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HowTos

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HowTo: Save A File In Vim / Vi Without Root Permission
  • Using smartctl to get SMART data on hard drives
  • Three door security for your Linux
  • Building rpm package from source
  • How to increase the priority of a running process in Linux
  • Pana - A music player based on Amarok 1.4
  • Fix Blue and Green Tinted Video Problem in Ubuntu
  • Substitute maximized window title and buttons with GNOME Panel applets
  • A Quick Guide to Lynx

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • UNIX / Linux: 10 Netstat Command Examples
  • Nginx with gzip static (gzip_static) support on Arch Linux ABS
  • A Debian Package Primer: Part One
  • Perform graphical Nmap scans with Zenmap 5.1
  • Recover Deleted Files on an NTFS Hard Drive from a Ubuntu Live CD
  • Code Project: create an animated RSS reader with Clutter
  • How to Install QtCurve in KDE
  • Comparing Files
  • Increase MySQL performance with query cache query_cache
  • How to setup Google Chrome 5 in Mandriva 2010
  • How to Customize GDM2 in ubuntu 9.10 jaunty

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 12 Server

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HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 12 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.

today's howtos & leftovers:

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News
HowTos
  • Hooking up a projector using Nvidia Twinview on Kubuntu
  • How To Upgrade Packages in PCLinuxOS 2009.2
  • Sony Removing Linux from Fat PS3s to Combat Piracy
  • Jury deliberating UNIX ownership in ongoing SCO trial
  • BackupPC and the USB Drive
  • Review: Geany IDE – Integrated Development Environment
  • Clementine-player - music player based on Amarok 1.4
  • Troubleshooting Wi-Fi Issues With Ubuntu
  • Library for reading and writing Quicktime files (utilities)
  • Geek Gang Signs
  • A Quick Shortcut to Shortcuts
  • Learning competence with free and open source software
  • Diagnosing font issues on Linux
  • Configure hostgroups for Nagios
  • Sysinfo- Display your system information in Ubuntu | Gnome
  • How to disable Shutdown Timer in Ubuntu Linux
  • update your Ubuntu system remotely using Webmin

Firefox Optimization – Speed

Filed under
Moz/FF
HowTos

okiebuntu.homelinux.com: Open Firefox and in the address bar type: about:config (click ‘ok ill be careful’) To modify a Preference in about:config page you can:

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Bash: Trim Leading White Space From Input Variables
  • Moving from Keyring on Palm to KeePass on Linux and Android
  • How To Upgrade To openSUSE 11.3 Milestone 4
  • fix Desktop Effects can't be enabled for intel integrated graphics in Jaunty
  • Fix Popping Sound From Speakers, Intel Ubuntu 9.10
  • Setup a DLINK WUA-2340 USB Wireless Adapter in Ubuntu
  • Quickly install Nagios on Ubuntu
  • Easily extend Nagios’ functionality
  • Bash Shell Exit Status Tutorial with Practical Examples
  • KVM how to use encrypted images
  • Is this a mount point?
  • How to Share Internet Connections in Ubuntu using bridge-utils
  • Disable unwanted Daemons in Fedora for Faster Bootup & Memory Increments
  • Adding Bombono DVD Repositories
  • Make Nautilus open Sub-Folders in current Window
  • Uninstall .deb Packages
  • I'll Get the MOP....
  • Perl – How to list installed modules
  • Set Up a High Performance Cluster (HPC) Using Lenny

today's howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Purge Removed Packages On Ubuntu/Debian
  • Use ssh_config To Simplify Your Life
  • wgetpaste: a command line tool for pastebin
  • cmus-small, fast and powerful console music player
  • About:Config – A Complete Guide
  • ffe (Flat file extractor)
  • Removable disk encryption with dm-crypt/LUKS
  • There’s a Lot in the Dot: Filesystem Permissions and Pathnames (Part 2)
  • Identifying Network Ports in Linux
  • Histwi — Powerful twitter tools
  • Install Latest Firefox 3.6.2 in Ubuntu using Ubuntuzilla Repository
  • Formatting USB sticks for Windows and Linux in Linux
  • Shared Wire Connection in Ubuntu

Linux Software Installation EasyGuide

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HowTos

journalxtra.com: A couple of years of experience have taught me there are many ways to install software into Linux. Most of those methods are as easy as fishing for piranhas with a horse for bait.

