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Misc

Linaro, RISC-V Processor, Ryzen and 8 Most Beautiful Linux Distros You Need To Try

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Misc
  • Linaro & Co Are Working On An ARM 24-Core Desktop / Developer Box

    Slipping under our radar back during the recent Linaro Connect event in San Francisco was word that Linaro, Gigabyte, and Socionext are coming together to produce an interesting microATX-based, 24 x ARM Cortex-A53 desktop / developer box.

  • Linux Now Has its First Open Source RISC-V Processor

    When it released its first open-source system on a chip, the Freeform Everywhere 310, last year, Silicon Valley startup SiFive was aiming to push the RISC-V (“risk five”) architecture to transform the hardware industry in the way that Linux transformed the software industry. Now the company has delivered further on that promise with the release of the U54-MC Coreplex , the first RISC-V-based chip that supports Linux, Unix, and FreeBSD.

  • Ryzen and Linux is a disaster (2017)

    Ryzen 7 series was introduced early March 2017, I bought parts for my Ryzen workstation beginning June 2017 thinking that few months will allow AMD to settle down and release necessary BIOS updates and CPU microcode upgrade. I was wrong. Terribly wrong.

    I was excited when doing the build, mostly because of the new case I bought: Fractal Design Define R5 and Seasonic M12 EVO Bronze 520W. This is premium case and I enjoyed every bit of doing the build. Plenty of space for hard-drives, many cool ideas or things in the case design (screw-less mounting), huge and silent fans, modularity of the case. With a big enough SATA Seagate drive, I was planning to do bcache and never run out of space for home directory.

  • 8 Most Beautiful Linux Distros You Need To Try (2017 Edition)

    Linux users have the liberty to enjoy an unparalleled freedom while choosing the Linux distributions as per their needs. Using different open source technologies, the developers keep creating something new and surprising the enthusiasts. Here, in this article, I’ll be listing the most beautiful Linux distros that have impressed me and other Linux users. This list is a mixture of newcomers and popular distros.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Containers and Microservices Spark a Search for Better File Systems

    File systems usually stay low, both at the operating system level and in tech discussions. Red Hat’s recent deprecation of the Btrfs file system from its platform ignited some interest in the role of file systems in containerized environments.

    As Linux distributions container-based operations microservices, they come across new file-system related challenges. Linux vendors, including Red Hat, SUSE and Canonical, are major players in the container space. In addition to their traditional OSes, these companies have also built container as service platforms to handle containerized workloads and microservices. Following the footsteps of CoreOS’s Container Linux, Red Hat has created Project Atomic; Canonical came out with Ubuntu Core and SUSE released SUSE CaaS Platform and Kubic.

  • Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service
  • SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

    SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

  • F/LOSS (in)activity, September 2017

    Unfortunately, September was a poor month for me in terms of motivation and energy for F/LOSS work. I did some amount of Gitano work, merging a patch from Richard Ipsum for help text of the config command. I also submitted another patch to the STM32F103xx Rust repository, though it wasn't a particularly big thing. Otherwise I've been relatively quiet on the Rust/USB stuff and have otherwise kept away from projects.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Equifax Breach Impact Expands as Former CEO Admits Patching Failure

    Credit reporting agency Equifax announced on Oct. 2, that the forensic investigation of its data breach has revealed that an additional 2.5 million Americans were impacted.

    Equifax first publicly announced on Sept. 7 that it was the victim of a data breach that exposed personally identifiable information on 143 million Americans. After a forensic investigation completed by security firm FireEye's Mandiant division, the number has now grown to 145.5 million.

  • Internet-wide security update put on hold over fears 60 million people would be kicked offline

    A multi-year effort to update the internet's overall security has been put on hold just days before it was due to be introduced, over fears that as many as 60 million people could be forced offline.

    DNS overseer ICANN announced on Thursday it had postponed the rollout of a new root zone "key signing key" (KSK) used to secure the internet's foundational servers after it received fresh information that indicated its deployment would be more problematic than expected.

    [...]

    No matter what the reason, it is an indication of how incredibly difficult it is to update the internet on a network-wide basis. Just look at IPv6.

