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HowTos

Creating Reports in OpenOffice.org Base

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OOo
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: Let's face it, databases are only minimally human-readable. In fact, to anybody who's not an accountant or a computer geek, reading databases can be downright intimidating. However, this limitation is partially compensated by the fact that reports in Base are quick and easy to create and are displayed and printed in Writer.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Scheduling Commands with crontab

  • Manage Sony Reader in Linux
  • Surveillance video under Linux using ZoneMinder
  • How to block DDOS attacks in Linux
  • Dodge the challenges of a dual-head display setup with Fedora 10
  • Death to Processes
  • Compiling Perl into Binary Code
  • How to add a directory to the path
  • Debian Lenny AMD64 Install Tutorial
  • Ubuntu 9.04: Installing Landscape on the Server
  • KVM in Ubuntu - Setup and Virtual Machine Creation Guide

10 Expert Ubuntu Tricks

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Ubuntu
HowTos

pcworld.com: Recently I started work on a new Ubuntu tips book that will partner my existing title, Ubuntu Kung Fu. The new book is still being planned and won't be published until next year, but I thought I'd share 10 tips that are on my list to be included.

Virtualization With KVM On A CentOS 5.2 Server

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HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a CentOS 5.2 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Fast Fluxbox Compositing

  • Handle Compressed and Uncompressed Files Uniformly
  • Installing Xfce Themes
  • Clean a string for a filename
  • Save the Last Flash Movie You Watched
  • Use SSH Tunneling to surf net invisibly
  • Simulating / Emulating a MPI Cluster or Supercomputer under Ubuntu
  • Formatting a Thumb/Flash Drive in Linux CLI
  • scp + find -Search files in a remote server
  • Csharp and VIM
  • Opensuse 11 on VirtualBox
  • Hide Gnome Apps in KDE and Vice Versa
  • Shell script used time
  • How To Control Your CPU Frequency In Ubuntu
  • Mplayer with DVDs
  • Beginner's Guide to Virtual Machines with VirtualBox

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • File Synchronization with Unison over SSH

  • Enable Plymouth on Fedora 10
  • Copy MySQL Tables between hosts
  • ntop in openSUSE to probe & monitor Network Traffic
  • Linux + Compiz - The beauty of Linux
  • Writing simple python setup commands
  • Tutorial: Build Your Own Linux Distro
  • Building a Linux Firewall Part 1: Why?
  • Linux Firewall Part 2: Determine Your Network Setup
  • Commandline 101: Copying Files with rsync
  • How to Set Up a Linux Media Centre?
  • How to setup abit AirPace PCI-e WiFi card without ndiswrapper in Ubuntu
  • How to upgrade packages or install them from AUR
  • How to install Gnome Global Menu on Ubuntu - easy way
  • 3D Chuck. The Gimp script way.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Find and delete files with a given extension

  • Having Problems With Acrobat Reader 9.1?
  • 3D Acceleration and Compiz Inside VirtualBox Guests
  • Migrating a project from one SVN repository to another using git-svn
  • Installing Debian Lenny from a USB memory stick
  • Ubuntu - Changing default Java version
  • Checking Software Package Digital Signatures
  • How to save the output of a Linux command to a file

Understanding Linux Virtual Memory

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HowTos

omnitraining.net: Virtual memory is one of the most important, and accordingly confusing, piece of an operating system. Understanding the basics of virtual memory is a requisite to understanding operating system performance.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Tutorial: An Introduction to Linux CLI

  • Howto: Create launchers using easy bash scripts
  • Install Codecs Flash JRE Without Internet In Ubuntu
  • Linux Determine which Services are Enabled at Boot
  • How to Install Hercules Classic Silver Webcam in Ubuntu
  • Preventing a service from starting on Debian or Ubuntu
  • OpenGL in Mandriva
  • Burning ISOs in CLI using OpenSUSE 11.1
  • File Synchronization with Rsync over SSH
  • Dropbox for Linux
  • lsof Seeks All Open Files

The Beginner's Guide to Linux Part 4: Introduction to the Terminal

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HowTos

maximumpc.com: Traditionally, most new users have always been reluctant to experiment with the command line interface. Once you understand the terminal, Linux will finally open up to you. The terminal is easily the most powerful part of a Linux system.

