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Linux Live CDs, the One Feature Microsoft and Apple Haven't Copied Yet

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

There is a silent battle going on behind the curtains between the major operating systems. When it comes to gaming, for example, Windows is still the leader. If we're talking about Linux, then everyone knows that it owns the server market. Mac OS X looks pretty and has a few applications that are still making the system a tool for media production. When it comes to Live systems, neither Windows nor Mac OS X can hold a candle to Linux.

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MacOs-Linux 11.04 Officially Killed by Its Developer

Filed under
Linux
Mac

MacOs-Linux 11.04 was a project that seemed to attract problems right from the start. It was a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) that imitated the desktop and a few functionality of the operating system made by Apple.

Many users thought that the distribution will run into various copyright issues and that seem to have been the case. The developer contacted us and said that the Sourceforge listing has been removed and the project has been killed.

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Will Apple sue Amazon for copying the iPhone?

Filed under
Android
Mac
Legal

Let’s face it, Apple has never been shy about suing other companies that they think have infringed on their intellectual property. The recent legal fights with Samsung are a good example, but there have been others over the years. At one point Steve Jobs even vowed to use Apple’s billions to destroy Android in court because he regarded it as a stolen product.

Apple has made it clear that they will go after anybody that they think has copied their work. The company has spent millions and millions of dollars trying to protect its patents and products. The end result has been somewhat muddled, but that doesn’t mean that Apple will stop sending its lawyers after those it regards as thieves.

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LibreOffice 4.1.6 Final Released on Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X

Filed under
LibO
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

All the supported platforms have received this new update, but this is a maintenance build that’s mostly about bug fixes, which means that it fits perfectly in what has been made available so far, with no major surprises.

“LibreOffice 4.1.6 is the last release of the LibreOffice 4.1 family, targeted to large deployments in enterprises and public administrations, which should always be supported by TDF certified developers. Today, we users can choose between LibreOffice 4.2.3 Fresh, targeted to early adopters and technology enthusiasts, and LibreOffice 4.1.6 Stable targeted to enterprise deployments and conservative users,” said Florian Effenberger, TDF executive director.

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Now you can access Windows PCs and Macs from Android devices

Filed under
Android
Microsoft
Mac

Google has finally launched it’s Chrome Remote Desktop app for Android, which allows a Mac and Windows user to control their machines from an Android tablet or smartphone. It’s a really cool and one of the easiest Remote Desktop tool which works great.

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No, the iPhone 6 is not going to demolish Android

Filed under
Android
Mac

The hype is growing for the iPhone 6, and TheStreet jumped on the bandwagon with another silly article about how the iPhone 6 is going to “demolish Android.” TheStreet essentially claims that a larger screen iPhone 6 will be so good that it will just blow away every Android phone and bring zillions of Android users over to the iPhone. The fanboyish blather in this article reeks of a desperate attempt on TheStreet’s part to gin up page views and ad impressions.

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Why Samsung is the Mitt Romney of the Android world

Filed under
Android
Mac

Samsung has always come across as a bit of a sleazy company to me. Something about the company has always just rubbed me the wrong way. Whenever I see a Samsung ad or read a story about them I feel like I’ve been slimed. It’s a feeling akin to dealing with a used car salesman or an insurance salesman, you just know that they are full of crap and you feel dirty after dealing with them.

You could even call Samsung the Mitt Romney of Android manufacturers. I lived in Massachusetts when Romney was governor so I knew what a grinning sleazebag he was, and despite that I held my nose and voted for the trouser snake back in 2012 simply because I felt he was slightly less bad when it comes to the economy than four more years of Dear Leader Obama (next time remind me to vote third party…a pox on both their houses…ugh!). But I felt dirty after I cast that vote, and that’s how Samsung makes me feel: dirty.

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iPhone becomes victim of Android’s success, makes Apple worry

Filed under
Android
Mac

Apple, the world’s most valuable technology company, is worried these days and not without reason. Well, Android phones with either larger screens or lower prices than the iPhone are making the tech giant’s blood boil.

Internal Apple documents show that the company’s sales department is anxious about growing competition from Android-powered devices amidst declining iPhone sales, Re/code said in a report.

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Android more stable than iOS: Study

Filed under
Android
Mac

For long we have been hearing strories that Android is unsafe, unstable, while iOS is reliable. But new data that has emerged will totally change the picture. A study conducted by Crittercism, a performance monitoring company has revealed that while iOS 7.1 is the most stable version of iOS to date, its Android counterpart is far more stable.

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Tim Cook blasts latest Apple-bashing book as ‘nonsense’

Filed under
Mac

It’s not unusual for Apple CEO Tim Cook to blast anything that is not pro Apple. As a result, few were surprised when Tim Cook labeled Yukari Iwatani Kane’s book “Haunted Empire: Apple After Steve Jobs” as “nonsense.” Iwatani Kane claims that Apple is no longer the company they were under Jobs, and that we have already seen the best that they have to offer.

