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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Another DIY Net Player

    This is a Raspberry Pi based audiophile net player that decodes my mp3 collection and net radio to my Linn amplifier. It is called TeakEar, because it’s main corpus is made from teak wood. Obviously I do not want to waste rain forest trees just because of my funny ideas, the teak wood used here has been a table from the 1970ies, back when nobody cared about rainforests. I had the chance to safe parts of the table when it was sorted out, and now use it’s valuable wood for special things.

  • August 2017 Issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine Released

    The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the August 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. All articles may be freely reproduced via any and all means following first publication by The PCLinuxOS Magazine, provided that attribution to both The PCLinuxOS Magazine and the original author are maintained, and a link is provided to the originally published article.

  • Ryzen Linux Users Are Still Facing Issues with Heavy Compilation Loads

    It was originally reported that Linux users were facing segmentation faults and, at times, crashes when running concurrent compilation loads on Ryzen CPUs, and these issues don’t appear to be fixed: Phoronix has run additional tests and found that heavy workloads remain problematic, as of Linux 4.13. These problems did not occur when tested using Intel CPUs.

  • 50+ Segmentation Faults Per Hour: Continuing To Stress Ryzen

    In direct continuation of yesterday's article about easily causing segmentation faults on AMD Zen CPUs, I have carried out another battery of tests for 24 hours and have more information to report today on the ability to trivially cause segmentation faults and in some cases system lock-ups with Ryzen CPUs.

  • Give Generously! Seven Ways To Help Open Source

    Your business most likely depends on open source software. But are you playing your part to make sure it will still be there in the future? For that to happen, the projects where it is both maintained and improved need to flourish.

    How can you contribute to that goal? The first thought most of us have — donate money — is unlikely to be the best way to support the open source projects that are most important to you. While proprietary software companies want your money in huge quantities to pay their shareholders, executives and staff, in open source communities most of the people who develop the code are paid elsewhere. As a consequence, there’s only a modest need for cash and a little goes a long way.

  • RFC: integrated 3rd-party static analysis support
  • GCC Working On 3rd Party Static Analysis Support

    Red Hat's David Malcom has posted a series of patches for implementing third-party static analysis support within the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).

today's leftovers

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  • The Story of the Last Linux Action Show

    The final episode of the Linux Action Show was a really special time, and during a special event. Friends from all over the world joined us for one big goodbye party.

  • Zukitwo and Zukitre Themes Available for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Since many of us heard that Ubuntu is making Gnome desktop its default desktop again, many creators got motivation to make eyecandy stuff again for Ubuntu. Zuktiwo and Zukitre themes are not new in the market and quite famous among users who are using Linux from sometime, the initial release of this pack was way back in 2011. These themes give light and grayish look to the desktop, the basic aim of these themes to enhance the look of GTK and Gnome-Shell just like many other great Gtk themes. Both themes works perfectly under all resolutions bigger screens and with smaller screens. These themes supports latest GTK 3.22/3.20/3.18 and Gnome Shell 3.24/3.22/3.18. Zukitre and Zukitwo themes supports GTK 3 and GTK 2 based desktop environments such as Gnome Shell, Gnome Classic, Gnome Fallback, Cinnamon, Mate, XFCE, Budgie, Pantheon, etc.

  • Obsidian Gtk Themes Looks Amazing On Gnome Desktop

    If you are looking for dark themes for your Linux desktop then you are on the right page. Obsidian themes looks great and gives your desktop a dark bluish and greenish flavor. Gtk theme is based on Adwaita-Maia and it has Gnome Shell theme as well, it is currently compatible with Gtk 3.20/3.22/3.24 versions and only works fine in Gnome Desktop, this pack is pretty simple and elegant. If you find any issues with this theme then report it to developer and hopefully it will get fixed in the next update. If you are using other distribution you can directly download theme from its page and install it manually in ~/.themes folder or /usr/share/themes/. You can use Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes.

