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Mozilla Mobile

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Linux
Mac
Moz/FF

Android 6 Vs. iOS 9: The Showdown

Filed under
Android
Mac

It wasn’t too long ago that we put the major mobile operating systems head to head, but with big updates from both Google and Apple in the meantime, we think it’s worth another look at where they both stand. Is there a clear winner? Or are they barely distinguishable any more?

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Majority of Linux users still use Windows or MacOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

Majority of voters, more than one third, use two operating systems on their computer, one of them being a flavour of Linux and another - Windows or MacOS

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Also: World Without Linux Video Series Debuts

Sources: Apple Dumps VMware Licensing Agreement, Will Step Up Deployment Of Open-Source KVM Virtualization

Filed under
Mac
OSS

Several VMware partners told CRN that their customers are looking at KVM and OpenStack as a way to lower their VMware licensing costs. While OpenStack and KVM aren't easy to deploy, large organizations can afford to hire the necessary talent and expertise, solution providers said.

"While most companies don't have the technical chops to ditch VMware and go with KVM, ones with mature IT departments may look at this and reconsider their VMware strategies," said one longtime VMware partner executive, who didn't want to be named

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Make Ubuntu Look Like Mac With the Gela Theme

Filed under
Mac
Ubuntu

Up until Ubuntu went public with Unity, out-of-the-box Linux has always been rather ugly compared to both Windows and Mac. (And depending on who you ask, Ubuntu’s Unity was even a step in the wrong direction!)

If you recently switched from Mac to Linux, or if you’re just a regular Linux user who happens to like the aesthetics of Mac, the good news is that you can do something about it — by using the Gela Theme.

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Security Research and Jailbreaking

Filed under
Mac
Security
  • Tech Allies Lobby to Keep U.S. Rule From Fettering Security Research

    When the U.S. Department of Commerce proposed a rule to regulate the international trade and sharing of "intrusion software," worried security firms immediately went on the defense.

    Industry giants, such as Symantec and FireEye, teamed up with well-known technology firms, such as Cisco and Google, to criticize the regulations. The proposed rules, published in May, would cause "significant unintended consequences" that would "negatively impact—rather than improve—the state of cyber-security," Cisco stated in a letter to the Commerce Dept.'s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS).

  • XcodeGhost apps haunting iOS App Store more numerous than first reported

    Security researchers have both good and bad news about the recently reported outbreak of XcodeGhost apps infecting Apple's App Store. The bad: the infection was bigger than previously reported and dates back to April. The good: affected apps are more akin to adware than security-invading malware.

  • Wanted alive: $1m for an iOS 9 bug to hijack, er, jailbreak iThings

    Exploit traders Zerodium will pay a million dollars to anyone who finds an unpatched bug in iOS 9 that can be exploited to jailbreak iThings – or compromise them.

    The $1m (£640,000) bounty will be awarded to an individual or team that provides a working exploit to achieve remote code execution on an iOS device via the Safari or Chrome browsers or through an SMS/MMS message.

    This exploit could be combined with other exploitable vulnerabilities to perform an untethered jailbreak on an iPhone or iPad, allowing fans to install any applications they want on their gadgets – particularly software not available on Apple's App Store.

Being Thoughtful About FOSS History

Filed under
Mac
OSS

Time to saddle up the rant stallion and take him out of the stable: This comes up from time to time on social media — as it did again several days ago — and it’s really about time it stops.

Dennis Ritchie and Steve Jobs died pretty close to each other, time-wise. That may sound like the start of a joke — “Dennis Ritchie and Steve Jobs meet at the pearly gates, and…” — but we’re not going there today. Many people are under the impression that while Steve Jobs got all the attention as the “messiah of computing” when he died, Dennis Ritchie was completely ignored.

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Here's why the iPhone isn't going to catch up to Android any time soon

Filed under
Android
Mac

In short: Even as previous Android-heavy markets mature, new ones will continue to grow across the globe. As tens of millions of people in emerging markets start buying smartphones, the ongoing Android price war will make the platform more attractive than ever — securing Google's lead for years to come.

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Apple’s Android apps move is likely a desperate attempt to sell more Apple Watches

Filed under
Android
Mac

News broke last week that Apple, Inc. was advertising for an applications SW engineer to work on Android apps, but given Apple’s reluctance previously to provide apps for the rival Android platform, has Apple finally realized that it can’t really on users of the iPhone to cross-sell its other products, such as the Apple Watch?

According to the job listing, Apple is “looking for engineers to help [Apple] bring exciting new mobile products to the Android platform,” with, as 9to5Mac pointed out at the time, new being the only giveaway that Apple was planning to extend its range of Android apps from its current Move to iOS app and forthcoming release of Apple Music for Android.

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New Android games:

Classic Educational Puzzle Game Zoombinis Comes To Android After A Successful Kickstarter Campaign

Fallout Shelter Game: Android App Release Date August 13

Apple v Android debate: And the winner is ...

Filed under
Android
Mac

THIS WEEK we've been running our latest INQUIRER debate, and with the topic set as iOS vs Android, things got heated.
The debate has now closed, and the final results are in *drumroll* 72 percent of INQ readers prefer Android, leaving just 28 percent of you, sob, on Team iOS.

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More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%