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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • OpenSnitch Is a Host-Based Firewall for Linux Desktops

    Simone Margaritelli, the VP of Research at Zimperium, has created a Linux port of Little Snitch, a wildly popular macOS firewall application.

    Named OpenSnitch, the Linux port works on the same principles of the macOS version, being a host-based firewall that notifies users when local apps are attempting to initiate new outgoing network connections.

    Similar to Little Snitch's normal modus operandi, when this happens, OpenSnitch will display a popup, asking the user for instructions on how to deal with this new process.

    All user decisions are saved as rules in local JSON files. Users can edit these rules later to fine-tune the firewall or import/export rules from/to other systems.

  • You Can Now Run Progressive Web Apps as Native Chrome OS Apps on Your Chromebook

    Google's François Beaufort recently informed the Chrome OS community about the fact that it's now possible to run progressive Web Apps like native apps in Chrome OS on their Chromebooks.

    Live in the Chrome Canary experimental channel for Chrome OS, the new feature promises to let you run progressive Web Apps just like you would run native Chrome OS apps on your Chromebook. The apps will work offline in their own custom window.

  • How to Synchronize Time using NTP Server in Ubuntu
  • Tutorial: Writing your first view from scratch (C++20 / P0789)
  • More GNOME Performance Improvements Are On The Way

    While it unfortunately didn't happen in time for last month's GNOME 3.28 release, there are more performance improvements en route.

    Several performance fixes are inbound on top of an important performance fix covered at the end of March where Clutter's text rendering code was causing frequent spikes in GNOME Shell's frame-time.

  • Plymouth Adds Device Rotation Support

    Commits these days to Plymouth are fairly rare with this Red Hat developed project seeing its first commits of 2018 yesterday.

    Plymouth doesn't seem commits too often since this Linux graphical boot system is largely in great shape, relies upon the stable DRM/KMS kennel APIs, and has largely hit feature completion for a simple graphical boot screen that is far better than the days of RHGB or alternatives. But a fair amount of new code did land yesterday in Plymouth for now supporting device rotation.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linspire 7.0 Service Pack 1 released

    Today we are delivering Linspire 7 SP1 for general release. With this release we have several fixes and changes that we have made to Linspire. With this release we have resolved many of the issues that users had with our first release. Linspire 7 is the only desktop distribution that is supported for 10 years on the desktop. Linspire is deployed by many companies, government agencies and education facilities for their productivity, design and development workstations.

  • Slackware 13.x EOL in July

    Patrick has been supporting older Slackware releases for more than 7 years and it's getting harder to push updates for those releases as their base libraries are too ancient. It will also keep his load high as it might take more time to inspect whether an update affected older releases and trying to build or patch packages to fix those issues.

    Well, in the next few months (exactly one day after USA independency day), the support for all Slackware 13.x (13.0, 13.1, and 13.37) will expires and support will only be given to Slackware 14.x and future releases.

  • Indore: SVVV signs MoU with Red Hat Academy

    Red Hat is an open source, web deployed and managed education program that is designed to provide turnkey curriculum materials to academic institutions to start and sustain an open source and Linux curriculum program. SVVV is a state private university established with a vision to be a leader in shaping better future for mankind through quality education, training and research. Red Hat Academy turns academic institutions into centers for enterprise-ready talent by outfitting them with Red Hat training.

  • Top Badgers of 2017: Alberto Rodriguez Sanchez

    “Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

    This article features Alberto Rodriguez Sanchez (bt0dotninja), who clocked in at the #4 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 33 badges! As of the writing of this article, Alberto is the #117 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux all-in-one: Slimbook Curve comes with your distro of choice pre-installed

    Spanish computer maker Slimbook has unveiled the Slimbook Curve, an all-in-one with a 24-inch curved screen made for GNU/Linux.

  • Slimbook Curve All-In-One Linux PC

    Spanish hardware and PC manufacturer Slimbook has created a new all-in-one Linux PC in the form of the aptly named Slimbook Curve, that features a curved 24 inch IPS display offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels as well as a matte, anti-glare finish. The Slimbook Curve can by installed with a wide variety of different Linux operating systems including No OS, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Ubuntu Mate, Debian, Elementary OS, Linux Mint, OpenSUSE, Antergos, Fedora and KDE Neon.

