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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Sonic Mania ‘Plays Perfectly’ on Linux via WINE

    The Windows version of Sonic Mania is playable on Linux using WINE — and that’s not just me saying that, that’s a bunch of Linux gamers over on Reddit (where else?).

  • Icculus has ported The End is Nigh to on-demand service 'Jump', Linux may come soon plus some thoughts

    Ever heard of the on-demand subscription gaming service Jump? It's an on-demand game streaming service and Icculus just ported The End is Nigh to it.

    Recently, I wrote about how The End is Nigh might be coming to Linux. Sadly, that's not actually the case just yet. Announcing it on his Patreon, Icculus noted about his work to port it to the on-demand service Jump. They actually reached out to him to do it, as it turns out.

  • liveslak 1.1.9 and new ISO images

    The ‘liveslak‘ scripts used to create the ISO images for Slackware Live Edition have been stamped with a new version, 1.1.9. The updates are significant enough to warrant an ‘official’ update and new ISO images.

    The latest set of Slackware Live Edition ISOs are based on liveslak 1.1.9 and Slackware-current dated “Tue Sep 19 20:49:07 UTC 2017“. Just in time (I was already creating ISOS based on -current “Mon Sep 18 19:15:03 UTC 2017“) I noticed that Patrick downgraded the freetype package in Slackware, and I re-generated all of the ISO images to incorporate the latest freetype package – because that one is working and the previous one had serious issues.

    If you already use a Slackware Live USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • The best of Tizen deals from Samsung’s ‘Smart Utsav’ festive offers in India
  • Chrome 62 Beta: Network Quality Estimator API, OpenType variable fonts, and media capture from DOM elements

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 62 Beta Released With OpenType Font Variations, DOM Media Capture

    Google has rolled out their public beta of the upcoming Chrome/Chromium 62 web-browser update.

  • Turning Off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth in iOS 11's Control Center Doesn’t Actually Turn Off Wi-Fi or Bluetooth [Ed: Proprietary software means you cannot trust it and anything you think it does it likely won't]

    Turning off Bluetooth and Wi-Fi when you're not using them on your smartphone has long been standard, common sense, advice. Unfortunately, with the iPhone's new operating system iOS 11, turning them off is not as easy as it used to be.

    Now, when you toggle Bluetooth and Wi-Fi off from the iPhone's Control Center—the somewhat confusing menu that appears when you swipe up from the bottom of the phone—it actually doesn't completely turn them off. While that might sound like a bug, that's actually what Apple intended in the new operating system. But security researchers warn that users might not realize this and, as a consequence, could leave Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on without noticing.

  • HP Brings Back Obnoxious DRM That Cripples Competing Printer Cartridges

    Around a year ago, HP was roundly and justly ridiculed for launching a DRM time bomb -- or a software update designed specifically to disable competing printer cartridges starting on a set date. As a result, HP Printer owners using third-party cartridges woke up one day to warnings about a "cartridge problem," or errors stating, "one or more cartridges are missing or damaged," or that the user was using an "older generation cartridge." The EFF was quick to lambast the practice in a letter to HP, noting that HP abused its security update mechanism to trick its customers and actively erode product functionality.

    HP only made matters worse for itself by claiming at the time that it was only looking out for the safety and security of its customers, while patting itself on the back for being pro-active about addressing a problem it caused -- only after a massive consumer backlash occurred.

  • EFF quits W3C over decision to accept EME as Web standard

     

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation has resigned from the World Wide Web Consortium after the latter announced it was accepting the published Encrypted Media Extensions as a Web standard.  

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP

    Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update.

    Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes.

    The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay.

    Today, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register: "We're working to resolve this as soon as possible" and referred affected customers to a new support post.

  • GNOME 3.26 Released! Check Out the New Features

    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3 released six months after the last stable release GNOME 3.24. The release, code-named “Manchester”, is the 33rd stable release of the free, open-source desktop.

  • Arch Arch and away! What's with the Arch warriors?

    If you choose to begin your Linux adventures with Arch Linux after trying Ubuntu for a month, you're probably doing it wrong. If there's a solid reason why you think Arch is for you; awesome! Do it. You will learn new things. A lot of new things. But hey, what's the point in learning what arch-chroot does if you can't figure out what sudo is or what wpa_supplicant does?