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More in Tux Machines

Networking and Security

  • FAQ: What's so special about 802.11ad Wi-Fi?
    Here are the broad strokes about 802.11ad, the wireless technology that’s just starting to hit the market.
  • 2.5 and 5 Gigabit Ethernet Now Official Standards
    In 2014, multiple groups started efforts to create new mid-tier Ethernet speeds with the NBASE-T Alliance starting in October 2014 and MGBASE-T Alliance getting started a few months later in December 2014. While those groups started out on different paths, the final 802.3bz standard represents a unified protocol that is interoperable across multiple vendors. The promise of 2.5 and 5 Gbps Ethernet is that they can work over existing Cat5 cabling, which to date has only been able to support 1 Gbps. Now with the 802.3bz standard, organizations do not need to rip and replace cabling to get Ethernet that is up to five times faster. "Now, the 1000BASE-T uplink from the wireless to wired network is no longer sufficient, and users are searching for ways to tap into higher data rates without having to overhaul the 70 billion meters of Cat5e / Cat6 wiring already sold," David Chalupsky, board of directors of the Ethernet Alliance and Intel principal engineer, said in a statement. "IEEE 802.3bz is an elegant solution that not only addresses the demand for faster access to rapidly rising data volumes, but also capitalizes on previous infrastructure investments, thereby extending their life and maximizing value."
  • A quick fix for stupid password reset questions
    It didn’t take 500 million hacked Yahoo accounts to make me hate, hate, hate password reset questions (otherwise known as knowledge-based authentication or KBA). It didn't help when I heard that password reset questions and answers -- which are often identical, required, and reused on other websites -- were compromised in that massive hack, too. Is there any security person or respected security guidance that likes them? They are so last century. What is your mother’s maiden name? What is your favorite color? What was your first pet’s name?
  • French hosting provider hit by DDoS close to 1TBps
    A hosting provider in France has been hit by a distributed denial of service attack that went close to one terabyte per second. Concurrent attacks against OVH clocked in at 990GBps. The attack vector is said to be the same Internet-of-Things botnet of 152,464 devices that brought down the website of security expert Brian Krebs. OVH chief technology officer Octave Klaba tweeted that the network was capable of attacks up to 1.5TBps.
  • Latest IoT DDoS Attack Dwarfs Krebs Takedown At Nearly 1Tbps Driven By 150K Devices
    If you thought that the massive DDoS attack earlier this month on Brian Krebs’ security blog was record-breaking, take a look at what just happened to France-based hosting provider OVH. OVH was the victim of a wide-scale DDoS attack that was carried via network of over 152,000 IoT devices. According to OVH founder and CTO Octave Klaba, the DDoS attack reached nearly 1 Tbps at its peak. Of those IoT devices participating in the DDoS attack, they were primarily comprised of CCTV cameras and DVRs. Many of these types devices' network settings are improperly configured, which leaves them ripe for the picking for hackers that would love to use them to carry our destructive attacks.

Android Leftovers

  • Goodbye QWERTY: BlackBerry stops making hardware
    BlackBerry CEO John Chen has been hinting at this move for almost a year now: today BlackBerry announced it will no longer design hardware. Say goodbye to all the crazy hardware QWERTY devices, ultra-wide phones, and unique slider designs. Speaking to investors, BlackBerry CEO John Chen described the move as a "pivot to software," saying, "The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners. This allows us to reduce capital requirements and enhance return on invested capital." The "Outsourcing to partners" plan is something we've already seen with the "BlackBerry" DTEK50, which was just a rebranded Alcatel Idol 4. Chen is now betting the future of the company on software, saying, "In Q2, we more than doubled our software revenue year over year and delivered the highest gross margin in the company's history. We also completed initial shipments of BlackBerry Radar, an end-to-end asset tracking system, and signed a strategic licensing agreement to drive global growth in our BBM consumer business." BlackBerry never effectively responded to the 2007 launch of the iPhone and the resulting transition to modern touchscreen smartphones. BlackBerry took swings with devices like the BlackBerry Storm in 2008, its first touchscreen phone; and the BlackBerry Z10 in 2013, the first BlackBerry phone with an OS designed for touch, but neither caught on. BlackBerry's first viable competitor to the iPhone didn't arrive until it finally switched to Android in 2015 with the BlackBerry Priv. It was the first decent BlackBerry phone in some time, but the high price and subpar hardware led to poor sales.
  • Oracle's 'Gamechanger' Evidence Really Just Evidence Of Oracle Lawyers Failing To Read
    Then on to the main show: Oracle's claim that Google hid the plans to make Android apps work on Chrome OS. Google had revealed to Oracle its "App Runtime for Chrome" (ARC) setup, and it was discussed by Oracle's experts, but at Google I/O, Google revealed new plans for apps to run in Chrome OS that were not using ARC, but rather a brand new setup, which Google internally referred to as ARC++. Oracle argued that Google only revealed to them ARC, but not ARC++ and that was super relevant to the fair use argument, because it showed that Android was replacing more than just the mobile device market for Java. But, here's Oracle's big problem: Google had actually revealed to Oracle the plans for ARC++. It appears that Oracle's lawyers just missed that fact. Ouch.
  • Understanding Android's balance between openness and security
    At the 2016 Structure Security conference, Google's Adrian Ludwig talked about the balance between keeping Android as open as possible, while also keeping it secure.
  • Google's Nougat Android update hits the sweet spot: Software 'isn't flashy, but still pretty handy'
    Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a few that could save money — and perhaps even your life. Nougat is starting to appear on phones, including new ones expected from Google next week.
  • How to change the home screen launcher on Android
  • Andromeda: Chrome OS and Android will merge
  • Sale of Kodi 'fully-loaded' streaming boxes faces legal test
  • Android boxes: Middlesbrough man to be first to be prosecuted for selling streaming kits

Endless OS 3.0 is out!

So our latest and greatest Endless OS is out with the new 3.0 version series! The shiny new things include the use of Flatpak to manage the applications; a new app center (GNOME Software); a new icon set; a new Windows installer that gives you the possibility of installing Endless OS in dual-boot; and many bug fixes. Read more

Expandable, outdoor IoT gateway runs Android on i.MX6

VIA’s “Artigo A830” IoT gateway runs Android on an i.MX6 DualLite SoC and offers HDMI, GbE, microSD, numerous serial and USB ports, plus -20 to 60° operation. As the name suggests, the VIA Technologies Artigo A830 Streetwise IoT Platform is designed for outdoor Internet of Things gateway applications. These are said to include smart lockers, vending machines, information kiosks, and signage devices that run “intensive multimedia shopping, entertainment, and navigation applications.” The outdoors focus is supported with an extended -20 to 60°C operating range, as well as surge and ESD protection for surviving challenges such as a nearby lightning strike. Read more