Virtualization With KVM On A Mandriva 2010.0 Server

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MDV
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Mandriva 2010.0 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Connecting To Serial Null Modems With GNU Screen
  • Use vmstat to monitor your system memory and CPU
  • Install Multiple 'Bleeding Edge' Firefox Versions in Linux
  • Fastest way to create ramdisk in Ubuntu/Linux
  • install 32bit deb applications in 64bit Ubuntu
  • Unix How To: Aliases and Functions
  • Add a Cache Clearing Button to Firefox
  • Get to know Linux: AppArmor
  • Console color schemes
  • Back In Time : System Restore on Ubuntu
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Games: OpenMW and Linux Gaming Benchmark

  • OpenMW, the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing
    OpenMW [Official Site], the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing with recent blog posts highlighting some changes sounding rather great. Speaking on their official blog, the developers noted back in September that they've had some new developers come on board, with thanks in part to the multiplayer "TES3MP" project (Morrowind Multiplayer), which is built from OpenMW.
  • Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 1800X For NVIDIA/Radeon Linux Gaming
    Following last week's look at using the new "Coffee Lake" Intel Core i3 / i5 / i7 CPUs for Linux gaming comparison among our other ongoing tests of these new "8th Gen" processors, a frequent request has been a closer look at the gaming performance between the Core i7 8700K and the Ryzen 7 1800X. Here's a look with two AMD Radeon graphics cards and two NVIDIA GeForce offerings.

Bloomberg's big move on machine learning and open source

With its orange text on black interface and colour coded keyboard, the Bloomberg professional services terminal – known simply as ‘The Terminal’ – doesn’t appear to have changed much since it was launched in the early ’80s. But behind the retro (Bloomberg prefers ‘modern icon’) stylings, its delivery of financial markets data news, and trading tools has advanced rapidly. The terminal’s 315,000 subscribers globally are now able to leverage on machine learning, deep learning, and natural language processing techniques developed by the company, as they seek an edge in their investment decisions. Bloomberg is also applying those same techniques to its internal processes. Leading the company’s efforts in the area is Bloomberg’s head of data science Gideon Mann, who spoke with CIO Australia earlier this month. [...] Behind much of Bloomberg’s recent builds has been an open source ethic. Mann says there has been a sea change within the company about open source. "When the company started in 1981 and there really wasn't a whole lot of open source. And so there was a mentality of you know if it's not invented here we're not interested,” Mann says. [...] The organisation took some convincing, but, championed by the CTO, there has been a “huge culture change” towards open source. “There are two groups you got to convince: you’ve got to convince management that using open source is going to be safe and lead to better software, and then you also have to convince engineers that using open source is going to increase their skillset, will lead to software that’s easier to maintain and is less buggy and it's going to be a more beautiful system. Once you can kind of convince those two then you're set,” Mann says. The company is an active contributor to projects including Solr, Hadoop, Apache Spark and Open Stack. Read more Also: Uber Open Sources AthenaX, Its Streaming Analytics Platform

Firefox 57 - Trick or Treat?

The best way to describe Firefox 57 is too little, too late, but better later than never. In a way, it's a pointless release, because it brings us back roughly where Firefox was and should have been years ago. Only all this time in between was wasted losing user base. WebExtensions will be the thing that makes or breaks the browser, and with insufficient quality in the available replacements for those that don't make the culling list, there will be no real incentive for people to stay around. Firefox 57 is better than earlier versions in terms of looks and performance, but that's like saying you get 50% discount on a price that is twice what it should be. Ultimately unnecessary, just like graduating from university by the age of 68. There aren't any major advantages over Chrome. This is essentially a Firefox that sucks less. So yes, on the positive side, if you do want to continue using Firefox, version 57 makes much more sense than the previous 53 releases. It has an almost normal look, some of the sorely needed security & privacy addons are available, and it offers a passable user experience in terms of speed and responsiveness. Bottom line, I will stick with Firefox for now. As long as my extensions keep working. Take care. Read more

Android Leftovers