  • What’s New in Zorin OS 12.2
  • The New Features Of Fedora 27
  • Antoine Beaupré: My free software activities, September 2017
  • LXD Weekly Status #17

    We used this opportunity to talk about our next round of LTS releases, LXC 3.0, LXD 3.0 and LXCFS 3.0, all to be released early next year. What kind of breaking changes we may want to do at that time and how we expect support to work for them.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Final Beta released
  • Roku releases five new streaming devices and an OS update
  • Linux-friendly embedded computer offers up to 4x isolated serial ports

    Axiomtek’s rugged “ICO300-83B” is a fanless DIN-rail PC with a Celeron N3350 SoC, 2x mini-PCIe, 4x USB 3.0, and up to 4x isolated RS-232/422/485 ports.

    Axiomtek’s Intel Apollo Lake based ICO300-83B computer can be considered a more advanced version of its entry-level, Bay Trail Atom based ICO-300-MI, but it has more in common with the more advanced, Braswell based ICO310 design. Among other similarities, the ICO300-83B has the same compact, 155 x 110 x 48mm footprint as the ICO310, as well as up to 8GB DDR3L RAM, 2x GBE ports, and 4x USB 3.0 ports.

  • Open Jam, our open source game jam, kicks off this week

    Take note, indie game developers: We're less than a week away from the start of the first-ever Open Jam, a 72-hour game jam dedicated to promoting open source games and game development tools. We'll reveal the theme on our jam page this Friday morning, October 6, at 12:01 a.m. Eastern Time (4:01 a.m. UTC).

  • SAP Backs Kubernetes, Boasts Commitment to Open Source

    Buys Cloud Native Computing Foundation board seat; gets praise from Linux Foundation director

  • FreeBSD Picks Up Support For ZFS ZCP: Carry Out Admin Tasks Via Lua Scripts

    FreeBSD 12.0 will have initial support for ZFS Channel Programs (ZCP) for running administrative tasks on the file-system via Lua.

  • Sponsor Software Freedom Conservancy

    I did an interview with the Software Freedom Conservancy to discuss why I try to contribute to the Conservancy whenever I can. Because I believe many more free software communities deserve to have a home for their project at the Conservancy.

    Please support the Software Freedom Conservancy by donating so they will be able to provide a home to many more communities. A donation of 10 US dollars a month will make you an official sponsor. Or donate directly to one of their many member projects.

  • NVIDIA Corporation (NVDA) Hoping Open Source Bet Pays Off

    The graphics chipmaker, which was known for most of its existence as a maker of video cards for PC gaming, suddenly finds itself at the center of multiple technological revolutions, including self-driving cars, AI, VR, the internet of things, and more.

  • Tracking live brain activity with the new NeuBtracker open-source microscope

    NeuBtracker* is equipped with two cameras: One tracks the unrestrained behavior of the zebrafish larva while the other automatically remains pointed at the transparent head, and consequently the brain, to record fluorescence images. "This approach makes it possible to observe neuronal activity during unrestrained behavior. We can test the larvae in different environmental conditions and can immediately analyze the effects," says Prof. Dr. Gil Westmeyer from the Institutes of Biological and Medical Imaging (IBMI) and Developmental Genetics (IDG) at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as well as the Department of Nuclear Medicine and Munich School of Bioengineering (MSB) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).

    [...]

    The new instrument is a so-called open-source microscope.

  • Support For Myriad ma2x8x CPUs Added To LLVM

    The latest work hitting LLVM 6.0 is support for the Myriad ma2x8x class of processors and some other missing Myriad CPUs.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux To Get "Extended LTS" Releases, Kernel Support For Six Years

    Linux right now offers a "Long Term Support" release where support for the kernel branch is maintained for two years, which is nice compared to kernel releases usually dropping maintenance around N+1.1 after the release. But moving forward, Linux LTS releases will now be maintained for six years.

    The two-year Linux LTS cycle is suitable for many users, but one case where it's not long enough is the lifecycle of a smartphone and the status quo is many Android phones out there are still running on Linux kernels no longer receiving bug/security fixes. Via Google's Project Treble and cooperation with the upstream Linux community, that two year process is now being extended to six years.

