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HowTos

Learn how UNIX multitasks

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HowTos

On UNIX systems, each system and end-user task is contained within a process. Learn how to control processes and use a number of commands to peer into your system.

Bandwidth monitoring with vnStat

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HowTos

If you want to monitor and manage your Internet bandwidth, perhaps to make sure your ISP is not overbilling you, try vnStat, an open source, Linux-based application that gives you a clear picture of your bandwidth usage. This command-line application is simple to install and easy to use.

Gaim nicer notifications with libnotify on Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy

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HowTos

Gaim (now renamed to Pidgin, but the version I’m using isn’t that new) comes with a “guifications” plugin to do “notifications”, those little popup “toast” messages to tell you that someone’s messaged you, someone’s logged on or off, all that sort of thing.

How To Build A New Freetype

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HowTos

I've had several requests for my RPM for freetype2 including sub-pixel rendering for openSUSE 10.2. So here are instructions on how to build your own, including my modified SPEC file. If you're in the USA it might be illegal to download my file, so this file is only for people who live in free countries. Or at least semi-free countries, like the UK.

1. Download freetype2 source rpm

Disabling unused daemons to speed up your boot sequence

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HowTos

Many Linux distros usually start a lot of daemons when booting, resulting in a long wait before you can get to work after powering on your machine. Some of those daemons are rarely used (or even not al all) by the majority of users. This tutorial describes how to disable unused or rarely used daemons in a proper way, resulting in faster boot sequences and less CPU load.

debug a currently running program with GDB

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HowTos

Here is a quick tips of GDB. There is a time when I was working on a module that was written in c/c++ hangs in the middle of execution. I have no clue how it happens, and it happens quite rare. I keep guessing and try to feed in more debug print lines to search for the cause of the hangs. Spend few days with no luck, but suddenly I thought of GDB.

Upgrade Debian Sarge to Debian Etch

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HowTos

Before upgrading your system, it is strongly recommended that you make a full backup, or at least back up any data or configuration information you can’t afford to lose. The upgrade tools and process are quite reliable, but a hardware failure in the middle of an upgrade could result in a severely damaged system

Command line tips - seeing how much disk space is left with df

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HowTos

t’s time for another command line tip today - and that is how to see how much disk space you have left overall on a particular partition.

It’s always good to know how much space you have left, especially when you’re about to leap into a backup, wget a big file or do some other process which needs a lot of space.

Administrating SElinux on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

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HowTos

audit2allow is a nice tool for understanding AVC denials. On RHEL4, all AVC denials are logged to the kernel ring buffer. The command dmesg will show these, and audit2allow -d will interprit them, and output the SELinux rules needed to allow these denials.

Recover MySQL Database root password

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HowTos

By default, MySQL Server will be installed with root superuser without any password. You can connect to MySQL server as root without requiring password or by keying in blank password. However, if you have set the password for root and forget or unable to recall the password, then you will need to reset the root password for MySQL.

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