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HowTos

The beginner's guide to Slackware Linux

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Slack
HowTos

techradar.com: Give a man Ubuntu, and he'll learn Ubuntu. Give a man SUSE, and he'll learn SUSE. But give a man Slackware, and he'll learn Linux.

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 11 Server

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HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 11 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Tip of the Day: Rip DVDs With Thoggen

  • Install Air under Kubuntu Jaunty with KDE 4.3 Beta 2
  • How to install ATI fglrx drivers in Debian Lenny
  • How to send Text Messages with Skype for Linux on Ubuntu
  • Mount Manager – User-friendly partition management
  • Converting VMware Images to VirtualBox - A Simple Method
  • Last.fm in Debian/Ubuntu
  • How to Prevent Ubuntu from Changing Hardware Clock
  • How to boost the loading time of programs in Ubuntu?
  • 3 Ways to Install Latest Wine in Ubuntu 9.04
  • 3 Desktop Tweaks on PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Gnome

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to: Easily Share Files with Dropbox

  • GTalk Settings In Pidgin
  • Improve your ubuntu by a single click
  • Transform Kubuntu Jaunty to Windows 7 In 3 Simple Steps
  • Install Cacti on Ubuntu
  • Make old add-ons work in Firefox beta
  • Mandriva 2009.1 Spring n compaq presario 3225AU

How To Install Qmailtoaster (CentOS 5.3)

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HowTos

Qmailtoaster is a project that aims to make the installation of Qmail onto RPM based systems a snap. All of the packages are distributed in source RPMs so building the packages for your particular distro and architecture is as easy as running a script or a simple command for each package.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Get Fancy Skype Notifications on Ubuntu

  • One String to Rule Them All...
  • Making Vim Oneliners
  • How to disable loading of unnecessary kernel modules
  • Building a Wide-area Linux-based Wireless Network, part 3
  • ATI Catalyst (fglrx) and Kernels 2.6.30 / 2.6.29
  • How to Remove The Annoying Update manager Pop-up in Ubuntu

The Perfect Desktop - Fedora 11 (GNOME)

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Fedora 11 desktop (GNOME) that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Working with subtitles (create, edit, embed) in Linux

  • Recover Linux Xandros on Eee-Box manually
  • Mini HOWTO: Setting up a Home Web Server by CHROOTing BusyBox's httpd in Tiny Core Linux v2.0
  • SSH Login Takes a Long Time
  • Taking Android screenshots from Ubuntu Jaunty
  • Collecting debug information when your GPU hangs
  • Photo KDE Tutorial 1-5: Perspective Adjustment
  • Installing Picasa Photo Viewer In Ubuntu
  • Visualize your code in KDevelop
  • Get to know Linux: Links
  • Installing PHP on the HP Mini Mi

Install more then 100 games in one command with Djl

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Software
Gaming
HowTos

unixmen.com: Djl is an open-source (GPL licensed) game manager written in Python 2.5 for the GNU/Linux Operating Systems. It is inspired by Valve's Steam software for Windows.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Commandline 101: man pages

  • Capivara - Twin panel advanced File Manager
  • Using Ubuntu as a midi through
  • Making Use Of Lazarus' Web Interface
  • Vim Basics
  • The perfect backup
  • How to Convert .rpm files to .deb files in Ubuntu
  • Record a screencast as an mpeg
  • How to install gnash in Debian 5.0
  • How to configure Ubuntu for 802.1x WPA TKIP environment
  • How to Get Detailed Information & Benchmark Linux System
  • 18 awesome Palm Pre tips, tricks and shortcuts
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone
    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions. The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28. The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

GNU Make, FSFE Newsletter, and FSF's BLAG Removal

  • Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make
    Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That’s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make — a program that tries to be smart about running compiles. This was especially important when your 100 MHz CPU connected to a very slow disk drive would take a day to build a significant piece of software. On the face of it, make is pretty simple. But today, looking at a typical makefile will give you a headache, and many projects use an abstraction over make that further obscures things.
  • FSFE Newsletter June 2018
  • About BLAG's removal from our list of endorsed distributions
    We recently updated our list of free GNU/Linux distributions to add a "Historical" section. BLAG Linux and GNU, based on Fedora, joined the list many years ago. But the maintainers no longer believe they can keep things running at this time. As such, they requested that they be removed from our list. The list helps users to find operating systems that come with only free software and documentation, and that do not promote any nonfree software. Being added to the list means that a distribution has gone through a rigorous screening process, and is dedicated to diligently fixing any freedom issues that may arise.

Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement
    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly. "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."
  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]
     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM
    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.
  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers
    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM. Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Graphics: XWayland, Ozone-GBM, Freedreno, X.Org, RadeonSI

  • The Latest Batch Of XWayland / EGLStream Improvements Merged
    While the initial EGLStreams-based support for using the NVIDIA proprietary driver with XWayland was merged for the recent X.Org Server 1.20 release, the next xorg-server release will feature more improvements.
  • Making Use Of Chrome's Ozone-GBM Intel Graphics Support On The Linux Desktop
    Intel open-source developer Joone Hur has provided a guide about using the Chrome OS graphics stack on Intel-based Linux desktop systems. In particular, using the Chrome OS graphics stack on the Linux desktop is primarily about using the Ozone-GBM back-end to Ozone that allows for direct interaction with Intel DRM/KMS support and evdev for input.
  • Freedreno Reaches OpenGL ES 3.1 Support, Not Far From OpenGL 3.3
    The Freedreno Gallium3D driver now supports all extensions required by OpenGL ES 3.1 and is also quite close to supporting desktop OpenGL 3.3.
  • X.Org Is Looking For A North American Host For XDC2019
    If software development isn't your forte but are looking to help out a leading open-source project while logistics and hospitality are where you excel, the X.Org Foundation is soliciting bids for the XDC2019 conference. The X.Org Foundation is looking for proposals where in North America that the annual X.Org Developers' Conference should be hosted in 2019. This year it's being hosted in Spain and with the usual rotation it means that in 2019 they will jump back over the pond.
  • RadeonSI Compatibility Profile Is Close To OpenGL 4.4 Support
    It was just a few days ago that the OpenGL compatibility profile support in Mesa reached OpenGL 3.3 compliance for RadeonSI while now thanks to the latest batch of patches from one of the Valve Linux developers, it's soon going to hit OpenGL 4.4. Legendary open-source graphics driver contributor Timothy Arceri at Valve has posted 11 more patches for advancing RadeonSI's OpenGL compatibility profile support, the alternative context to the OpenGL core profile that allows mixing in deprecated OpenGL functionality. The GL compatibility profile mode is generally used by long-standing workstation software and also a small subset of Linux games.