Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mac

Microsoft and Apple Against Repairs

Filed under
Hardware
Microsoft
Mac

2018 Mac Mini blocks Linux, here are alternative small form factor PCs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Mac

Apple's long-awaited refresh of the Mac Mini includes a component called the "T2 Security Chip" which Apple touts as having "a Secure Enclave coprocessor, which provides the foundation for APFS encrypted storage, secure boot, and Touch ID on Mac," as well as integrating "the system management controller, image signal processor, audio controller, and SSD controller," which were separate components in previous Mac systems. Because of the extent to which T2 is involved with the boot sequence of this new hardware, Apple controls what operating systems can be loaded onto their hardware.

Read more

Blocking Linux From Booting

Filed under
Linux
Mac
  • Don’t Panic, You Can Boot Linux on Apple’s New Devices

    Does Apple stop Linux from booting on its newly refreshed Mac Mini PC or MacBookAir laptops?

    That’s the claim currently circling the web‘s collective drain. The posit is that the new T2 ‘secure enclave’ chip Apple has baked in to its new models prevents Linux from booting.

    But is this actually true?

    Kinda. The answer is both “yes, technically” and “no, not completely”.

  • Apple's New Hardware With The T2 Security Chip Will Currently Block Linux From Booting

    Apple's MacBook Pro laptops have become increasingly unfriendly with Linux in recent years while their Mac Mini computers have generally continued working out okay with most Linux distributions due to not having to worry about multiple GPUs, keyboards/touchpads, and other Apple hardware that often proves problematic with the Linux kernel. But now with the latest Mac Mini systems employing Apple's T2 security chip, they took are likely to crush any Linux dreams.

    At least until further notice, these new Apple systems sporting the T2 chip will not be able to boot Linux operating systems. Apple's T2 security chip being embedded into their newest products provides a secure enclave, APFS storage encryption, UEFI Secure Boot validation, Touch ID handling, a hardware microphone disconnect on lid close, and other security tasks. The T2 restricts the boot process quite a bit and verifies each step of the process using crypto keys signed by Apple.

Themes/GTK: Enhancing the Looks of GNU/Linux

Filed under
Mac
GNOME
  • elementary OS 5.0 Capitaine-X Combo Customization

    This short tutorial explains in brief to customize elementary OS 5.0 with Capitaine icons + Elementary-X theme combo. You see, this will make your OS looks like Apple macOS smoother. This combo is really beautiful, thanks to Keefer Rourke and Suraj Mandal, the talented developers of the respective artworks. I also mention here a one-liner command so you can test this in instant (i.e. one tap on LiveCD session). Okay, enjoy this customization!

  • Nordic Theme And Zafiro Icons Looks Amazing Together On Desktop

    If you are fond of dark theme whether it's your personal liking or for comfort of your eyes, then you landed on the right page. Today, we introduce you to the very elegant theme called "Nordic". This Gtk theme is created using the awesome Nord color pallete which looks amazing on the desktop, it is released under GNU General Public License V3. Nordic also pack theme for Gnome Shell, and support almost every desktop environment such as Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, Mate, Budgie, Panteon, etc. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint then download the theme directly from its page and install it in this location "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes". Since Nordic theme pack is in active development that means if you find any kind of bug or issue with it then report it to get fixed.

​IBM Code Release for Mac@IBM

Filed under
Mac
OSS
  • Mac@IBM code goes open source

    Designed to streamline the integration of corporate-owned or BYOD Apple Mac devices and applications into the enterprise while delivering a personalized experience, Mac@IBM has seen the number of IBMers using Macs increase from 30,000 in 2015 to 134,000 in 2018.

  • IBM open-sources Mac@IBM code, spreading tech to other businesses

    IBM on Tuesday shared word that it's open-sourcing its Mac@IBM provisioning code, which should enable other companies to provision Macs using similar architecture.

  • ​IBM open-sources Mac sysadmin software

    In 2015, IBM had half-a-million Windows users. It then gave its staffers the option to switch to Apple Macs. Six months later, over 30,000 had made the shift. Today, over 134,000 IBMers are Mac users. To manage them, IBM created its own Mac-specific system administration program: Mac@IBM. Now, IBM is open-sourcing this program.

  • IBM open sources Mac@IBM code

    At the Jamf Nation User Conference, IBM has announced that it is open sourcing its Mac@IBM provisioning code. The code being open-sourced offers IT departments the ability to gather additional information about their employees during macOS setup and allows employees to customize their enrollment by selecting apps or bundles of apps to install.

Apple Wipes

Filed under
Hardware
Mac

Linux vs Mac: 7 Reasons Why Linux is a Better Choice than Mac

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

If you’re already using a Mac or planning to get one, we recommend you to thoroughly analyze the reasons to decide whether you need to switch/keep using Linux or continue using Mac.