  • Setting a primary monitor for launching games in a dual monitor rig
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring On Linux Is Working With Hwmon-Next

    If you want CPU temperature monitoring to work under Linux for your Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processor(s), it's working on hwmon-next.

    The temperature monitoring support didn't make it for Linux 4.14 but being published earlier this month were finally patches for Zen temperature monitoring by extending the k10temp Linux driver.

  • Fanless Skylake computer offers four PCI and PCIe slots

    Adlink’s MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 embedded computers run Linux or Windows on Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offer 4x PCI/PCIe slots, 6x USB ports, and 4x COM ports.

    If Adlink’s new MVP-6010/6020 Series looks familiar, that’s because it’s a modified version of the recent MVP-5000 and last year’s MVP-6000 industrial PCs. The top half appears to be identical, with the same ports, layout, and Intel 6th Gen Core “Skylake” TE series processors. Like the MVP-6000, it adds a PCI and PCIe expansion unit on the bottom, but whereas the MVP-6000 had two slots, the MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 have four.

  • How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet

    Qi has been an Android staple for a while, and now it’s coming to iPhones, too.

  • W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret

    Earlier this summer, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) — the organization responsible for defining the standards that make up the Web — decided to embrace DRM (aka "EME") as a web standard. I wasn’t happy about this. I don’t know many who were.

    Shortly after that, the W3C agreed to talk with me about the issue. During that discussion, I encouraged the W3C to increase their level of transparency going forward — and if there is an appeal of their DRM decision, to make that process completely open and visible to the public (including how individual members of the W3C vote on the issue).

    The appeal happened and has officially ended. I immediately reached out to the W3C to gather some details. What I found out was highly concerning. I’ll include the most interesting bits below, as un-edited as possible.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Verified cryptography for Firefox 57

    Traditionally, software is produced in this way: write some code, maybe do some code review, run unit-tests, and then hope it is correct. Hard experience shows that it is very hard for programmers to write bug-free software. These bugs are sometimes caught in manual testing, but many bugs still are exposed to users, and then must be fixed in patches or subsequent versions. This works for most software, but it’s not a great way to write cryptographic software; users expect and deserve assurances that the code providing security and privacy is well written and bug free.

  • Busting the myth that net neutrality hampers investment

    This week I had the opportunity to share Mozilla’s vision for an Internet that is open and accessible to all with the audience at MWC Americas.

    I took this opportunity because we are at a pivotal point in the debate between the FCC, companies, and users over the FCC’s proposal to roll back protections for net neutrality. Net neutrality is a key part of ensuring freedom of choice to access content and services for consumers.

    Earlier this week Mozilla’s Heather West wrote a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai highlighting how net neutrality has fueled innovation in Silicon Valley and can do so still across the United States.

    The FCC claims these protections hamper investment and are bad for business. And they may vote to end them as early as October. Chairman Pai calls his rule rollback “restoring internet freedom” but that’s really the freedom of the 1% to make decisions that limit the rest of the population.

  • Sysadmin war story: “The network ate my font!”

     

    Turns out the printer had a cache for fonts and was using the font cached from the earlier check image which included the font! Moreover, the Toronto and Hollywood offices were on a different printer maintenance schedule — and as part of the maintenance the printers are rebooted which clears the font cache!

  • The Harmful Consequences of Postel's Maxim draft-thomson-postel-was-wrong-01

     

    Jon Postel's famous statement in RFC 1122 of "Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send" - is a principle that has long guided the design of Internet protocols and implementations of those protocols.  The posture this statement advocates might promote interoperability in the short term, but that short-term advantage is outweighed by negative consequences that affect the long-term maintenance of a protocol and its ecosystem.

  • Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. (TSX:POT), Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT): VC in The Spotlight

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • IBM Linux-only mainframe delivers breakthrough security
  • Kubernetes Meets HPC

    Anyone who has worked with Docker can appreciate the enormous gains in efficiency achievable with containers. While Kubernetes excels at orchestrating containers, high-performance computing applications can be tricky to deploy on Kubernetes.

