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HowTos

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HowTo: Use Bash Parameter Substitution Like A Pro
  • How to use eCryptfs (Cryptographic Filesystem) in Ubuntu
  • Find Servers and Hundreds of Online Players for Urban Terror
  • Resolving SELinux Boot Error
  • Multiple X (Desktop) Sessions in Ubuntu
  • Disable The Spotify Tray (Notification Area) Icon In Linux
  • Fixing sendmail configuration error
  • Fix Ubuntu Plymouth For Proprietary Nvidia And ATI Graphics Drivers

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to restore Grub 2 after reinstalling Windows
  • How to pin or add new apps to Ubuntu Netbook Unity Launcher?
  • Fix Google Earth Crashing On Startup In Ubuntu
  • Unix How-To: Checking on Collisions
  • Create a slide-show screen saver with the help of F-spot
  • convert uppercase to lowercase in a file
  • Linux Beginners Guide to NFS Mount Using Exportfs
  • How to customize the clock applet in Ubuntu
  • setsid - start programs in new shell
  • Simple shell script to install media players, codecs, and more
  • send email from the command line - Gmail Mutt -

The Perfect Server - Ubuntu 10.10 [ISPConfig 3]

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to prepare an Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat) server for the installation of ISPConfig 3, and how to install ISPConfig 3. ISPConfig 3 is a webhosting control panel that allows you to configure the following services through a web browser: Apache web server, Postfix mail server, MySQL, BIND or MyDNS nameserver, PureFTPd, SpamAssassin, ClamAV, and many more.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Shell scripting for system administrators: beyond the basics
  • Ubuntu 10.10 manual disk partitioning guide
  • HowTo: Use Bash Parameter Substitution Like A Pro
  • How to Add UbuntuOne Indicator to Your Ubuntu Panel
  • 6 Expect Script Examples to Expect the Unexpected
  • Multimedia (MP3, MPEG-4, AVI, DiVX, etc.) support in Ubuntu
  • Fix for Ubuntu Extras GPG error
  • Get A Quake Like Terminal Under Gnome Using Terminator
  • How to set up an OpenVPN server
  • The 10 Cleverest Ways to Use Linux to Fix Your Windows PC
  • Configure Logitech G Series Keyboards In Ubuntu With Gnome15
  • Getting Plymouth on openSUSE
  • Booting to ISO images from a USB key

How To Upgrade Ubuntu 10.04 To 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat) (Desktop & Server)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

The new Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat) has just been released. This guide shows how you can upgrade your Ubuntu 10.04 desktop and server installations to Ubuntu 10.10.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Nvidia Graphics Driver in Ubuntu 10.10
  • How To Switch Between GNOME & KDE 4.5 On Ubuntu
  • Clock Management on Linux
  • Tweak The NotifyOSD Notifications In Ubuntu 10.10
  • FFmpeg Tricks You Should Know
  • Install Mplayer and Multimedia Codecs in Ubuntu
  • 6 Examples to Backup Linux Using dd Command
  • openntpd on gentoo(with Networkmanager)
  • Storage DBAN, Disksposal and Diskpensation
  • Screen resolution with nVidia driver in Lucid

4 Archiving Tools for Linux Server Admins

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linuxplanet.com: There are all kinds of fancy backup applications, from free to complicated and expensive. But it's still hard to beat the speed, simplicity, and flexibility of the old standbys.

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • New mimetype icons coming to Oxygen
  • get the high resolution back for tty after activation of nVidia driver in Ubuntu
  • Customizing Ubuntu 10.10
  • Switching from Windows to Linux: One Month In
  • Ubuntu 10.10 Recommendations
  • Alien Arena 2011 Is Coming Soon
  • Ubuntu 10.10 - Various Versions
  • Gentoo kernel versions and the latest vulnerabilities
  • Generate OpenDocument spreadsheets from database
  • KDEMU – Jonathan Riddell for Kubuntu 10.10
  • Debian squeezes Chromium back in
  • Building ProFTPD with SFTP support on Debian Lenny
  • What Would You Like in Mint 10?
  • A Useful Ubuntu Tweak Alternative For Beginners
  • Tools of the week: Delete files securely on Linux
  • Enable Right | Middle Click On Clickpads – Ubuntu 10.10
  • How to type the new Rupee Symbol in Ubuntu 10.10

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Perl upgrade from cpan shell
  • How to remove Vmware from Linux
  • Linux text to speech with Festival
  • Linux Outlaws 168 - The Brigadier Drops By
  • How to password protect files and folders in Ubuntu
  • Install Gnome Nanny Parental Control On Ubuntu
  • Working Broadcom wireless in Kubuntu live session
  • Novell's BSM now Novell Operations Center
  • Running Commands in the background
  • 4 Ways to Supercharge Double-Click Action in Firefox
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More in Tux Machines

Events: Video Conferences, Code.gov, and LibreOffice

  • How to video conference without people hating you
    What about an integrated headset and microphone? This totally depends on the type. I tend to prefer the full sound of a real microphone but the boom mics on some of these headsets are quite good. If you have awesome heaphones already you can add a modmic to turn them into headsets. I find that even the most budget dedicated headsets sound better than earbud microphones.
  • Learn about the open source efforts of Code.gov at this event
    The U.S. government has a department looking to spread open source projects, and members will be in Baltimore this week. Code.gov is looking to promote reuse of open source code within the government to cut down on duplicating development work, and spread use of the code throughout the country. On April 26 event at Spark Baltimore, team members from Code.gov, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Presidential Innovation Fellowship are among those invited to be at a meetup to share more. Held from 12-3 p.m., the event will feature talks from the invited guests about what they’re working on and Federal Source Code Policy, as well as how it can apply locally, said organizing team member Melanie Shimano.
  • LibreOffice Conference 2018 Takes Place in Tirana, Albania, for LibreOffice 6.1
    While working on the next major LibreOffice release, The Document Foundation is also prepping for this year's LibreOffice Conference, which will take place this fall in Albania. The LibreOffice Conference is the perfect opportunity for new and existing LibreOffice developers, users, supporters, and translators, as well as members of the Open Source community to meet up, share their knowledge, and plan the new features of the next major LibreOffice release, in this case LibreOffice 6.1, due in mid August 2018. A call for papers was announced over the weekend as The Document Foundation wants you to submit proposals for topics and tracks, along with a short description of yourself for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 event, which should be filed no later than June 30, 2018. More details can be found here.
  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Paper
    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s conference in Tirana (Albania). The event is scheduled for late September, from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, we want to hear from you!

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more