Read more

Openwashing iPhone With "HeadGaze" and Microsoft Openwashing Itself

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
OSS

Linux Kernel Vs. Mac Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Both the Linux kernel and the macOS kernel are UNIX-based. Some people say that macOS is "linux", some say that both are compatible due to similarities between commands and file system hierarchy. Today I want to show a little of both, showing the differences and similarities between Linux Kernel & Mac kernel like I mentioned in previous Linux kernel articles.

Read more

Also: A Batch Of x86 Speculation Fixes Headed To The Linux 4.19 Kernel

10 Best Linux Distros to Install on Your MacBook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

macOS is a Unix-like Operating System so many of the features in Linux distros are similar to those that it offers. That notwithstanding, because it is Unix-like does not mean that it is Linux and for one reason or the other you may want to run a full-fledged OS.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

5 of the Best File Managers for Linux

One of the pieces of software you use daily is a file manager. A good file manager is essential to your work. If you are a Linux user and want to try out file managers other than the default one that comes with your system, below is a list of the best Linux file managers you will find. Read more

Fedora: Flatpak, PHP Builds, Ansible and NeuroFedora

  • Flatpak – a solution to the Linux desktop packaging problem
    In hindsight I must say the situation was not as bad as I thought on the server level: Linux in the data center grew and grew. Packaging simply did not matter that much because admins were used to problems deploying applications on servers anyway and they had the proper knowledge (and time) to tackle challenges. Additionally, the recent rise of container technologies like Docker had a massive impact: it made deploying of apps much easier and added other benefits like sandboxing, detailed access permissions, clearer responsibilities especially with dev and ops teams involved, and less dependency hell problems. Together with Kubernetes it seems as there is an actual standard evolving of how software is deployed on Linux servers. To summarize, in the server ecosystem things never were as bad, and are quite good these days. Given that Azure serves more Linux servers than Windows servers there are reasons to believe that Linux is these days the dominant server platform and that Windows is more and more becoming a niche platform.
  • PHP on RHEL-8
  • How to authenticate Ansible with Azure
  • NeuroFedora update: week 46

LLVM/AOCC, GCC at AMD

  • Radeon GCC Back-End Updated For Running Single-Threaded C & Fortran On AMD GPUs
    Back in September Code Sourcery / Mentor Graphics posted the Radeon GCC back-end they have been developing with the cooperation of AMD. This is for allowing the GCC compiler to eventually offload nicely to Radeon GPUs with its different programming languages and supported parallel programming models, particularly with OpenMP and OpenACC in mind. But for now this patch series just works with single-threaded C and Fortran programs. The second version of this port was posted for review. Hitting the GCC mailing list on Friday was the updated version of this AMD GCN port targeting Tonga/Fiji through Vega graphics hardware. Code Sourcery will post the OpenACC/OpenMP support bits at a later date while for now the code works with single-threaded C/Fortran programs with C++ not yet supported, among other initial shortcomings. For now the AMDGPU LLVM back-end is far more mature in comparison, which is what's currently used by the open-source AMD Linux driver compute and graphics stacks.
  • AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler 1.3 Brings More Zen Tuning
    Earlier this month AMD quietly released a new version of their Optimizing C/C++ compiler in the form of AOCC 1.3. This new compiler release has more Zen tuning to try to squeeze even more performance out of Ryzen/EPYC systems when using their LLVM-based compiler. The AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler remains AMD's high performance compiler for Zen compared to the earlier AMD Open64 Compiler up through the Bulldozer days. AOCC is based on LLVM Clang with various patches added in. Fortunately, with time at least a lot of the AOCC patches do appear to work their way into upstream LLVM Clang. AOCC also has experimental Fortran language support using the "Flang" front-end that isn't as nearly mature as Clang.

Security: Japan's Top Cybersecurity Official, SuperCooKey, Information Breach on HealthCare.gov

  • Security News This Week: Japan's Top Cybersecurity Official Has Never Used a Computer
  • SuperCooKey – A SuperCookie Built Into TLS 1.2 and 1.3

    TLS 1.3 has a heavily touted feature called 0-RTT that has been paraded by CloudFlare as a huge speed benefit to users because it allows sessions to be resumed quickly from previous visits. This immediately raised an eyebrow for me because this means that full negotiation is not taking place.

    After more research, I’ve discovered that 0-RTT does skip renegotiation steps that involve generating new keys.

    This means that every time 0-RTT is used, the server knows that you’ve been to the site before, and it knows all associated IPs and sign-in credentials attached to that particular key.

  • Information Breach on HealthCare.gov

    In October 2018, a breach occurred within the Marketplace system used by agents and brokers. This breach allowed inappropriate access to the personal information of approximately 75,000 people who are listed on Marketplace applications.