    In this post, I discuss some of the challenges of running HPC workloads with Kubernetes, explain how organizations approach these challenges today, and suggest an approach for supporting mixed workloads on a shared Kubernetes cluster. We will also provide information and links to a case study on a customer, IHME, showing how Kubernetes is extended to service their HPC workloads seamlessly while retaining scalability and interfaces familiar to HPC users.

  • The latest Windows Server beta has a surprising feature: Support for Linux containers
  • VMware wants the support of open-source developers
  • Public Money? Public Code!

    31 organisations ask to improve public procurement of software

    Today, on 13 September 2017, 31 organisations are publishing an open letter. The letter calls for lawmakers to advance legislation requiring publicly financed software that has been developed for the public sector be made available under a Free and Open Source Software licence.

  • WordPress to ditch React library over Facebook patent clause risk

    Automattic, the company behind the popular open source web publishing software WordPress, has said it will be pulling away from using Facebook’s React JavaScript library over concerns about a patent clause in Facebook’s open source license.

    In a blog post explaining the decision yesterday, WordPress’ Matt Mullenweg said Automattic had hoped to officially adopt React for WordPress — noting it has already used it for the Calypso ground-up rewrite of WordPress.com a few years ago, and had started using it for its major Gutenberg core project.

    But he reveals it’s changed its mind after seeing Facebook dig in behind the patent clause — which was recently added to the Apache Software Foundation’s (ASF) list of disallowed licenses.

  • Havenlabs' Open Source 3D Printed Utility Band Offers Simple Functionality for Amputees
  • Bluetooth problem could let hackers take control of Apple, Samsung and Google devices

    Millions of mobile phones, laptops and smart home devices could be at risk of hacking after researchers discovered a way to take over devices using the Bluetooth connection.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ​New IBM big iron for Linux

    IBM mainframes are alive, well, and being designed to make the most of Linux.

  • Create a Linux VM with these potential limitations in mind

    it involves creating a VM object and allocating hardware resources, such as memory, virtual network adapters and virtual CPUs. As simple as the creation process might be, however, the OS that will eventually be installed onto the VM requires some consideration. For example, the VM will need to be provisioned with enough memory to run the OS. In some cases, there may be additional considerations that need to be made beyond meeting the minimum hardware requirements of the OS. This can be especially true for a Linux VM.

  • Cairo Adds Support For OpenGL ES 3.0

    The Cairo 2D vector graphics library used by GTK, Firefox, WebKit, and many other programs finally has an OpenGL ES 3.0 back-end merged.

    Cairo supports many different backends from OpenGL to DirectFB to outputting as SVG/PDF/PostScript files as well as Skia, Direct2D, OpenVG, and other less notable code paths. Finally, OpenGL ES 3.0 is now supported by mainline Cairo.

  • Install and Configure ISC DHCP Server in Debian 9
  • Solving Physics Problems on Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers: GNU/Linux at Dropbox, Debian and Gentoo Development, Managing Linux Disks

Filed under
Misc
  • Optimizing web servers for high throughput and low latency

    This is an expanded version of my talk at NginxConf 2017 on September 6, 2017. As an SRE on the Dropbox Traffic Team, I’m responsible for our Edge network: its reliability, performance, and efficiency. The Dropbox edge network is an nginx-based proxy tier designed to handle both latency-sensitive metadata transactions and high-throughput data transfers. In a system that is handling tens of gigabits per second while simultaneously processing tens of thousands latency-sensitive transactions, there are efficiency/performance optimizations throughout the proxy stack, from drivers and interrupts, through TCP/IP and kernel, to library, and application level tunings.

  • Summary of the discussion on off-line keys.
  • Xiaomi’s stunning Mi Mix gets a sequel, the Mi Mix 2
  • Squeezing More Juice Out Of Gentoo With Graphite, LTO Optimizations

    Developer Shane Peelar has come up with a Gentoo Portage configuration for building out the distribution with aggressive compiler optimizations in the name of performance.

    Peelar's Gentoo configuration will build with -O3 optimizations, GCC Graphite optimizations, and LTO (Link Time Optimizations).

  • Debian-Administration.org is closing down

    The site will go read-only at the end of the month, and will slowly be stripped back from that point towards the end of the year - leaving only a static copy of the articles, and content.