  • AIMS inverter control via GPIO ports

    I recently upgraded my inverter to a AIMS 1500 watt pure sine inverter (PWRI150024S). This is a decent inverter for the price, I hope. It seems reasonably efficient under load compared to other inverters. But when it's fully idle, it still consumes 4 watts of power.

    That's almost as much power as my laptop, and while 96 watt-hours per day may not sound like a lot of power, some days in winter, 100 watt-hours is my entire budget for the day. Adding more batteries just to power an idle inverter would be the normal solution, probably. Instead, I want to have my house computer turn it off when it's not being used.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Timespinner is an upcoming metroidvania that’s looking great and is fun to play

    Following a successful crowdfunding campaign several years ago, this 2d metroidvania has grown and matured as a project. I had a chance to play a closed beta and things look promising.

  • What’s New in Enso OS 0.2.1

    Enso OS 0.2.1 is the latest release of Enso Linux Distribution 0.2 series. This release features Xfce 4.12 series as default desktop environment, include the Panther application launcher, which it can resizing itself on change of the screen resolution. Also Plank dock installed by default.

    Based on Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS and using Linux Kernel 4.4, which means that it offers support for the latest hardware components available on the market. Galal now includes a new windows switcher that lists the active windows in a much more easy to read manner that is more familiar to users than was previously implemented. Enso greeter now applies a nice blur effect onto the set background which was kindly taken from the Deepin project

  • What Else Will Red Hat Acquire?

    Linux may not be the OS of choice for desktops, but it dominates the world when it comes to supercomputers, web servers, and Chromebooks. Additionally, Linux Kernel actually powers the Android OS that is used in Android-based mobile devices. According to market reports, as of 2017, Linux powered all of the top 500 supercomputers in the world.

  • Fedora 28 : Golang by JetBrains .
  • Debian & Stuff -- Montreal Debian Meeting

    Today we had a meeting of the local Montreal Debian group. The last meetings we had were centered on working on finishing the DebConf17 final report and some people told us they didn't feel welcome because they weren't part of the organisation of the conference.

    I thus decided to call today's event "Debian & Stuff" and invite people to come hack with us on diverse Debian related projects. Most of the people who came were part of the DC17 local team, but a few other people came anyway and we all had a great time. Someone even came from Ottawa to learn how to compile the Linux kernel!

  • Linux Mint Launching SFF MintBox Mini 2 and Mini 2 Pro PCs Running Linux Mint 19

    The Linux Mint development team recently announced the MintBox Mini 2 and MintBox Mini 2 Pro small form factor PCs which will ship with Linux Mint 19 this summer. The tiny passively cooled computers are based on Compulab’s Fitlet2 SFF barebones PC and comes in two flavors: the base Mini 2 with Intel Celeron J3455, 4GB DDR3L, and 64GB SATA SSD and the Mini 2 Pro with J3455 processor, 8GB RAM, and 120GB solid state drive. The MintBox Mini 2 PCs measure 4.4” x 3.3” x 1.3” and weigh approximately 12 ounces.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Needs Deep Pockets

    I love the operating systems revolving around the Linux Kernel. I think it’s amazing that something so good comes to the world so cheap or mostly free. You can do tremendous work on this platform, so it begs the question: Why aren’t more people using it? Here are the known benefits:

  • Open Standards, Open Source Come Together With New Tech-World Partnership

    The open-source-focused Linux Foundation is teaming with TM Forum, a communications technology industry group that has upped its open standards game in recent years.

    With a new partnership, the world of telecom is jumping into the world of open source with both feet.

    Last month, TM Forum, an association that represents communications service providers (CSPs) as they interact in the digital supply chain, announced it would team with the Linux Foundation, the nonprofit best known for shepherding its namesake, the open-source operating system on which the modern internet is largely built.

    The foundation is also known as a key steward of major open-source projects, and with the partnership, TM Forum will boost its open-source game, a change advocated by the CSPs it represents.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Lands Out-of-Order Rasterization Support, Small Performance Boost

    The Mesa-based RADV Vulkan driver has landed initial support for out-of-rasterization support, but it's currently disabled by default.

    Back in 2016 AMD developers introduced the VK_AMD_rasterization_order extension for out-of-order rasterization handling. This VK_AMD_rasterization_order extension has been present since Vulkan 1.0.12 and has already been supported in AMDGPU-PRO.

