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HowTos

Old school Linux tips

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Linux
HowTos

ghacks.net: Some times you just have to pull some tricks out of the vault. These tips can be timeless, classic, or just retro. But generally speaking they still apply to users today. Naturally, since these are mostly old school tips, they are going to be command line tips.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Create a Mail Icon with the GIMP
  • Keep your passwords safe in Linux with KeePassX
  • How to access / mount Windows shares from Linux
  • Tweak Photo Metadata with FotoTagger
  • C++ Pretty Functions
  • How to Find the Most Memory taking process in Ubuntu Linux
  • Increase download speed with Aria2 utility
  • FTP and SFTP Beginners Guide with 10 Examples
  • Install the Banshee Meego Interfact in Ubuntu

Text editing with Nano made easy

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HowTos

tuxradar.comNano supports syntax highlighting. Nano supports text justification. And yet, Nano is so much easier than Emacs or Vim. Discover the hidden power of this versatile command line text editor - you may never want to go back to the GUI again!

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • OOo: Eliminate blank rows columns in spreadsheets
  • Bash If Statements
  • Bash Conditional Expressions
  • Guide to dual-booting
  • Guake: Hide-able terminal goodness
  • Hide Desktop Icons in Ubuntu
  • noCD? |boot from usb| Sabayon Linux
  • How to install webmin in Ubuntu
  • Prevent brute force attacks using fail2ban

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Setting up a network printer in Fedora 13
  • The why and how of RPATH
  • Open Images in a Linux Console using fbi, a console based Image Viewer
  • Manage Tabs in Opera Like a Pro
  • Strip All Unwanted MP3 ID3 Tags
  • Reverting to Alsa Sound System in Ubuntu
  • Restore Grub 2.0 after Windows 7 Install
  • How to disable Ping response in Ubuntu
  • How to make a Hockney style Photograph in GIMP

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 13 Server

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HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 13 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Record Net Radio with Mplayer
  • Install debian server in a linux chroot environment
  • Add a Frosted Glass Caption Bar to a photo with The GIMP
  • Set up a L2TP over IPSec VPN using a Radius backend
  • Using your new Bluecherry MPEG-4 codec card and driver...
  • Backup up your GoogleMail locally with getmail
  • Spotify Links Working in Linux
  • Restrict network access by time or IP address with Squid
  • Module parameters from rc.conf in Arch

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Improve Photos with digiKam’s Local Contrast Tool
  • easiest way to split and merge pdf files in Ubuntu
  • Updating BIOS Firmware on a Linux Only Thinkpad Laptop
  • Ubuntu Web Gateway
  • Convert Linux man pages to PDF files
  • Hacking OOo for dummies (2)
  • Stream Multimedia from Linux Box (Enable UPnP on Ubuntu)
  • Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert Nautilus Script
  • How to do Perl Hash Reference and Dereference
  • Gnote: Fedora 13 note tool

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Audio Recording in Linux: An Introduction [PART 1]
  • Tweak your RGBA enabled desktop
  • Boot-Up Manager (BUM) - Graphical runlevel editor
  • BackupPC not graphing? Pool size won't shrink? Try this
  • How to change background color to transparent in GIMP
  • gnome-terminal empty
  • Using Symantec NetBackp With Fedora
  • Convert a PDF file into a single Image using ImageMagick
  • Cloning With Linux 3 Ways
  • Using rdist to copy files to multiple hosts
  • Transfer Installed Packages to New Computer or Drive in Ubuntu
  • Auto-hide cursor when idle in Ubuntu
  • Perl Array Reference and Dereference Tutorial With Examples

Ubuntu 10.04 Upgrade: Best Practices Checklist

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Ubuntu
HowTos

itworld.com: ave you been thinking about upgrading your computer to Ubuntu 10.04? I recently made the leap, at the prompting of my Update Manager. The process went fairly smoothly, but I did have to deal with a couple of minor annoyances. Here are a few tips.

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