  • Mesa 17.2.2 Set For Release Next Week

    For those not comfortable riding Mesa Git, Mesa 17.2.2 is set to be released early next week as the newest stable update for the open-source 3D graphics driver stack.

    Point release manager Juan Suarez Romero of Igalia is planning on releasing Mesa 17.2.2 next Monday, 2 October, if all goes well. So far there are 43 patches queued and a handful of more patches still possibly landing. Friday marked the release candidate for this newest point release.

  • SELinux (Security-Enhanced Linux)

    SELinux, or Security-Enhanced Linux, is a part of the Linux security kernel that acts as a protective agent on servers. In the Linux kernel, SELinux relies on mandatory access controls (MAC) that restrict users to rules and policies set by the system administrator. MAC is a higher level of access control than the standard discretionary access control (DAC), and prevents security breaches in the system by only processing necessary files that the administrator pre-approves.

  • Alpine Linux

    Alpine Linux is a small, security-oriented, lightweight Linux distribution based on the musl libc library and BusyBox utilities platform instead of GNU. It operates on bare-metal hardware, in a VM or even on a Raspberry Pi. The distribution is noncommercial and evolved for embedded and server-based workloads, although desktop OS use is possible.

  • Red Hat Inc. Is on a Roll
  • Attend a Fedora Women Day 2017 event

    Fedora Women Day (FWD) is a worldwide series of events initiated by the Fedora Diversity Team. The events are dedicated to female contributors of the Fedora Project. During this day of celebration, local communities gather to present the accomplishments of women in the Fedora Project and thank them. FWD is also a great chance to promote the participation of more women and raise awareness about the gender gap in tech communities. Furthermore, FWD and events like it show the importance of diversity in open source projects such as Fedora.

  • Keep the Trump administration out of your private life with Tails 3.2 Linux distribution

    As we learned from the great patriot Edward Snowden, the US government can and will spy on you. Not caring about that invasion of privacy, and dismissing it with the flawed statement of "I have nothing to hide," is flat out idiotic. Regardless of what you do on your computer, or on the internet, your privacy is sacred, and quite frankly, it was earned by our forefathers that fought for our freedoms.

    If you do care about your privacy, and you want to keep the heavy-handed Trump administration or other government agency out of your private business, please know you aren't powerless. There is a specific Linux-based operating system that aims to protect your privacy from corrupt governments and other evildoers, such as hackers and spies. Called "Tails," it always runs in a live environment from a DVD or flash drive. In other words, especially with an optical disk, it will help to hide your footprints. Today, version 3.2 sees release.

Today's Leftovers and Red Hat

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Advancing with Open Source

    For today’s system administrators, the future holds tremendous promise. In this ebook, we have covered many technical skills that can be big differentiators for sysadmins looking to advance their careers. But, increasingly, open source skillsets can also open new doors.

    A decade ago, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst predicted that open source tools and platforms would become pervasive in IT. Today, that prediction has come true, with profound implications for the employment market. Participating in open source projects -- through developing code, submitting a bug report, or contributing to documentation -- is an important way to demonstrate open source skills to hiring managers.

  • FreeType Improvements For The Adobe Engine

    With FreeType 2.8.1 having been released last week, a lot of new code landed in the early hours of today to its Git repository.

    The code landed includes the work done this summer by Ewald Hew for Google Summer of Code (GSoC 17) adding support for Type 1 fonts to the Adobe CFF engine. Type 1 is an older, less maintained font format.

  • Are You Fond Of HDR Photography? Try Luminance HDR Application In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Luminance HDR is an graphical user interface that is used for manipulation and creation of High Dynamic Range(HDR) images. It is based on Qt5 toolkit, it is cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac, and released under the GNU GPL license. It provides a complete workflow for High Dynamic Range(HDR) as well as Low Dynamic Range (LDR) file formats.
    Prerequisite of HDR photography are several narrow-range digital images with different exposures. Luminance HDR combines these images and calculates a high-contrast image. In order to view this image on a regular computer monitor, Luminance HDR can convert it into a displayable LDR image format using a variety of methods, such as tone mapping.