  • dwm: A Minimalist Tiling Window Manager For Linux

    Tiling window managers have several advantages over their more popular cousins such as Gnome, KDE, XFCE, or Fluxbox. The feature of this post, dwm, takes these advantages to their most extreme.

    While most tiling managers strive to be lightweight, dwm keeps itself on a starvation diet of 2000 lines of code or fewer. All its configuration is done when it’s compiled, so it doesn’t read a runtime configuration file. It uses tags (the numbers 1 through 9), rather than arbitrarily-named window spaces, to group programs together. It can also be run entirely with keyboard commands, though it does incorporate mouse support for selecting and dragging windows when appropriate.

  • Proposed design for mobile network settings

    While thinking of design, i looked on biggest “competitors” on mobile OS market – Android and iOS. Mainly i am taking design ideas from Android, since i am thinking it has good proportion between usability and functionality, while i am studying/following KDE Human Interface Guidelines, https://community.kde.org/KDE_Visual_Design_Group/HIG and as recommended i am using Kirigami 2 framework, which implement most of HIG rules by itself.

  • Templates to create your own Plasma Wallpaper plugin
  • [Slackware] GNOME Library Stack Update
  • Clear Linux Shedding More Light On Their "Magic" Performance Work

    If you have been a Phoronix reader for any decent amount of time, you have likely seen how well Intel's Clear Linux distribution continues to run in our performance comparisons against other distributions. The developers behind this Linux distribution have begun a new blog series on "behind the magic" for some of the areas they are making use of for maximizing the out-of-the-box Linux performance.

    Their first post in their "behind the magic" series is on transparent use of library packages optimized for Intel's architecture... While they are optimizing for their own hardware as one would expect, let's not forget, Clear Linux does run on AMD hardware too; they are not doing any voodoo magic, which is why it pains me that more Linux distributions have not taken such a stance for better out-of-the-box speed. In fact, it runs on AMD hardware darn well as we have shown with our Ryzen and EPYC benchmarks. Obviously Intel tweaks their software packages for their own x86_64 CPUs, but even when testing on the AMD hardware Clear Linux tends to perform the best in terms of out-of-the-box performance and that Intel isn't doing anything to sabotage the performance otherwise.

  •  

  • Release 18.03 (“Impala”, 2018/04/04)

    This section lists the release notes for each stable version of NixOS and current unstable revision.

  • ISO Refresh: antergos 18.4
  • Dustin Kirkland: I'm Joining the Google Cloud Team!

    A couple of months ago, I reflected on "10 Amazing Years of Ubuntu and Canonical". Indeed, it has been one hell of a ride, and that post is merely the tip of the proverbial iceberg...

    The people I've met, the things I've learned, the places I've been, the users I've helped, the partners I've enabled, the customers I've served -- these are undoubtedly the most amazing and cherished experiences of my professional career to date.

  • ITRS releases integrations to monitor open source big data technologies

    ITRS has released a set of six fully-supported integrations to monitor key big data technologies used in financial services today including Kafka, Hadoop, PostgreSQL, MongoDB, Cassandra and Elasticsearch.

    This means ITRS Geneos clients will now have the ability to troubleshoot, analyse and optimise the performance of applications running on a big data stack.

  • Jolla Winter Ambience Contest: the winners

    After the last, exciting, MWC18, we can finally announce the winners of the Jolla Winter Ambience Contest, made in collaboration with Jolla. The winners will get an email in the following days with instructions on how to redeem their prizes.

  • Intel Coffee Lake H-series debuts in Congatec and Seco modules

    Intel announced 18 new 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” chips, including up to hexa-core Core H-series and Xeon M-series CPUs, which are appearing in Linux-ready COM Express Type 6 modules from Seco and Congatec.

  • CenturyLink contributes orchestration developments to open source

    AT&T has led the charge in contributing inhouse developments to open source processes, in a bid to accelerate adoption of new software-driven network technologies, and increase its own influence over the whole ecosystem.

Shows: EzeeLinux, Cooking With Linux, Unleaded Hangouts, DevNation Live

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Misc
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.14 | Do You Really Need To Upgrade?

    With all the fuss about Ubuntu 18.04 and it’s many children coming along, you may be wondering if you should upgrade. Let’s chat about it.

