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More in Tux Machines

Programming: DevNation, Python, RcppAnnoy and More

  • Plumbing Kubernetes CI/CD with Tekton

    Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists. In this session, Kamesh Sampath introduces Tekton, which is the Kubernetes-native way of defining and running CI/CD. Sampath explores the characteristics of Tekton—cloud-native, decoupled, and declarative—and shows how to combine various building blocks of Tekton to build and deploy a cloud-native application.

  • Coverage 5.0 beta 1

    I want to finish coverage.py 5.0. It has some big changes, so I need people to try it and tell me if it’s ready. Please install coverage.py 5.0 beta 1 and try it in your environment. I especially want to hear from you if you tried the earlier alphas of 5.0. There have been some changes in the SQLite database that were needed to make measurement efficient enough for large test suites, but that hinder ad-hoc querying.

  • How to get current date and time in Python?

    In this article, you will learn to get today's date and current date and time in Python. We will also format the date and time in different formats using strftime() method. There are a number of ways you can take to get the current date. We will use the date class of the datetime module to accomplish this task.

  • RcppAnnoy 0.0.14

    A new minor release of RcppAnnoy is now on CRAN, following the previous 0.0.13 release in September. RcppAnnoy is the Rcpp-based R integration of the nifty Annoy library by Erik Bernhardsson. Annoy is a small and lightweight C++ template header library for very fast approximate nearest neighbours—originally developed to drive the famous Spotify music discovery algorithm. This release once again allows compilation on older compilers. The 0.0.13 release in September brought very efficient 512-bit AVX instruction to accelerate computations. However, this could not be compiled on older machines so we caught up once more with upstream to update to conditional code which will fall back to either 128-bit AVX or no AVX, ensuring buildability “everywhere”.

  • The Royal Mint eyes fresh IT talent to power digital drive

    The Royal Mint has been manufacturing coins for 1,100 years, originally from the Tower of London and, since 1967, from its current site in South Wales. Today, it is the world’s largest export mint, printing 3.3 billion coins and blanks a year, and now is looking to expand its digital reach to serve retail customers online.

  • Google plans to give slow websites a new badge of shame in Chrome

    A new badge could appear in the future that’s designed to highlight sites that are “authored in a way that makes them slow generally.” Google will look at historical load latencies to figure out which sites are guilty of slow load times and flag them, and the Chrome team is also exploring identifying sites that will load slowly based on device hardware or network connectivity.

  • Moving towards a faster web

    In the future, Chrome may identify sites that typically load fast or slow for users with clear badging. This may take a number of forms and we plan to experiment with different options, to determine which provides the most value to our users.

    Badging is intended to identify when sites are authored in a way that makes them slow generally, looking at historical load latencies. Further along, we may expand this to include identifying when a page is likely to be slow for a user based on their device and network conditions.

  • The Maturing of QUIC

    QUIC continues to evolve through a collaborative and iterative process at the IETF — of adding features, implementing them, evaluating them, reworking or discarding them because they don’t stand up to continued scrutiny, and refining them. And in doing so, QUIC has matured in more ways than we imagined, yielding a protocol that is remarkably different and substantially better than it was in the beginning. So, keeping your arms and legs inside the ride at all times, let us take you on this journey of how QUIC has gone from an early experiment to a standard poised to modernize the [Internet].

  • HEADS UP: ntpd changing [in OpenBSD]

    Probably after 6.7 we'll delete the warning. Maybe for 6.8 we'll remove -s and -S from getopt, and starting with those options will fail.

today's howtos

"Wireshark For The Terminal" Termshark 2.0 Adds Stream Reassembly, Piped Input And Dark Mode

Termshark, a Wireshark-like terminal interface for TShark written in Go, was updated to version 2.0.0. This release includes support for dark mode, piped input, and stream reassembly, as well as performance optimizations that make the tool faster and more responsive. Read more

Red Hat Leftovers

  • GitHub report surprises, serverless hotness, and more industry trends

    Now, let's discuss how developers can use Quarkus to bring Java into serverless, a place where previously, it was unable to go. Quarkus introduces a comprehensive and seamless approach to generating an operating system specific (aka native) executable from your Java code, as you do with languages like Go and C/C++. Environments such as event-driven and serverless, where you need to start a service to react to an event, require a low time-to-first-response, and traditional Java stacks simply cannot provide this. Knative enables developers to run cloud-native applications as serverless containers in seconds and the containers will go down to zero on demand. In addition to compiling Java to Knative, Quarkus aims to improve developer productivity. Quarkus works out of the box with popular Java standards, frameworks and libraries like Eclipse MicroProfile, Apache Kafka, RESTEasy, Hibernate, Spring, and many more. Developers familiar with these will feel at home with Quarkus, which should streamline code for the majority of common use cases while providing the flexibility to cover others that come up.

  • When Quarkus Meets Knative Serverless Workloads

    Daniel Oh is a principal technical product marketing manager at Red Hat and works CNCF ambassador as well. He's well recognized in cloud-native application development, senior DevOps practices in many open source projects and international conferences.

  • Making things Go: Command Line Heroes draws infrastructure

    Most of our episodes feature languages that have clear arcs. "The Infrastructure Effect" was different. By all accounts, COBOL is a language heading the way of Latin. There are only a few specialists who are proficient COBOL coders. But it’s still vital to many long-lasting institutions that affect millions: the banking industry, the IRS, and manufacturing. And the world of tech infrastructure is moving on—to Go. Where does that leave COBOL in the next few years? And how do you tease all of that in an image? We had to decide what visual themes could we use to depict each language—and then, how to combine them into a single, coherent frame. COBOL and Go have a similar function, so we wanted to make sure each language had clear, distinct imagery. We decided to rely on some of their real-world applications: the bank and subways for COBOL, and the cloud-based applications for Go.

  • Using the Red Hat OpenShift tuned Operator for Elasticsearch

    I recently assisted a client to deploy Elastic Cloud on Kubernetes (ECK) on Red Hat OpenShift 4.x. They had run into an issue where Elasticsearch would throw an error similar to: Max virtual memory areas vm.max_map_count [65530] likely too low, increase to at least [262144] According to the official documentation, Elasticsearch uses a mmapfs directory by default to store its indices. The default operating system limits on mmap counts are likely to be too low, which may result in out of memory exceptions. Usually, administrators would just increase the limits by running: sysctl -w vm.max_map_count=262144 However, OpenShift uses Red Hat CoreOS for its worker nodes and, because it is an automatically updating, minimal operating system for running containerized workloads, you shouldn’t manually log on to worker nodes and make changes. This approach is unscalable and results in a worker node becoming tainted. Instead, OpenShift provides an elegant and scalable method to achieve the same via its Node Tuning Operator.

  • bcc-tools brings dynamic kernel tracing to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1

    In Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, Red Hat ships a set of fully supported on x86_64 dynamic kernel tracing tools, called bcc-tools, that make use of a kernel technology called extended Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF). With these tools, you can quickly gain insight into certain aspects of system performance that would have previously required more time and effort from the system and operator. The eBPF technology allows dynamic kernel tracing without requiring kernel modules (like systemtap) or rebooting of the kernel (as with debug kernels). eBPF accomplishes this while maintaining minimal overhead for each trace point, making these tools an ideal way to instrument running kernels in production.

  • What open communities teach us about empowering customers

    When it comes to digital transformation, businesses seem to be on the right track improving their customers' experiences through the use of technologies. Today, so much digital transformation literature describes the benefits of "delivering new value to customers" or "delivering value to customers in new ways."