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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Building The Ultimate KDE Desktop With Arch Linux (Part 1)
  • Getting Ready For Karmic Koala – Upgrading To GRUB 2
  • Getting Ready For Karmic Koala – Upgrade Your File System To Ext4
  • Linux Kernel /etc/sysctl.conf Security Hardening
  • Preparing An Ubuntu Machine For Upgrade
  • Booting Linux from Internet with boot.kernel.org
  • The cure for everything - chmod 777
  • How to Lift Ubuntu Linux Ram Limit
  • Batch Resize Images Using ImageMagick
  • Inkscape Tutorial - An Isometric Tileset - part 3
  • Seahorse - Encryption Made Easy
  • Convert virtually any video into a DVD-valid MPEG2 stream

How To Enable Networking In Xen Guests On Hetzner's New EQ Servers (Debian Lenny)

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can enable networking in Xen guests (domU) on Hetzner's new EQ servers. With the new EQ servers, you can get up to three additional IPs that are in the same subnet as the server's main IP.

Konqueror tips and tricks

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KDE
HowTos

ghacks.net: If you are familar with KDE you know Konqueror. Konqueror used to be one of the finest file managers on the PC desktop – period. But now KDE has migrated toward a simpler, more user-friendly file manager (Dolphin) and pushed Konqueror to serve as a web-browser only. That does not mean Konqueror can not be used as a file manager. It can. In fact, Konqueror can do many things.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Prevent deletion or moving of files
  • Keep IMAP email messages locally using OfflineIMAP
  • Forgetting Sudo (we've all done it)
  • How to create and apply a patch with Git
  • Inkscape Tutorial - An Isometric Tileset - part 2
  • Stumbling and Sniffing Wireless Networks in Linux, Part 2
  • Quick fix: Compiz on Gentoo, resolving text corruption in terminal
  • ldd arbitrary code execution
  • On upgrading openSUSE with 3rd party repositories

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Tip : Simple way of making a stop animation
  • Installing Courier POP3 and IMAP daemon with MySql backend
  • Installing Postfix with MySql backend and SASL for SMTP authentication
  • Add antivirus to Postfix with ClamAV
  • How to enable quota on OpenSuse
  • Inkscape Tutorial - An Isometric Tileset - part 1
  • faster linux desktop…
  • BashStyle-NG – Change look and feel of your Bash, Vim, and Nano
  • Medibuntu in Ubuntu Karmic Koala
  • Speeding up dynamic websites via an nginx proxy
  • Prune KDE New File > Templates
  • How To Make DVD Video Play in DVD Player
  • How to create an Encrypted Partition
  • Quick Tip: Update Shortcuts in Ubuntu's Main Menu
  • To Do List After installing Ubuntu 9.10

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install a software that comes in a tar.gz package in Linux?
  • Setting IO Scheduler for Maximum Performance on OpenSuSe Linux
  • Encrypt-Decrypt file using OpenSSL
  • How to install Windows 7 and Ubuntu side by side
  • How To Safely Uninstall Ubuntu From A Windows Dual-Boot Environment
  • SheevaPlug Kernel and Gentoo binhost
  • Install Postfix for reliable email delivery
  • Offline Package Management for APT
  • karmic and log rotation
  • Using vSphere Client on Ubuntu Linux with Single Application RDP
  • Axel – ultimate download accelerator for Linux that actually works
  • If Apache mod_rewrite isn’t working…

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Asset scanning with nmap and ndiff
  • Meet and Greet with AutoYaST
  • Using Scenarios in OpenOffice Calc
  • Linux MTU Change Size
  • Building Your Own Linux Kernel: Tricky kernel options (part 3)
  • Wget commands you didn't hear about before
  • Ubuntu’s Encrypted Home Directory: A Canonical Approach to Data Privacy

How-To Build FFmpeg on Debian Squeeze

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HowTos

It's been a long time now since I wrote my original How-To for building FFmpeg on Debian. A lot has changed since then, in both the Debian and FFmpeg world, so it's definitely time for an update.

How To Set Up WebDAV With Apache2 On Ubuntu 9.04

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Ubuntu
HowTos
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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.