  • VIDEO: When Linux Demos Go Wrong

    Full disclosure; this is an edited version of a live broadcast. You've heard me say it, and warn you about it. On this occasion, I decided it would be fun to take you through a tour of Linux based music player applications. To get said music on my system, I was also going to show you how to rip music from CDs using various applications. That's when things fell apart and my desktop lost track of the CD hardware. I do recover however and the whole thing does make for an interesting exercise in trying to figure out just what the heck went wrong so I can fix it before I submit to the growing panic. Because things went horribly wrong, at least for a while, I had to reboot my system which meant the show was suddenly in multiple parts. In assembling said parts into a semi-coherent whole, I may have added things here and there.

  • Facebook Data Collection – Unleaded Hangouts

    Facebook Data Collection. Should we stop using it? If we continue to use Facebook, what can be done to minimize the privacy impact – does it even matter? We discuss.

  • Next DevNation Live: Test Smarter and Gain Some Time Back, April 5th, 12pm EDT

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Now Available: April 2018 issue of Linux Journal
  • Linux 4.16 Released, SLES SP3 for Raspberry Pi, Cloudflare Launches the 1.1.1.1 Privacy-First DNS Service and More
  • Intel FSP reverse engineering: finding the real entry point!

    After attending 34C3 in Leipzig at the end of December, in which we (Zlatan and me) met with some of you, and had a lot of fun, I took some time off to travel Europe and fall victim to the horrible Influenza virus that so many people caught this year. After a couple more weeks of bed rest, I continued my saga in trying to find the real entry point of the Intel FSP-S module.

  • The End of Windows

    That wasn’t the only news that week: Microsoft also renamed its cloud service from Windows Azure to Microsoft Azure. The name change was an obvious one — by then customers could already run a whole host of non-Windows related software, including Linux — but the symbolism tied in perfectly with the Office on iPad announcement: Windows wouldn’t be forced onto Microsoft’s future.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL Basics – Windows Containers & Kubernetes

    It’s been a while since we did a “PodCTL Basics” show (see: Kubernetes, Linux Containers, Containerizing an Application, Services Meshes), but we’ve heard a lot of questions about Windows Containers, so we thought it was time to review the basics. In this short show, we talk about the differences between Linux and Windows containers, the dependencies in Windows Server 02016, the requirements of older vs. newer .NET applications, and how this will all play together with the Kubernetes technology that will orchestrate both Linux and Windows containers. These “Basics” shows are intended for listeners that are new to this technology space. In future episodes, as the technology matures, we’ll have additional shows that provide more technical depth.

  • Linux Kernel 4.16, GIMP 2.10 RC, Firefox Facebook Container, Qubes OS & more | This Week in Linux 26

    Facebook is still under fire for privacy violations but Mozilla is trying to help users mitigate these issues with their new Facebook Container Extension for Firefox.

  • AMD Vega 20 GPU in Linux patch reignites hope for an RX Vega refresh coming this year

    Rumblings of an AMD Vega 20 GPU have begun thanks to a Linux patch file update. The Vega 7nm die shrink seems a likely culprit for the additional code, but that hasn’t stopped excited rumours of a complete generational refresh sometime this year.

  • AMD's refreshed Vega 20 spotted in Linux driver patches

    AMD won't be releasing a follow up to their flagship Radeon RX Vega 64 this year, but a refreshed Vega 20 has been spotted in the new Linux driver patches.

  • Last week in Kube

    Kube by now is my daily driver, and we’ve managed to iron out a lot of the remaining kinks since the last update.

  • py3status v3.8

    Another long awaited release has come true thanks to our community!

  • Questions and Answers With Candidates for openSUSE Board Elections

    Elections for the openSUSE Board have been postponed until mid-April. Until then, the community can familiarize themselves with the candidates who are running for three available seats on the board.

    openSUSE Community Members can engage with the candidates directly or on the openSUSE-project mailing list if they have specific questions for a candidate(s).

  • Fun and games in -current when ABIs break

    All of us who follow Slackware’s development know that “shared library version bump” means ABI breakage. I.e. a lot of 3rd-party binaries will suddenly not find required library versions anymore. In particular icu4c and poppler are nasty beasts. Slackware’s own packages had been carefully updated and recompiled where needed of course, so there was no breakage in the distro itself. But many people do not run a bare Slackware installation… a lot of software is usually installed on top. And that is the software which will be affected by an incompatible change like this one on April 1st.

