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HowTos

Installing SugarCRM Community Edition On Fedora 14

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HowTos

SugarCRM is a webbased CRM solution written in PHP. SugarCRM is available in different flavours called "Editions" ("Community" (free), "Professional", and "Enterprise"). For a detailed overview of the different editions, have a look at the SugarCRM website. In this tutorial I will describe the installation of the free Community Edition on Fedora 14. With the modules My Portal, Calendar, Activities, Contacts, Accounts, Leads, Opportunities, Cases, Bugtracker, Documents and Email, SugarCRM Community Edition offers everything that can be expected from a CRM solution.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • KDEPIM 4.4.8 Tagged and Released
  • How To Fix “Register Globals Is Enabled” Issue While Installing Drupal?
  • Enable Alt+F2 in Ubuntu 11.04 Alpha 1
  • [SOLVED] Compiz text input problem in Ubuntu 11.04 Alpha 1
  • Change the default Application of PDF file
  • How to Add a Folder Shortcut to the Taskbar
  • Drupal 7.0 RC 1 Released
  • Merry Christmas & Happy New Year Wallpaper in GIMP
  • Daily Linux Kernel Benchmarks For A Year
  • Tried Ubuntu 10.10 for a week, back to #!CrunchBang
  • Fuduntu 14.6 now available
  • Ubuntu Myth Busted #4: By pandering to non-technical users, they will not give back
  • Introducing Oxidized Trinity 6 "Squeeze"
  • Linux Crazy Podcast 86 Vilhelm von Ehrenheim
  • Linux Outlaws 179 - Lead Lined Pants

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Missing Menus in Ubuntu apps? Try this
  • How to install packages "on demand" in Ubuntu - auto-apt
  • Interactive Commands in Bash
  • How to find open ports in Servers in your Network with Linux
  • How To Clear The Zeitgeist History [Quick Tip]
  • Fully Automatic Installation
  • Install and configure wine to Play latest windows games in Linux
  • Sending Emails Via Gmail SMTP With Python
  • Install And Run Evernote On Linux / Ubuntu
  • Apache configuration on Gentoo - part 2

The Move To Linux - Encrypted Disk Issues

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Linux
Hardware
Software
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: One of the standards that has become normal in the US federal sector is the requirement that all mobile devices, such as laptops, have encrypted drives. This was a direct result of a number of laptop thefts earlier in the decade that resulted in the supposed leaking of personal information.

Cut and Play With Pitivi Video Editor

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Software
HowTos

linuxforu.com: While other FOSS video editors like OpenShot and Avidemux are good, Pitivi comes pre-installed with Ubuntu 10.04.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to use USE in Gentoo and dependencies
  • Install BURG in Ubuntu: A stylish replacement for GRUB
  • delete cookies, cache and history in all major browsers
  • How to install Steam on Linux
  • My desktop backup solution
  • Debian Package Viewer for files and contents - deb-gview

Installing Lighttpd With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Ubuntu 10.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

Lighttpd is a secure, fast, standards-compliant web server designed for speed-critical environments. This tutorial shows how you can install Lighttpd on an Ubuntu 10.10 server with PHP5 support (through FastCGI) and MySQL support.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Burn your music files from any format to audio CD
  • Change Screen Layout settings in Ubuntu using ArandR (XrandR GUI)
  • Let’s Learn LaTex: Part 4
  • Drupal: How To Programmatically Add, Embed Or Insert Views In Your Theme tpl
  • How to sync your iPad with Linux
  • list or find the largest files and directories-folders, Free disk space
  • dual-boot Mint or Ubuntu and Windows 7 on two hard drives

Qemu and its hidden virtues

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Software
HowTos

linuxaria.com: Every day we read of new Linux distributions (GNU/Linux to be correct), and sometimes happen to want to try them “on the road”, even those who do not have a live version. The first program that comes to mind, I think, is precisely Qemu.

Five tips for easy Linux application installation

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Linux
HowTos

techrepublic.com: Most people don’t realize how easy it is to install applications on modern releases of the Linux operating system. Even so, some users encounter traps that seem to trip them up at every attempt. How can you avoid these traps?

