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Misc

Black Hat USA 2007: That's a wrap

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linux.com: Black Hat USA 2007 was fast-paced, fun, and informative. It demonstrated that security is big business. The halls were lined with vendors, some new, some old, and the smell of money was everywhere. Still, I'm left thinking this year's show had a different tone to it than last year's.

The Coming Software Patent Apocalypse

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coding horror: Every practicing programmer should read the Wikipedia article on software patents, if you haven't already. Many software companies are of the opinion that copyrights and trade secrets provide adequate protection against unauthorized copying of their innovations. However, the cost of developing a suitable portfolio of patents may be out of reach of many small software companies. If this sounds like a classic Mutually Assured Destruction arms race, that's because it is.

KDE hacker authors Qt book

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linuxdevices: Core KDE developer Daniel Molkentin has written a book about Trolltech's cross-platform application development toolkit. Published by NoStarch Press, and entitled, "The Book of Qt 4."

How “Wintel thinking” reduces productivity

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Paul Murphy: For many jobs there’s a PC way and a Unix way. For example, I write these blogs using vi under either CDE (Solaris 10) or Gnome (Solaris 9) and just embed references and format information as I go along. The result is extremely portable because the text is independent of the format.

Most Important Laptops…Ever!

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CyberNetNews: Modern laptops continue to get more powerful and smaller in size, but we can’t forget about the predecessors that led to the notebooks that we have today. PCWorld put together an article outlining the top-10 most important laptops of all time where they outline the significance of each one. So what laptops made the list?

Get the iPhone’s Features Without an iPhone

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sheehantu: Apple made headlines this weekend with its launch of the iPhone. I applaud Apple for pioneering a new design and user-interface, however feature-wise the iPhone is similar to a Motorola RAZR that debuted two years ago. For those of you who want to get the software on an iPhone without purchasing an iPhone, check out this list:

Project Gutenberg

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Red Hat Mag: Free as in, well, free. At least, that’s what the folks at Project Gutenberg believe. They work hard to make as many literary (in a very broad sense of the term) works as possible available in a variety of formats, languages, and media to as many people as possible.

ThinkFree office suite goes offline

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LinuxWorld: ThinkFree Inc. added offline support to its online application suite Tuesday and launched it as a US$7-a-month alternative to Microsoft Office.

Maine waters down, passes network neutrality resolution

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arstechnica: Maine has become the first state in the US to pass network neutrality legislation, although the resolution that was finally passed is significantly weaker than the initial bill that was considered.

The Peer to Patent Project Has Begun - 5 patents listed

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Groklaw: The first patent applications we are invited to try to disqualify by looking for prior art have been posted on the Peer to Patent Project website. This is the project working to provide the USPTO with information about prior art during the application process.

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35 Open Source Tools for the Internet of Things

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Citrix and Google partner to bring native enterprise features to Chromebooks

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Is Open Source an Open Invitation to Hack Webmail Encryption?

While the open source approach to software development has proven its value over and over again, the idea of opening up the code for security features to anyone with eyeballs still creates anxiety in some circles. Such worries are ill-founded, though. One concern about opening up security code to anyone is that anyone will include the NSA, which has a habit of discovering vulnerabilities and sitting on them so it can exploit them at a later time. Such discoveries shouldn't be a cause of concern, argued Phil Zimmermann, creator of PGP, the encryption scheme Yahoo and Google will be using for their webmail. Read more