    What’s this version bump all about? How is it possible that it affects your computer so deeply?

    Most programs depend on other programs. Software developers hate to re-invent the wheel if they can avoid it. Lots of lower-level or widely used functionality has been put into software libraries. Think of network access functionality, text rendering, encryption etc – smart people have created useful, efficient and robust software and stuffed that code into libraries. Your own program can link against these libraries at run-time and access the functionality they have to offer and your program needs.

  • Red Hat Rides Containers, Kubernetes, Hybrid Cloud Into the Future

    Red Hat exited its fiscal 2018 on a high note as the company continued to show strong growth from new platforms expected to drive long-term growth. And even better, investors this time appear to be on board.

    At a high level, Red Hat’s financial results were robust with strong growth for both the quarter and full year, which ended Feb. 28. Quarterly revenues surged nearly 23 percent year-over-year to $772 million, while full-year revenues were up more than 21 percent to$2.9 billion.

  • Fedora 28 Beta Linux distro is finally here

    Fedora is the best overall Linux-based desktop operating system -- Linus Torvalds famously uses it regularly. Today, version 28 of the distribution finally achieves Beta status. After a short delay -- it was scheduled to be available a week earlier -- the distro is back on track, and looking better than ever.

    As is typical now, there are three versions of the operating system -- Atomic Host, Server, and Workstation. While all three have their places, normal desktop computer users will want to focus on Workstation. There are plenty of new features (and bugs), but the most exciting aspect of Fedora 28 Workstation is the inclusion of the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment.

  • Looking back on starting Libravatar

    As noted on the official Libravatar blog, I will be shutting the service down on 2018-09-01.

    It has been an incredible journey but Libravatar has been more-or-less in maintenance mode for 5 years, so it's somewhat outdated in its technological stack and I no longer have much interest in doing the work that's required every two years when migrating to a new version of Debian/Django. The free software community prides itself on transparency and so while it is a difficult decision to make, it's time to be upfront with the users who depend on the project and admit that the project is not sustainable in its current form.

    [...]

    In addition, I wanted to validate that it is possible to run a FOSS service without having to pay for anything out-of-pocket, so that it would be financially sustainable. Hosting and domain registrations have been entirely funded by the community, thanks to the generosity of sponsors and donors. Most of the donations came through Gittip/Gratipay and Liberapay. While Gratipay has now shut down, I encourage you to support Liberapay.

    Finally, I made an effort to host Libravatar on FOSS infrastructure. That meant shying away from popular proprietary services in order to make a point that these convenient and well-known services aren't actually needed to run a successful project.

  • My Debian Activities in March 2018
  • This Week in Lubuntu Development #1

    At Lubuntu we decided it was a good idea to create a weekly newsletter detailing the work that has been happening. So, here we are.

  • Android Studio – A Powerful IDE for Building Apps for All Android Devices

    Android Studio, Android’s official IDE, is a powerful and popular, feature-rich IDE for building apps for all Android compatible devices. It is specifically designed for Android platform to speed up building of apps and help users develop top-quality, reliable and efficient apps from scratch, for every type of Android device.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Mageia Blog (English) : Weekly Roundup 2018 – Weeks 12 & 13

    Apologies for the wait between roundups – life has a way of taking over, sometimes; anyway, here’s the latest.

    Since the last Roundup there have been quite a few updates coming through. You’ll see there are still a few security updates still coming in for Mga5, and that some kernel and microcode updates have also come through for Mageia 6.

    QA tests of the upgrade from KDE4 to Plasma are getting better and better, but there are still some bugs remaining. Martin’s qarepo package has been updated to v1.3 only a couple of days ago, making testers’ lives a little easier; hopefully this will help with huge meta-packages like Plasma. Once Plasma is sorted, and any fallout bugs are fixed, the path to both Mageia 5 to Mageia 6, and Mageia 6.1 will be a lot clearer.

  • Linux Mint 19 "Tara" Cinnamon to Let Users Raise the Volume over the 100% Limit

    Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre published March 2018's newsletter to let the community know about some of the exciting features coming to the Linux Mint operating system this summer.

    As you're probably aware, the Linux Mint 19 "Tara" release is currently in development, and it's coming in June based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system with the latest Cinnamon and MATE desktop environments, as well as up-to-date applications and GNU/Linux technologies.