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in Multimedia

  • Organize your movie and TV files with tinyMediaManager
    The trouble with video files is that they are not easily parseable. How can your computer tell whether that 8 GB file in your ~/Movies folder is the latest superhero movie, or your daughter's soccer game? I consider myself an early adopter of digital content. I prefer a digital format, and since I consume a lot of independent content that doesn't have the budget for physical releases anyway, most of my purchases are digital files. I keep these on an NFS shared drive, and stream to Kodi or ncmpcpp, or whatever media client I happen to be using on any given Linux or Android device.
  • 6 reasons why Guayadeque is a music lover's open source player
    Recently I upgraded my laptop's Linux to the latest release, and I was surprised and saddened to discover that the wonderful music player Guayadeque seems to be considered as dead upstream, at least in Debian and Ubuntu. In a January blog post, the original author Juan Rios (@anonbeat) wrote that he is no longer able to support the code, which relies on outdated version of GStreamer 0.10. (When I asked about the status of Guayadeque on AskUbuntu, someone replied that it can now be built from source using the code on GitHub, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed.)
  • Which open source audio player is your favorite?

Peppermint OS 7 Linux Distribution Officially Released Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

It's a bit earlier than expected, but the Peppermint OS 7 GNU/Linux distribution has been officially unveiled today, June 24, 2016, based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system. Peppermint OS 7 has been in development for the past year, and it comes as a drop-in replacement for the Peppermint Six version, which was officially released back in May 2015. It is distributed as 64-bit and 32-bit flavors for all computers, but the 64-bit one also offers complete support for UEFI/Secureboot systems. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Installing Arch Linux. Part 1
    Arch Linux is often rather challenging or scary when it comes to a newbie's first Linux experience. Some reasons you may want to go with Arch would be the Pacman package handler, or the fact that it comes with no bloat software that will allow you to truly make it your own. In the installation process, there is no GUI or "Press Next to Continue" to hold your hand. This usually drives people away. I also found the forums to have lots of impatient people who expect you to magically know what you're doing. Here I will try to provide an in depth guide on how to install and setup your own Arch Linux computer.
  • openSUSE News: openSUSE Conference Day 2
    Frank Karlitschek, founder of Nextcloud and ownCloud, talked about the importance of federation infrastructure and reaching the critical mass. He pointed out that Free Open Source Software projects that offer similar applications to those that are proprietary fail to gain mainstream acceptance. One of the reasons he gave was trying to balance the balance between privacy and openness. He suggested that more projects should work with one another on a cloud-sharing standard and perhaps there should be a Global User Directory. Users could manage their privacy data that is shared or visible on a GUD as an answer to sharing personal cloud-based content with users running different applications or services.
  • DebCamp16 day 0
  • GSoC-Journey till Mid term
  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160623-1
    About one month has passed since we did release TeX Live 2016, and more than a month since the last Debian packages, so it is high time to ship out a new checkout of upstream. Nothing spectacular new here, just lots and lots of updates since the freeze.
  • Raspberry Pi Stays on Top in Survey of 81 Open-Spec SBCs

GNU/Linux on Servers and PS3

  • Nearly 1 in 3 Azure virtual machines now run Linux
  • What a Virtual Network Looks Like: Planning
    Network services don't spring up unbidden from the earth but rather they're coerced out of infrastructure in response to business and consumer opportunities. Every operations and management paradigm ever proposed for networking includes an explicit planning dimension to get the service-to-infrastructure and service-to-user relationships right. On the surface, virtualization would seem to help planning by reducing inertia, but don't you then have to plan for virtualization? How the planning difficulties and improvements balance out has a lot to do with how rapidly we can expect virtualization to evolve.
  • How DevOps Failed 60K Users
    Back in 2006, when I was an operations engineer at Slideshare, I was part of a team that launched a DevOps model to speed processes and stay ahead of our competition.
  • Democratizing Docker: Changing Containers' Competitive Landscape
    At DockerCon 16, approximately 4,000 attendees descended on the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle from June 19 to 21 to learn about and experience the phenomenon that is the Docker container ecosystem. The big news of the event came on the first day of the conference with the announcement of Docker 1.12 and its integrated orchestration system. In the keynote speeches and in multiple sessions that I attended, that new Swarm mode was a hot topic of technical and business discussion.
  • Apple Opens the iOS 10 Kernel, Sony Compensates Linux Users… [Tech News Digest]
  • Here's How Much You'll Get From Sony's PlayStation 3 Bungle
  • Sony Settles 'Other OS' PS3 Lawsuit
  • Did you install Linux on your PS3? Then Sony owes you $55
  • Sony Settlement Gives PS3 Owners $9 After Company Made Console Less Useful Via Firmware Update
    We've noted countless times how in the modern computing era, you don't really own what you think you own. You don't really own the music or books that can arbitrarily disappear on your devices, and you no longer really own a wide variety of hardware that can be dramatically changed (often for the worse) via firmware update months or years after purchase. If you're extra lucky, you'll shell out $300 for a piece of hardware that one year later simply won't work at all. With intelligent automobiles and the rise of the internet-of-not-so-smart things, that's more true now than ever. Case in point: back in 2010 we noted how Sony issued several firmware updates for its Playstation 3 gaming console that effectively made the console less useful. One specifically (PS3 software update 3.21) removed the console owner's ability to load alternative operating systems like Linux. But tinkerers being tinkerers, some users found ways to use the feature to expand the console's functionality in all kinds of creative ways. Fearing a loss of control and potential spike in piracy, Sony decided to make the console significantly less useful.