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HowTos

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Answers to Linux Questions

  • Canon i250 on Ubuntu 7.10
  • Obscure Linux Commands: Some of My Favorite Incantations
  • How do you check if your webcam is working properly?
  • HowTo: Convert First Letter of Dir Folder to Uppercase
  • Creating the debian-sys-maint MySQL account on a Debian or Ubuntu system
  • Reading compressed Files

Getting the login right: moving from xdm to gdm or kdm

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HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: For years now, I have been clinging to xdm as my display manager; years ago, I spent several days tweaking the configuration files of xbanner and xdm to get it to look “just so”, and I didn’t want to change it. But no more! I decided to spend a little time trying to get each display manager to look “right” with my original login screen design.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HowTo Send a Command Through SSH to Several PCs Simultaneously

  • Dstat - Versatile resource statistics tool
  • How do I set the real time scheduling priority of a process?
  • A Tutorial on Wget
  • Make Your Own Plug ‘N Play Zone Using Ubuntu Linux!
  • Getting Awn dock on Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon
  • Running Fedora 8 on Legacy Windows XP

Bash bits, nibbles and bytes: Cut script inefficiency

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HowTos

blogs.ittoolbox: One of the most common uses I use scripting for is parsing log files. You know, those incredibly verbose files that we should read to find out if we have been h4x0r3d or not. Unfortunately there is a lot of information in those logs that we are not interested in at the time. So we write scripts to filter out the required information.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Downgrading from KDE 4.0.2 to KDE 4.0.1

  • Hidden Linux : Fun with ISO images
  • Install Firefox 3 Beta 4 in Ubuntu with One Command
  • How to Set VMWare resolution fullscreen as your Ubuntu desktop
  • HowTo: Convert First Letter of Text Line to Uppercase
  • A try on current nouveau
  • HowTo Integrate a Download Manager into Firefox

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).

more howtos

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HowTos
  • Set up a TFTP server for easy network boots and firmware upgrades

  • Purging 32-bit libraries from an amd64 Ubuntu system
  • Copying all your emails to another account
  • Reset your MySQL root password
  • Short Tip: Create a “bash alias” with an argument
  • Fix libpango Dependency Errors
  • Transparent panel
  • Linux Networking 2: a router with port forwarding
  • Gnome-Do Plugin: Install with apturl - quick update
  • How to get your iPod working in Ubuntu

Installing Fonts on Linux

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HowTos

linuxjournal.com: One of the things I always enjoy when creating presentations, letters, videos, graphics and other documents is playing with different fonts. Fonts can change a boring text-only presentation or paper into an exciting, stylish, wild or classic experience. Yes, it is very easy to get carried away, but that is part of the fun -- trying to achieve the perfect balance between form and function.

Back up Linux with ease

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HowTos

tectonic.co.za: I’m not particularly fond of backing up my data. I know I should do it and I feel pretty smug when it is done, but it is a time-consuming and frustrating process. I want is a one-click backup tool that, once set, does all the work for me. Backerupper may not be TimeMachine but it is pretty idiot-proof and does the job.

few howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Sync Amarok With iPOD Classic & 3rd Generation iPOD Nano

  • Ubuntu/XP: Streaming Sopcast to your mobile devices
  • Recording sounds for Impress slides with eVoice
  • Debian amd64: iceweasel with i386 plugins, outside a chroot
  • Redirecting Ports Using iptables Prerouting
  • Fix for suspend and hibernation problem for Laptops
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War Thunder on GNU/Linux and More on SteamVR

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Wednesday's security advisories
  • Smartphones with fingerprint scanners under screen to hit market this year
    The majority of fingerprint scanners can be found either on the back of a smartphone or on the front, embedded in the home button. But it looks like that status quo is soon about to change. According to a report from The Investor, CrucialTec, a manufacturer of fingerprint modules based in South Korea, will launch its on-screen fingerprint scanning solution that allows you to unlock your device by placing a finger on the screen sometime this year. This means that we can expect to see the first smartphones featuring the new fingerprint technology hit the market in 2017. Unfortunately, CrucialTec did not reveal an exact time frame or the smartphone manufacturers it is currently working with.
  • Kaspersky launches 'secure operating system' -- with no trace of Linux in it [Ed: You must be pretty desperate for headlines and attention when your marketing pitch is, "we're not Linux!"]
  • Windows Botnet Spreading Mirai Variant
    A Chinese-speaking attacker is spreading a Mirai variant from a repurposed Windows-based botnet. Researchers at Kaspersky Lab published a report today, and said the code was written by an experienced developer who also built in the capability to spread the IoT malware to Linux machines under certain conditions.
  • Five New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities Were Fixed in Ubuntu 16.10, 14.04 & 12.04
    We reported earlier that Canonical published multiple security advisories to inform Ubuntu users about the availability of new kernel updates that patch several flaws discovered recently by various developers. We've already told you about the issues that are affecting Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) users, so check that article to see how you can update your systems is you're still using the Linux 4.4 LTS kernel. But if you managed to upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, which uses Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak)'s Linux 4.8 kernel, then you need to read the following.
  • Another Linux Kernel Vulnerability Leading To Local Root From Unprivileged Processes

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