    One of the new features included in the Cinnamon edition of Linux Mint 19 "Tara" is the ability to configure the maximum volume. In other words, you'll be able to raise the volume over the 100 percent limit. This is possible thanks to a new setting in Cinnamon's Sound panel, allowing volume amplification to up to 150 percent.

  • Rough, tough fanless box has dual HDMI and PoE

    Axiomtek’s fanless, rugged “eBOX565-312-FL” embedded system runs Linux or Windows on a Celeron N3550, and offers dual HDMI, quad USB 3.0, an external SATA tray, and Power-over-Ethernet.

    Like last year’s eBOX100-312-FL, the similarly ruggedized eBOX565-312-FL features an Intel’s Celeron N3350, a dual-core, 1.1GHz/2.4GHz “Apollo Lake” SoC with 6W TDP. It also similarly supplies dual HDMI ports and an external SATA tray, among other common attributes. Yet, this latest eBOX brings some enhancements such as 4x USB 3.0 ports and Power-over-Ethernet.

  • Google To Launch Low Cost Pixel Phones In Select Markets

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The April 2018 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine
  • Pre-order your own disk with (K-, L-, X-) Ubuntu 18.04

    Ladies and gentlemen, it is the same time of the year again. It is end of March, and it means that the release of the next generation of your favourite operating system will be released less than in a month's time! And this will be a Long-term support (LTS) version this time!

    Yes, Ubuntu 18.04 is less than a month away. Many of you already looking for downloading of your own ISO image of the system. Yes, that's the next version, codenamed Bionic Beaver.

    But many of you are not so lucky, and will need to wait longer, because you can not or do not want to create their own DVDs with operating system images.
    We can help!

  • Weekend Reading: Raspberry Pi Projects

    The Raspberry Pi has been very popular among hobbyists and educators ever since its launch in 2011. It’s a credit-card-sized single-board computer with a Broadcom BCM 2835 SoC, 256MB to 512MB of RAM, USB ports, GPIO pins, Ethernet, HDMI out, camera header and an SD card slot. The most attractive aspects of the Raspberry Pi are its low cost of $35 and large user community following.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement
    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly. "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."
  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]
     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM
    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.
  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers
    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM. Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Graphics: XWayland, Ozone-GBM, Freedreno, X.Org, RadeonSI

  • The Latest Batch Of XWayland / EGLStream Improvements Merged
    While the initial EGLStreams-based support for using the NVIDIA proprietary driver with XWayland was merged for the recent X.Org Server 1.20 release, the next xorg-server release will feature more improvements.
  • Making Use Of Chrome's Ozone-GBM Intel Graphics Support On The Linux Desktop
    Intel open-source developer Joone Hur has provided a guide about using the Chrome OS graphics stack on Intel-based Linux desktop systems. In particular, using the Chrome OS graphics stack on the Linux desktop is primarily about using the Ozone-GBM back-end to Ozone that allows for direct interaction with Intel DRM/KMS support and evdev for input.
  • Freedreno Reaches OpenGL ES 3.1 Support, Not Far From OpenGL 3.3
    The Freedreno Gallium3D driver now supports all extensions required by OpenGL ES 3.1 and is also quite close to supporting desktop OpenGL 3.3.
  • X.Org Is Looking For A North American Host For XDC2019
    If software development isn't your forte but are looking to help out a leading open-source project while logistics and hospitality are where you excel, the X.Org Foundation is soliciting bids for the XDC2019 conference. The X.Org Foundation is looking for proposals where in North America that the annual X.Org Developers' Conference should be hosted in 2019. This year it's being hosted in Spain and with the usual rotation it means that in 2019 they will jump back over the pond.
  • RadeonSI Compatibility Profile Is Close To OpenGL 4.4 Support
    It was just a few days ago that the OpenGL compatibility profile support in Mesa reached OpenGL 3.3 compliance for RadeonSI while now thanks to the latest batch of patches from one of the Valve Linux developers, it's soon going to hit OpenGL 4.4. Legendary open-source graphics driver contributor Timothy Arceri at Valve has posted 11 more patches for advancing RadeonSI's OpenGL compatibility profile support, the alternative context to the OpenGL core profile that allows mixing in deprecated OpenGL functionality. The GL compatibility profile mode is generally used by long-standing workstation software and also a small subset of Linux games.