  • New build server was ordered

    OK, so I got frustrated too many times when waiting for packages that were compiling. My current build machine with its AMD ‘Athlon II X4 640’ CPU and 8 GB of RAM, is now 5 years old and obviously no longer quite fit for the tasks I need it to perform. Compiling Chromium for 64bit Slackware in a virtual machine took more than 24 hours last week (yes, for a single package). Basically, that convinced me to empty my stash of donated funds (thanks to all of you Slackware supporters) and order the most powerful midi tower I could buy for that money. What else is that money for, after all. Well, beer perhaps

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Automotive Grade Linux shops for hypervisor to accelerate smart cars

    The Automotive Grade Linux has revealed it's going shopping for a hypervisor so that in-car computers can handle lots of different jobs.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Reaches Key Car Platform Milestones

    Automotive Grade Linux on Wednesday released version 4.0 of the AGL infotainment platform and announced new projects to support telematics, instrument cluster, heads-up-display and a virtualization component.

    The group also announced that seven new companies have joined AGL and The Linux Foundation. The addition of Brison, Karamba Security, Lear Corporation, Luxoft, Thundersoft, SafeRide Cyber Security and Wipro increases AGL's membership to more than 100 partners.

  • AMDGPU DC Display Code Updated In amd-staging-drm-next
  • AMD Ryzen 3 1200 & Ryzen 3 1300X Linux Performance

    I just received the Ryzen 3 1200 and Ryzen 3 1300X yesterday, so have been rushing to get out these initial Linux figures for those curious how they compare to the many Windows results that came out last week. In this article are the initial Ryzen 3 Linux benchmark results compared to a variety of Intel and AMD CPUs on Ubuntu Linux. In the days ahead I intend to do several more Ryzen 3 powered articles including a fresh look at Mesa Git with KHR_no_error support enabled, an OpenGL vs. Vulkan comparison with these low-end CPUs, and possibly a fresh compiler comparison and more. If you have any other Linux test requests for Ryzen, feel free to let me know by commenting on this article in our forums.

  • Samsung’s Bixby—A frustrating voice assistant with all the wrong features

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux desktop market share hit an all time high in July, according to one measure [Ed: According to a Microsoft-connected firm]

    In June of 2016, Linux market share on the desktop according to their statistics hit over 2% for the first time. People were sceptical, but it seems it has mostly stayed above that 2% mark. In May of this year it did dip down to 1.99%, but as of July it recorded the highest yet at 2.53%.

  • Razor- the next generation bare-metal provisioning software

    When you have a machine with just BIOS (basic input-output system) on it, one way to load an Operating system is to use a bootable thumb drive, similar to the way you work with a laptop. However, installing OS on remote systems in data centers that are present in remote locations might not be feasible. Installing an operating system over the network directly to the computer’s hardware is known as bare metal provisioning.

    A network boot screen in a network is similar to the one displayed below that shows up only when both the new gods and old gods are content to give us something known as Preboot Execution Environment (PXE).

  • Automotive Grade Linux New UCB 4.0 & New Member Karamba

    There were two announcements about Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). Karamba Security, a provider of cybersecurity solutions for connected and autonomous vehicles, today announced that it has joined the Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) Project and The Linux Foundation to help develop its cybersecurity best practices. AGL released the latest version of the AGL infotainment platform, Unified Code Base (UCB) 4.0, which includes support for SmartDeviceLink integration, Speech Recognition APIs, secure Over-the-Air Updates (SOTA) and improvements to the App Framework and Software Development Kit (SDK).

  • Cylon – Arch Linux Distribution Maintenance Program/Tool

    Cylon is a menu driven small shall script which basically gives you an idea to manage/maintain the Arch Linux and it’s derivatives by offering fourteen categories with variety of applications (hassle free application installation), which helps you to compete your day to day operation very smoothly.

    The script provides updates, maintenance, backups and system checks utilities for an Arch based Linux distribution like Manjaro, Antergos, Chakra, etc.,.

  • Red Hydrogen phone gets a video preview: It’s big—very big

    Many were confused earlier in July when Red, makers of ultra high-end 4K and 8K cameras for Hollywood, announced it was making an Android smartphone.