  • Opera Web Browser Now Has Built-in WhatsApp and FB Messenger, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Enterprise open source comes of age

    In the age of digitalisation and data centre modernisation, open source has come of age.

    This is demonstrated by the growth that enterprise open source software provider SUSE has enjoyed over the last months.

    “SUSE is in good shape,” says Nils Brauckmann, CEO of SUSE. “In the last year, revenue grew at 21%, and it was profitable growth.”

    Business is positive going forward, he adds, with SUSE now part of the larger mothership Micro Focus group following the completion this month of the HPE Software spin merger.

    “Micro focus is now the seventh-largest pure-play software vendor in the world, with revenues approaching $4,5-billion,” Brauckmann points out.

  • Red Hat, Microsoft Extend Alliance to SQL Server
  • UbuCon Europe 2017

    I’ve been to many Ubuntu related events before, but what surprises me every time about UbuCons is the outstanding work by the community organising these events.

    Earlier this month, I was in Paris for UbuCon Europe 2017. I had quite high expectations about the event/location and the talks, especially because the French Ubuntu community is known for hosting awesome events several times a year like Ubuntu Party and Ubuntu install parties.

  •  

Various Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Misc
  • XFree KWin: Ridding KDE's Wayland Compositor Of X11 Dependencies

    Martin Flöser (nee Gräßlin) has announced the "XFree KWin" project. This isn't to be confused with XFree86 but rather is about ridding KWin optionally of X11/X.Org dependencies.

  • Bad News for Users of TopIcons Plus

    The development of the popular TopIcons Plus GNOME extension has been put on pause.

    Offering a convenient way to access indicator applets and system tray icons from the GNOME top bar, the extension has proven popular with GNOME Shell users, especially as GNOME 3.26 removes the legacy tray entirely.

  • Fix the “This version of Skype is not supported” Error on Ubuntu
  • Will Blockchain Race to the Front of the Disruption Line in IoT?

    The group, founded in 2015, is the fastest-growing project in the history of the Linux Foundation according to Hyperledger Executive Director Brian Behlendorf.  This project has reached out to various industries in addition to IoT, industries which also are adopting IoT including healthcare.

  • The State Of Intel's GPU Virtualization Pass-Through On Linux

    Wrapping up our XDC2017 coverage for this annual X.Org developer event that took place this past week in Mountain View, Zhenyu Wang of Intel presented on their ongoing work for mediated GPU virtualization pass-through support on Linux, Intel GVT.

  • Red Hat announces that Ansible Project 2.4 now generally available

    Red Hat announced this week general availability of Ansible Project 2.4, its simple and agentless open source IT automation framework. The upstream Ansible project is one of the world’s most popular open source IT automation technologies, with nearly 3,000 unique contributors, more than 32,000 commits to the upstream Ansible open source project, and a user base that spans industries and the globe.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) is Under Analysts Radar
  • Best Self-Hosted CRM Apps

    Customer relationship management or simply CRM is a term or specifically an approach to managing and analyzing the interaction of your current customers and leads. The CRM software allows you to manage the customer data, customer interaction, automate sales, manage client contacts and employees, customer support etc. In this article we will cover some of the best self-hosted CRM applications which you can install on a CRM Linux VPS and use for managing your company.

  • Electric Cars, Open Source Summit, and Linux Server Innovation [Ed: "This article was sponsored and written by IBM." Linux Foundation writes what Big Bully IBM tells it to write.]
  • Intel IX4 Networking Performance On DragonFly Gets Boosted By Direct Input Support

    DragonFlyBSD today picked up direct input support within the kernel's polling code. This can boost the networking performance though for now is just supported by the IX4 driver, what is used as the Intel 10Gb Ethernet driv

  • Chicago School Official: US IT Jobs Offshored Because 'We Weren't Making Our Own' Coders

    In the video, the Director of Computer Science and IT Education for the nation's third largest school district offers a take on why U.S. IT jobs were offshored that jibes nicely with the city's new computer science high school graduation requirement. From the transcript: "People still talk about it's all offshored, it's all in India and you know, there are some things that are there but they don't even realize some of the reasons that they went there in the first place is because we weren't making our own."