Software, KDE and GNOME Leftovers

  • Drawing Feynman Diagrams for Fun and Profit with JaxoDraw
    When first developed, theoretical physics was mostly done either with pen and paper or on a chalkboard. Not much thought was given as to how you could render these drawings within a document being written on a computer. JaxoDraw is meant to help fill in that gap in document layout and provide the ability to render these drawings correctly and give output you can use in your own documents. JaxoDraw is written in Java, so it should run under almost any operating system. Unfortunately, it isn't likely to be in the package repository for most distributions, so you'll need to download it from the project's website. But, because it's packaged as a jar file, it's relatively easy to run.
  • Kodi v18 Leia - Alpha 2
    We have been relatively quiet for a while and several months have past since the first pre-release Alpha build. Today we present you the second official Alpha build in this pre-release trilogy. It is a continuation of the first one which was released beginning of March and contains our continous battle against the dark side that consist of bugs and usability problems.
  • Kodi 18 Alpha 2 Released With Stability & Usability Improvements + New Wayland Code
    It's been a few months since the Kodi 18 Alpha while available today is the second alpha release of this major update to the open-source, cross-platform HTPC software. Kodi developers have been spending the past few months working on a range of stability and usability enhancements to this software formerly known as XBMC. Kodi 18's latest additions include live TV viewing improvements, Windows support improvements, continued Android integration enhancements, re-introducing Wayland protocol support, video player enhancements, and more.
  • LibreOffice color selector as GTK widgets
    Here's what the native GTK widget mode for the color picker looks like at the moment under Wayland. A GtkMenuButton displaying a color preview of the currently selected color and a GtkPopover containing the color selection widgetry.
  • TenFourFox FPR8 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 final is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). There are no changes from the beta except for outstanding security patches. As usual, it will go live Monday night, assuming no changes.
KDE:
  • Latte Dock, Beta 1 for v0.8 (v0.7.95)
    Hello everyone Latte Dock v0.7.95 which is the first beta of v0.8 is here. Latte v0.8 is a huge release and one of its main goals is to make the user feel with it very natural and comfortable. [...] Important for contributors: Beta1 will last 10 days, during these days translators will be able to report string improvements at bugs.kde.org. English isnt my native language, (proof reading / simpler expanations) might be necessary. When Beta2 is released around 3 to 5 July the string freeze will take place. Beta2 period will last 10 more days. So v0.8 is scheduled for 13 to 15 Jully. During all these days improvements and fixes can be landed through review process at kde phabricator.
  • Musing About Communities Size And Activity
    If you remember my previous installment I raised a couple more questions which I pointed out as tougher to address and I'd keep on the side for a while. Well, I decided to look at something simpler in the meantime... which unexpectedly took more time than expected. First I thought I'd try to reproduce the cohesion graph from Paul's Akademy 2014 talk... but it looks like we have a reproducibility issue on that one. However hard I try I don't manage to reproduce it. What I get is very different, so either there's a bug in my tentative script or there was a bug in Paul's script or somehow the input data is different. So one more mysteries to explore, I'm at a loss about what's going on with that one so far.
  • Second Post and First Weekly
    Because of the last one, I have been refactoring related code in the last month. The refactoring is generally completed, with KisDlgInternalColorSelector being the last dependency that haven’t been moved to enable KisPaletteView to be used everywhere needed.
GNOME:
  • Ubuntu Developers Working On Improvements To GNOME Software Store
    Canonical/Ubuntu developers are working on improvements to the GNOME Software "app store" and recently held an in-person design sprint along with one upstream GNOME developer for coming up with improvements. The Ubuntu developers working on improvements to GNOME Software were joined by prolific GNOME contributor Richard Hughes for brainstorming improvements to better GNOME Software over the months to come.
  • App Launching From GNOME Shell Now More Robust Under Memory Pressure & Faster
    Right now on systems with low amounts of available system memory, GNOME Shell can sometimes fail to launch applications due to an error over not being able to allocate memory in the fork process. With the latest rounds of Glib optimizations, this should no longer be the case.
  • GNOME Web Browser is Adding a Reader Mode
    An experimental reader mode will ship in the next version of GNOME Web, aka Epiphany. The feature is already available to try in the latest development builds of the GTK Webkit-based web browser, released this week as part of the GNOME 3.29.3 milestone.

today's howtos