    Dubbed Red Hydrogen, the phone's substantial $1,595 price tag was accompanied by all manner of lofty promises about shattering "the mould of conventional thinking" and "nanotechnology." The phone supposedly had a "holographic" display, too.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Journal August 2017
  • Tacoma, the sci-fi narrative adventure has released with day-1 Linux support, some thoughts

    Tacoma [GOG, Steam, Official Site], the sci-fi narrative adventure from the developer of Gone Home has officially launched. It includes day-1 Linux support so I took a look.

  • Super NES Classic pre-orders start later this month

    Nintendo's announcement follows a retail fiasco last week in which Walmart mistakenly offered Super NES Classic systems for pre-order then was forced to cancel those pre-orders. "We know this is incredibly disappointing to those customers and we apologize for the mistake," the retailer said in a statement. The mistaken listing sold out within minutes late on a Friday night.

  • The State Of KDE Plasma For Summer 2017

    Last week was KDE's annual Akademy conference where developers and enthusiasts came together to recap the past year of KDE software development as well as some of what's ahead.

    Longtime KDE developer Sebastian Kügler has provided a recap of the KDE Plasma activities from Akademy 2017. Those interested in the state of Plasma can read Sebastian's post at dot.kde.org. Below are some of the highlights.

  • OSMC's July update is here

    We hope you're having a great Summer break. OSMC's July update is ready with a few improvements to keep your device running in tip-top shape. The Vero 4K also sees a large number of improvements, particularly with regards to HDR and 10-bit content. We would like to thank everyone who tested these improvements in our forums and ensured they got included in OSMC quickly.

  • Samsung’s 88-inch Ultra-Large QLED TV, the Q9, launched in North America and Korea
  • DragonFly 4.8.1 released

    DragonFly version 4.8.1 is a bugfix release for 4.8, and also includes improved Intel video support and support for the virtio_scsi driver.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • XWayland Grabs Onto Keyboard Grab Support

    Adding to the list of changes for X.Org Server 1.20 that will be released in the future is grab protocol support for XWayland.

    Last year is when the keyboard grabbing protocol for Wayland was proposed and made it into Wayland-Protocols 1.9. This is about allowing virtual machines, VNC viewers, or XWayland to be able to "grab" all input from a device and send to a particular surface, modeled like a keyboard locking mechanism.

  • Supercomputing by API: Connecting Modern Web Apps to HPC

    In this video from OpenStack Australia, David Perry from the University of Melbourne presents: Supercomputing by API – Connecting Modern Web Apps to HPC.

  • [Video] What’s New in Mageia 6
  • Geeko in the Wild
  • Technical Standards: The Hard Part of Making Everyone Happy

    A recent controversy involving the group that sets the rules of the road for the web is a great reminder of how challenging standards-making really is, even if your standards are the ones everyone is using.

    Standards have a way of bleeding into parts of life that you might not give a second thought to, as a consumer.

    Case in point: Watching a show on Netflix is a pretty satisfying ritual, isn’t it? Lots of people do it. Tens of millions in fact, many of them on their computers, in their web browsers.

  • Apple can’t end lawsuit over “breaking” FaceTime on iPhone 4, judge rules

    Back in February 2017, two Californians sued Apple in a proposed class-action lawsuit over the fact that the company disabled an older version of iOS. Disabling the outdated iOS had the effect of making FaceTime stop working on the customers' iPhone 4 devices.

    [...]

    "Apple broke FaceTime in order to gain a financial advantage and reduce relay fees," Judge Koh also wrote. "Further, although Apple knew that it had intentionally disabled FaceTime, Apple told consumers that FaceTime had stopped working because of a 'bug resulting from a device certificate that expired.' Apple did not tell users that Apple had intentionally caused the digital certificate to expire prematurely."

  • The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes

    The ethicality or lack thereof of what Paterson did has been debated for years. Gary Kildall stridently claimed many times that he ripped off the actual CP/M source code, but this is a very problematic assertion. There is no evidence that he even had access to the source, which Digital, like most companies then and now, guarded carefully.

