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some howtos:

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  • gstreamer bug in Ubuntu and a temporary fix

  • opensuse kernle update, recompile
  • How To Reset Any Linux Password
  • Randomize lines in a file
  • Make your bash shell cool again
  • Copy package into chroot environment on Gentoo
  • Get To Know Linux: See Your Systems’ Memory Usage
  • How-To: Compile Programs From Source in Linux
  • Burning Xbox 360 Games on Linux (Stealth!)
  • What is ‘wheel’?
  • Commandline 101: Getting a Grip on Grep
  • CPU Scaling on Celeron M Notebooks
  • Adding new file extension on Kwrite
  • Random Educational Moment: modaliases
  • Add more features to your Right-Click Menu with Nautilus Pyextensions
  • Getting started with the yum package manager

some howtos:

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  • Howto Make an MPEG Picture Slideshow with digiKam in Ubuntu

  • Gentoo : A complete and utter retards guide to installing
  • 6 Ubuntu Package Management tips for the Fedora User
  • Jaunty 64-bit and Eclipse
  • Move /home to it’s own partition
  • The Great KDE Font Mystery
  • Simple guide to Sound Solutions for Ubuntu Users
  • Upgrading Ubuntu to the Cutting Edge
  • iopp: howto get i/o information per process
  • Remove Compiz from Ubuntu
  • Setting up SSHFS

Quick fixes for common Linux problems

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HowTos We'll come right out and say this – Linux breaks. No matter how much we might like our chosen distro, there is no denying that things can go wrong. So here's our guide to dealing with some of the most common problems, and some advice on how to deal.

Three Easy Steps to Set-up Anonymous Web Browsing on Linux

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HowTos This simple guide will enable you to surf the web anonymously while using Firefox on Linux. But to do this, you will need to install these two important tools.

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

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This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V).

few more howtos:

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  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.4.6

  • Analyzing boot performance of OpenSuse 11.1 with bootchart
  • How to Tunnel Web Traffic with SSH Secure Shell
  • Howto Setup Wireless on a Fujitsu Siemens Li 2727 notebook
  • Debian Lenny Minimal Desktop
  • How to use a WiFi interface
  • Debugging Wifi on Ubuntu Linux
  • Ubuntu-Change Icon Size
  • Lenny Laptop: Wifi Setup

some howtos:

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  • Transparent GTK Themes

  • How To Edit Your Screensaver Settings In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Automate Linux with Cron and Anacron
  • How to install curl for PHP5 under Ubuntu/Debian
  • HOWTO : Convert existing ext3 to ext4

some howtos:

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  • KDE 4.2 on Gentoo - Part 1: The Preparation

  • How to Install KDE 4.2 on Ubuntu 8.10
  • From Chapter Four: The Unix and Open source Culture
  • Remove duplicate files
  • Encrypted Debian Live USB key
  • Cork Board With The GIMP
  • Plain Authentication for sendmail with SASL
  • Save time with Gedit snippets
  • Virtual Hosting in Sendmail
  • How To Transfer Files Easily Among Linux Machines
  • Vim: master the basics
  • 6 Ways To Connect Linux to the Outside World That Are Not Wireless, Bluetooth, or Ethernet
  • HowTo force remote devices (routers/switches) to refresh their arp cache entry for a machine

More Linux tips every geek should know

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HowTos We asked our followers on and Twitter what kind of articles they wanted us to put up. KeithWatson1 responded with "I would love to see desktop tip articles", so here goes:

some howtos:

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  • Monitor CPU Speed with Gkfreq Plugin for Gkrellm

  • Using Gmail to Bypass “Email Already In Use” Errors
  • Using ssh as a generic stdin consumer and stdout producer
  • Remove trash in Ubuntu
  • How To Download Almost Any Web-Based Email Via POP
  • How To Find What Package Provided a File?
  • Bash tips: if -e wildcard file check => [: too many arguments
  • AOL on PCLinuxOS
  • Adjust sudo timeout
  • Qt-4.5.0 on Gentoo portage tree
  • Upgrading to PostgreSQL 8.3 on Gentoo
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