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HowTos

Hands on with the i3 Window Manager: Installing, configuring and using

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HowTos

I recently happened to notice that there was a new point-release (4.12) of the i3 Window Manager. In keeping with what seems to be their general approach, the release was extremely low-key; I only noticed it because I check their home page from time to time.

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How to use 1Password for Teams on Android devices

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Android
HowTos

Users of 1Password are in for a treat. AgileBits, the company behind this outstanding password management tool, has released a major update to the mobile app, and it's one that everyone should get behind immediately.

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today's howtos

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HowTos

today's howtos

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HowTos

How To Test Solid State Drive Health with GNOME Disks

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GNOME
HowTos

Solid State Drives (SSDs) are slowly becoming the norm, with good reason. They are faster, and the latest iterations are more reliable than traditional drives. With no moving parts to wear out, these drives can (effectively) enjoy a longer life than standard platter-based drives.

Even though these drives are not prone to mechanical failure, you will still want to keep tabs on their health. After all, your data depends on the storing drives being sound and running properly. Many SSDs you purchase are shipped with software that can be used to monitor said health. However, most of that software is, as you might expect, Windows-only. Does that mean Linux users must remain in the dark as to their drive health? No. Thanks to a very handy tool called GNOME Disks, you can get a quick glimpse of your drive health and run standard tests on the drive.

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How to produce electronic music with the Raspberry Pi

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Linux
HowTos

The world of electronic music has traditionally been a fairly expensive venture, whether you're paying for expensive hardware or software. Luckily, there are plenty of free apps and open source software to enable people to get creative on the devices that they mostly have anyway. But I wanted to see how far the famously inexpensive Raspberry Pi could be pushed as a music-making machine.

Turns out, it can be quite an amazing little sequencer, as long as you know what tools to use and aren't afraid to learn a little something new.

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