    [...]

    The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS.

Leftovers: Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review; upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre

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  • Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review

    I ordered a litebook after emailing back and forth questions about Linux and the product. They replied super fast and everything sounded great.

    In reality, if I had to guess what is happening, it's a couple teenagers working out of their moms basement, ordering laptops from aliexpress in bulk, installing Linux and then selling them for a profit.

  • Coming Soon | For The Record

    Are we too dependent our Internet connectivity? Should we instead, explore creating our own Linux media servers in place of common streaming services? I’ll give you a preview of my effort to reduce my reliance with common streaming services. I’ll talk about upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre and more!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google Grabs Nielsen as Business Apps User From Microsoft

    For word processing and spreadsheets, Nielsen staff now uses Google Docs and Sheets instead of Microsoft’s Word and Excel applications from its familiar Office suite of software. For video conferencing and messaging, Nielsen dropped Microsoft’s Skype in favor of Google equivalents.

  • 3DR Solo Back as Open Source Platform

    Don’t play Taps for 3DR‘s Solo yet. 3DR’s CEO Chris Anderson tweeted today that the Solo is getting a second life.

    In an article title “The Solo Lives On,” on the ArduPilot Blog – ArduPilot is an opensource autopilot system – the team explains how a community of developers worked to give the Solo a “heart transplant.” The developer of the now-obselete Pixhawk 2.0 hardware flight system, the Solo’s stock system, has developed a bolt-on replacement which will allow for new ArduCopter firmware changes.

  • Bluetooth Mesh networks: Is a standards body right for IoT innovation?

        

    Mesh networks are not new. It is a network topology in which each node relays data for the network. All mesh nodes cooperate in the distribution of data in the network. The IoT-purpose-built Zigbee—a low-power, low-bandwidth ad hoc network—is a mesh network. Dating to 2002, Aruba Networks was founded to build Wi-Fi mesh networks. In 2014, student protesters in Hong Kong used mobile app FireChat to turn the crowd’s smartphones into a Wi-Fi and Bluetooth mesh network so authorities could not interrupt protester’s coordinating conversations by blocking 3G and 4G network access.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Arch Linux host cites freedom of speech defense, after using offensive domain name

    According to a user on Reddit by the name of 'fameistheproduct', this isn't the first time something in the community has offended some users. At one point, the system automatically generated license codes that could be regarded as offensive by some. The offending content has since been removed by the organization.

  • Ubuntu Still Working On Unity 7 Low Graphics Mode Improvements

    While Ubuntu's desktop future now rests with GNOME Shell for Ubuntu 17.10 and beyond, developers are still working on some Unity 7 refinements for existing Ubuntu desktop users.

    With Ubuntu 16.04 LTS still to be supported for years to come, Unity 7 is seeing a bit more than just maintenance take place. One of the areas of Unity 7 still being worked on is improving its low graphics mode for helping users on low-end/older systems as well as running within VMs where there may not be 3D acceleration available.

  • Intel kills Curie module and Arduino 101 SBC

    Intel is discontinuing its Curie wearables module and its Curie-enabled Arduino 101 SBC. Last month, Intel shut down the Joule, Edison, and Galileo.

    A month after Intel discontinued its Linux-ready, Atom-based Intel Joule and Intel Edison COMs, as well as its Quark-based Galileo Gen 2 SBC and its Recon Jet sports eyewear, the chipmaker announced the “end-of-life timeline” for its Quark-based Intel Curie module and the discontinuation of its Curie-based Arduino 101 SBC.

  • Chinese smartphone brands captured 87% of home market

     

    These top four Chinese brands now capture 69% of the market and have raced ahead of international and other local brands with expansive distribution reach and exciting portfolio.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why Linus is right (as usual)
    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable. This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs. The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.
  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes
    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies. One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting
    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download. VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon. Why Vidcutter? If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily. VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More
    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases. The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.
  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows
    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux. It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.
  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements
    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes. MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it. Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.
  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.
  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon
    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed. The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.
  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development
     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

today's howtos