announced our move to a rolling release model. As such, these two schools of thought are in contradiction of one another.

  • First release of official ArchStrike ISO files! [Ed: last week]
  • July ’16 security fixes for Java 8

    On the heels of Oracle’s July 2016 security updates for Java 8, the icedtea folks have released version 3.1.0 of their build framework so that I could create packages for OpenJDK 8u101_b13 or “Java 8 Update 101 Build 13” (and the JRE too of course).

  • Pipelight update

    I decided to do an update of my “pipelight” package. I had not looked at it for a long time, basically because I do not use it anymore, but after I upgraded my “wine” package someone asked if I could please write up what could be done for wine-pipelight.

    As you know, pipelight is a Linux plugin wrapper for Mozilla-compatible browsers which lets you install and use Windows plugins on Linux. This configuration enables you to access online services which would otherwise be unavailable to you on a Linux platform. The pipelight plugin wrapper uses wine to load the Windows software.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Current Analyst Ratings
  • Friday Session Wrap for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora @ EuroPython 2016 - event report
  • Android 7.0 Nougat could be release as soon as next month
  • Android gains anti-spam caller ID feature
  • Amazon Cloud Revenue Hits $2.9B
  • ServerMania – Discover High Availability Cloud Computing, powered by OpenStack

    Cloud computing is fast growing in the world of computer and Internet technology, many companies, organizations and even individuals are opting for shared pool of computing resources and services. For starters, Cloud computing is a type of Internet-based computing where users consume hosted services on shared server resources.

    There are fundamentally three types of cloud computing available today: private, public and hybrid cloud computing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Windows 10 pain: Reg man has 75 per cent upgrade failure rate

    As your humble HPC correspondent for The Register, I should probably be running Linux on the array of systems here at the home office suite. But I don't. I've been a Microsoft guy since I bought my first computer way back in 1984.

    You, dear readers, can rip me for being a MStard, but it works worked well for my business and personal needs.

    I've had my ups and downs with the company, but I think I've received good value for my money and I've managed to solve every problem I've had over the years.

    Until yesterday, that is.

    Yesterday was the day that I marked on my calendar as "Upgrade to Windows 10 Day." We currently have four systems in our arsenal here, two laptops and two desktops.

    The laptops are Lenovo R61 and W510 systems, and the desktops are a garden variety box based on an Asus P7P55D Pro motherboard. The other desktop is my beloved Hydra 2.0 liquid cooled, dual-processor, monster system based on the EVGA Classified SR-2 motherboard. These details turn out to be important in our story.

  • Rygel/Shotwell/GUADEC
  • How to setup HTTP2 in cPanel/WHM Linux VPS using EasyApache3
  • Pushed Fedora Graphical upgrade via Gnome software utility
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/30
  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Available for System76 PCs, Ubuntu 15.10 Users Must Upgrade

    As reported by us last week, Canonical announced the first point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and it looks like the guys over System76 were pretty quick to push the update to users' computers.

    Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS is the latest, most advanced version of the Xenial Xerus operating system, and we recommend that you upgrade to it as soon as possible if you didn't do it already. This is an important point release because it also opens up the upgrade path for users of the Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS (Trusty Tahr) distribution.

  • A Reminder Of Why I Hate Ubuntu

    Yesterday I was reminded why I hate Ubuntu. I suddenly was unable to SSH into Odroid-C2. From Odroid-C2 I could do everything as normal. It turned out the IP address had changed despite my HOST declaration in Beast’s DHCP server and Odroid-C2 being set to use DHCP, or so I thought. Nope. There was a dhclient.conf file in Odroid-C2 which requested everything and the kitchen sink from DHCP, stuff I had no use of like netbios… The man page for the dhclient.conf file says it all: “The require statement lists options that must be sent in order for an offer to be accepted. Offers that do not contain all the listed options will be ignored. There is no default require list.”

  • Thin Mini-ITX board taps Braswell SoCs, offers 4K video

    IEI’s “tKINO-BW” Mini-ITX board features Intel Pentium and Celeron “Braswell” SoCs, 4K video, triple display support, and optional remote management.

    Over the last year, numerous Mini-ITX boards based on Intel’s “Braswell” family of 14nm SoCs have reached market, but there have been far fewer models billed as being “thin.” This somewhat arbitrary term refers to boards with low-profile coastline port layouts, generally for space-constrained embedded applications rather than big gaming boxes.

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