  • After the breach, Equifax now faces the lawsuits

    Since it announced a massive data breach earlier this month, Equifax has been hit with dozens of lawsuits from shareholders, consumers and now one filed by a small Wisconsin credit union that represents what could be the first by a financial institution attempting to preemptively recoup losses caused by alleged fraud the hack could cause.

    Equifax has said its breach exposed sensitive information about 143 million consumers, including Social Security and driver's license numbers. This kind of data could be used for identity theft and to create fake accounts, cybersecurity experts have said.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Sonic Mania ‘Plays Perfectly’ on Linux via WINE

    The Windows version of Sonic Mania is playable on Linux using WINE — and that’s not just me saying that, that’s a bunch of Linux gamers over on Reddit (where else?).

  • Icculus has ported The End is Nigh to on-demand service 'Jump', Linux may come soon plus some thoughts

    Ever heard of the on-demand subscription gaming service Jump? It's an on-demand game streaming service and Icculus just ported The End is Nigh to it.

    Recently, I wrote about how The End is Nigh might be coming to Linux. Sadly, that's not actually the case just yet. Announcing it on his Patreon, Icculus noted about his work to port it to the on-demand service Jump. They actually reached out to him to do it, as it turns out.

  • liveslak 1.1.9 and new ISO images

    The ‘liveslak‘ scripts used to create the ISO images for Slackware Live Edition have been stamped with a new version, 1.1.9. The updates are significant enough to warrant an ‘official’ update and new ISO images.

    The latest set of Slackware Live Edition ISOs are based on liveslak 1.1.9 and Slackware-current dated “Tue Sep 19 20:49:07 UTC 2017“. Just in time (I was already creating ISOS based on -current “Mon Sep 18 19:15:03 UTC 2017“) I noticed that Patrick downgraded the freetype package in Slackware, and I re-generated all of the ISO images to incorporate the latest freetype package – because that one is working and the previous one had serious issues.

    If you already use a Slackware Live USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • The best of Tizen deals from Samsung’s ‘Smart Utsav’ festive offers in India
  • Chrome 62 Beta: Network Quality Estimator API, OpenType variable fonts, and media capture from DOM elements

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 62 Beta Released With OpenType Font Variations, DOM Media Capture

    Google has rolled out their public beta of the upcoming Chrome/Chromium 62 web-browser update.

  • Turning Off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth in iOS 11's Control Center Doesn’t Actually Turn Off Wi-Fi or Bluetooth [Ed: Proprietary software means you cannot trust it and anything you think it does it likely won't]

    Turning off Bluetooth and Wi-Fi when you're not using them on your smartphone has long been standard, common sense, advice. Unfortunately, with the iPhone's new operating system iOS 11, turning them off is not as easy as it used to be.

    Now, when you toggle Bluetooth and Wi-Fi off from the iPhone's Control Center—the somewhat confusing menu that appears when you swipe up from the bottom of the phone—it actually doesn't completely turn them off. While that might sound like a bug, that's actually what Apple intended in the new operating system. But security researchers warn that users might not realize this and, as a consequence, could leave Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on without noticing.

  • HP Brings Back Obnoxious DRM That Cripples Competing Printer Cartridges

    Around a year ago, HP was roundly and justly ridiculed for launching a DRM time bomb -- or a software update designed specifically to disable competing printer cartridges starting on a set date. As a result, HP Printer owners using third-party cartridges woke up one day to warnings about a "cartridge problem," or errors stating, "one or more cartridges are missing or damaged," or that the user was using an "older generation cartridge." The EFF was quick to lambast the practice in a letter to HP, noting that HP abused its security update mechanism to trick its customers and actively erode product functionality.

    HP only made matters worse for itself by claiming at the time that it was only looking out for the safety and security of its customers, while patting itself on the back for being pro-active about addressing a problem it caused -- only after a massive consumer backlash occurred.