  • What you need to know to manage Linux disks

    There are numerous other commands for examining disks and file systems. Those described here are some of the most useful and informative. Using them periodically has advantages as the easiest way to spot problems is becoming so used to the output of commands such as these that you easily spot the kind of differences that might indicate problems.

  • Install and Configure LEMP in Debian 9

Leftovers: OpenSourcePC, Brutal Legend on Ubuntu MATE, and SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3

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Misc
  • OpenSourcePC is Open for Business

    At OpenSourcePC you can customize your computer and hardware as much as you can customize your software. They offer wraps, laser etching, custom paint, custom branding, and hydro dipping to get that exact look you want and upgrades for Ram, CPU, GPU, solid state drives, storage, cooling, and overclocking. OpenSourcePC uses Linux based operating system Ubuntu. Linux gives the user complete control while Ubuntu is secure and user friendly offering the best of both worlds. In the future, OpenSourcePC will be adding Linux based desktops and servers to their line-up, so make sure to check in for new product updates.

  • Brutal Legend on Ubuntu MATE

    Today I solicit help from the YouTube chat room (in my LIVE stream) for help playing Brutal Legend. I’ve made it up to just before meeting with Ozzy. Thankfully, the chat room offers up helpful advice that gets me farther than ever before!

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3 Debuts to Boost Efficiency and Security

    SUSE, through Raj Meel, was pleased to announce the release and general availability of the third Service Pack of the SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 commercial operating system designed for enterprises.

    The SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 release has a 13-year life cycle, and SUSE promises to offer ten years of general support, as well as three years of extended support for all customers. And SP3 is here to boost the efficiency and security of the operating system, on which the free and open-source OpenSuSE Leap OS is based, as well as to add several new features and the latest GNU/Linux technologies.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Zstd Compression For Btrfs & Squashfs Set For Linux 4.14, Already Used Within Facebook

    As we've been expecting, Zstd compression for Btrfs is coming with the Linux 4.14 along with Zstd support in SquashFS.

  • AMD EPYC 7601 + TYAN Transport SX TN70A-B8026 Arrives For Linux Benchmarking

    This initial EPYC Linux testing at Phoronix is being done with the 7601 backed by 8 x 16GB (128GB) of DDR4-2666 memory. Thanks to AMD and Tyan for making this testing possible.

  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: September 8, 2017

    GNOME Shell 3.25.91 is now in Artful in preparation for the move to 3.26 before release.

    We’re adding notification badge support to the Dock extension. This branch has been proposed to the upstream project and is awaiting review.

    We’ve packaged the KStatusNotifier extension to provide support for indicators. This will provide support for apps which use libappindicators which was removed from GNOME 3.26. You can read more about this here.

    Didier has also been tidying up the work we did at the Fit and Finish hackfest and you can see more about that here.

  •  

  • Thin Mini-ITX offers choice of Skylake or Kaby Lake

    Fujitsu’s Linux-ready “D3474-B” is a thin Mini-ITX board with 6th or 7th Gen Intel CPUs, up to 32GB DDR4, wide-range power, and dual M.2 slots.

    Avnet-owned embedded firm MSC Technologies announced it is distributing Fujitsu’s D3474-B thin Mini-ITX board, which runs Linux or Windows on Intel’s 6th Gen (“Skylake”) or 7th Gen (“Kaby Lake”) processors. Several months ago, yet another Germany-based company — Hy-Line Computer Components — also announced [translated] it was selling the D3474-B, which is Fujitsu’s first thin Mini-ITX offering.

  • European edition of the Family Hub Refrigerator to get Bixby in multiple languages
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Devices: Advantech, Tizen, F-Droid

OSS Leftovers

  • Why no more new AND successful FOSS projects in the last ten years?
     

    If you ask me, the new, successful FOSS projects should be project that fix, replace, rewrite, whatever… the really unglamorous, low-level tools, libraries and so on that would make that happen. Yes, I know that this is really unlikely to happen under current business models and until IoT everywhere, new iPhones every year and the like are perceived as higher priorities, regardless of their environmental impacts and, very often, sheer lack of sense.