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More in Tux Machines

KDE on Android: CI, CD & SDK

I guess we all agree that one of the biggest stoppers to get a contribution out is the ability to get the system ready to start working on the contribution. Today I want to talk a bit about generating Android binaries from our machine. In the KDE Edu sprint we had the blatant realisation that it’s very frustrating to keep pushing the project while not being swift at delivering fresh packages of our applications in different systems. We looked into windows, flatpak, snap and, personally, I looked into Android once again. Nowadays, KDE developers develop the applications on their systems and then create the binaries on their systems as well. Usually it’s a team effort where possibly just one person in the team will be familiar with Android and have the development combo in place: Android SDK, Android NDK, Qt binaries and often several KDE Frameworks precompiled. Not fun and a fairly complex premise. Read more Also:

today's howtos

Linux Kernel and Security: LVM2, Containers, AMD

  • LVM2 Begins Work On Major Changes To Logical Volume Management
    LVM2 as the user-space tools for Logical Volume Management (LVM) on Linux is in the process of going through a big re-work.
  • Containers and Cloud Security
    The idea behind this blog post is to take a new look at how cloud security is measured and what its impact is on the various actors in the cloud ecosystem. From the measurement point of view, we look at the vertical stack: all code that is traversed to provide a service all the way from input web request to database update to output response potentially contains bugs; the bug density is variable for the different components but the more code you traverse the higher your chance of exposure to exploitable vulnerabilities. We’ll call this the Vertical Attack Profile (VAP) of the stack. However, even this axis is too narrow because the primary actors are the cloud tenant and the cloud service provider (CSP). In an IaaS cloud, part of the vertical profile belongs to the tenant (The guest kernel, guest OS and application) and part (the hypervisor and host OS) belong to the CSP. However, the CSP vertical has the additional problem that any exploit in this piece of the stack can be used to jump into either the host itself or any of the other tenant virtual machines running on the host. We’ll call this exploit causing a failure of containment the Horizontal Attack Profile (HAP). We should also note that any Horizontal Security failure is a potentially business destroying event for the CSP, so they care deeply about preventing them. Conversely any exploit occurring in the VAP owned by the Tenant can be seen by the CSP as a tenant only problem and one which the Tenant is responsible for locating and fixing. We correlate size of profile with attack risk, so the large the profile the greater the probability of being exploited.
  • Canonical Releases AMD Microcode Updates for All Ubuntu Users to Fix Spectre V2
    Canonical released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the well-known Spectre security vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were publicly disclosed earlier this year and discovered to affect billions of devices made in the past two decades. Unearthed by Jann Horn of Google Project Zero, the second variant (CVE-2017-5715) of the Spectre vulnerability is described as a branch target injection attack.

Programming: 5 Pillars of Learning Programming, New Releases of Rust and Git

  • 5 Pillars of Learning Programming
    Learning how to program is hard. I often find that university courses and boot camps miss important aspects of programming and take poor approaches to teaching rookies. I want to share the 5 basic pillars I believe a successful programming course should build upon. As always, I am addressing the context of mainstream web applications. A rookie’s goal is to master the fundamentals of programming and to understand the importance of libraries and frameworks. Advanced topics such as the cloud, operations in general, or build tools should not be part of the curriculum. I am also skeptical when it comes to Design Patterns. They presume experience that beginners never have.
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Announcing Rust 1.27
    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.27.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.
  • Rust 1.27 Released With SIMD Improvements
    Most notable to Rust 1.27 is SIMD support via the std::arch module to make use of SIMD (Single Instruction, Multiple Data) instructions directly. Up to now Rust could already make use of LLVM's auto-vectorization support, but this lets Rust developers write SIMD instructions on their own and to allow for the proper Rust code to be executed based upon the CPU at run-time.
  • Git 2.18 Released With Initial Version Of Its New Wire Protocol
    Version 2.18 of the Git distributed revision control system is now available. Arguably most notable about Git 2.18 is the introduction of its new wire protocol "protocol_v2" that is designed to offer much greater performance. This new protocol is designed to be much faster and is already being used at Google and elsewhere due to the significant performance benefits.
  • Git v2.18.0
    The latest feature release Git v2.18.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 903 non-merge commits since v2.17.0, contributed by 80 people, 24 of which are new faces.