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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • What Is Arch Linux 32? How To Migrate To This New Fork As Arch Linux 32-Bit Support Ends?

    About nine months ago, the Arch Linux developers announced the end of the support for 32-bit architecture. As a result, Arch Linux 2017.02.01 was the last release to ship a 32-bit ISO as well. It was followed by a depreciation period.

  • Trading Watch on Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Mellanox Announces First Major Production Deployment of Linux Kernel-Based Open Ethernet Switch
  • Cloud Foundry: Focusing on Flexibility and Choice for a Cloud-Native World

    For some organizations working outside of technology hubs such as Silicon Valley, there is a vast shortage of developer talent to choose from. As a result, many have taken a proactive learning approach to help bring their developers up-to-speed with the demands of today’s cloud-native software platforms.

    Cloud Foundry is evolving its technology to benefit these users’ goals, explained Cloud Foundry Executive Director Abby Kearns, in this live-streamed episode of The New Stack Makers podcast recorded at Cloud Foundry Summit Europe last month.

  • Kubernetes by the numbers: 10 compelling stats

    How quickly has Kubernetes’ popularity soared? By most accounts, very quickly. Earlier this year, Cloud Native Computing Foundation executive director Dan Kohn penned a blog post that dug into that claim. People regularly tout Kubernetes as one of the highest velocity projects ever in open source history: Does the data back it up?

    As Kohn found, there may not be a single definitive metric, but they all point in the same conclusion: “You can pick your preferred statistic, such as that Kubernetes is in the top 0.00006% of the projects on GitHub,” Kohn wrote. “I prefer to just think of it as one of the fastest moving projects in the history of open source.”

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers: Linux and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Misc
  • Intel User-Mode Instruction Prevention Support Revised For The Linux Kernel

    An Intel engineer over the weekend sent out the latest patches for implementing the company's User-Mode Instruction Prevention (UMIP) support within the Linux kernel.

    User-Mode Instruction Prevention appears to be on track for upcoming Cannonlake processors and prevents certain instructions from being executed if the ring level is greater than zero. These instructions include the store task register, store machine status word, store global descriptor table, and store interrupt descriptor table. To fend off possible escalation attacks, Intel's UMIP security feature will prevent these instructions from being executed outside of the highest level privileges.

  • Mesa 17.3 Features - Vulkan Updates, Better Performance

    Mesa 17.3 is due out in the days ahead as the Q4'2017 installment of Mesa 3D for delivering the updated open-source OpenGL and Vulkan driver stacks for Linux and other platforms. As usual, this quarterly update to Mesa introduces a ton of new features, performance improvements, and other enhancements.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • IT Security Woes and Linux – Unleaded Hangout

    IT Security Woes and Linux are the topic of the day with the hangout crew. We discuss recent events with Equifax and how they’re not the only cybersecurity incident worth note.

  • GNOME Asia 2017

    Finally, I got opportunity to write about my first and awesome GNOME Asia 2017. This year is a special year for GNOME as it’s the 20th anniversary of GNOME and 10th anniversary of GNOME Asia conference.

    GNOME Asia was hosted at Chongqing University, Chongqing this year which happens to be known as 3D city built on and around mountains. It was also my first experience in China as a visitor. I was excited.

  • Faking cleaner URLs in the Debian BTS
  • My Free Software Activities in October 2017

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • Skylake-based touch panels offer up to IP69 protection

    Wincomm’s Linux-ready “WTP-9E66” resistive touch-panel PCs come in IP66 protected 15-, 19-, and 22-inch models, with optional PCAP, IP67, and IP69.

  • Tizen 4.0 Milestone M2: What has been released?

    Samsung has published the second milestone, so-called M2, of Tizen 4.0. This is the second release for Tizen 4.0 after Samsung hit the first milestone back in June, also announcing that Tizen is the most successful Linux-based embedded OS in the whole world. As expected, Tizen 4.0 M2 comes with a bunch of new, welcome additions and some fine-tuning for the platform.

  • Apple Quarter and Few Other Items in Smartphone Wars

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Akademy 2018 site visit

    Last week I was part of the expedition by KDE (together with Kenny and Petra) to visit the local team that is helping us organize Akademy 2018 in Vienna.

  • 12 emerging IT job titles with a bright future [Ed: They interject pure buzzwords into job titles (not new jobs). Typical Red Hat spin.]
  • At This Price, Is It Too Late To Buy Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?
  • My suggestion for QEMU

    I have been involved in open source software since 1993. And in 1994, I believed so strongly in the ability for people to come together to write code that I created the FreeDOS Project, to replicate the functionality of MS-DOS. And twenty-three years later, I'm still using and developing FreeDOS.

    My desktop system is Linux, and I run FreeDOS using QEMU (Quick EMUlator). QEMU is very easy to use, and provides great flexbility to define your virtual machine. I run FreeDOS in QEMU when I want to play an old DOS game, or when I want to test some legacy software, or when I want to write code to update a FreeDOS program.

    But one problem pops up occasionally when using QEMU. A lot of old DOS software uses the function keys to do various things. The most extreme example is WordPerfect, which was arguably the most popular commercial word processor of the day. WordPerfect is notorious for using all of the function keys, in every combination, including use of Ctrl and Alt to access all the common features. I think WordPerfect probably used all of the expanded keys too, like Home and End.

  • syspatch(8) Binary Updates Now for the Latest Release Only

     

    We intend to only build syspatches for one release in the future.  Errata patches will continue to be generated for 2 releases.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
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