Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

HowTos

Creating Screencasts With recordMyDesktop On Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

recordMyDesktop is a desktop session recorder for GNU/Linux that attemps to be easy to use, yet also effective at its primary task. It produces files using only open formats. These are theora for video and vorbis for audio, using the ogg container.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • kde 4.3 is here Smile quick gentoo (upgrade) guide

  • Simple ftp with Gftp
  • HOWTO : Add or rename network interface on Debian 5.0
  • Tutorial: Set up Ubuntu Linux on a Windows PC
  • How to Videoconference Linux and Windows with Ekiga
  • Week of bash scripts – newx and bgcmd
  • How to install Google Chrome Themes
  • Using GIMP as Single Window – Tabs and Groups in Compiz
  • Feature: Running Linux in a virtual environment with VirtualBox
  • iftop to monitor traffic/bandwidth in SUSE/openSUSE
  • Scanning Your Network with nmap
  • Customize Your Ubuntu Laptop Appearance with Themes
  • Set up Claws Mail to work with Gmail
  • Using Rsync

Install KDE 4.3 in Ubuntu/Kubuntu 9.04

Filed under
HowTos

KDE 4.3 was released just yesterday, and it comes with a lot of great new features and improvements. In order to install it just follow the steps below.

Install KDE 4.3 In Ubuntu Jaunty 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala simply have do an apt-get upgrade to update to the latest KDE 4.3 (which was released yesterday) but (K)Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope users have to add the Kubuntu PPA backports so they can install the latest KDE 4.3.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Apache2 umask

  • Installing Google Chrome from .deb file with support for plugins, flash
  • HOWTO: Fix Linux hang/freeze during reboots and restarts
  • View PDF documents with Apvlv on Ubuntu
  • WineXS – Simple graphical environment to configure Wine
  • Howto use downloaded ISOs as a repository in Debian
  • Read a File Line by Line
  • Painless Linux Multi-boot Setup
  • Week of bash scripts – Extract
  • Tech Tip: View Config Files Without Comments
  • Speeding up file deletion in KDE4
  • Episode #54: chmod Squad
  • Chat with AIM, MSN, Gtalk, and Yahoo through Irssi with bitlbee
  • Linux RunLevels
  • Secure remote firewall administration via SSH
  • How to Install Chromium Daily Builds in Ubuntu
  • How to install virtualbox on Ubuntu 9.04 and run WindowsXP as virtual OS

Installing "Sugar on a stick" (Strawberry Release) On A USB Stick

Filed under
HowTos

Sugar is the desktop environment that is used for the "One Laptop per Child" (OLPC) netbooks. It can also be installed on normal computers and even run off of a USB stick (which should have at least 1GB of size).

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Adding a widescreen monitor in Linux
  • Perform Files/Folders Comparision With Meld In Ubuntu Linux
  • Searching and replacing special characters in OOo
  • Create a Local Ubuntu Repository using Apt-Mirror and Apt-Cacher
  • HOWTO: Resolving more udev issues on Debian
  • How to re-enable backspace as back key in Firefox 3.5
  • Bash, in Color
  • A week of bash scripts – Crush
  • Tutorial: Install and Use of Cairo dock
  • Gnu Screen display number of updates for Arch linux

Boot On BTRFS With Debian

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial will explain you how to boot from a BTRFS filesystem with kernel 2.6.31-RC4 and BTRFS 0.19. BTRFS is a new filesystem with some really interesting features like online defragmenting and snapshots. BTRFS is an experimental filesystem, use at your own risk. The kernel used is also experimental.

Choosing the right Linux File System Layout using a Top-Bottom Process

Filed under
HowTos

linuxconfig.org: As you may probably know, Linux supports various filesystems such as ext2, ext3, ext4, xfs, reiserfs, jfs among others. Few users really consider this part of a system, selecting default options of their distribution's installer. In this article, I will give some reasons for a better consideration of the file-system and of its layout.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Get back the ctrl-alt-backspace behavior in Ubuntu

  • Basic Commands: Symbolic Links
  • Use Feh to browse images and set wallpaper
  • Godaddy.com’s Relay Mail Server with Postfix on Ubuntu Server
  • Copy Text and Files to the X Clipboard from the Command Line
  • Create an autostartup script for Debian and Ubuntu systems
  • Famous Perl One-Liners Explained, Part II: Line Numbering
  • Small openSUSE Build Service Tips
  • Install AntiX 8.2 Final on External Flash Drive
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India