  • FOSS Backstage - CfP open
    It's almost ten years ago that I attended my first ApacheCon EU in Amsterdam. I wasn't entirely new to the topic of open source or free software. I attended several talks on Apache Lucene, Apache Solr, Hadoop, Tomcat, httpd (I still remember that the most impressive stories didn't necessarily come from the project members, but from downstream users. They were the ones authorized to talk publicly about what could be done with the project - and often became committers themselves down the road.
  • Liveblogging RIT’s FOSS projects class: initial questions for community spelunking
    Stephen Jacobs (SJ) and I are co-teaching “Project in FOSS Development” at RIT this semester, which basically means “hey students, want to get course credit for contributing to a FOSS project?” The class is centered around 5 project sprints of two weeks each. The first 3 weeks of class are preparing for the sprint periods; the week before spring break is a pause to reflect on how sprints are going. Otherwise, class efforts will be centered around executing project work… (aka “getting stuff done”).
  • Design’N’Buy launches All-In-One Designer on Magento Open Source 2.2
    Design’N’Buy announces the launch of their flagship product – the AIOD on Magento Open Source Version 2.2. With the launch of web to print solution on Magento Version 2.2 , Design’N’Buy becomes first event in web to print industry to offer complete eCommerce printing solution for printers on one of the widest and latest technology platform.
  • Singapore: Blockchain startup Bluzelle raises $19.5m through ICO
    Singapore-based decentralised database provider Bluzelle has announced that its initial coin offering (ICO) has raised $19.5 million in funding, according to a press statement.
  • Blockchain Startup Bluzelle Raises $19.5M USD In ICO
    Bluzelle’ advisor list includes the likes of Brian Fox, creator of GNU Bash, Alex Leverington, one of the original Core ethereum developers, Prashant Malik, co-creator of Apache Cassandra and Ryan Fugger, the original creator of the cryptocurrency Ripple.
  • The Document Liberation project announces five new or improved libraries
    The Document Liberation Project has announced five new or improved libraries to export EPUB3 and import AbiWord, MS Publisher, PageMaker and QuarkXPress files.
  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access
    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public. The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).
  • Is the Most Massive, Illegal Paywall in the World About to Come Down?
    A groundbreaking lawsuit is poised to decimate what is arguably the most unjust, destructive, and it now sounds like illegal paywall in the world, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records, PACER. PACER is the federal government court documents repository. Every federal court document, for every case, lives in PACER. It’s essentially a giant FTP document repository with a horrendous search system bolted on, not dissimilar to EDGAR. PACER was created in 1988 to enable access to court records electronically. Initially available only in courthouses the system was expanded to the web in 2001.
  • Codasip Announces Studio 7, Design and Productivity Tools for Rapid Generation of RISC-V Processors
    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, today announced that it has launched the 7th generation of its Studio, the unique IP-design and customization software that allows for fast configuration and optimization of RISCV processors, customer-proprietary processor architectures, and their accompanying software development toolchains.
  • EE4J Code Begins the Journey to Open Source
    The EE4J project, which was created to manage the Eclipse Foundation’s stewardship of Java EE technologies following Oracle’s decision to open source them, is starting to gain traction. Soon after the project was created, EclipseLink and Yasson (the official reference implementation of Java JSON Binding, JSR-367) became the first two projects to be transferred under the EE4J umbrella. As reported in December, the announcement was made that seven more projects were being proposed.

Database SQLite 3.22.0 Released

Quick Look at Notebookbar on LibreOffice 6.0 and Pattern Choices

  • Quick Look at Notebookbar on LibreOffice 6.0
    This is a short preview of how Notebookbar will look like on LibreOffice 6.0. Notebookbar is a new toolbar appearance on LibreOffice since version 5.3 that look similar to Microsoft Office 2007 Ribbon Toolbar. It's tabbed, column based, and categorized. We can use Notebookbar on Writer, Calc, and Impress already. It's still a experimental feature for now, so it's not recommended for production use. However, it's already good looking at LibreOffice 6.0 and we need to see more. I show here screenshots of Writer's Notebookbar from all tabs with some commentary.
  • LibreOffice bitmap pattern
    Do you like to use nice bitmap pattern in LibreOffice for area fill. So if you draw a rectangular, a start, … whatever you can use this bitmaps. With the help of designers from openclipart, pixabay, publicdomainpictures, … I made 42 seamless area bitmap pattern but only 50% are needed. So which one do you like which one can be dropped.