  • EFF quits W3C over decision to accept EME as Web standard

     

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation has resigned from the World Wide Web Consortium after the latter announced it was accepting the published Encrypted Media Extensions as a Web standard.  

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Uber Sued, Intel ‘Damage Control’, ZDNet FUD, and XFRM Privilege Escalation

  • Uber hit with 2 lawsuits over gigantic 2016 data breach
    In the 48 hours since the explosive revelations that Uber sustained a massive data breach in 2016, two separate proposed class-action lawsuits have been filed in different federal courts across California. The cases allege substantial negligence on Uber’s part: plaintiffs say the company failed to keep safe the data of the affected 50 million customers and 7 million drivers. Uber reportedly paid $100,000 to delete the stolen data and keep news of the breach quiet. On Tuesday, CEO Dara Khosrowshahi wrote: “None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it.”
  • Intel Releases Linux-Compatible Tool For Confirming ME Vulnerabilities [Ed: ‘Damage control’ strategy is to make it look like just a bug.]
    While Intel ME security issues have been talked about for months, confirming fears that have been present about it for years, this week Intel published the SA-00086 security advisory following their own internal review of ME/TXE/SPS components. The impact is someone could crash or cause instability issues, load and execute arbitrary code outside the visibility of the user and operating system, and other possible issues.
  • Open source's big weak spot? Flawed libraries lurking in key apps [Ed: Linux basher Liam Tung entertains FUD firm Snyk and Microsoft because it suits the employer's agenda]
  • SSD Advisory – Linux Kernel XFRM Privilege Escalation

gThumb 3.6 GNOME Image Viewer Released with Better Wayland and HiDPI Support

gThumb, the open-source image viewer for the GNOME desktop environment, has been updated this week to version 3.6, a new stable branch that introduces numerous new features and improvements. gThumb 3.6 comes with better support for the next-generation Wayland display server as the built-in video player, color profiles, and application icon received Wayland support. The video player component received a "Loop" button to allow you to loop videos, and there's now support for HiDPI displays. The app also ships with a color picker, a new option to open files in full-screen, a zoom popover that offers different zoom commands and a zoom slider, support for double-click activation, faster image loading, aspect ratio filtering, and the ability to display the description of the color profile in the property view. Read more Also: Many Broadway HTML5 Backend Improvements Land In GTK4

ExTiX 18.0, 64bit, with Deepin Desktop 15.5 (made in China!) and Refracta Tools – Create your own ExTiX/Ubuntu/Deepin system in minutes!

I’ve made a new extra version of ExTiX with Deepin 15.5 Desktop (made in China!). Deepin is devoted to providing a beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. Only a minimum of packages are installed in ExTiX Deepin. You can of course install all packages you want. Even while running ExTiX Deepin live. I.e. from a DVD or USB stick. Study all installed packages in ExTiX Deepin. Read more Also: ExTiX, the Ultimate Linux System, Now Has a Deepin Edition Based on Ubuntu 17.10 Kali Linux 2017.3 Brings New Hacking Tools — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here

Graphics: Greenfield, Polaris, Ryzen

  • Greenfield: An In-Browser HTML5 Wayland Compositor
    Earlier this year we covered the Westfield project as Wayland for HTML5/JavaScript by providing a Wayland protocol parser and generator for JavaScript. Now that code has morphed into Greenfield to provide a working, in-browser HTML5 Wayland compositor.
  • New Polaris Firmware Blobs Hit Linux-Firmware.Git
    Updated firmware files for the command processor (CP) on AMD Polaris graphics cards have landed in linux-firmware.git. These updated firmware files for Polaris GPUs are light on details besides being for the CP and from their internal 577de7b1 Git state.
  • Report: Ryzen "Raven Ridge" APU Not Using HBM2 Memory
    Instead of the Vega graphics on Raven Ridge using HBM2 memory, it appears at least for some models they are just using onboard DDR4 memory. FUDZilla is reporting today that there is just 256MB of onboard DDR4 memory being used by the new APU, at least for the Ryzen 5 APU found on the HP Envy x360 that was the first Raven APU system to market.