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HowTos

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HowTos
  • View 360 Panorama Photos on Ubuntu with this Image Viewer Plugin
  • AV1 Is Making Progress As A Royalty-Free Video Codec Based Off VP9

    The Alliance for Open Media continues working hard on their first video codec, dubbed AV1, that started off with the VP9 libvpx code-base and are pursuing to do for free video codecs what the Opus codec has done for audio.

    AV1 strives to be a viable open, royalty-free video codec suitable for Internet video and developed by Alliance for Open Media. AV1 is still hoping to succeed VP9 and be a viable contender to HEVC/H.265, but not until later in 2017 is the bitstream format expected to be finalized and thus not until 2018 when we may begin seeing some AV1 adoption.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Browser Gets a Release Candidate, Now Based on Chromium 56.0.2924.88

    Softpedia was informed by Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard about the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.7 web browser, dubbed as Vivaldi Snapshot 1.7.735.36.

    By our count, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.7.735.36 is the eighth released for the Vivaldi 1.7 development cycle. This is small release that rebases the web browser to Chromium 56.0.2924.88, updates various language translations, fixes a handful of regressions from previous versions, and improves the new History panel.

  • Will Skype’s Linux App Stop Working on March 1?
  • You Can Now Install Various KDE Apps from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Snappy Store

    In December last year, we reported on the work done by KDE Community developer Harald Sitter to bundle the official KDE applications as Snaps and make them available for installation on the Ubuntu Snappy Store.

    A Snap build of the latest KDE Frameworks 5, a collection of add-on libraries for Qt 5, made its way into the Snappy Store, and can be easily installed on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system if you execute the "sudo snap install kde-frameworks-5" command in a terminal emulator.

  • LibreOffice 5.3 Upgrade Brings Open-Source Office Suite to the Cloud

    The open-source LibreOffice office application suite has been improving steadily since 2010, when it was forked from the Oracle OpenOffice suite. The latest incremental milestone is LibreOffice version 5.3, released Feb. 1 and providing users with new features and improved performance. LibreOffice bundles multiple applications including the Writer Document, Calc Spreadsheet, Impress Presentation, Draw, Math Formula and Base Database. Among the numerous feature updates in Writer are new PDF document-handling capabilities that enable users to import and digitally sign existing documents. Writer also benefits from new table formatting capabilities and an easier-to-use side menu for page options. LibreOffice typically is available as the default office suite in many Linux distributions and freely available for Apple Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows applications. Plus, with LibreOffice 5.3, the whole office suite also can be deployed in the cloud. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at key features of LibreOffice 5.3.

  • Glibc 2.25 Now Available With getrandom(), Better Stack Smashing Protection

    New features to glibc 2.25 include getentropy() and getrandom() functions, several other new functions, new math.h features, support for OpenBSD's explicit_bzero, most of glibc can now built with the stack smashing protector enabled, expanded coverage of GDB pretty printers, some new tunables, and a range of other work.

  • [Old] vc-dwim-1.8 released [stable]
  • [Old] GNU Screen v.4.5.0
  • A Makefile for your Go project

    My most loathed feature of Go is the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. Hopefully, this issue is slowly starting to be accepted by the main authors. In the meantime, you can workaround this problem with more opinionated tools (like gb) or by crafting your own Makefile.

  • nanotime 0.1.1
  • RcppCCTZ 0.2.1
  • IPv6 and OpenVPN on Linode Debian/Ubuntu VPS
  • How To Install The Java Runtime And Development Kit On Ubuntu
  • How To Enable Subtitles On Kodi 17 Krypton With Estuary Skin

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Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.

GNU/Linux Games and Wine