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HowTos

Freeing an HP Chromebook 11 with Arch Linux ARM

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GNU
Linux
HowTos

A few years ago I acquired an HP Chromebook 11, which I talked about in an article on this site at that time. I talked about how I ran Linux software side-by-side with Chrome OS thanks to the likes of Crouton. Since then, the machine has had some basic use, and rather ironically, used as an offline machine, where I would use it for typing purposes mostly, being that the machine has a lovely keyboard and is very battery efficient. But I recently felt it was time to ditch Papa Google's influence on the machine and get rid of Chrome OS - enter Arch Linux ARM.

Back when I had my first look at the machine and installed Crouton, it seemed that installing Linux properly to the machine (eg. completely replace Chrome OS) didn't seem feasible for a machine with an ARM processor such as the HP Chromebook 11. Thankfully, I was either wrong back then or perhaps things have simply improved the last couple of years, as installing a proper Linux distro on one of these little machines and blowing away Google's product is quite easy to do. Now the amount of GNU/Linux distributions that properly support this particular machine are not plentiful, being an ARM machine with very particular hardware and firmware, but thankfully Arch Linux ARM (the ARM port of Arch Linux) does. Or more specifically, it supports the Samsung Chromebook 11, which seems to be the exact same machine, just with different branding.

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Programming and Howtos

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Development
HowTos

Software and today's howtos

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Software
HowTos
  • UDisks 2.7.0 released

    A new upstream version of UDisks2 was released on Friday (June 2nd) -- version 2.7.0. People following the recent development of UDisks2 and our recent blog posts [1] [2] should know that this is a big version bump which can only mean one thing: the pull request changing UDisks to use libblockdev where possible was merged! Which is almost 100 commits with changes.

  • FastHub is an Open-Source GitHub Client Application Built From Scratch

    Many of us here are familiar with GitHub, but some of us have been looking for a good, open-source client application for the platform. This is where XDA Senior Member k0sh stepped up and created FastHub. Not only is it fast, easy to navigate, beautifully designed, and open-source, but you can download it from the Play Store or the XDA Labs repository.

  • Chirp is a Simple Electron Twitter Client [Ed: Electron makes it shallow]
  • How to verify a Fedora ISO file
  • Securing Private Keys on a Linux Sysadmin Workstation
  • How to run multiple commands in Linux Simultaneously
  • Enable Nautilus Git Integration with this Open-Source Extension
  • Puppet's Cloud Discovery: Know What's Running in Your Cloud

    The promise of automation always has been its ability to manage a wide range of tasks across all your systems, whether they're in your own data center or somewhere in the cloud. But in order to automate, you need to know what you have, and that's getting harder these days.

    We've all come across orphaned cloud VMs and instances, perhaps spun up for a quick test by a developer, created as a bit of shadow IT or merely forgotten during the press of the latest product release. Regardless of why they were created and forgotten, these instances pose quite a few risks to your time, security and budget. After all, the meter's pretty much always running on cloud instances, orphaned or not.

  • ‘Next generation of Skype’ Unveiled, But Theres No Mention of Linux Support

    Er… Only that’s it; there’s no mention of if, much less when, Linux users will be able to experience the (admittedly terrible) changes.

    For a cross-platform communication service trumpeted as being “available everywhere, so you can go anywhere”, skipping an entire platform is a bit of an oversight.

    Microsoft signs off their announcement by poking the penguin in the eye, saying Skype “…can be with you for all life’s moments, no matter where the world takes you—on your favorite devices, to smart speakers, and beyond.”

    Just not if my ‘favorite devices’ run Linux though, aye?

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