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HowTos

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Installing VICE 2.1 on Ubuntu 9.04

  • More Karmic plans
  • Gmail Notifier Highly Integrates with Ubuntu 9.04
  • Reconfigure automatic login in ubuntu 9.04 jaunty jackalope
  • Replacing text in multiple files
  • Red Hat: Building $600 Million Partner Channel?
  • Microsoft Admits Windows 7 Is Not Really Suitable For Netbooks
  • NetBSD, Mandriva get shiny new releases
  • Command Line vs. GUI Reality Check
  • How to upgrade from Mandriva 2009 to the new Mandriva 2009 Spring
  • The GNOME Foundation Needs Your Help
  • Palm's Pré: the $170 phone
  • Quickly edit your images with IrfanView
  • Customize your Ubuntu GNOME theme
  • ntop installation/configuration on OpenSuSe
  • Sound Converter
  • Are configuration management tools still needed in the cloud?
  • A brief introduction to mod_perl - Part 1

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • The Tiny Linux Shell Crash Course For Beginners

  • CLI Magic: geek one-liners
  • A command guide to APT-GET and DPKG
  • Use Aliases to have an address book in mutt
  • Geotagging with Linux
  • Check for root kits with rkhunter
  • Quick Tip: Clear Out GNOME Tracker Indexes
  • Migrate MySQL Database to a new Server
  • Mini HOWTO: Tiny Core Linux 1.4 LiveUSB home web server
  • Jaunty Video Performance
  • Finding the Time
  • How to create DVD movies in Linux with DeVeDe

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to create DVD movies in Linux with DeVeDe

  • 5 Popular Tricks to Customize Nano
  • Fix for flash not working after Jaunty Upgrade (64bit)
  • Pretending IceWeasel to be Firefox in Debian Linux
  • quickly adding new baddies to iptables
  • PyMOTW: multiprocessing, part 2
  • Install Ubuntu Linux in 5 Minutes
  • PIDA - A Python IDE
  • /dev/null and /dev/zero What's the diff
  • Postfix Backup MX eMail Server Anti-Spam Configuration
  • Run Windows Apps Seamlessly Inside Linux
  • How to set up a mail server on a GNU / Linux system
  • Connect Remotely to Your Linux Machine Graphically
  • Commandline 101: Free!
  • Adding a simple progress bar to dd
  • Close shell keeping all subprocess running
  • Easily Configure QEMU to Run Bootable ISO Images

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to rip DVD movies in Linux with Handbrake

  • How to make a podcast
  • Linux Firewall Part 4: Installation
  • Making OpenSolaris and Ubuntu Coexist: Grub Config
  • How to install fonts on Ubuntu 9.04
  • LVM made easy
  • Remove The Shutdown/Restart Countdown
  • Creating an invoicing system with OpenOffice.org

How-To: Compile and Install K3b 1.65.0 Alpha from Source in Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope

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HowTos

Over time K3b got its reputation as one of the most powerful burning applications not only for KDE, but for Linux in general. This short guide will list several easy steps you need to follow in order to compile and install K3b from source.

The Perfect Server - Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope (Ubuntu 9.04) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

Cover Art & Lyrics Widget for your desktop

Filed under
Software
HowTos

d0od.blogspot: Display album art (and lyrics!) for your playing tracks right on your desktop! Installation is simple, and I'll guide you through making a launcher for it too!

GParted partitioning software - Full tutorial

Filed under
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: No matter which operating system you want to have installed on your machine, there's one thing they all have in common: partitions. Being able to control the partitions is one of the most basic, most important aspects of mastering your operating system.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Manually Adding Screensavers To gnome-screensaver

  • Commandline 101: su and sudo
  • Find the longest line in a file
  • Make Google Earth Use Your GTK Theme!
  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 7
  • Cipher benchmark for dm-crypt / LUKS

Managing Multiple KVM Hosts With Enomalism2 [Ubuntu 8.10]

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

In my previous guide about how to set up Enomalism2 on Ubuntu 8.10 I concentrated on just one KVM host. This tutorial is an extension to that article in that it shows how to add further Ubuntu 8.10 KVM hosts to the setup that can then be managed from one single control panel.

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today's howtos

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.